Category Archives: EdgeHTML

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Improved JavaScript and WebAssembly performance in EdgeHTML 17 – Microsoft Edge Dev Blog

In every release of Microsoft Edge, we tune the Chakra JavaScript engine to provide better startup and execution performance, with a leaner memory footprint, and with improved responsiveness on real-world workloads.As EdgeHTML 17 rolls out to users as part of the Windows 10 April 2018 Update, we’d like to dive into some of the optimizations we’ve made in the Chakra engine in this release. These ongoing optimizations can have a dramatic impact on the day-to-day browsing experience for end users, resulting in faster sites and web apps.

(Re-)defer parsing for arrow functions and object literals methods
Over the past two Windows releases, we have been improving Chakra’s defer- and re-defer-parsing pipeline, allowing pages to start up faster while consuming less memory.
When given a script, Chakra performs a quick pre-parse check for syntax errors and defers the full parsing of any eligible function until it is first called. Re-deferring happens at a later point when Chakra heuristics determines that a fully parsed function is unlikely to be called again, in which case Chakra releases the memory holding the metadata generated during full parsing and leaves the function effectively in a state as if it had been just pre-parsed and deferred.
In EdgeHTML 17, we have continued to invest in this pipeline, and extended the list of functions eligible to include arrow functions and methods on object literals.

// parsing of these functions are deferred until called
// arrow functions
let addOne = (x) => {x + 1};

// object literal methods
let john = {
name: ‘John Doe’,
get name() {return this.name},
greet() {console.log(‘Hello’)}
};

The impact of this change can vary depending on the sites, but our early experiments show an average memory savings of 7% from this and a few other memory improvements in EdgeHTML 17.
RegExp bytecode refactoring
Many Microsoft Edge users rely on extensions for ad blocking and related scenarios to control their experience while browsing the internet. Some ad blocking extensions are built using a considerable amount of RegExp logic, which motivated us to make a series of bytecode refactoring changes for a leaner experience when running with these extensions enabled in Microsoft Edge.
Most significant among those changes is that Chakra condensed RegExp opcodes from 4 bytes to 1 and packed the structs. While the consequential unalignment might imply a performance slowdown, data collected on various scenarios indicates that it shouldn’t cause any visible performance regression.

As a result of this refactoring, Chakra was able to reduce RegExp bytecode memory in some popular extensions in this release by up to 10%, savings that should be reflected in other apps or sites using RegExp as well.

In addition to memory savings, EdgeHTML 17 brings improvements to several JavaScript built-ins, building on optimizations initially enabled in EdgeHTML 16.
Type sharing for Object.create
Object.create is used to support JavaScript inheritance and null is also often tossed in to create a lean and mean dictionary/property bag. Chakra has an internal type system, and each object in Chakra is represented with an internal dynamic type. Many Chakra optimizations depend on objects with similar layout sharing types with each other. For example, inline caches can store fast paths for various types encountered at call sites, and objects with the same or an equivalent type are able use the same fast path as the cached type.
Type sharing between {x: 1}, {x: 2, y: 2}, {x: 3, z: 3}
Previously, however, objects created by Object.create were associated with a special null type handler in Chakra that cannot share types with other objects, so these optimizations didn’t apply to objects created using Object.create.

let dict1 = Object.create(null);
let dict2 = Object.create(null);
let dict3 = Object.create(null);
dict1.x = 1;
dict2.x = 2; dict2.y = 2;
dict3.x = 3; dict3.z = 3;
// because Object.create cannot share types, o.x in 2nd/3rd calls are cache misses
foo(dict1);
foo(dict2);
foo(dict3);

Beginning with EdgeHTML 17, Object.create returns objects with sharable types. Object.create(Object) now has the normal Object type, and Object.create(null) uses a new null type handler sharable with other Object.create(null) and compatible objects. dict1, 2 and 3 in the above example can now share types and have equivalent types, hence o.x in foo(dict2) and foo(dict3) are cache hits. This change results in an up to 25% speedup in some AngularJS workloads.
Polymorphic inline cache for Object.assign
Object.assign is an ES2015 feature often used to merge or clone objects. In EdgeHTML 16, we improved bracket access (o[prop]) by deploying polymorphic inline cache, which is able to cache multiple types and their associated fast paths at a given call site. With EdgeHTML 17, we’ve propagated the same optimization to benefit Object.assign, which upon de-sugaring involves a sequence of o[prop] style calls.

