Tag Archives: more

For Sale – FE Switches/HDD’s/PS4 ctrl/Amazon Fire tv + junk

Cleaning out some junk to make room for more junk. Prices do not include postage

PS4 Controller – basically brand new, used about 10 times at most, boxed – £30
Amazon dot – Bought from here about 2 weeks ago, prefer the google mini – £25
Fire tv Stick – owned for about a year, lost the plug, comes with everything else -£15
*2TB WD RE4 – Jan 2010 OOW – £20 Minor smart error (1D sector relocation) price adjusted
*2TB Seagate ST2000dm001 – Date: “15176” :confused: -£25. no errors, see below
*3TB WD Green – Jul 2011 OOW – £35 smart

Random Junk;
Dell powerconnect 3424 24p FE/100mb switch -£15
Cisco catalyst 2950 48p FE switch -£15
Bunch Of Scuzzy 320 10k drives, not sure exactly how many I’ve got – all come with HP DL drive caddies;
3-4 x 300GB – £15ea
1-4 x 146GB – £10ea
4 x 73GB -£7ea
NZXT 200mm Fan – £7
BT homehub 5b -£5
Random Sky Router and Switch, don’t even think it’s GBe, comes boxed though! ;) – £2

Modding stuff:

70m of 18AWG stranded wire(psu cables) – can cut to length if needed – £?
Plastic sleeving rolls, not sure how much is in here tbh. Red, black, red and black – £10ea
atx pin removers – £4ea
Cable Combs clear, 24p but you can snap then to 6p and 8p. Snug on 18awg sleeved, bit tight on 16awg with loose sleeving.
Random assortment of ATX connectors, EPS, 6/6+2/8P PCI-E, 20+4 ATX, 24P ATX £various
6-pin PCI-E extensions (£2ea)
Auto Adjusting Cable Strippers – £15
3x Quality Crimpers – £10 ea

More junk to come

Wanted

-intel Quad-core 6xxx or 7xxx, looking for something capable to encoding high bitrate 4k content. Something like a 6400ish. non-K and T/low power preferred but may consider others at a good price.
-16gb DDR4 2666+ RAM – For Ryzen OC’in so b-die ideally. Can trade my ballistix 2133mhz if downgrading
-240 NXZT X62 or H110.
-Google home Mini – Don’t really want to spend more than £30 on this, can trade for the dot + £5
-Ubiquity Unifi 24P non-POE switch, latest version and with warranty preferred. Interested in their USG as well.
-Node 202 case, white or black

Price and currency: As above
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG/Cash On Collection
Location: GLASGOW
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Roccat Kone EMP Mouse – Nearly brand new

I bought this mouse and used it for a couple hours and had to get another mouse more suited to my grip

Look at the reviews for this mouse, it is very well reviewed. Basically brand new

Price and currency: £48
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank transfer
Location: stoke on trent
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – FE Switches/HDD’s/PS4 ctrl/Amazon Fire tv + junk

Cleaning out some junk to make room for more junk. Prices do not include postage

PS4 Controller – basically brand new, used about 10 times at most, boxed – £30
Amazon dot – Bought from here about 2 weeks ago, prefer the google mini – £25
Fire tv Stick – owned for about a year, lost the plug, comes with everything else -£15
*2TB WD RE4 – Jan 2010 OOW – £20 Minor smart error (1D sector relocation) price adjusted
*2TB Seagate ST2000dm001 – Date: “15176” :confused: -£25. no errors, see below
*3TB WD Green – Jul 2011 OOW – £35 smart

Random Junk;
Dell powerconnect 3424 24p FE/100mb switch -£15
Cisco catalyst 2950 48p FE switch -£15
Bunch Of Scuzzy 320 10k drives, not sure exactly how many I’ve got – all come with HP DL drive caddies;
3-4 x 300GB – £15ea
1-4 x 146GB – £10ea
4 x 73GB -£7ea
NZXT 200mm Fan – £7
BT homehub 5b -£5
Random Sky Router and Switch, don’t even think it’s GBe, comes boxed though! ;) – £2

Modding stuff:

70m of 18AWG stranded wire(psu cables) – can cut to length if needed – £?
Plastic sleeving rolls, not sure how much is in here tbh. Red, black, red and black – £10ea
atx pin removers – £4ea
Cable Combs clear, 24p but you can snap then to 6p and 8p. Snug on 18awg sleeved, bit tight on 16awg with loose sleeving.
Random assortment of ATX connectors, EPS, 6/6+2/8P PCI-E, 20+4 ATX, 24P ATX £various
6-pin PCI-E extensions (£2ea)
Auto Adjusting Cable Strippers – £15
3x Quality Crimpers – £10 ea

