Tag Archives: Microsoft Edge

How to distribute your existing Desktop Applications via Windows Store to Windows 10 PCs – including the new Windows 10 S configuration

Overview

Windows 10 S is a specific configuration of Windows 10 Pro that offers a familiar, productive Windows experience that’s streamlined for security and performance. By exclusively using apps in the Windows Store and ensuring that you browse safely with Microsoft Edge, Windows 10 S keeps you running fast and secure day in and day out. Windows 10 S was inspired by students and teachers and it’s the best Windows ever for schools. It’s also a great choice for any Windows customer looking for consistent performance and advanced security. By limiting apps to those in the Windows Store, Windows 10 S is ideal for people who have everything they need in the Windows Store and prefer the peace of mind that comes with removing the risk of downloading apps from other places.

What do I do with my existing non-Store app? Desktop Bridge is the answer

With the Desktop Bridge you can easily package your current desktop application or game as an .appx, distribute through the Windows Store and target all Windows Desktop devices including Windows 10 S to increase your user reach and easier monetization.

You can package any desktop application such as: WPF, WinForms, MFC, VB6, etc.

Once completed, your users will enjoy from smooth installation and update experiences: Clean, simple and fast install/uninstall updates via differential packages, streaming and many more.

Now you can also modernize your app with the Universal Windows Platform (UWP) to increase user engagement and reach all Windows devices.

We have a lot of customers that already went through the process such as: Kodi, Slack, Evernote, Adobe Photoshop Elements 15 and many others.

Here are few customers that shared their stories:

  1. MusiXmatch is the world’s largest lyrics platform with millions of lyrics available online and more than 50 million users on various platforms
  2. Tale of Wuxia (侠客风云传) is a traditional desktop Win32 role-playing game (RPG) that was created by Heluo Studio
  3. CLIP STUDIO PAINT is the leading paint tool software that supports creation of animation and manga

A quote from Evernote:

“The Desktop Bridge vastly simplifies our [Evernote] installer and uninstaller. It also opens up UWP APIs including Live Tiles and notifications. And having the full-featured Evernote app in the Windows Store means future improvements will reach users faster.”

—Seth Hitchings, VP Engineering, Evernote

What should I do next?

  1. Register as an app developer in the Windows Dev Center
  2. Prepare to package your application
  3. Sign up and get started using the Desktop Bridge
  4. Package your current desktop application as an .appx
  5. Test your Windows app for Windows 10 S, you can also check out this blog post for more details
  6. Submit your app to the Windows Store

Resources

Did you find this post helpful? Please let us know in the comments below—and also let us know if there’s anything else you’d like us to dig into for you about this topic.

Enjoy!

Introducing more shopping tips with Cortana in Microsoft Edge

With Cortana and Microsoft Edge, we hope to continue offering features that will help you save time and money when shopping online using the Microsoft Edge web browser. To that end, we recently released a pilot feature that helps find the best pricing for the product you are viewing. However, Cortana will only notify you if the relevant details are available at the time of your visit. We are just beginning to roll this out to everyone on Windows 10 Creators Update to get feedback. Currently the feature supports 14 retailers including Amazon, Walmart, and eBay, within the US. We will be increasing availability and the number of retailers we support in the months ahead, so stay tuned for more updates.

When you visit the site of a supported retailer, Cortana will alert you that there are other options available at a lower price for the same product.

 Once you click on the Cortana icon, the information will be displayed in the right pane within the same window.

How it works:

The feature works similar to current Cortana features where you see Cortana display notification in the address bar if there’s helpful information available for the site you’re on. When you visit the site of a supported retailer, Cortana will alert you that there are other options available at a lower price for the same product. Once you click on the Cortana icon, the information will be displayed in the right pane within the same window.

Let us know what you think about the feature. Your feedback is important as we continue to make improvements and add support for other sites.

Using color fonts for beautiful text and icons

In this post, we’ll introduce you to a text technology called color fonts. We’ll discuss what color fonts are, when they can be useful and how to use them in your Windows 10 apps.

What are color fonts?

Color fonts, also referred to as “multicolor fonts” or “chromatic fonts,” are a relatively new font technology that allows font designers to use multiple colors within each glyph of the font. Color fonts allow apps and websites to draw multicolored text with less code and more robust operating system support than ad-hoc techniques implemented above the text stack.