// an illustrative Object.assign polyfill
function assign(target, …sources) {
sources.forEach(src => {
for (let prop in src) {
// multiple types and fast paths can now be cached at target/src call sites
// therefore improves Object.assign performance
target[prop] = src[prop]
}
});
return target;
}

This simple optimization results in a roughly 2% improvement in some React/Redux workflows, and we expect to further improve performance for this pattern in the next release.
JSON.parse/stringify optimizations
JSON.parse and JSON.stringify are your handy JSON serialization tools in JavaScript. Interestingly, it is also a fairly common pattern to make nested JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)) calls to clone data objects.
Previously, Chakra implemented JSON.stringify by first scaning the object to be serialized, creating the necessary metadata, allocating a large enough buffer for the output string, creating intermediate sub-strings (for each quote, comma, key, value, etc.), and concatenating them together one-by-one.
The creation of intermediate strings caused a lot of redundancy in terms of both time and memory, so in EdgeHTML 17, Chakra skips creating those substrings altogether, and also delays filling up the output string from the metadata until it is actually needed. In the case of a JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj) call, the serialized object string is never actually created, and Chakra is able to construct the output object from the metadata generated during stringify.

let obj = {a: 1, b: 2};
let str = JSON.stringify(obj); // scans obj & create metadata
let objClone = JSON.parse(str); // re-construct obj from metadata, no string created
console.log(str); // JSON string creation is delayed until here

This change leads to JSON.stringify being roughly 40% faster in internal performance tests and roughly 70% faster for nested parse/stringify calls.
Rewriting Array Iterators in JavaScript and faster for…of
For…of performance on array also received a major boost in the EdgeHTML 17, and is up to 2.5x faster according to our testing. This speedup is achieved through rewriting the C++ Array Iterators implementation in JavaScript.
We had contemplated a feature rewrite in JS before―many JS optimizations didn’t apply to the C++ implementation, plus next() calls in C++ allocate objects on the heap, which is more expensive than JS stack allocation. The major challenge with a JS implementation is that de-sugared for…of involves a try/catch/finally block to handle cases of abrupt completion, which would have disabled most Chakra optimizations.
To work around those limitations, we made efforts to turn on JIT optimizations for functions with try/catch/finally in EdgeHTML 16, and later enabled inlining for the same as well. With those pre-requisites in place, we were able to rewrite for…of in JS, which runs much faster on non-excepting path.

Microsoft has been working closely with the WebAssembly Community Group (CG) to evolve this growing technology, and we shipped the WebAssembly MVP last year in EdgeHTML 16.
In EdgeHTML 17, WebAssembly (and asm.js) gets even faster with inlining support, which speeds up the workloads we’ve been tracking by about 4.5%. For ChakraCore embedders, WebAssembly is not only available on Windows, but also on Linux and MacOS, as we fixed calling convention issues.
A number of new and exciting WebAssembly features are being discussed within the CG, such as threads, reference types (for host interop), and ES modules integration. We look forward to continuing to collaborate with the CG to move this technology forward and to landing additional features as they progress on the standards track.

It’s always exciting to share more about performance enhancements to Chakra and Microsoft Edge. As always, we’ll continue to make enhancements in future releases, and your feedback is one of the key signals for us to decide what to do next.
We encourage you to dive in and try out these improvements for yourself, and be sure to share your thoughts with us on the ChakraCore repo, or via @MSEdgeDev and @ChakraCore on Twitter!
– Limin Zhu, Program Manager, Chakra
Updated June 19, 2018 12:36 pm

What’s new in Microsoft Edge in the Windows 10 April 2018 Update

The next update to Microsoft Edge is now available with the Windows 10 April 2018 Update! This update includes EdgeHTML 17, the next major version of Microsoft Edge’s rendering engine, as well as new features and everyday improvements across the product.
You can get your hands on the April 2018 Update today by checking for updates on your Windows 10 device, or, if you don’t have one, by downloading a free virtual machine from the Microsoft Edge Developer Site. You can also test Microsoft Edge for free in BrowserStack, which offers instant cloud-based manual and automated testing from a Mac or PC. BrowserStack will be updated to include the final release of EdgeHTML 17 in the coming weeks.
In this post, we’ll highlight what’s new in Microsoft Edge for users, and the new capabilities for site developers in EdgeHTML 17.
Better browsing: What’s new in Microsoft Edge
In every release, it’s our goal to make the web sing on Windows by making Microsoft Edge the fastest, easiest, and most productive place for you to enjoy your favorite sites and web apps. Below, you’ll find the biggest new features for Microsoft Edge.
Mute tabs with a click
We hear feedback every day that it’s too hard to find where audio is coming from, especially with lots of tabs open. In the April 2018 Update, the hunt to mute videos is over! When you hear unwanted audio playing in the browser, just press This tab is playing media  on the tab to turn the audio on or off.
Mute tabs with a single click
Our goal is to put users in control of autoplay content on the Web, so we’re continuing to explore more features to intelligently restrict autoplay audio and video content in future releases.
Automatically fill forms and credit card details
Microsoft Edge can now remember your name, credit card details, and other info when you’re signed in with a Microsoft Account. With your permission, we’ll save your form entries and give you the option to complete forms automatically.

