Tag Archives: Cloud

Breaking down the Exchange Online vs. on-premises choice

We all know the cloud is there, but how does an organization determine if a move from an on-premises platform is the right one?

Many companies currently using Exchange Server cannot escape from the siren call of the cloud. Untold numbers of organizations will weigh the pros and cons of Exchange Online vs. on-premises Exchange Server. There are many reasons to move to the cloud, just as there are ones to stay put.

Whether the cloud is better requires some deeper analysis. I’ve spent most of the last eight years migrating organizations of every size to Office 365. Over that time, I’ve grown familiar with the motivations to move to the cloud, as well as the ones to maintain the status quo.

This article will dig into the Exchange Online vs. on-premises Exchange Server debate and examine the differences between the two offerings, as well as which has the advantage in certain areas.

Is Exchange Online less expensive?

In many cases, the first selling point of Exchange Online is the cost. Since Exchange Online and Exchange on premises are very different, it’s difficult to do an apples-to-apples comparison. To get started, you must look at several factors.

The first factor to weigh is how long you plan to keep your on-premises servers. If you upgrade your on-premises servers every three years, then it’s likely those costs will exceed the payments for Exchange Online. If you plan to keep your on-premises Exchange servers for 10 years, then you’ll likely pay considerably less than Exchange Online.

There are a number of costs associated with on-premises Exchange, such as hardware, electricity, data center space and repair costs. Due to all of these factors, the real answer is a lot more complicated than the de facto response from Microsoft that the cloud is always cheaper. Of course, it’s to the vendor’s benefit to get as many companies signed up for an Office 365 subscription as possible.

Is Exchange Online more reliable?

Just as there are several ways to look at the question of cost, it’s also difficult to determine reliability in the Exchange Online vs. on-premises equation.

Microsoft touts its 99.9% uptime guarantee for Office 365. Upon closer inspection, does that assurance hold up?

Open any Office 365 tenant at any time and look at the service health dashboard. Every tenant I check has items marked in red almost every day, but those customers still pay for the full subscription. I’m not saying Office 365 has a lot of downtime, but that 99.9% uptime guarantee is more gray than it is black and white.

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What are the perks and drawbacks
of a switch to hosted email?

As for on-premises Exchange, there is no way to evaluate the overall reliability of Exchange Server. I’ve seen organizations that almost never have problems, while others experience numerous major outages. I don’t think Office 365 is more reliable than on-premises Exchange, but my expectation is data loss is less likely with Exchange Online.

Exchange Server is a very complicated and difficult product to manage. Unless you have some very talented Exchange admins, Exchange Online is the more stable choice.

Do you get newer features with Exchange Online?

In this area, there is no doubt which platform has the advantage. Due to its nature as a cloud service, Exchange Online gets new features well before on-premises Exchange. Not only that, but there are many features that are exclusive to Exchange Online. For a company that wants all the latest and greatest features, the clear choice is Exchange Online.

Every organization has specific needs it must consider, and quite often the traditional on-premises mail system does the job.

However, there is a downside to the constant stream of new features. It can take time for both users and administrators to recover from the culture shock that sets in after the migration to Exchange Online when they realize the feature set changes constantly. There is always something new to learn. Many workers prefer to come into work without spending time to learn about new features in the email system.

What’s the final verdict?

Now that you’ve gone through the Exchange Online vs. on-premises deliberation, which is better? With the sheer number of factors to consider, there is no definitive answer.

Every organization has specific needs it must consider, and quite often the traditional on-premises mail system does the job. For example, a company that relies on public folders might see some difficulties migrating that feature to Exchange Online and decide to stay with the on-premises Exchange.

It’s no secret Microsoft wants its customers to move to the company’s cloud services, but they continue to develop on-premises versions of their software.

Microsoft plans to release Exchange 2019 later this year. When that offering arrives, take the time to evaluate all the features in that release and determine whether it’s worth moving to the cloud. For some organizations, on-premises email might continue to be a better fit.

Polycom cloud service simplifies device management

Polycom has released a cloud service for provisioning, managing and monitoring its desk and conference room phones. The hardware vendor’s latest attempt to penetrate the cloud market comes a few months before its proposed acquisition by headset-maker Plantronics is set to close.

Polycom Device Management Services for Enterprises (PDMS-E) is a web-based application for controlling Polycom phones from a single user interface. It will let IT administrators manage the settings of individual phones — or every phone all at once. It also will provide analytics on call quality and connectivity issues. The product is now available in North America.

Next quarter, Polycom plans to expand the capabilities of PDMS-E to include Polycom video endpoints and, eventually, the video endpoints of Cisco, Avaya and Lifesize. The vendor will fold Polycom RealConnect — its platform for managing interoperability between its devices and Microsoft Skype for Business — into its new cloud offering.