More junk to come

Wanted

-intel Quad-core 6xxx or 7xxx, looking for something capable to encoding high bitrate 4k content. Something like a 6400ish. non-K and T/low power preferred but may consider others at a good price.
-16gb DDR4 2666+ RAM – For Ryzen OC’in so b-die ideally. Can trade my ballistix 2133mhz if downgrading
-240 NXZT X62 or H110.
-Google home Mini – Don’t really want to spend more than £30 on this, can trade for the dot + £5
-Ubiquity Unifi 24P non-POE switch, latest version and with warranty preferred. Interested in their USG as well.
-Node 202 case, white or black

Price and currency: As above
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG/Cash On Collection
Location: GLASGOW
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – FE Switches/HDD’s/PS4 ctrl/Amazon Dot+Fire tv + junk

Cleaning out some junk to make room for more junk. Prices do not include postage

PS4 Controller – basically brand new, used about 10 times at most, boxed – £30
Amazon dot – Bought from here about 2 weeks ago, prefer the google mini – £25
Fire tv Stick – owned for about a year, lost the plug, comes with everything else -£15
*2TB WD RE4 – Jan 2010 OOW – £25
*2TB Seagate ST2000dm001 – Date: “15176” :confused: -£25
*3TB WD Green – Jul 2011 OOW – £35
*Smart data inc this weekend

Random Junk;
Dell powerconnect 3424 24p FE/100mb switch -£15
Cisco catalyst 2950 48p FE switch -£15
Bunch Of Scuzzy 320 10k drives, not sure exactly how many I’ve got – all come with HP DL drive caddies;
3-4 x 300GB – £15ea
1-4 x 146GB – £10ea
4 x 73GB -£7ea
NZXT 200mm Fan – £7
BT homehub 5b -£5
Random Sky Router and Switch, don’t even think it’s GBe, comes boxed though! ;) – £2

Modding stuff:

70m of 18AWG stranded wire(psu cables) – can cut to length if needed – £?
Plastic sleeving rolls, not sure how much is in here tbh. Red, black, red and black – £10ea
atx pin removers – £4ea
Cable Combs clear, 24p but you can snap then to 6p and 8p. Snug on 18awg sleeved, bit tight on 16awg with loose sleeving.
Random assortment of ATX connectors, EPS, 6/6+2/8P PCI-E, 20+4 ATX, 24P ATX £various
6-pin PCI-E extensions (£2ea)
Auto Adjusting Cable Strippers – £15
3x Quality Crimpers – £10 ea

More junk to come

Wanted

-intel Quad-core 6xxx or 7xxx, looking for something capable to encoding high bitrate 4k content. Something like a 6400ish. non-K and T/low power preferred but may consider others at a good price.
-16gb DDR4 2666+ RAM – For Ryzen OC’in so b-die ideally. Can trade my ballistix 2133mhz if downgrading
-240 NXZT X62 or H110.
-Google home Mini – Don’t really want to spend more than £30 on this, can trade for the dot + £5
-Ubiquity Unifi 24P non-POE switch, latest version and with warranty preferred. Interested in their USG as well.
-Node 202 case, white or black

Price and currency: As above
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG/Cash On Collection
Location: GLASGOW
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

How to craft a data archiving strategy for 95% of your data

Reality can’t be ignored. In most data centers, 80% or more of stored data hasn’t been accessed in more than a year. Tighten that time frame up, and we find 95% of data has not been accessed in the last 90 days. That means the vast majority of data just sits on that expensive and speedy flash array you bought to serve active data.

The problem is most IT professionals hesitate to take an aggressive step such as moving 95% of their data to a secondary storage tier. But the truth is, with proper design, IT can reach this goal with few complaints. Here are four basic rules that will get you on your way:

Rule No. 1: Archive response can be almost as fast as primary

Your data archiving strategy should rely on storage using high-capacity HDDs, assisted by deduplication and compression, to drive as much cost out of the archive storage tier as possible. While all those technologies could affect data recall performance, in most cases, a recall from a properly designed active archive is almost as fast as primary storage.

That’s because primary storage is responding to hundreds, if not hundreds of thousands, of recall requests per second, while an archive typically responds to one or two per hour. Archives are usually busier dealing with inbound write traffic than old data being accessed. With less I/Os to respond to, disk-based archive storage can respond to individual requests almost as fast as primary storage. Note, though, that archives don’t have to respond as fast as primary storage, they just have to respond fast enough that users won’t notice the difference.