Better reading with annotations, grammar tools, and more
We’ve overhauled the reading and Books experiences in Microsoft Edge, bringing a new, consistent, more powerful experience across all your documents, whether they’re EPUB or PDF books, documents, or web pages in Reading View.
The new reading experience uses Fluent Design System elements like motion and Acrylic material to provide a fluid, delightful experience that keeps the focus on the page.
In EPUB books and the Reading View for websites, you can now use the new Grammar Tools button to enable new comprehension aids. Grammar Tools can break the words on the page into syllables, as well as highlight different parts of speech such as nouns, verbs, and adjectives.

You can now also save EPUB books—whether downloaded from the web or purchased from the Microsoft Store—add bookmarks, and manage them all at the Books tab in the Microsoft Edge ”Hub” menu. You’ll also find suggestions there based on your reading habits.
For a distraction-free reading experience, you can now take books, PDFs, and Reading view pages full-screen. To enable full screen reading, just click the double arrow icon on the reading bar or press F11 on your keyboard.
Clutter-free printing
When printing a web page, you can now save paper by only printing the content you need. Select the “Clutter-free printing” option to print webpages without pop-ups and other unnecessary clutter.
Improved support for touchpad gestures
Microsoft Edge now supports custom multi-touch gesture support on devices with a precision touchpad, such as modern Surface laptops. On supported sites like Bing Maps, you can now use pinch-to-zoom and two-finger panning gestures to navigate maps just like you would on a touch screen.
Offline web sites and push notifications
Microsoft Edge now supports new web standards that allow web pages to send push notifications to your Action Center, even when the browser is closed. In addition, certain web pages can now work offline and improve performance, by using locally cached data when the cache is up to date, or when your device has a poor connection. You can learn more about these features in our post Service Workers: Going beyond the page.
New features for Extensions
We’re adding new extensions for Microsoft Edge every day, allowing users to customize their browsing experience with their favorite ad blockers, password managers, and more. To make it easier to find the extensions you’re looking for, Microsoft Edge will now show a dynamic list of suggested extensions under the “Extensions” menu.
Improvements for everyone
That’s just scratching the surface of what’s new in Microsoft Edge – you can learn more about these features at Microsoft Edge Tips, and see a list of everything that’s new over at the Microsoft Edge Changelog.
In every release, we make changes based on your feedback. Once you’ve tried out Microsoft Edge in the April 2018 Update, we want to hear what you think! You can send feedback on these features and suggestions for future improvements by selecting “Send feedback” from the “…” menu in Microsoft Edge.
Better basics: Improved performance and power efficiency
Windows users spend more time in web content than in any other activity on Windows. The Microsoft Edge engine powers not only the browser, but also powers web content throughout Windows—including in Windows apps and throughout the Windows shell itself—so performance and power efficiency is a major area of focus for the Microsoft Edge team in every release.
In the April 2018 update, we’re introducing dozens of optimizations that improve real, day-to-day performance and efficiency in every area of the product.
Making the browser more responsive
Input responsiveness is key to making the browser feel fast even when interacting with heavy websites or running on a busy system. In the April 2018 update, we’ve made improvements to make Microsoft Edge much more responsive on busy systems—such as when lots of other apps or background tasks are running.
Users will notice this most dramatically when something outside the browser such as a game or other high-impact application is busy in the background, which previously could cause input (such as typing) to be delayed, sometimes substantially dramatically.
Thanks to improved thread management in the April 2018 Update, this input will be more aggressively prioritized above background tasks, so Microsoft Edge will be much more responsive even when resources are limited.
We’ve also made improvements to responsiveness on busy pages. When the browser is busy with work that blocks user interactivity, we’ll more aggressively interrupt those tasks to put the user’s input first.
Better efficiency for an internet of GIFs
Regardless of how you pronounce them, GIFs are here to stay! In this update, we’ve dramatically reduced the power efficiency impact of rendering animated GIFs, especially on pages with lots of GIFs. Around 20 percent of pages loaded in Microsoft Edge include at least one GIF, so these improvements add up to even more battery life for Microsoft Edge compared to previous versions and to other browsers.
We’ve also made overall improvements to how we load images—on webpages with lots of images, we’ll now load the page noticeably faster by laying out page content without waiting to download the image in most cases.
Using resources more intelligently
Many web pages use resources continuously even when the user is not interacting or when the window is not in the foreground. When a tab is open for long periods of time, especially when lots of tabs are open, this impact adds up to reduced performance and battery life.
To prioritize the user experience, Microsoft Edge now intelligently suspends background tabs after the user has not interacted with them for a while, caching the content and suspending all CPU activity on that tab. This means improved performance and reduced power usage over time, with a minimal impact to the user experience. Tabs are then rapidly rehydrated when the user clicks on them. Our data from Windows Insiders previewing this feature shows that most suspended tabs are restored in less than half a second.
We’re also making foreground tabs more efficient. If a page is focused, but the user is not interacting with it (for example, scrolling or clicking links), Microsoft Edge will reduce the frame-rate of the tab to conserve power. This doesn’t impact video or 3D content on the page, and the browser will restore the full 60fps frame-rate as soon as the user interacts again.
New developer features for more engaging sites and web apps
The April 2018 Update brings with it EdgeHTML 17, our fifth major version of the Microsoft Edge rendering engine. This release brings powerful new developer capabilities for web sites and web apps, including the foundation for full-featured Progressive Web Apps on Windows.
A foundation for Progressive Web Apps
Starting in EdgeHTML 17, Service Workers and push notifications are enabled by default; you can learn more about these features in the blog post Service Worker: Going beyond the page. This completes the suite of technologies (including Fetch networking and the Push and Cache APIs) that lays the technical foundation for progressive Web Apps (PWAs) on Windows 10.