Most fonts for reading and writing—the fonts you are probably most familiar with—are not color fonts. These fonts define only the shape of the glyphs they contain, either with vector outlines or monochromatic bitmaps. At draw time, a text renderer fills the glyph shape using a single color (the “font color”) specified by the app or document being rendered.

Color fonts, on the other hand, contain color information in addition to shape information. Some approaches even allow fonts to include multiple color palettes, giving the font artistic flexibility. Color fonts typically include fallback information for platforms that do not support color fonts or for scenarios in which color functionality has been disabled. In those situations, color fonts are rendered as normal monochromatic fonts.

One color font you may be familiar with is Segoe UI Emoji—the default font used in Windows to display emoji. Below, you can see an example of a glyph from Segoe UI Emoji rendered in monochrome (left) and in color (right).

Why use color fonts?

Now that you know what color fonts are, let’s talk about how they can be useful.

Color fonts were originally designed to enable multicolored emoji in text communication scenarios. They excel at that task, but they are useful for other scenarios as well. Color fonts offer a way to implement rich text effects with the simplicity and functionality of regular fonts. To apps and the operating system, text rendered in a color font is the same as any other text: It can be copied and pasted, parsed by accessibility tools and so on.

Color fonts are a better alternative to raster graphics for rich text scenarios like website headers or document section titles. Although raster graphics are commonly used in these scenarios, they do not scale well to all display sizes, nor do they provide the same accessibility features as real text. If you find yourself frequently generating raster images of text from multicolored artwork, consider using a color font instead.

Color fonts can also be used for your app’s iconography. Some app developers prefer using icon fonts to standalone image files, due to the convenience and layout functionality offered by fonts. With color fonts, you can pack rich, scalable, full-color icons into a single icon font.

(Note: Starting in Windows 10 Creators Update, you can also achieve scalable vector iconography by using standalone SVG images directly in your XAML app. For more information, see Vector iconography: Using SVG images in your app.)

What kinds of color fonts does Windows support?

The OpenType specification defines several ways to embed color information in a font. Starting in Windows 10 Anniversary Update, Windows supports all of these approaches. The different approaches are summarized below.

Vector-based color fonts define glyph shapes using mathematical curves and lines. They may use the traditional font outline syntax coupled with color palettes (via OpenType’s ‘COLR’ and ‘CPAL’ tables), or they may use embedded SVG assets (via OpenType’s ‘SVG ’ table). These formats excel at representing most iconography compactly, and as vectors, they offer infinite scalability.

Bitmap-based color fonts define glyph shapes using embedded raster graphics, such as PNG images. They may use OpenType’s ‘CBDT’ and ‘CBLC’ tables, or they may use OpenType’s ‘sbix’ table. This approach makes it straightforward to control every pixel of a glyph’s shape and provide photorealistic content, but designers must provide multiple image sizes to ensure high-quality visual scaling.

Using color fonts

From both the developer’s perspective and the user’s perspective, color fonts are “just fonts.” They can be installed and uninstalled from the system in the same way as monochromatic fonts, they can be included in your app package as a local asset, or they can be used as a web font by your website.

In the XAML and Microsoft Edge frameworks, you can style just about any text with a color font in the same way as a regular font, and by default, your text will be rendered in color. However, if your app operates at a lower level and calls Direct2D APIs (or Win2D APIs) to render its text, then it must explicitly request color font rendering.

Using color fonts in XAML

The XAML platform’s text elements (like TextBlock, TextBox, RichEditBox, and FontIcon) support color fonts by default. Simply style your text with a color font, and the styled text will be rendered in color. The following code example shows how to style a TextBlock with a color font that has been packaged with your app assets. (The same technique applies to regular fonts.)


<TextBlock FontFamily="Assets/MyColorFont.otf#MyFontFamilyName">Here is some text.</TextBlock>

Applying a color font to a XAML TextBlock

The FontFamily property points to the relative location of a font file that has been added to the app package. Since a single font file may include multiple font families, you also need to specify the desired font family using the hash syntax illustrated above.

If you never want your XAML text element to render multicolor text, set its IsColorFontEnabled property to false. For example, you may choose to have your app render monochromatic text when accessibility features are enabled.