Rule No. 2: Don’t archive everything on day one

With an archive strategy in place, the only reason to buy more primary storage is to gain performance, not capacity.

IT has, with good reason, developed a distrust of everything. Archive software vendors and, especially, hardware vendors brag about ROIs showing data archiving strategy investments paying for themselves 30 seconds after installation. The problem is to get this rapid ROI, customers must buy 100 TB of archive or secondary storage and move 80% to 95% of their data as soon as the archive platform is stood up. Any IT professional worth their certifications isn’t going to do that. There’s no need. The primary storage that holds all this old data is bought and paid for, and most vendors aren’t going to let you send back half of a storage array for a refund.

A more logical data archiving strategy is to archive data on an as-needed basis — typically, as those primary systems come off of maintenance, have reached end of life or are full to the point that more capacity or another primary storage system must be purchased. You’ll want to know how much of the data on that array can be archived. With that information, you should buy just that amount of storage from your archive vendor, enabling you to put off the purchase of a primary storage system or to run a much smaller high-performance storage system. With an archive strategy in place, the only reason to buy more primary storage is to gain performance, not capacity.

Rule No. 3: Transparent recall may or may not be critical

If an aggressive data archiving strategy — such as archiving 80% of primary storage — is followed, then prepare for more frequent data recalls from users. Considering the gradual move to archive storage described in rule No. 2, however, recalls may not be a frequent as you’d expect.

First, make sure most of those recalls can occur without IT interruption. That means you need to select software that can set transparent links between where the file used to be and where it is on the archive. It’s also important to remember the archive might be multistep, on-premises disk to tape or on-premises disk to the cloud, which means that these links must be updated with the file location each time it moves to another storage device.

The other side of the coin in transparent recalls is setting up an apparatus in the architecture that has stub files or a centralized metadata control layer. Like any apparatus, there’s a certain amount of rigidity to this control layer, including a potential management issue with stub files and a certain amount of lock-in to the data management vendor. You must decide if the downsides of transparent recall are worth the upside.

Rule No. 4: Expect more frequent recalls

If your organization goes all-in with a 95% data archiving strategy or evolves to that point, be prepared for more recalls. Whether recalls are done transparently or manually because of the lack of the transparent recall component, you can now measure them in dozens per hour. The higher the recall rate, the more you’ll want to lean toward a disk-based archive, either exclusively or as a front end to tape.

If most of the archive is disk-based, a high recall rate shouldn’t affect performance. At the very least, the front end of the archive should be disk- or cloud-based. Tape, if used at all, should either serve as the deep archive or solely as a backup to the archive. While tape is a robust and reliable technology, its role in a data archiving system as that archive becomes more active requires more planning.

Don’t go on a data archiving strategy diet

No question, 95% of your data is likely eligible for archiving. Archiving shouldn’t be looked at as a storage diet that’s done every so often.  Instead, it’s an organizational change that occurs gradually and, once fully applied, never stops. Data should constantly flow through your enterprise from primary storage to archive storage, and occasionally back to primary.

Tintri storage solves healthcare firm’s primary and DR needs

Before settling on Tintri storage to handle more than 40 million files, Cross Country Healthcare used more than a half dozen systems for primary and secondary data. None of them fit quite right.

Cross Country Healthcare, a healthcare staffing company based in Boca Raton, Fla., had arrays spread across its branch and regional offices before consolidating production and data protection to reduce its IT footprint.

Cross Country used three NetApp filers to handle about 42 million files, one EMC VNX and one EMC XtremIO all-flash array for other primary data, along with a couple of EMC Data Domains and a Dell Compellent array for backup.

Each of the storage systems had its own problems, said Jason Bourque, vice president of infrastructure at Cross Country Healthcare. He said the NetApp arrays didn’t scale well enough to keep up with heavily virtualized workloads, Cross Country lacked the in-house experience to manage the VNX, and the Dell EMC XtremIO was too expensive.

“We needed to start over [because] I was dealing with disparate technologies across different platforms,” Bourque said. “We were trying to get away from the old point-to-point architecture. So we started to think about what our storage backbone should be.”

Tintri storage to the rescue

Tintri developed its storage arrays specifically for VMware virtualized workloads, making it a good fit for the 100% virtualized healthcare staffing firm. Bourque said Cross Country bought its first Tintri storage system in 2015 and moved all production workloads over to the new Tintri T850 array, consolidating five platforms into one.

