Category Archives: Visual Studio

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Visual Studio 2017 Update 4 makes it easy to modernize your desktop application and make it store ready

Last year with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, we introduced the Desktop Bridge to provide desktop applications a path to modernize with the Universal Windows Platform, and to distribute via the Windows Store and the Microsoft Store for Business to all Windows 10 PCs, including devices that are running the Windows 10 S configuration.
The primary developer tool at the time was the Desktop App Converter, a tool that converts your current app installer into a Windows app package (.appx file), which can be submitted to the Windows Store or deployed via your distribution mechanism of choice. With Update 4 for Visual Studio 2017 we now have great support directly in Visual Studio for your Windows desktop application projects (WPF, Winforms, Win32, etc.). With the new tools you can now as you develop them in VS by simply hitting F5!
Let me walk you through an example, step-by-step. I am starting out with this Winforms app that showcases various chart controls. It’s been created several years ago in an older version of VS against .NET 4. Now my goal is to release it in the Windows Store and incrementally modernize it. Here is how easy it is now with Update 4 for Visual Studio 2017.

Step 1 – Add Windows App Packaging project to the solution
Before we start we need to make sure our desktop application project is loaded in Visual Studio 2017 and builds without error. Then in the next step we want to package our application as a Windows App Package (.appx file) so our Winforms app can take advantage of all the same Windows 10 app deployment features that are available to UWP apps: clean install & uninstall, seamless updates, Store distribution and many more. To do this, we will take advantage of the new tooling features introduced in Update 4 for Visual Studio 2017. We are adding a new project of type “Windows Application Packaging Project” to our solution:

Now we need to specify our min/target versions…

…and let the packaging  project know which project output to include in the package. To do so we right-click on the “Applications” node and set a reference to our Winforms project – done!

Important! Select the “DistributionPackage” project as your startup project. Now hit F5 and watch how your app gets packaged, deployed and launched as a Desktop Bridge app. You can start testing and debugging in this new execution context. If you set the Winforms project as startup project and hit F5, you can still test and debug the unpackaged version of your application
Step 2 – Configure app for Windows Store release
Our app is already running as a Desktop Bridge app now and we have successfully tested and debugged it in this configuration. Next we just need to put some finishing touches on the package so it integrates nicely with the Windows 10 Shell (tiles, badges, etc.) and to make sure it conforms to the Store submission requirements. First thing, we need to replace the default visual assets that come with the project template with our real, application-specific assets. This is very easy now in Visual Studio 2017 with the Visual Assets Manager in the package manifest editor:

To prepare for our Store submission we need to create the application in the Windows Dev Center and reserve our application name, provide screenshots for the store front, set the price, age ratings, etc. If you are not planning to distribute via the Windows Store, you can skip this step.

Last thing we need to do before we can release our app to the public is create a package bundle that is ready to deploy and Store-compliant. This bundle can contain binaries for different architectures, resources for different locales as well as the symbols for our binaries so we can later make sense of any crash reports in the Dev Center or Mobile Center. This can be done for Desktop Bridge apps directly from Visual Studio now, just like you would do for any UWP app:

As part of creating the packages we also run the certification tests and then submit the package to the Dev Center for certification and publishing. You can try the result of my submission out now and install the sample app on your machine from the Store by clicking on the badge below – source code for the app is available for your reference here.

What else does this enable for developers?
Aside from distributing and monetizing via Windows Store, your app now enjoys the modern deployment capabilities built into Windows 10. You don’t need to build an installer anymore, updates are automatic and differential. Uninstalls are guaranteed to be clean. Moreover, since your app is now in the Windows 10 App Model, you have access to UWP APIs and features, such as live tiles, Cortana integration, background tasks etc. Another important benefit specifically for Windows Forms apps is the new high DPI support in .NET 4.7, which is included in the Windows Creators Update (1703). Our sample app here is taking advantage of this new support, by following the steps outlined in this article.
And there is more
Talking about installers, did you know that your app package is also your installer on Windows 10? Users can just click to install it, as long as it’s signed with a certificate that is trusted on the target device. This enables you to distribute your modernized desktop application in the way that’s right for your scenario, without having to go through the Store – e.g. for LOB applications in an enterprise. Learn more about it here.