Using color fonts in Microsoft Edge

As with XAML, Edge supports rendering color fonts by default in websites and web apps, including the XAML WebView control. Simply use HTML and CSS to style your text with a color font, and the styled text will be rendered in color.

Using color fonts in Direct2D

In contrast to the UI frameworks, the lower-level graphics APIs, such as Direct2D and DirectWrite, do not render color glyphs by default. This is to avoid unexpected behavior changes in text-rendering apps that were designed prior to color font support.

If your app renders text with Direct2D’s DrawText and DrawTextLayout APIs, you must “opt in” to color glyph rendering. To do so, pass the D2D1_DRAW_TEXT_OPTIONS_ENABLE_COLOR_FONT flag to the relevant drawing method. The following code example shows how to call Direct2D’s DrawText method to render a string in a color font:


// If m_textFormat points to a font with color glyphs, then the following 
// call will render m_string using the color glyphs available in that font.
// Any monochromatic glyphs will be filled with m_defaultFillBrush.
m_deviceContext->DrawText(
    m_string->Data(),
    m_string->Length(),
    m_textFormat.Get(),
    m_layoutRect,
    m_defaultFillBrush.Get(),
    D2D1_DRAW_TEXT_OPTIONS_ENABLE_COLOR_FONT
    ); 

Drawing multicolored text with Direct2D’s DrawText method

Using color fonts in Win2D

Like Direct2D, Win2D’s text drawing APIs do not render color glyphs by default.

To opt in to color glyph rendering with Win2D, set the EnableColorFont options flag in the text format object your app passes to the text drawing method. The following code example shows how to render a string in a color font using Win2D:


// The text format that will be used to draw the text. (Declared elsewhere
// and initialized elsewhere by the app to point to a color font.)
CanvasTextFormat m_textFormat;

// Set the EnableColorFont option.
m_textFormat.Options = CanvasDrawTextOptions.EnableColorFont;

// If m_textFormat points to a font with color glyphs, then the following 
// call will render m_string using the color glyphs available in that font.
// Any monochromatic glyphs will be filled with m_color.
drawingSession.DrawText(
    m_string,
    m_point,
    m_color,
    m_textFormat
    );

Drawing multicolored text with Win2D’s DrawText method

Building OpenType SVG color fonts

Color fonts are a relatively recent development in font technology, so support among font-building tools is still in its early stages. Not all types of color font are supported by all font tools, but support continues to improve as color fonts gain popularity.

Building a font from scratch is a complex process, and it’s more than we can cover in this blog post. But color fonts aren’t just for professional type designers—if you’re an app or web designer with a monochromatic icon font, and you’d like to upgrade it to a color font, we’ve developed a small tool to help make the process easier: the OpenType SVG Font Editor.

This app lets you take an existing font and add color by embedding your own SVG artwork for each glyph using a simple drag-and-drop interface. SVG is a popular vector art format supported by tools like Adobe Illustrator and Inkscape. On platforms that support OpenType SVG fonts (like Windows apps, Edge and Firefox), the color glyphs are rendered. Other platforms will automatically fall back to the monochromatic glyphs. For more information, please see the OpenType SVG Font Editor’s GitHub page.

The tool was developed by a group of Microsoft interns on the Windows graphics team. We found the tool useful, so we’ve made it available as an open-source project for others to use and improve.

Conclusion

Color fonts are an exciting new technology that unlocks richer text scenarios than were previously possible without sacrificing platform support for accessibility, fallback, scalability, printing and complex font capabilities. For more information, please see the following resources:

Panasonic announces Toughbook 33 2-in-1 detachable laptop powered by Windows 10

Inspired by mobile professionals, it features a 3:2 display and is designed to meet MIL-STD-810G and IP65 standards to perform in even the most extreme conditions.

Panasonic Toughbook 33 2-in-1: Panasonic Toughbook 33 2-in-1 in attached flip mode

Panasonic Toughbook 33 2-in-1: Panasonic Toughbook 33 2-in-1 in attached flip mode

With Windows 10, this device arrives built-in with Cortana* – your digital personal assistant who can help you complete tasks, set reminders, and work across your devices more productively. For workers operating in extreme conditions, these hands-free options offer important flexibility. The touchscreen, 3:2 display and IP55 digitizer pen allow you to use Windows Ink for drawing or signature accuracy on the screen, as well as writing or highlighting web pages in Microsoft Edge, even in the toughest of weather conditions. You can also login quickly and securely with Windows Hello using either the infrared webcam with facial recognition or the fingerprint reader.