PWAs are simply web apps that are progressively enhanced with native app-like features on supporting platforms and browser engines, such as installation / home screen launch, offline support, and push notifications. On Windows 10 with the Microsoft Edge (EdgeHTML) engine, PWAs enjoy the added advantage of running independently of the browser window as Universal Windows Platform apps.
Beyond PWAs, Service Workers and the Cache API allow developers the ability to intercept network requests and respond from the cache. A website need not even been a full-blow web app to take advantage of the Service Worker cache for fine-tined page load performance and reliability, as well as the ability to provide an offline experience during periods of no internet or poor-quality connection.
Head over to our Progressive Web Apps docs to learn more about Service Workers and details about PWAs on Windows 10.
Expressive, performant typography with Variable Fonts
Full support for Variable Fonts, including CSS font-variation-settings and font-optical-sizing is available in EdgeHTML 17. Variable fonts enable developers to achieve the look of seemingly different typefaces with a single font by adjusting various axes – reducing the need for multiple font files and bettering performance.

Learn more about variable fonts and how to use them on your site at our Test Drive guide: Variable Fonts: An exploration of expressive, performant typography.
More powerful extensions
Microsoft Edge now supports the Notification API which displays notifications from extensions. Extension developers can now create different types of notifications (basic, list, image etc.) which support full user interaction. The notifications are also automatically logged into the Action Center. EdgeHTML 17 now also supports the Tabs.reload() method as part of the standard tabs API class.
Visit the notifications sample on how to use this API in your extension.
Improved accessibility via ARIA 1.1 Roles, States, and Events
EdgeHTML 17 now includes support for roles, states, and properties from the Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) 1.1 specification, including banner, complementary, aria-haspopup, aria-placeholder, and many more. Check out the Accessibility docs for more information about accessibility in Microsoft Edge.
Customizable multi-touch scrolling and gestures with Pointer Events
On devices with a Precision Touch Pad (PTP), Microsoft Edge will now fire Pointer Events with a pointerType of “touch” in response to PTP gestures.