Conclusion
Getting your desktop application development project ready for Windows Store submission is easy now with Visual Studio 2017 Update 4. Once converted to a Windows App Package your app can take advantage of all the Windows 10 platform capabilities and start using new APIs and features on Windows 10. Here are some resources for more details:
Desktop Bridge docs
Desktop Bridge samples
App Modernization video on Channel 9
Are you ready to submit your desktop application to the Windows Store? Let us know about it here, and we will help you through the process!

Windows Developer Day in London – Windows 10 Fall Creators Update SDK Availability

Windows 10 Fall Creators Update provides a developer platform that is designed to inspire the creator in each of us – empowering developers to build applications that change the way people work, play and interact with devices. To truly fulfill this platform promise, I believe that our developer platform needs to be centered around people and their needs.  Technology should adapt and learn how to work with us.
As we showed at Microsoft Build in May, the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update SDK delivers thousands of new capabilities and improvements that support this promise. Today, at Windows Developer Day in London, we’re celebrating three areas that help you, our developer partners:
Create inspiring experiences using the next revolution in technology – Mixed Reality
Modernize applications for the modern workplace
Build and monetize your games and applications
I’m pleased to share with you that you can get started now by downloading the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update SDK. Windows 10 adoption has been incredible – with more than 500 million monthly active devices. We are also seeing devices staying current with the latest updates faster than ever, with the majority of devices running the latest updates in less than 6 months, and over eighty percent of devices running the latest update in less than a year. We can’t wait to see the next wave of innovation enabled by the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update SDK.
Create inspiring experiences using the next revolution in technology – Mixed Reality
The next revolution of computing is Mixed Reality. Microsoft is the only company embracing the entire continuum for mixed reality, from augmented reality to virtual reality and everything in between. Windows 10 was designed from ground up for spatial interactions and the next wave in this journey is Windows Mixed Reality, uniting the digital and real world to create a rich, immersive world. As humans, we interact with space constantly, and Windows Mixed Reality will feel the most natural for users. With HoloLens, we have already demonstrated unrivaled innovation that is transforming industries. Now, our immersive headsets offer unrivaled experiences.
For developers, Windows Mixed Reality offers unique opportunities.
Our unified platform maximizes reuse across platforms and device form factors
Windows Mixed Reality provides reach on the broadest range of devices
Our Microsoft Store provides an unrivaled discovery opportunity
Millions of people come to the Store every day to get an application from our broad catalog
Modernize applications for the modern workplace
With the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update SDK, developers can easily create a new or update an existing application to support modern experiences that employees need, or customers expect.
Modernizing your deployment
The deployment system in Windows 10 has been significantly enhanced to help your users start using your application quicker and easier. This starts with the ability to only download the delta between updates, the updated bits versus the entire package to your end user. In addition, you can break up your application into components to allow streaming install. This will allow your application to work before your user has the entire application installed.
To assist with this modernization, the Fall Creators Update introduces the Windows application packaging project with Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4. This new project allows developers to utilize the app packaging without having to convert your existing installer. Just add the project and you’re done. Once your application is using the modernized installer, you now have access to all the APIs that have been added to the Windows Platform. For example, integration with Windows Hello to assist with security, action center integration to assist with engagement, and cross-device capabilities provided with device relay and activity feed.
Another major investment has been the integration of .NET Standard 2.0 which enables developers to reuse their code across platforms and devices with Visual Studio and integrates the vast array of libraries available in the open source community built on .NET.
Fluent Design System
The Fluent Design System is the evolution of Microsoft’s approach to creating the very best user experiences. Experiences with Fluent Design feel natural on the device you’re using, whether it’s a large screen desktop with keyboard, a laptop or tablet with touch, a mixed reality headset, or one of many other computing form factors. Applications using Fluent Design are optimized for consuming content and are efficient and powerful to use for creating and collaborating, and they help you to achieve more… they are experiences you love to use!