Panasonic Toughbook 33 Detached: Panasonic Toughbook 33 2-in-1 in detached mode showcasing keyboard and screen

Panasonic Toughbook 33 Detached: Panasonic Toughbook 33 2-in-1 in detached mode showcasing keyboard and screen

The Toughbook 33 2-in-1 laptop is built for maximum mobility with two twin hot-swappable batteries that provide 10 hours of battery life, or up to 20 with the Long Life Battery configuration – enough to ensure uptime for even the most demanding jobs. Tablet Mode in Windows 10 delivers a smooth, touch-first experience; your apps will scale smoothly, and onscreen features will adapt for easy navigation on this 2-in-1. This device provides six flexible usage modes, designed to ensure the device offers the flexibility today’s workers demand and offers two keyboards to choose from to accommodate the unique needs of mobile professionals.

Panasonic Toughbook 33: Panasonic Toughbook 33 folded in tablet mode with screen showing

Panasonic Toughbook 33: Panasonic Toughbook 33 folded in tablet mode with screen showing

Other features of the Panasonic Toughbook 33 with Windows 10 include: 

  • 1080p webcam and an 8MP rear camera
  • Up to 10 hours battery life, or up to 20 with the optional Long Life Battery configuration; twin-battery design for hot-swap battery replacement
  • 256GB SSD with heater (optional 512GB), 8GB onboard RAM (optional 16GB)
  • Choice of Barcode or Serial (true) or 2nd USB, Choice of Insertable SmartCard or Contactless Smartcard or Fingerprint readers
  • 12.0” 3:2 QHD 2160×1440 wide-view angle display with direct bonding, and a 1200 nit sunlight-viewable screen
  • Magnesium alloy chassis, MIL-STD-810G and IP65 all-weather design, in addition
  • Available with two different vehicle docks for new deployments: a tablet vehicle dock and a 2-in-1 vehicle dock. For Panasonic’s large customer installation base of Toughbook 31 vehicle docks, Panasonic is also offering a drop-in-replacement 31 Vehicle Dock Adapter (VDA) with removable Lite Keyboard.

Pricing and Availability: The Panasonic Toughbook 33 2-in-1 laptop with Windows 10 comes with the detachable Premium Keyboard for those looking for the flexibility of a 2-in-1, but can also be purchased as a tablet only. The Toughbook 33 will be available from authorized Panasonic resellers later this month starting around $3,649.

*Cortana available in select markets.

Windows 10 Tip: Import data from another browser to Microsoft Edge in one step

Here’s how to import your data:

Microsoft Edge displaying the Windows Blogs and showing the menu for importing data from another browser to Microsoft Edge

In Microsoft Edge, click on the three dots in the upper-right-hand corner, then on Settings.

Under “Import favorites and other info,” click the “Import from another browser” button. Then, choose the browser from which you’d like to move your data.*

Have a great week!

*Microsoft Edge can import browsing history, passwords, and other data only from Internet Explorer and Google Chrome. Favorites can be imported from Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer and 360.

Microsoft Education: Empowering students and teachers of today to create the world of tomorrow

We believe technology can inspire creativity in today’s classrooms, where the makers of tomorrow reside. This next generation of creators embrace technology as their first language; learn by collaborating and communicating with anyone in the world; and create with touch, command with voice, and conceptualize in 3D.

Preparing each of these creators for the jobs of tomorrow is one of our biggest societal challenges and greatest opportunities. Today, only 3% of college degrees in the US are in computer science and 65% of today’s students will have jobs that do not yet exist.

At Microsoft, our mission is to empower every person and organization on the planet to achieve more. As part of that mission, we believe technology can be used as a tool to empower students and teachers to create the world of tomorrow.

Introducing Windows 10 S – a new Windows experience inspired by teachers and students

Our mission with Windows is to build a platform that inspires creativity in each of us.