Also in the third quarter, Polycom plans to release a version of PDMS for service providers, aiming to help those partners improve uptime and enhance their customer portals. The service provider offering will make use of technology and partnerships Polycom inherited from Obihai Technology, which it acquired in January.

“Polycom makes great phones,” said Ira Weinstein, managing partner of Recon Research Inc., based in Coral Springs, Fla. “But the important thing here is for Polycom to have greater value and a stronger footprint in the enterprise, they need to add more value.”

The Polycom cloud service will provide provisioning, management and analytics tools that many businesses aren’t getting from their service providers, Weinstein said. And Polycom can provide more insight than anyone into its own devices.

But Polycom will need to battle against its own public image. “I don’t think the typical person in our industry sees Polycom as a cloud service provider,” Weinstein said.

In announcing PDMS, company executives said they would not comment on the company’s impending acquisition by Plantronics — a $2 billion deal that is set to close in the third quarter of 2018. Polycom has continued to operate as an independent company as the acquisition closes, said Amy Barzdukas, the vendor’s chief marketing officer.

Polycom cloud service extends hardware-based strategy

Polycom decided years ago to make its phones and cameras compatible with the software of a wide range of service providers, rather than build its own calling or web conferencing service.

In a conference call with reporters and analysts this week, CEO Mary McDowell said the company’s longtime strategy had proven to be successful, saying revenue had grown last year for the first time in six years. The formerly public company struggled financially in the years preceding its 2016 acquisition by private equity firm Siris Capital Group LLC.

With the release of PDMS, Polycom is looking to gain a foothold in the cloud market without directly competing with the software vendors that power its hardware, such as Microsoft and Zoom, said Rob Arnold, analyst at Frost & Sullivan.

“It’s pretty much a follow-through on what they said they were going to do last year: focus on device and not infrastructure,” Arnold said. “This way, they are not competing with their partners, and they are staying focused on the hardware and the devices, as they had mentioned.”

As phones become more advanced, with built-in video conferencing capabilities and touchscreen apps, businesses need better monitoring and management tools for those endpoints, Arnold said.

Polycom plans to expand its cloud offerings to include meeting room features, such as automatic attendance rosters, facial recognition and natural language controls.

The Microsoft Cloud can save customers 93 percent and more in energy and carbon efficiency

New report outlines how businesses moving from on-premises datacenters to the Microsoft Cloud can achieve sustainable innovation

REDMOND, Wash. — May 17, 2018 — A new report issued Thursday by Microsoft Corp. in partnership with WSP shows significant energy and carbon emissions reduction potential from the Microsoft Cloud when compared with on-premises datacenters. These gains, as much as 93 percent more energy efficient and as high as 98 percent more carbon efficient, are due to Microsoft’s extensive investments in IT efficiency from chip-to-datacenter infrastructure, as well as renewable energy.

“The world is producing more data than ever, making our infrastructure decisions about how to power this digital transformation incredibly important,” said Brad Smith, president and chief legal officer, Microsoft. “Today’s report confirms what we’ve long believed — that investing in sustainability is good for business, good for customers and good for the planet.”

Specifically, the report found that cloud investments made by Microsoft in IT operational efficiency, IT equipment efficiency, datacenter infrastructure efficiency and renewable electricity were responsible for the environmental benefits. These efficiencies translate into both energy and carbon savings for Microsoft and customers using Microsoft Cloud services.

Microsoft Cloud services achieve energy and emissions reductions in comparison with every on-premises deployment scenario assessed — Microsoft Azure Cloud Compute, Azure Storage, Exchange Online and SharePoint Online.

With more regions than any other cloud provider, Microsoft provides cloud services to customers around the world. As customers across all industries move to the cloud, sustainability and environmental responsibility are key factors in their choice of cloud provider.

“Schneider Electric chose the Microsoft Cloud to power our numerous cloud-based offerings, and it has helped us achieve our goal of becoming a global leader in sustainable energy management,” said Michael MacKenzie, vice president, EcoStruxure Technology Platform – IoT & Digital Offers, Schneider Electric. “The fact that Microsoft shares our sustainability values and focus on decreasing environmental impact makes the company a natural partner for us.”

“When organizations choose low-carbon cloud computing, they are taking an important step forward on sustainability,” said Lance Pierce, president of CDP North America. “Sustainable digital transformation, powered by a cleaner cloud, enables the creation of a sustainable and thriving economy that works for people and planet in the long term.”

Learn more about the Microsoft’s investments and approach to sustainability in the cloud at https://blogs.microsoft.com/on-the-issues/?p=58951. The report can be found in full at “The Carbon Benefits of Cloud Computing: A Study on the Microsoft Cloud.”