For developers, the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update provides a comprehensive solution for creating applications with Fluent Design in a way that’s simple, powerful and flexible to your needs. It includes UX building blocks, guidelines, samples, tools, and a community to help you build the best experiences for your customers. Here are some highlights:
The Navigation View control provides an easy, consistent home for getting around your app.
Acrylic Material gives you a rich new visual building block that helps you create information hierarchy and greater immersion in your app.
The Reveal Highlight interaction visualization built into many controls helps your experience feel natural to use across as disparate inputs as mouse, pen, touch and gaze.
Connected Animations aid usability by preserving context and increasing engagement, and are so easy to adopt incrementally.
Gesture Actions like swipe build on familiar patterns to help users efficiently and naturally get stuff done.
Learn more about all the different building blocks and features you can take advantage of at: http://developer.microsoft.com/design.
Device Relay and Activity Feed
Microsoft Graph and Project Rome enable new and exciting ways to drive user engagement across apps, devices and platforms. Device relay allows your customers to continue what they’re doing right now, but on a different device and Activity Feed, allows them to pick up an activity they were doing in the past, and continuing it now or sometime in the future.
Helping your customers stay connected to what they need to do right now isn’t as easy as it used to be. People have multiple devices they switch between and they expect them to all work together. Using the Remote Systems and Remote Sessions APIs, you can do truly delightful device relay scenarios to help your customers use the right device for the task.  The Remote Systems APIs enable you to communicate with the user’s devices across Windows, Android and iOS.
With the Activity Feed, you can keep your customers engaged and help them resume what they need to do next. Your customers can’t always finish what they were doing in a task or session in your app, but you can still help them pick up where they left off between devices and experiences by simply adding an activity to the Activity Feed using the UserActivity API.
Build and monetize your games and applications
Lastly, with the Expanded Resources feature in the Fall Xbox One Update, we’ve made another investment in the promise to open Xbox One to UWP game developers who want to build more immersive experiences. Now, developers will automatically have access to 6 exclusive cores, 5 GB of ram and full access to the GPU with DX12! We designed Visual Studio 2017 with game developers in mind! We built a brand-new work-load based installer in Visual Studio 2017, which optimizes the install experience for game developers, so you get everything you need and nothing you don’t.
We recently launched the Xbox Live Creators Program, and this gives anyone the ability to build and publish games for the Xbox One family of devices and Windows 10 PCs. You don’t have to go through concept approval, and the certification is simplified. What’s more is that you are able to leverage select Xbox Live features like stats, leaderboards and cloud saves. We have added more monetization options and tools in Microsoft Store. Interactivity is the future of live streaming and Mixer is our fast and interactive live streaming platform. We have the Mixer SDKs for the major game engines and languages and you can make something cool in less than an hour. Our goal is to create a community of indie game developers. We want to foster open discussions between developers and Windows, and each other. With that in mind, we are bringing back Dream.Build.Play in 2017. The 2017 Challenge has a prize pool over $225,000 (USD), with several categories.
Community and thanks
We were pleased today to have been joined on stage in London by two creative partners building UWPs for unique and innovative experiences.  Black Marble, a UK based developer is building on its history of simplifying law enforcement experiences with a new Mixed Reality UWP to bring MR to courtrooms. Texthelp, another UK based company, showcased a UWP application and Edge extension that helps improve reading and writing comprehension for children with dyslexia and students learning in a second language. Texthelp has also announced a new app, EquatIO, which assists learning in mathematics.
Whether you’re building immersive experiences for Windows Mixed Reality, games, education or business applications, community is crucial to the Windows developer platform. I’d also like to take a moment to thank all developers who are participating Windows Insiders Program and have been using the Fall Creators Update Preview SDK. We value your insight and suggestions, as well as your feedback.
I look forward to seeing what you create with the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update SDK. The Windows Dev Center is open now for submissions to the Microsoft Store! For more details, go to dev.windows.com.

Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 16288 and Mobile Emulator Build 15240 Released

Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK and the Mobile Emulator to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 16288 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 16288 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.
The Preview SDK and Mobile Emulator can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.
For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum. For new developer feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice.
Things to note:
This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017.  You can install this SDK and still also continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 Creators build or earlier to the Store.
The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download the Visual Studio 2017 here.
Breaking Changes
ecmangen.exe removal from the SDK:  Ecmangen.exe will no longer ship with the Windows SDK. Developers who rely on ecmangen for event manifest creation are advised to install the Windows Creators Edition of the SDK to obtain the file. Developers may also use notepad or other XML editor of choice for manifest creation. A schema file is available on MSDN to aid in manifest creation, for tools that support it.
API Updates and Additions
When targeting new APIs, consider writing your app to be adaptive in order to run correctly on the widest number of Windows 10 devices. Please see Dynamically detecting features with API contracts (10 by 10) for more information. 
There have been no changes since build 16278 to the API surface.

Windows Template Studio 1.3 Released!

We’re extremely excited to announce the Windows Template Studio 1.3.
In this release, we added in app scheme launch, finalized our work for localization, massive improvements in accessibility and started our work for Visual Basic support.
What’s new:
For a full list of adjustments in the 1.3 release, head over to WTS’s Github.

New Feature:
Scheme to launch app (aka myAwesomeApp://myDeepLinksIntoMyApp?foo=bar)
Template improvements:
Default Windows theme support added to template
Files are now UTF-8 with BOM to make sure all cultures are supported
Accessibility support in templates
Improvements to the Wizard:
Accessibility support in Wizard drastically improved
Lots of under the hood bug fixes and code improvements
All needed parts for localization are built-in now (looks like we missed window to get actual localized files)
Initial VB engine work was added in.
Bug fixes
Process improvements:
StyleCop enforcements across Template and Wizard code bases
Appveyor added for pull requests to be sure we have proper continuous integration checks
Required work for .NET Foundation
How to get the update:
There are two paths to update to the newest build.
Already installed: Visual Studio should auto update the extension. To force an update, Go to Tools->Extensions and Updates. Then go to Update expander on the left and you should see Windows Template Studio in there. Click “Update.”
Not installed: Head to https://aka.ms/wtsinstall, click “download” and double click the VSIX installer.

What else is cooking for next versions?
We love all the community support and participation. In addition, here are just a few of the things we are currently building out that will be in future builds:
Fluent Design in the templates
Ink templates
Improved Right-click->add support for existing projects
Localization in the wizard
Visual Basic support
Caliburn.Micro support
Prism support
With partnership with the community, we will continue cranking out and iterating new features and functionality. We’re always looking for additional people to help out and if you’re interested, please head to our GitHub at https://aka.ms/wts. If you have an idea or feature request, please make the request!