In the classroom, Windows is the leading education platform worldwide, as teachers choose it for rich creativity inspiring applications, like Autodesk SketchBook, Adobe Photoshop Elements, Minecraft, and the rich Office 365 (not the mobile experience), which is coming soon to the Windows Store. Teachers also choose Windows for rich peripheral support, including amazing new STEM lesson plans with Arduino boards, LEGO® Education WeDo® 2.0, tools to enable accessibility, virtual reality headsets, interactive whiteboards, and more.

To understand how we could do more, our teams traveled the world to talk with school administrators, teachers, and students using Windows in the classroom. Teachers were consistent—kids can get distracted easily and don’t always follow direction. They asked for their Windows to be more resilient to hundreds of different youthful kids interacting with each device during the school year, maintaining the same great battery life and fast login time on the first day of school as the last. On the administrator front, I recall how Ricardo Garmendia from the Renton School District described how his department supports 850 classrooms with 11,000 Windows devices—he was overwhelmed with the ongoing setup of new devices, and management of the current devices in the classroom.

Windows 10 S Start screen with education apps pinned to the Start menu

Windows 10 S is inspired by students and teachers, streamlined for simplicity, security and superior performance. I believe it best reflects the soul of Windows.

With Windows 10 S, all the applications which teachers and students download come from the Windows Store where they are first verified for security, and then locally they each run in a safe “container”, ensuring consistent performance of the system. In the classroom, this ensures fast login times and consistent performance, enabling everyone in the classroom to start learning quickly, and stay focused without distraction.

Windows 10 S can run any browser in the Windows Store. And we have been focused on making Microsoft Edge great for the classroom, ensuring compatibility with the sites educators use, like Google Docs. New features in Microsoft Edge like the new Tab Preview Bar make it easy for students to research and manage school projects. With Windows Ink in Microsoft Edge, students can easily make notes directly on a web page and share them with a classmate.

For Ricardo, and other school IT admins around the world, we also now have the Set Up School PC app in the Windows Store, enabling set up of entire classrooms of devices with customized experiences using a USB stick, in as little as 30 seconds per device. And with Microsoft Intune for Education – available today – we now have a complete end-to-end solution for teachers and schools to configure and manage all their student’s PCs.

With Windows 10 S, we’ve ensured that a teacher or administrator who understands the risks of downloading any app from the Internet, can do so. At any time, they can go to the Windows Store and switch to Windows 10 Pro. This is a one-way switch, as when a user is running Windows 10 Pro they can install anything—but this is the magic of the open Windows platform, which we plan to always continue to make available alongside Windows 10 S.

Inspired by teachers and students, Windows 10 S is a new Windows experience. I believe at its core, Windows 10 S is the soul of today’s Windows.

Windows 10 PCs for Education starting at $189

Our goal with Windows 10 S is to develop the open vibrant partner-centric ecosystem we have today. Our partners, including Acer, ASUS, Dell, Fujitsu, HP, Samsung, and Toshiba offer a range of new Windows 10 PCs for Education today –  starting at $189. In the coming months, these partners will offer a range of Windows 10 S devices—from powerful and affordable Windows Ink and touch PCs to beautiful premium devices.

I look forward to students all around the planet learning on these partner devices with Windows 10 S.

Microsoft Teams comes to the classroom

New classroom experiences in Microsoft Teams take collaboration to a whole new level – and make Teams the digital hub for teachers and students. Together with OneNote Class Notebooks and new assignment and quiz experiences, teachers can easily distribute content, grade work, personalize learning, and communicate with students, parents and staff.

New classroom experiences in Microsoft Teams take collaboration to a whole new level – and make Teams the digital hub for teachers and students.

Word, Excel, and PowerPoint Online already allow students to co-author documents in real time. And new classroom experiences in Microsoft Teams take collaboration to a whole new level – and make Teams the digital hub for teachers and students. Together with OneNote Class Notebooks and new assignment and quiz experiences, teachers can easily distribute content, grade work, personalize learning, and communicate with students, parents, and staff. Teams also enables teachers to bring in rich and engaging content from the web, guest speakers, and solutions from education partners like busuu, Canvas, Flipgrid, and Kahoot!. And most importantly, Teams helps students develop the communication and collaboration skills they’ll need to be successful in the future. To learn more about the new classroom experiences in Teams, visit the Office Blog.