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications, (425) 638-7777,

rrt@we-worldwide.com 

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

 

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Red Hat and Microsoft co-develop the first Red Hat OpenShift jointly managed service on a public cloud

Microsoft and Red Hat expand partnership around hybrid cloud, container management and developer productivity

SAN FRANCISCO — May 8, 2018 — Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq “MSFT”) and Red Hat Inc. (NYSE: RHT) on Tuesday expanded their alliance to empower enterprise developers to run container-based applications across Microsoft Azure and on-premises. With this collaboration, the companies will introduce the first jointly managed OpenShift offering in the public cloud, combining the power of Red Hat OpenShift, the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform, and Azure, Microsoft’s public cloud.

“Gartner predicts that, by 2020, more than 50% of global organizations will be running containerized applications in production, up from less than 20% today.”1

With organizations turning to containerized applications and Kubernetes to drive digital transformation and help address customer, competitive and market demands, they need solutions to easily orchestrate and manage these applications, across the public cloud and on-premises. Red Hat OpenShift on Azure will be jointly engineered and designed to reduce the complexity of container management for customers. As the companies’ preferred offering for hybrid container workflows for our joint customers, Red Hat and Microsoft will jointly manage the solution for customers, with support from both companies.

In addition to being a fully managed service, Red Hat OpenShift on Azure will bring enterprise developers:

  • Flexibility: Freely move applications between on-premises environments and Azure using OpenShift, which offers a consistent container platform across the hybrid cloud.
  • Speed: Connect faster, and with enhanced security, between Azure and on-premises OpenShift clusters with hybrid networking.
  • Productivity: Access Azure services like Azure Cosmos DB, Azure Machine Learning and Azure SQL DB, making developers more productive.

When customers choose Red Hat OpenShift on Azure, they will receive a managed service backed by operations and support services from both companies. Support extends across their containerized applications, operating systems, infrastructure and the orchestrator. Further, Red Hat’s and Microsoft’s sales organizations will work together to bring the companies’ extensive technology platforms to customers, equipping them to build more cloud-native applications and modernize existing applications.

Customers can more easily move their applications between on-premises environments and Microsoft Azure because they are leveraging a consistent container platform in OpenShift across both footprints of the hybrid cloud.

The expanded collaboration between Microsoft and Red Hat will also include:

  • Enabling the hybrid cloud with full support for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform on-premises and on Microsoft Azure Stack, enabling a consistent on- and off-premises foundation for the development, deployment and management of cloud-native applications on Microsoft infrastructure. This provides a pathway for customers to pair the power of the Azure public cloud with the flexibility and control of OpenShift on-premises on Azure Stack.
  • Multiarchitecture container management that spans both Windows Server and Red Hat Enterprise Linux containers. Red Hat OpenShift on Microsoft Azure will consistently support Windows containers alongside Red Hat Enterprise Linux containers, offering a uniform orchestration platform that spans the leading enterprise platform providers.
  • More ways to harness data with expanded integration of Microsoft SQL Server across the Red Hat OpenShift landscape. This will soon include SQL Server as a Red Hat certified container for deployment on Red Hat OpenShift on Azure and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform across the hybrid cloud, including Azure Stack.
  • More ways for developers to use Microsoft tools with Red Hat as Visual Studio Enterprise and Visual Studio Professional subscribers will get Red Hat Enterprise Linux credits. For the first time, developers can work with .NET, Java, or the most popular open source frameworks on this single, and supported, platform.

Availability

Red Hat OpenShift on Azure is anticipated to be available in preview in the coming months. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure and Azure Stack are currently available.

Supporting Quotes

Paul Cormier, president, Products and Technologies, Red Hat

“Very few organizations are able to fully silo their IT operations into a solely on-premises or public cloud footprint; instead, it’s a hybrid mixture of these environments that presents a path toward digital transformation. By extending our partnership with Microsoft, we’re able to offer the industry’s most comprehensive Kubernetes platform on a leading public cloud, providing the ability for customers to more easily harness innovation across the hybrid cloud without sacrificing production stability.”

Scott Guthrie, executive vice president, Cloud and Enterprise Group, Microsoft

“Microsoft and Red Hat are aligned in our vision to deliver simplicity, choice and flexibility to enterprise developers building cloud-native applications. Today, we’re combining both companies’ leadership in Kubernetes, hybrid cloud and enterprise operating systems to simplify the complex process of container management, with an industry-first solution on Azure.”

About Red Hat Inc.

Red Hat is the world’s leading provider of open source software solutions, using a community-powered approach to provide reliable and high-performing cloud, Linux, middleware, storage and virtualization technologies. Red Hat also offers award-winning support, training, and consulting services. As a connective hub in a global network of enterprises, partners, and open source communities, Red Hat helps create relevant, innovative technologies that liberate resources for growth and prepare customers for the future of IT. Learn more at http://www.redhat.com.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

1 Gartner Inc., Smarter with Gartner, “6 Best Practices for Creating a Container Platform Strategy,” Contributor: Christy Pettey, Oct. 31, 2017

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

 

 

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WD My Cloud Mk1 enclosure

My WD My Cloud has developed a fault where it falls off the network every few hours, needing a hard reboot. I’ve tested the drive and its in perfect condition so it mus be an overheating issue with the board.