Cross Country now has more than 400 virtual machines running on Tintri flash storage to handle production workloads. The Tintri arrays provide storage for Microsoft SQL databases and front-office applications, 80 branch offices and more than 10 regional locations. Tintri’s VM Scale-out software pools storage across its VMstore arrays and Tintri Analytics helps with capacity planning.

We were trying to get away from the old point-to-point architecture. So we started to think about what our storage backbone should be.
Jason Bourquevice president of infrastructure, Cross Country Healthcare

Two years after standardizing production on Tintri storage, the healthcare staffing provider implemented a new data protection and disaster recovery project. Initially, Cross Country moved off of the Data Domain and Compellent systems to ExaGrid disk backup. The firm used Veeam Software for agent-based backups to an ExaGrid library, and then replicated to another ExaGrid system at a secondary disaster recovery site. The primary site was in Miami with the secondary site in Atlanta.

But backing up more than 50 systems with large data sets caused a long lag time in sending all the large blocks of data to the recovery site.

“It took two weeks to get data to the recovery site,” Bourque said. “We were putting ourselves at risk. In order to back up, we used Veeam that sent backups to the ExaGrid storage and then it was replicated to another ExaGrid. We had so much data that [we did] snapshots each day and sent them to the backup site. It would take two weeks to move the large blocks of data.”

Bourque said Cross Country bought a new Tintri VMstore array for its primary data center and moved one of the older systems to the Atlanta DR site in March 2017. Now it replicates between the Tintri storage arrays, reducing its recovery point objective from two weeks to less than a day.

“We snapshot once a day,” he said, “so our recovery time is within 24 hours. Tintri knows the block-level changes so it only sends the changed data. We continue to use Veeam and ExaGrid to archive data.”

Cross Country Healthcare now is working on turning its virtualized infrastructure into a private cloud setup. Tintri has repositioned itself as a cloud service platform with its Tintri Enterprise Cloud EC6000 Series.

“We have a cloud-first approach,” Bourque said. “I don’t want to deal with anything that is two versions behind. We want to put ourselves completely in the cloud.”

Wanted – MacBook Air 13.3

Hi True Romance,

As discussed, I have a Macbook Air for sale. It unfortunately is more than 2 years old, but is in really good condition. It is a refurb model from OCM, which I ordered on 9 October 2017. It therefore still has the remainder of the 6 months warranty that you get with OCM to give you a piece of mind.

Just for info, this actually I received after my first Mac ended up developing a faulty keyboard. OCM were very good at getting out a replacement which is actually better than the one I did have.

It doesn’t say what year, but it’s almost certainly either later 2013 or early 2014.

It does not have the original box, but I have the box it came in and it will be very well packaged up.

Comes with PAT tested magnetic charger.

Spec is Core i7 1.7 Ghz, 8Gb RAM, 250 Gb SSD, Intel Graphics 5000.

If you were to buy it, I will also chuck in a laptop sleeve (its from an HP Spectre, but it does the job and it’s not at all obvious that its HP!), and if you like, I will chuck in the £6 Mini Display Port to Display Port cable. Using that, I was able to connect to my 21:9 monitor and display 2560×1080 natively which was very nice! I’m assured it will happily go up to 3440×1440.

I’d be looking to get about £500 for it including RMSD.

Let me know if you are interested.

Wanted – MacBook Air 13.3

Hi True Romance,

As discussed, I have a Macbook Air for sale. It unfortunately is more than 2 years old, but is in really good condition. It is a refurb model from OCM, which I ordered on 9 October 2017. It therefore still has the remainder of the 6 months warranty that you get with OCM to give you a piece of mind.

Just for info, this actually I received after my first Mac ended up developing a faulty keyboard. OCM were very good at getting out a replacement which is actually better than the one I did have.

It doesn’t say what year, but it’s almost certainly either later 2013 or early 2014.

It does not have the original box, but I have the box it came in and it will be very well packaged up.

Comes with PAT tested magnetic charger.

Spec is Core i7 1.7 Ghz, 8Gb RAM, 250 Gb SSD, Intel Graphics 5000.

If you were to buy it, I will also chuck in a laptop sleeve (its from an HP Spectre, but it does the job and it’s not at all obvious that its HP!), and if you like, I will chuck in the £6 Mini Display Port to Display Port cable. Using that, I was able to connect to my 21:9 monitor and display 2560×1080 natively which was very nice! I’m assured it will happily go up to 3440×1440.

I’d be looking to get about £500 for it including RMSD.

Let me know if you are interested.