Introducing Code Builder for Minecraft: Education Edition

Minecraft: Education Edition key art

What continues to amaze me about Minecraft is that a game that strikes such a deep connection with children has become such an important learning tool to teach teamwork, logical thinking, and problem-solving. Minecraft is not just one of the most popular video games in history — it is also revolutionizing education, with schools in more than 100 countries using Minecraft: Education Edition to promote creativity and collaboration in the classroom.

Today, we announced Code Builder for Minecraft: Education Edition, designed to inspire students to learn the basics and the power of coding by combining the open worlds of Minecraft with popular learn-to-code platforms such as Tynker, ScratchX and a new open source platform from Microsoft called MakeCode. Players can move around, build and create in Minecraft by writing code. To learn more about Code Builder for Minecraft: Education Edition visit, the Minecraft Education Blog.

Free offers for teachers and students

To make it easy and affordable to bring Windows 10, Office 365 for Education with Microsoft Teams, and Minecraft to the classroom, we are offering teachers and students:

  • New Windows 10 education PCs starting at $189
  • Free one-year subscription to Minecraft: Education Edition for new Windows 10 education PCs
  • Free Windows 10 S for all schools on their current Windows Pro PC
  • Free Microsoft Office 365 for Education with Microsoft Teams
  • Free trial of Microsoft Intune for Education

Free offers for Teachers and Students To make it easy and affordable to bring Windows 10, Office 365 for Education with Microsoft Teams and Minecraft to the classroom, we are offering teachers and students: • New Windows 10 education PCs starting at $189 • Free one-year subscription to Minecraft: Education Edition for new Windows 10 education PCs • Free Windows 10 S for all schools on any current Windows Pro PC • Free Microsoft Office 365 for Education with Microsoft Teams • Free trial of Microsoft Intune for Education

Windows 10 S, Office 365 for Education with Microsoft Teams, Minecraft: Education Edition, and Microsoft Intune for Education offer a complete solution for teachers and students—with none of the compromises of Chromebooks and G Suite.

Introducing Surface Laptop powered by Windows 10 S – available for pre-order today

When we built Windows 10 S, we saw an opportunity to not only bring streamlined performance, simplicity, and security to students and teachers in a K-12 environment but to scale to meet the needs of college students and beyond. So today, we’re also excited to announce the newest member of our Surface family – Surface Laptop.

Available for pre-order today in 20 countries, Surface Laptop is the perfect balance of portability, performance, and elegance. Powered by Windows 10 S, Surface Laptop has up to 14.5 hours of battery life* to take students through their day and is built to give students the same great performance through four years of college and beyond. We believe ideas will come to life on a 13.5” PixelSense screen with the power of 7th generation Intel core processors. The signature keyboard is covered in Alcantara® material and features a responsive keyset, large trackpad, and soft palm rest for a new level of typing comfort. Surface Laptop is available in four rich, tone-on-tone colors: Platinum, Burgundy, Cobalt Blue and Graphite Gold. To learn more about the new Surface Laptop visit, the Devices Blog.

Surface Laptop starts at $999 USD and will be available beginning on June 15.

Bringing 3D and Windows Mixed Reality experiences to the classroom to spark creativity

Mixed Reality can bring a whole new dimension to teaching and learning in the classroom. If anything makes me wish to be a student again, it’s mixed reality. With 3D and Windows Mixed Reality, we’re empowering educators with a whole new set of tools to create curriculums for their students and peers.

Today, we announced a new strategic partnership with Pearson, one of the largest education companies in the world, who is working to integrate 3D and mixed reality into their secondary and university level curriculum. By the school year 2018, Pearson will offer curriculum in health, commerce, history, and STEM, on all Windows Mixed Reality devices. In addition, we announced a new feature coming to Windows 10 this fall, called View Mixed Reality. This feature allows you to see 3D content through your screen into the real world as mixed reality, using a simple RGB camera.

Showing a new feature coming to Windows 10 this fall, called View Mixed Reality. This feature allows you to see 3D content through your screen into the real world as Mixed Reality, using a simple RGB camera.

A new feature coming to Windows 10 this fall, called View Mixed Reality. This feature allows you to see 3D content through your screen into the real world as mixed reality, using a simple RGB camera.

STEM Saturdays at Microsoft Store

We want all students and teachers to experience education experiences from Microsoft. Beginning this Saturday, May 6, Microsoft Store locations across the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and Australia will host STEM Saturdays throughout May in all full-line locations in addition to the range of free programs year-round that empower students and educators. STEM Saturdays bring pop-up classrooms to Microsoft Store and offer hands-on experiences like building a sensor that measures the flexion and extension of a finger to learn about the anatomy of a human hand.

We believe technology can be used as a tool to empower students and teachers to create the world of tomorrow.

We can’t wait for tomorrow.

Terry

*Testing conducted by Microsoft in April 2017 using pre-production Intel Core i5, 256GB, 8 GB RAM device. Testing consisted of full battery discharge during video playback. All settings were default except: Wi-Fi was associated with a network and Auto-Brightness disabled. Battery life varies with settings, usage, and other factors.

Windows 10 Tip: Keep track of your tabs with Microsoft Edge

It’s easy to lose track of what’s in your tabs, especially if you have many tabs open from the same site that all look alike. The new tab preview bar and “Set these tabs aside” features in Microsoft Edge with the Windows 10 Creators Update allow you to easily manage and navigate your tabs.

Keep track of your tabs with the new tab preview bar:

The new tab preview bar in the Windows 10 Creators Update gives you a visual preview of every tab you have open without leaving your page.

The new tab preview bar gives you a visual preview of every tab you have open without leaving your page. Quickly manage your tabs using the preview bar without waiting for the pages to load by clicking on this Tab preview bar in Microsoft Edge icon next to the open tabs. You can also scroll through the previews with touch, mouse wheel, or a touchpad.

Set tabs aside for later:

Microsoft Edge makes it easy to sweep aside all the tabs you have open into a collection that you can restore at any time. Just click the “Set these tabs aside” button on the upper left-hand corner of your browser. Click the button next to that to see tabs you’ve set aside, then click “Restore tabs” to jump back in.

Head over here to learn more about getting the best out of Microsoft Edge, and have a great week!

A Week with Microsoft Edge: The only browser to stream Netflix content in 4K

This week, we’ve shared a new video and blog post every day to introduce you to the best of Microsoft Edge, and, in our final post today, we’re talking all about entertainment.

Did you know Microsoft Edge is the only browser that enables you to stream 4k Ultra HD Netflix movies and TV shows*, and the only browser on Windows 10 to support Dolby Digital Plus audio format natively? We also designed Microsoft Edge to deliver more battery life when unplugged – without any special battery saving mode or changes to default settings – so you can stream content longer than on other browsers, giving you more time to binge-watch your favorite show without hunting for an outlet.

Here are some tips for getting the most out of entertainment with Microsoft Edge:

You can catch up on other blog posts in this week’s series below.

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<!–
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Thanks for tuning in this week to learn more about Microsoft Edge!

*4K Ultra HD exclusivity is limited to PC’s. 4K Ultra HD works in both Microsoft Edge and Netflix app. Only 7th Gen Intel Core processor devices can decrypt 4K DRM. Netflix Ultra HD plan required.

A Week with Microsoft Edge: The browser built for books and reading

Next up in our series, A Week with Microsoft Edge we’re talking about how the browser is built for books and reading. With the Windows 10 Creators Update, we’ve worked to make reading in Microsoft Edge a great experience and have expanded the type of content you can read right within the browser. You can read PDF files, the e-book file format EPUB and books you’ve downloaded from the Windows Store right within Microsoft Edge. You can also simplify the layout of web pages with Reading view, save pages to read later in your reading list, and more.

Here are some tips for a great reading experience in Microsoft Edge.

You can catch up on other blog posts in this week’s series below.

<!–
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<!–
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<!–
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Stay tuned this week for more on Microsoft Edge!

A Week with Microsoft Edge: Personalizing the web

Next up in our series, A Week with Microsoft Edge we’re sharing tips for personalizing the web. With so much time spent browsing the web, we all want an experience that feels personal and custom, and with Microsoft Edge it’s easy to do just that.

Here are some tips on how to personalize the web in Microsoft Edge.

In case you missed our previous blog posts, we kicked off a blog post series, A Week with Microsoft Edge earlier this week all about introducing you to the best of Microsoft Edge.

Here are some additional resources for personalizing the web in Microsoft Edge.

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<!–
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Stay tuned this week for more on Microsoft Edge!