This allows site developers to provide a customized multi-touch experience on modern Windows devices, including pinch-to-zoom and two-finger panning gestures, while preserving the highly optimized scrolling behaviors that users have come to expect from Precision Touch Pad devices.
CSS transforms on SVG elements
EdgeHTML 17 now supports CSS transforms on SVG elements and presentation attributes. This allows SVG elements to be visually manipulated, including rotating, scaling, moving, skewing, or translating.
More powerful developer tools
The tools have been updated with a number of major features, including basic support for remote debugging (via our new DevTools Protocol), PWA debugging features, IndexedDB cache management, vertical docking and more! We also continued the overall refactoring effort started last release as part of ongoing investments in performance and reliability.
You can learn more about what’s new in the Microsoft Edge DevTools at DevTools in the latest Windows 10 update (EdgeHTML 17).
Plugin-free screen sharing via the Media Capture API
Microsoft Edge now supports Screen Capture in RTC via the Media Capture API. This feature lets web pages capture output of a user’s display device, commonly used to broadcast a desktop for plugin-free virtual meetings or presentations. We’ll be sharing more about the Media Capture API in Microsoft Edge in an upcoming blog post.
Improved Web Security
EdgeHTML 17 introduces support for Subresource Integrity (SRI). Subresource Integrity is a security feature that allows browsers to verify that fetched resources (e.g. images, scripts, fonts, etc.) are delivered without unexpected manipulation.
Also new in EdgeHTML 17, the Upgrade-Insecure-Requests request header allows browsers to request a secure browsing experience. This header tells the server that the browser supports upgrading any insecure requests and the user should be redirected to a secure version of the site if available.
And lots more!
There’s too much EdgeHTML 17 for one blog post—you can see the full list of everything that’s new, including the full list of new APIs exposed in the DOM, over at the Microsoft Edge Dev Guide for EdgeHTML 17.
Get started testing EdgeHTML 17 today
You can get the April 2018 Update in a couple different ways. If you have automatic updates enabled, the update will be delivered to you when it’s ready for your device, starting today. Developers and advanced users who would like to get the update today can visit this blog post to learn how.
You can get started testing EdgeHTML 17 today on any device using free virtual machines from Microsoft Edge Dev. We’ve also partnered with BrowserStack to offer unlimited remote manual and automated testing in Microsoft Edge—BrowserStack will be adding EdgeHTML 17 in the coming weeks.
As with every release, we want to build our web platform in the open. We’ve updated our open platform roadmap at status.microsoftedge.com to reflect EdgeHTML 17, and encourage you to review and provide feedback on the features that matter to you.
You can reach our team directly via @MSEdgeDev on Twitter, or via the Feedback Hub app on Windows. We look forward to hearing what you think!
— Kyle Pflug, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge
— Libby McCormick, Dev Writer, Microsoft Edge

Bringing expressive, performant typography to Microsoft Edge with Variable Fonts

For years, rich typography has been the envy of many web designers, who long for the typographic variety, texture, and precision available in print media. Now, with the recent innovations of OpenType Variable Fonts―pioneered in collaboration between Microsoft, Adobe, Apple, Google, and others―and new standards allowing for developers to control font variations in CSS, things are about to change.
In this example from our Variable Fonts demo, the Decovar font is animated along an astounding 15 axes using variable fonts.
Full support for Variable Fonts (including CSS font-variation-settings and font-optical-sizing) is coming to Microsoft Edge starting with EdgeHTML 17, available to preview in Windows Insider Preview builds as of Build 17120. To demonstrate how variable fonts enable expressive, performant experiences, we’ve built a new immersive developer guide on Test Drive: Variable Fonts.
Join us on an expedition to learn about Variable Fonts, and how to use them on your site.
Join us on an expedition to learn about what variable fonts provide web developers and designers, and how to use them on your site. For the best experience, visit the Test Drive in a modern browser that supports font-variation-settings and font-optical-sizing, such as Microsoft Edge on Windows Insider Preview build 17120 or higher.
― Greg, Melanie, and Francois

Microsoft Edge extensions, one year later

It has been a little more than a year since Microsoft first shipped the number one requested feature for Microsoft Edge – extensions! Today, we are excited to share a few updates on the progress we have made since then, and a quick look at what’s planned for the future, as we continue to listen to feedback from customers and partners.
We heard loud and clear that extensions like ad blockers, password managers, and key productivity enhancements are important to our customers to make the browser meet their needs. Throughout 2016, we worked closely with a small group of partners to launch a core set of highly-requested extensions through the Windows Store as part of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update. The first extensions in the Windows Store were AdBlock, Adblock Plus, Amazon Assistant, Evernote Web Clipper, LastPass, Mouse Gestures, Office Online, OneNote Web Clipper, Page Analyzer, Pinterest Save Button, Reddit Enhancement Suite, Save to Pocket and Translator for Microsoft Edge.