Any road up, I need a new enclosure. If you have one you don’t require any longer, let me know. It must be a MK1 version with the shiny silver enclosure and not the dull grey one.

Cheers.

Location: Belfast, N. Ireland…

WD My Cloud Mk1 enclosure

Saxo Bank and Microsoft partner to shape the future of cloud services in the financial industry

Saxo Bank aims to run its entire banking platform on Microsoft Cloud, thus providing an agile and highly secure environment for the bank to accelerate its digital journey and democratize financial services

REDMOND, Wash., and COPENHAGEN, Denmark — April 24, 2018 — On Tuesday, Microsoft Corp. and Saxo Bank announced a strategic partnership with the aim of running Saxo Bank’s entire technology stack on the Microsoft Cloud.

Financial services are at a transformational tipping point. It is key for financial organizations to harness data and cloud services as a strategic asset, shifting from hindsight to foresight closely hinged on security, privacy and regulatory compliance. With the partnership, Saxo Bank aims to lead at the forefront of technology developments in the financial industry.

Saxo Bank is a leading fintech specialist focused on multiasset trading and investment, servicing clients in more than 170 countries with access to investments in global capital markets and headquartered in Copenhagen, Denmark. Saxo Bank delivers “banking-as-a-service,” allowing other banks and brokers to leverage Saxo Bank’s technology and global capital markets access. Expecting the number and scale of partnerships to grow significantly, Saxo Bank has decided to leverage the Microsoft Cloud to ensure scalability, flexibility and security in the digital infrastructure.

“The future of financial services is cloud based, and by partnering with Microsoft we take part in shaping this future. Saxo Bank was a fintech long before the term was created, and it is a natural step for us to also pioneer cloud-based solutions in financial services,” said Kim Fournais, founder and CEO, Saxo Bank. “By leveraging the Microsoft Cloud, we can spend more time on developing technology and less time on running it, allowing us to continue to stay at the forefront of client-focused digitization and support our ambitious growth plans.”

A trusted platform is the foundation for running financial services in the cloud, and organizations — like Saxo Bank — that continuously develop to stay at the forefront of technology will become the digital leaders of the future and maintain their competitive edge.

“We are excited to help Saxo Bank shape the future of trading and investment on our cloud platform,” said Judson Althoff, executive vice president, Worldwide Commercial Business, Microsoft. “Saxo Bank is at the forefront of fintech, and our partnership will enable financial service organizations to securely harness data to better serve their clients.”

“We are proud to break new ground together with Microsoft and look forward to be working with key stakeholders such as regulators to ensure that cloud solutions continue to evolve and support the high regulatory standards that define the financial industry,” Fournais said. “At an early stage, we saw opportunities in using [the internet and] digital solutions to differentiate ourselves. Since we launched one of the first online investment platforms in 1998, we have been a Microsoft house, as such the Microsoft cloud is a natural fit for Saxo Bank.”

Today, Saxo Bank supports more than 120 White Label partnerships globally. Through its unique trading and investment technology, Saxo Bank facilitates access to more than 35,000 financial instruments across multiple asset classes.

About Saxo Bank

Saxo Bank Group (Saxo) is a leading fintech specialist focused on multi-asset trading and investment and delivering ‘Banking-as-a-Service’ to wholesale clients. For 25 years, Saxo’s mission has been to democratize investment and trading, enabling clients by facilitating their seamless access to global capital markets through technology and expertise.

As a fully licensed and regulated bank, Saxo enables its direct clients to trade multiple asset classes across global financial markets from one single margin account and across multiple devices. Additionally, Saxo provides wholesale institutional clients such as banks and brokers with multi-asset execution, prime brokerage services and trading technology, supporting the full value chain delivering Banking-as-a-Service (BaaS). Saxo’s award winning trading platforms are available in more than 20 languages and form the technology backbone of more than 100 financial institutions worldwide.

Founded in 1992 and launching its first online trading platform in 1998, Saxo Bank was a fintech even before the term was created. Headquartered in Copenhagen, Saxo Bank today employs more than 1500 people in financial centers around the world including London, Paris, Zurich, Dubai, Singapore, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Tokyo.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, rrt@we-worldwide.com

Microsoft Denmark, Helle Rosendahl, Senior Communications Advisor, +45 22409540,

a-hrose@microsoft.com

Saxo Bank, Steffen Wegner Mortensen, Head of PR and Public Affairs, +45 3977 6343, press@saxobank.com

 

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

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