Dream.Build.Play 2017 Challenge Updates

When we launched the Dream.Build.Play 2017 Challenge in June, we had big plans for not just a contest, but a way for indie game developers to connect with each other and show off their skills and experience. We didn’t set out to replace existing communities, but maybe we could create a little something that would complement other systems. Our goal is always to help indie developers be as successful as possible, and Dream.Build.Play 2017 Challenge is just one thing we thought up.
Before I begin, I do want to say that this article is long. I’ve got a lot of cool and important information to share, and rather than break it up into individual posts and have you search for it in multiple places, I’m throwing it all down in one place. Come back and refer to this page as often as you need to. Ok, let’s get started!
State of Play
By the look of it, that contest is generating some great interest from you all. To date there are over 2,000 indie developers from all walks of life signed up on the competition site, and we know there are more to come. And what do I mean by “walks of life”? Well, we have students, we have professional developers trying their hand at building a game, we have dedicated indie studios who want to showcase their talents.
But it doesn’t stop there. We have indie developers from all over the world too. My home country, Australia, is represented, as is the US and the UK. But how about Bangladesh? Yep. Austria? Yep. Greece, Sweden, France, Brazil… The list goes on. Dream.Build.Play is turning out to be a truly global experience.
That’s all great and all, you say, but what about these big plans you mentioned?
Glad you asked.
The Big Plans
This month, we launched phase two of the Dream.Build.Play website. It takes the contest and amps up the stuff you can do with it in a big way, but we’ve tried to do it in a thoughtful way that will help you out for other things too.
As of now, you can log into the Dream.Build.Play website and check out the community of developers who have created profiles. And you can create your own too. Each profile comes with name, country, photo and a brief bio description. But then it can be enhanced with what I consider the special sauce of Dream.Build.Play. Besides that basic biographical info, you can add all the ways people can connect with you, plus all the skills you have, plus all the games you’ve worked on.
Yes, all. First, take connections and networks. You can choose from Xbox, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and so on, but you can also add your DeviantArt or Bandcamp accounts, or GitHub, Unity, Unreal or Stack Overflow accounts. And a whole lot more. And if there’s something missing, we’ve got you covered with a Personal Website link. Add as many as you want. Add none. It’s up to you.
When it comes to skills, it gets event better. We’ve built an extensive list of skills, from a variety of programming languages, to middleware and game engines, to more softer skills like game design. But if you want to advertise a skill that’s not listed, just add it in, and as long as it passes our moderation queue, it’ll show up in your profile.
Adding games is where the magic really starts to show through. You can add every game you’ve worked on, and each one comes with its own set of information. From the game’s name and genre, to cover art, screenshots and even a trailer video. And then add a description, and what platform category it belongs to and you’re almost there. Every game entry can have its own set of connections. So if you have a website for your game, a YouTube link, a Twitch channel and a Facebook page, add them all so people can check it out.
Why is this important?
We created the community like this for a very important reason: so you can all connect with each other. Let me give you an example.
Dave is building a game in Unity, but he doesn’t have a single audio engineering bone in his body. But he really wants to enter the Dream.Build.Play 2017 Challenge and potentially win big cash money. I can relate.
Dave heads to the Community page and filters the Skills list for Audio Engineering. In the results pane, he sees a few other members who have that skill. He clicks on Grace’s profile. Dave sees that Grace not only has Audio Engineering as a listed skill, but she also has Unity. Great! She’ll likely know how to incorporate sound into his Unity game.
He can then check out the games Grace has listed, heading to their websites, or videos, and check out the audio that she has created previously. He likes the sounds he’s hearing and decides that he wants to see if Grace would like to join him on his epic journey. He can then return to Grace’s profile and click on any of the Connections she has added and get in touch.
Cool!
Cooler, if they agree to join forces, the Dream.Build.Play website allows them to do just that. All Dave has to do is head to his game page, edit it and add Grace to join his team. Bam! Both will now be listed as being part of the cool game that they’re collaborating on.
I love this community
One of my favorite things about the game developer community, is the willingness of everyone to help out and give people tips, feedback and advice on how to improve or fix their creations. I wanted to flag one great example of that that came out this week: Simon Jackson’s post on Unity and Visual Studio.
Simon and fellow indie dev Jim Perry brought to my attention a small issue between Visual Studio, Unity and Xbox Live. They thoughtfully investigated and figured out a workaround, and for all of you who are actively building UWP games in Unity who want to integrate Xbox Live, Simon has written up their findings on his blog: https://darkgenesis.zenithmoon.com/resolving-build-issues-for-uwp-packages-with-unity/
Also, I also want to highlight that Simon has created a special area on DevPost for Dream.Build.Play here: https://devpost.com/software/dreambuildplayresources. If you’re looking for additional info or resources, or you want to contribute back to the community, please head there and take a look.
Quick recap so far
A quick summary of where we are:
Phase two of Dream.Build.Play has launched. Woo!
You can now add your personal profile, complete with skills, connections and games.
Games can have their own connections, as well as screenshots, videos and more.
Games do NOT have to be for the Dream.Build.Play 2017 Challenge. They can be used to showcase your experience.
You can search the community based on skill.
You can form teams.
One special note. As I mentioned right at the beginning of this post, we’ve had (to date) over 2,000 people register to compete. If you look on the Community page and see less than that, that’s because only those people who have created a profile will show up on that page. So get in there and create your profile and make sure your friends and colleagues are heading back to Dream.Build.Play and updating theirs too, so the community fills out.
But wait, there’s more!
I hope you didn’t think we were stopping there. I’ve got some exciting news to share! We’re announcing a new contest as part of Dream.Build.Play: The Developer Diary Contest.
The Developer Diary contest challenges Dream.Build.Play creators and developers to document their journey in building a game. It has some minimal requirements such as needing to do at least five posts or videos, across at least a month in duration, but it’s really about encouraging you all to share your stories with each other.
Talk about a pain point you encountered and tell people how you fixed it. Or maybe something you were pleasantly surprised by when you started exploring UWP. Or how about how Azure made your life easier with some kind of cloud coolness.
Here’s a great example from Tarh Ik who we shared this with just a couple of days ago: https://tarhik.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/antimatter-instance-dev-log-entry-1/
And yes, the game he’s blogging about is indeed on Dream.Build.Play! https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/Windows/dream-build-play/game/7
You’ll have until December 31st to create your Developer Diary and be in the running to win $5,000 cash and the adulation of your peers. Get to it!
Need help?
To finish off this article, I know that creating a game can be tough. But we’re here to help. Not only can you post questions to our Windows Developer Twitter handle or Facebook group, but you can grab a whole bunch of documentation, all conveniently located in one place: The UWP Game Development Guide!
Until next time, good luck, create your profile and add all the games you’ve worked on, and see you in the Dream.Build.Play community!
Oh, and keep your eyes peeled. We may have some other announcements soon.

Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 16267 and Mobile Emulator Build 15240 Released

Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK and the Mobile Emulator to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 16267 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 16267 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.
The Preview SDK and Mobile Emulator can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.
For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum. For new developer feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice.
Things to note:
This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017. You can install this SDK and still continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 Creators build or earlier to the Windows Store.
The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download the Visual Studio 2017 here.
Known Issues
Compilation fails on non-Windows 10 platformsWhen building apps on previous platforms, you may get a build error:
C:program files (x86)Windows Kits10bin10.0.16232.0x86genxbf.dll:C:program files (x860Windows Kits10bin10.0.16232.0x86genxbf.dll(0,0): Error WMC0621: Cannot resolve ‘GenXbf.dll’ under path ‘C:program files (x860Windows Kits10bin10.0.16232.0x86genxbf.dll’.  Please install the latest version of the Windows 10 Software Development Kit.
Process ‘msbuild.exe’ exited with code ‘1’.
This will occur if the minimum target platform version is set to 10.0.16225.0. To work around this, right click on your project file and choose properties or open your project file in your favorite editor, and change the version to a previous released SDK. For example:

<WindowsTargetPlatformMinVersion>10.0.10586.0</WindowsTargetPlatformMinVersion>

Breaking Changes
ecmangen.exe removal from the SDK: Ecmangen.exe will no longer ship with the Windows SDK. Developers who rely on ecmangen for event manifest creation are advised to install the Windows Creators Edition of the SDK to obtain the file. Developers may also use notepad or other XML editor of choice for manifest creation. A schema file is available on MSDN to aid in manifest creation, for tools that support it.
API Updates and Additions
When targeting new APIs, consider writing your app to be adaptive in order to run correctly on the widest number of Windows 10 devices. Please see Dynamically detecting features with API contracts (10 by 10) for more information.
The following are the API changes since the 16257 Preview SDK, please reference that list.
Additions to Preview SDK 16257

 
namespace Windows.Storage.Provider {
public enum HardlinkPolicy : uint
public enum HydrationPolicy {
AlwaysFull = 3,
Partial = 0,
}
public enum InSyncPolicy : uint {
DirectoryLastWriteTime = (uint)512,
FileLastWriteTime = (uint)256,
}
public enum PopulationPolicy {
AlwaysFull = 2,
}
public sealed class StorageProviderSyncRootInfo {
HardlinkPolicy HardlinkPolicy { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.WebUI {
public sealed class WebUIStartupTaskActivatedEventArgs : IActivatedEventArgs, IActivatedEventArgsDeferral, IActivatedEventArgsWithUser, IStartupTaskActivatedEventArgs {
ActivatedOperation ActivatedOperation { get; }
}
}

Removals from Preview SDK 16257

 
namespace Windows.Storage.Provider {
public enum HydrationPolicy {
NoPartial = 3,
OnDemand = 0,
}
public enum PopulationPolicy {
NoPartial = 2,
}
}

Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 16257 and Mobile Emulator Build 15235 Released

Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK and the Mobile Emulator to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 16257 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 16257 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.
The Preview SDK and Mobile Emulator can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.
For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum.  For new feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice.
Things to note:
This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017.  You can install this SDK and still also continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 Creators build or earlier to the store.
The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download the Visual Studio 2017 here.
Known Issues
Designer fails to render: When viewing the XAML in the Designer Window in Visual Studio, the controls fail to render.  This can be resolved by using Visual Studio 2017.3 Preview.
Compilation fails on non-Windows 10 platforms  (need to see if fixed)When building apps on previous platforms, you may get a build error:
C:program files (x86)Windows Kits10bin10.0.16232.0x86genxbf.dll:C:program files (x860Windows Kits10bin10.0.16232.0x86genxbf.dll(0,0): Error WMC0621: Cannot resolve ‘GenXbf.dll’ under path ‘C:program files (x860Windows Kits10bin10.0.16232.0x86genxbf.dll’. Please install the latest version of the Windows 10 Software Development Kit.
Process ‘msbuild.exe’ exited with code ‘1’.
This will occur if the minimum target platform version is set to 10.0.16225.0.  To work around this, right click on your project file and choose properties or open your project file in your favorite editor, and change the version to a previous released SDK.  For example:

<WindowsTargetPlatformVersion>10.0.15063.0</WindowsTargetPlatformVersion>

WRL projects fail to compile with MIDLRT error: When building my WRL project that contains a WinRT Component, the project no longer compiles.  I get the following errors:
midlrt : command line error MIDL1012: [msg]argument illegal for switch / [context]ns_prefix
midlrt : command line error MIDL1000: [msg]missing source-file name
To work around this temporarily you will need to use the previous version of the MidlRT.exe tool.  You can do this by changing your changing your Target Platform Version to a currently installed previous SDK.

<WindowsTargetPlatformVersion>10.0.15063</WindowsTargetPlatofrmVersion>

Breaking Changes
ecmangen.exe removal from the SDK: ecmangen.exe will no longer ship with the Windows SDK. Developers who rely on ecmangen for event manifest creation are advised to install the Windows Creator Edition of the SDK to obtain the file. Developers may also use notepad or other XML editor of choice for manifest creation. A schema file is available on MSDN to aid in manifest creation, for tools that support it.
API Updates and Additions
When targeting new APIs, consider writing your app to be adaptive in order to run correctly on the widest number of Windows 10 devices. Please see Dynamically detecting features with API contracts (10 by 10) for more information.
The following are the API changes since the 16232 Preview SDK, please reference that list. The TreeView control has been removed, but will be back soon in the next release of Windows and the Preview SDK.
Addition from Preview SDK 16232

namespace Windows.Storage {
public sealed class AppDataPaths
public sealed class SystemDataPaths
public sealed class UserDataPaths
}

Removals from Preview SDK 16232

namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Automation.Peers {
public class TreeViewItemAutomationPeer : ListViewItemAutomationPeer
public class TreeViewListAutomationPeer : SelectorAutomationPeer
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls {
public class TreeView : Control
public sealed class TreeViewExpandingEventArgs
public class TreeViewItem : ListViewItem
public sealed class TreeViewItemClickEventArgs
public class TreeViewList : ListView
public class TreeViewNode : DependencyObject, IBindableIterable, IBindableObservableVector, IBindableVector
public enum TreeViewSelectionMode
public sealed class XamlBooleanToVisibilityConverter : IValueConverter
public sealed class XamlIntegerToIndentationConverter : IValueConverter
}