Enabling more powerful extensions
When we shipped this first batch of extensions, the response from our customers and enthusiasts was tremendous. Still, many of you were immediately ready for the list to grow, and have often asked when a personal favorite extension will show up.
Before we could enable a wider ecosystem of extensions for our customers, we needed to improve the capabilities of our extensions platform to allow new categories of extensions and more features for existing extensions. Over the past year, we’ve been focused on a few key engineering investments to add new capabilities:
Native Messaging (supported from EdgeHTML 15) allows an extension to communicate with a UWP application installed on the system, enabling apps to integrate with more sophisticated functionality outside of the browser, which enables more advanced password management and other features.
Bookmarks (supported from EdgeHTML 15) allowing an to access your favorites (with associated permissions.)
Improved APIs – In addition to new APIs like bookmarks, we improved and fleshed out the existing API classes already supported, which combined meant we support over 30% more APIs than in the initial release.
Fundamentals – Astute observers of our release notes and active testers in the Insider program may have noticed that some preview builds break extensions temporarily. The Insider program is key for us to see how experimental features are working on a build with real users, including helping us where we were falling short. We have used that data to improve the reliability and performance of our extension platform and will continue to focus on improving these fundamentals in future releases.
We’re always evaluating additional API support for future releases. You can see the extensions APIs that we currently support at our Extension API roadmap, as well as those that are under consideration (for example, Downloads and Notifications). We’re keen to hear your feedback on what’s most important to your extensions – let us know on UserVoice or via Twitter at MSEdgeDev.
Building a thoughtfully curated ecosystem
We have taken a purposefully metered approach as we onboard new extensions. Extensions are one of the most substantial features in a new browser, and we have a high bar for quality. Because extensions interact so closely with the browser, we have been very attuned to the security, performance, and reliability of Microsoft Edge with these extensions enabled. Starting with a small group of the most popularly requested extensions has allowed us to mature our extension ecosystem as alongside our extension platform, as well as to build a smooth onboarding experience for developers over time.
As we’ve continued to work on the extensions platform, we sometimes get questions asking why the list of extensions isn’t growing faster. What gives?
We are extremely sensitive to the potential impact of extensions on your browsing experience and want to make sure that the extensions we do allow are high-quality and trustworthy. We want Microsoft Edge to be your favorite browser, with the fundamentals you expect – speed, power efficiency, reliability, security. Poorly written or even malicious add-ons for browsers remain a potential source of privacy, security, reliability and performance issues, even today. We want users to be confident that they can trust extensions in Microsoft to operate as expected. As such, we continue to evaluate each extension submission to ensure that it will bring value to our users and support our goals for a healthy ecosystem.
A growing catalog of trusted extensions
Today, in the Windows Store, our partners are offering over 70 extensions worldwide, and are adding more every week – including popular extensions like Grammarly, which launched earlier this week! As this list grows, we will continue to preview new functionality and experimental extensions starting with Windows Insiders for testing and feedback, followed by a broader release via the Windows Store, to ensure the quality of the end-to-end experience.
Looking forward, we continue to work closely with our developer partners to onboard new extensions into the Store. We continue to prioritize what APIs we should support, and what partners we should work with from user feedback, so please keep it coming! Thanks to our users and partners for a great year!
– Colleen Williams, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge

Microsoft Edge Web Summit 2017 recordings are now available on Channel 9

Last week we welcomed hundreds of local developers and thousand of online viewers to our third annual Microsoft Edge Web Summit! Videos and slides from each session are now available to stream or download on Channel 9.
Learn about what’s new in EdgeHTML 16 in the keynote at Microsoft Edge Web Summit 2017.
Our sessions will bring you up to date on what’s in store for EdgeHTML 16, including learning how to use new and updated features like CSS Grid Layout, object-fit and object-position, WebVR, and the Web Payments API.

Learn about how to build faster websites with a fast and furious tour of web performance in the real world, and how to keep your development and testing on track with sonar, a new open-source, community-owned linting tool for the web. And make sense of the always-evolving web app landscape while blending the best of web and native with Progressive Web Apps.

Or go on a deep dive into the inner workings of the browser, to learn how we’re constantly rebuilding Microsoft Edge to be more secure, more accessible, and faster than ever, with every release we ship.

That’s just the beginning – there’s lots more to see on Channel 9, and we’ll have more to share about these topics and more in the coming weeks right here on the Microsoft Edge Dev Blog.
Thanks for joining us at Microsoft Edge Web Summit 2017 – we can’t wait to see you next year!
— Kyle Pflug, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge