Tag Archives: Tablet

For Sale – REDUCED Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet

Summary from Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories:

  • Two sensors for pen and multi-touch input. Battery-free and ergonomic pen with two buttons
  • Support of multi-touch gestures to scroll, zoom, rotate and more
  • Pressure-sensitive pen tip and eraser for natural feel. Paper-like tablet surface with 16:10 aspect ratio
  • Improved resolution for high accuracy. Four customisable ExpressKeys for quick function access

Only used it a few times. It works perfectly well and actually impressed me, but it’s just not for me. I’ve kept it in its box ever since, condition is absolutely mint. Comes with driver software on CD and a download code for Photoshop Elements 8 and ArtRage 3.0, but cannot guarantee that the code is still valid.

I just plugged the tablet into my Mac and it worked straight away, essentially giving me a large touchpad that can be used just with fingers as well, with the 4 buttons on the side acting as left and right mouse buttons. Obviously the idea is to use this with the pen, which is pressure sensitive and has two more buttons, but just to say that this thing is flexible.

tablet.jpg

box.jpg

Price and currency: £35
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG, BT, cash
Location: Twickenham
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – REDUCED Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet

Summary from Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories:

  • Two sensors for pen and multi-touch input. Battery-free and ergonomic pen with two buttons
  • Support of multi-touch gestures to scroll, zoom, rotate and more
  • Pressure-sensitive pen tip and eraser for natural feel. Paper-like tablet surface with 16:10 aspect ratio
  • Improved resolution for high accuracy. Four customisable ExpressKeys for quick function access

Only used it a few times. It works perfectly well and actually impressed me, but it’s just not for me. I’ve kept it in its box ever since, condition is absolutely mint. Comes with driver software on CD and a download code for Photoshop Elements 8 and ArtRage 3.0, but cannot guarantee that the code is still valid.

I just plugged the tablet into my Mac and it worked straight away, essentially giving me a large touchpad that can be used just with fingers as well, with the 4 buttons on the side acting as left and right mouse buttons. Obviously the idea is to use this with the pen, which is pressure sensitive and has two more buttons, but just to say that this thing is flexible.

Price and currency: £35
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG, BT, cash
Location: Twickenham
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – REDUCED Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet

Summary from Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories:

  • Two sensors for pen and multi-touch input. Battery-free and ergonomic pen with two buttons
  • Support of multi-touch gestures to scroll, zoom, rotate and more
  • Pressure-sensitive pen tip and eraser for natural feel. Paper-like tablet surface with 16:10 aspect ratio
  • Improved resolution for high accuracy. Four customisable ExpressKeys for quick function access

Only used it a few times. It works perfectly well and actually impressed me, but it’s just not for me. I’ve kept it in its box ever since, condition is absolutely mint. Comes with driver software on CD and a download code for Photoshop Elements 8 and ArtRage 3.0, but cannot guarantee that the code is still valid.

I just plugged the tablet into my Mac and it worked straight away, essentially giving me a large touchpad that can be used just with fingers as well, with the 4 buttons on the side acting as left and right mouse buttons. Obviously the idea is to use this with the pen, which is pressure sensitive and has two more buttons, but just to say that this thing is flexible.

Price and currency: £35
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG, BT, cash
Location: Twickenham
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – REDUCED Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet

Summary from Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories:

  • Two sensors for pen and multi-touch input. Battery-free and ergonomic pen with two buttons
  • Support of multi-touch gestures to scroll, zoom, rotate and more
  • Pressure-sensitive pen tip and eraser for natural feel. Paper-like tablet surface with 16:10 aspect ratio
  • Improved resolution for high accuracy. Four customisable ExpressKeys for quick function access

Only used it a few times. It works perfectly well and actually impressed me, but it’s just not for me. I’ve kept it in its box ever since, condition is absolutely mint. Comes with driver software on CD and a download code for Photoshop Elements 8 and ArtRage 3.0, but cannot guarantee that the code is still valid.

I just plugged the tablet into my Mac and it worked straight away, essentially giving me a large touchpad that can be used just with fingers as well, with the 4 buttons on the side acting as left and right mouse buttons. Obviously the idea is to use this with the pen, which is pressure sensitive and has two more buttons, but just to say that this thing is flexible.

Price and currency: £35
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG, BT, cash
Location: Twickenham
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – REDUCED Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet

Summary from Wacom Bamboo Fun Small Graphics Tablet: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories:

  • Two sensors for pen and multi-touch input. Battery-free and ergonomic pen with two buttons
  • Support of multi-touch gestures to scroll, zoom, rotate and more
  • Pressure-sensitive pen tip and eraser for natural feel. Paper-like tablet surface with 16:10 aspect ratio
  • Improved resolution for high accuracy. Four customisable ExpressKeys for quick function access

Only used it a few times. It works perfectly well and actually impressed me, but it’s just not for me. I’ve kept it in its box ever since, condition is absolutely mint. Comes with driver software on CD and a download code for Photoshop Elements 8 and ArtRage 3.0, but cannot guarantee that the code is still valid.

I just plugged the tablet into my Mac and it worked straight away, essentially giving me a large touchpad that can be used just with fingers as well, with the 4 buttons on the side acting as left and right mouse buttons. Obviously the idea is to use this with the pen, which is pressure sensitive and has two more buttons, but just to say that this thing is flexible.

Price and currency: £35
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG, BT, cash
Location: Twickenham
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Configure your app to start at log-in

For a long time, desktop PC users have been able to configure Win32 apps to start at startup or user log-in. This has also been possible for Desktop Bridge apps since the Windows 10 Anniversary Update (v10.0.14393.0). We’ve now extended this feature to allow regular Universal Windows Apps to take part in this also. This is available in Insider builds from Build 16226 onwards, along with the corresponding SDK. In this post, we’ll look at the code changes you need to make in your manifest and in your App class to handle the startup scenario, and how your app can work with the user to respect their choices.

Here’s a sample app, called TestStartup – the app offers a button to request enabling the startup behavior, and reports current status. Typically, you’d put this kind of option into a settings page of some kind in your app.

The first thing to note is that you must use the windows.startupTask Extension in your app manifest under the Extensions node, which is a child of the Application node. This is documented here. The same Extension declaration is used for both Desktop Bridge and regular UWP apps – but there are some differences.

  • Desktop Bridge is only available on Desktop, so it uses a Desktop-specific XML namespace. The new UWP implementation is designed for use generally on UWP, so it uses a general UAP namespace (contract version 5) – although to be clear, it is currently still only actually available on Desktop.
  • The Desktop Bridge EntryPoint must be “Windows.FullTrustApplication,” whereas for regular UWP it is the fully-qualified namespace name of your App class.
  • Desktop Bridge apps can set the Enabled attribute to true, which means that the app will start at startup without the user having to manually enable it. Conversely, for regular UWP apps this attribute is ignored, and the feature is implicitly set to “disabled.” Instead, the user must first launch the app, and the app must request to be enabled for startup activation.
  • For Desktop Bridge apps, multiple startupTask Extensions are permitted, each one can use a different Executable. Conversely, for regular UWP apps, you would have only one Executable and one startupTask Extension.
Desktop Bridge App UWP App

xmlns:desktop="http://schemas.microsoft.com/
appx/manifest/desktop/windows10"


xmlns:uap5="http://schemas.microsoft.com/
appx/manifest/uap/windows10/5"


<desktop:Extension
  Category="windows.startupTask"
  Executable="MyDesktopBridgeApp.exe"
  EntryPoint="Windows.FullTrustApplication">
  <desktop:StartupTask
    TaskId="MyStartupId"
    Enabled="false"
    DisplayName="Lorem Ipsum" />
</desktop:Extension>


<uap5:Extension
  Category="windows.startupTask"
  Executable="TestStartup.exe"
  EntryPoint="TestStartup.App">
  <uap5:StartupTask
    TaskId="MyStartupId"
    Enabled="false"
    DisplayName="Lorem Ipsum" />
</uap5:Extension>

For both Desktop Bridge apps and regular UWP apps, the user is always in control, and can change the Enabled state of your startup app at any time via the Startup tab in Task Manager:

Also for both app types, the app must be launched at least once before the user can change the Disabled/Enabled state. This is potentially slightly confusing: if the user doesn’t launch the app and then tries to change the state to Enabled in Task Manager, this will seem to be set. However, if they then close Task Manager and re-open it, they will see that the state is still Disabled. What’s happening here is that Task Manager is correctly persisting the user’s choice of the Enabled state – but this won’t actually allow the app to be activated at startup unless and until the app is launched at least once first – hence the reason it is reported as Disabled.

In your UWP code, you can request to be enabled for startup. To do this, use the StartupTask.GetAsync method to initialize a StartupTask object (documented here) – passing in the TaskId you specified in the manifest – and then call the RequestEnableAsync method. In the test app, we’re doing this in the Click handler for the button. The return value from the request is the new (possibly unchanged) StartupTaskState.


async private void requestButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    StartupTask startupTask = await StartupTask.GetAsync("MyStartupId");
    switch (startupTask.State)
    {
        case StartupTaskState.Disabled:
            // Task is disabled but can be enabled.
            StartupTaskState newState = await startupTask.RequestEnableAsync();
            Debug.WriteLine("Request to enable startup, result = {0}", newState);
            break;
        case StartupTaskState.DisabledByUser:
            // Task is disabled and user must enable it manually.
            MessageDialog dialog = new MessageDialog(
                "I know you don't want this app to run " +
                "as soon as you sign in, but if you change your mind, " +
                "you can enable this in the Startup tab in Task Manager.",
                "TestStartup");
            await dialog.ShowAsync();
            break;
        case StartupTaskState.DisabledByPolicy:
            Debug.WriteLine(
                "Startup disabled by group policy, or not supported on this device");
            break;
        case StartupTaskState.Enabled:
            Debug.WriteLine("Startup is enabled.");
            break;
    }
}

Because Desktop Bridge apps have a Win32 component, they run with a lot more power than regular UWP apps generally. They can set their StartupTask(s) to be Enabled in the manifest and do not need to call the API. For regular UWP apps, the behavior is more constrained, specifically:

  • The default is Disabled, so in the normal case, the user must run the app at least once explicitly – this gives the app the opportunity to request to be enabled.
  • When the app calls RequestEnableAsync, this will show a user-prompt dialog for UWP apps (or if called from a UWP component in a Desktop Bridge app from the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update onwards).
  • StartupTask includes a Disable method. If the state is Enabled, the app can use the API to set it to Disabled. If the app then subsequently requests to enable again, this will also trigger the user prompt.
  • If the user disables (either via the user prompt, or via the Task Manager Startup tab), then the prompt is not shown again, regardless of any requests from the app. The app can of course devise its own user prompts, asking the user to make manual changes in Task Manager – but if the user has explicitly disabled your startup, you should probably respect their decision and stop pestering them. In the sample code above, the app is responding to DisabledByUser by popping its own message dialog – you can obviously do this if you want, but it should be emphasized that there’s a risk you’ll just annoy the user.
  • If the feature is disabled by local admin or group policy, then the user prompt is not shown, and startup cannot be enabled. The existing StartupTaskState enum has been extended with a new value, DisabledByPolicy. When the app sees DisabledByPolicy, it should avoid re-requesting that their task be enabled, because the request will never be approved until the policy changes.
  • Platforms other than Desktop that don’t support startup tasks also report DisabledByPolicy.

Where a request triggers a user-consent prompt (UWP apps only), the message includes the DisplayName you specified in your manifest. This prompt is not shown if the state is DisabledByUser or DisabledByPolicy.

If your app is enabled for startup activation, you should handle this case in your App class by overriding the OnActivated method. Check the IActivatedEventArgs.Kind to see if it is ActivationKind.StartupTask, and if so, case the IActivatedEventArgs to a StartupTaskActivatedEventArgs. From this, you can retrieve the TaskId, should you need it. In this test app, we’re simply passing on the ActivationKind as a string to MainPage.


protected override void OnActivated(IActivatedEventArgs args)
{
    Frame rootFrame = Window.Current.Content as Frame;
    if (rootFrame == null)
    {
        rootFrame = new Frame();
        Window.Current.Content = rootFrame;
    }

    string payload = string.Empty;
    if (args.Kind == ActivationKind.StartupTask)
    { 
        var startupArgs = args as StartupTaskActivatedEventArgs;
        payload = ActivationKind.StartupTask.ToString();
    }

    rootFrame.Navigate(typeof(MainPage), payload);
    Window.Current.Activate();
}

Then, the MainPage OnNavigatedTo override tests this incoming string and uses it to report status in the UI.


protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
{
    string payload = e.Parameter as string;
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(payload))
    {
        activationText.Text = payload;

        if (payload == "StartupTask")
        {
            requestButton.IsEnabled = false;
            requestResult.Text = "Enabled";
            SolidColorBrush brush = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Gray);
            requestResult.Foreground = brush;
            requestPrompt.Foreground = brush;
        }
    }
}

Note that when your app starts at startup, it will start minimized in the taskbar. In this test app, when brought to normal window mode, the app reports the ActivationKind and StartupTaskState:

Using the windows.startupTask manifest Extension and the StartupTask.RequestEnableAsync API, your app can be configured to start at user log-in. This can be useful for apps which the user expects to use heavily, and the user has control over this – but it is still a feature that you should use carefully. You should not use the feature if you don’t reasonably expect the user to want it for your app – and you should avoid repeatedly prompting them once they’ve made their choice. The inclusion of a user-prompt puts the user firmly in control, which is an improvement over the older Win32 model.

Sample Code here.

How to Restart your App Programmatically

For some apps (especially games) it is not uncommon for the app to get into a state where it needs to restart – perhaps after a license update, after installing downloadable content, its caches have become corrupt or unwieldy, or for any other reason where the app needs to refresh state from scratch. In earlier releases, your only option would have been to prompt the user to close and relaunch, or to call CoreApplication.Exit – and both options provide sub-optimal user experience.

We have therefore introduced a new API that enables an app to request immediate termination and restart, and to pass arbitrary arguments into the fresh instance. In this post, we’ll look at how this works and how you can build it into your app. This is available now in Insider builds from Build 16226 onwards, along with the corresponding SDK.

Here’s a sample app, called TestRestart. 

The app provides a ListView of cities on the left, the currently-selected city on the right and a TextBox for providing arguments to the app when it is restarted. When the user taps the Request Restart button, the app will terminate and restart itself, passing in the supplied arguments. The new API, RequestRestartAsync, is exposed as a static method on the CoreApplication object. It takes a string parameter, which can be any string value you like – including input from the user or another external entity. If you do choose to accept input in this way, it is your responsibility to validate it correctly to make sure it conforms to whatever constraints you choose to impose. You should do this validation on input, before passing it to RequestRestartAsync. In this sample app, we’re expecting the user to type in the name of a city.


async private void DoRestartRequest()
{
    bool isValidPayload = false;
    string payload = restartArgs.Text;
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(payload))
    {
        foreach (ImageViewModel imageItem in imageListView.Items)
        {
            if (imageItem.Name == payload)
            {
                isValidPayload = true;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    if (isValidPayload)
    {
        AppRestartFailureReason result =
            await CoreApplication.RequestRestartAsync(payload);
        if (result == AppRestartFailureReason.NotInForeground ||
            result == AppRestartFailureReason.RestartPending ||
            result == AppRestartFailureReason.Other)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("RequestRestartAsync failed: {0}", result);
        }
    }
}

To mitigate privacy concerns, an app is only permitted to restart itself if it is in the foreground at the time it makes the request. When the app restarts, it restarts with normal UI – that is, as a normal foreground window. If we were to permit a background task or minimized app to restart, the result would be unexpected to the user. This is why the API is framed as a request. If the request is denied, the app would need to handle the failure – perhaps by waiting until it is in the foreground and trying again. If you were to request a restart and then through some twist of logic managed to request it again before the system started the operation, then you’d get the RestartPending result, although this is an edge case. You’re unlikely to ever get the other result – unless something goes wrong in the platform.

Note that this is the only significant constraint, but you should use this API carefully. For example, you probably should not use it if your app was not originally launched by the user – for example, if it was launched as the result of a share or picker operation. Restarting in the middle of one of those contract operations would certainly confuse the user.

If the request is granted, the app is terminated and then restarted. There are many different ways to activate an app: in addition to a regular launch activation, apps can choose to support file activation, protocol activation, share or picker activation and so on. The list is documented here. For the restart case, the app will be activated as a regular launch – just as if the user had closed the app manually and tapped its tile to launch it again – but including the arbitrary arguments supplied earlier (if any).

In your App class, you should handle this by overriding the OnActivated method. Test the ActivationKind, and if it’s ActivationKind.Launch, then the incoming IActivatedEventArgs will be a LaunchActivatedEventArgs. From this, you can get hold of the incoming activation arguments. For a regular user-initiated launch, the Arguments will be empty, so if it’s not empty you could simply infer that this is a restart activation. You can also check the PreviousExecutionState, which for a restart operation will be set to Terminated.

Although the arguments might have originated from an untrusted source (eg, the user), you should have done the validation before requesting restart. If so, you can consider them trustworthy when you receive them in OnActivated.


protected override void OnActivated(IActivatedEventArgs args)
{
    switch (args.Kind)
    {
        case ActivationKind.Launch:
            LaunchActivatedEventArgs launchArgs = args as LaunchActivatedEventArgs;
            string argString = launchArgs.Arguments;

            Frame rootFrame = Window.Current.Content as Frame;
            if (rootFrame == null)
            {
                rootFrame = new Frame();
                Window.Current.Content = rootFrame;
            }
            rootFrame.Navigate(typeof(MainPage), argString);
            Window.Current.Activate();
            break;
    }
}

What you do with the incoming arguments is entirely up to you. In this app, we’re simply passing them on to the MainPage. In the MainPage in turn, we have an override of OnNavigatedTo which uses the string to select an item in the ListView:


protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)

{
    string payload = e.Parameter as string;
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(payload))
    {
        foreach (ImageViewModel imageItem in imageListView.Items)
        {
            if (imageItem.Name == payload)
            {
                imageListView.SelectedItem = imageItem;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

As you can see, the CoreApplication.RequestRestartAsync method is a simple API. You can use it to terminate your app immediately, and have it restart as if by user action, with the additional option of passing in arbitrary arguments on activation.

Sample Code here.

Windows Store: video trailers, improved Store listings, advanced sales, and other new capabilities

At Build 2017, the Windows Store announced the initial availability of several features. Today, I want to share with you that all accounts have access to these features:

  • More ways to promote your apps and drive user acquisition
  • More ways to manage schedules, prices and sales
  • Debug your apps more effectively by using CAB files
  • Use Dev Center through a modern and efficient dashboard experience

Important: If you have a submission in progress, publish it (or delete it) and your next submission will show these new pricing, sales and store listing options. Also, if you use the Windows Store submission API, be sure to read the info at the bottom of this post.

More ways to promote your apps and drive user acquisition

Many of you told us that video trailers are one of the best ways to attract customers. You can now upload up to 15 trailers to use in your Store listing. When using trailers, make sure to also include the 1920 x 1080 pixel image (16:9) in the promotional images section, which shows up after the video stops playing. Feedback from other developers using videos has been very positive, try them out!

Video trailer as shown in the Store – see it in action here on a Windows 10 PC

Creating and updating Store listings used to take many steps per language and could take hours for a submission with listings in many languages. You can now update all Store listing content (description, images, keywords, etc.), by importing and exporting your listings, reducing the update time to just a few minutes.

Export and import of store listings – Submission overview page

More ways to manage prices and sales

 When a customer makes their first purchase, we’ve found that they typically continue to purchase more add-ons in that initial app or game, as well as in other products in the Store. The new pricing and availability page gives you additional options to drive users to that first purchase:

Schedule when your app or game will be visible (as long as the submission happens with enough time to process—we recommend at least three days in advance). You have the option to specify the schedule when your app should become available and discoverable in the Store, as well as a date when it should no longer be available for new acquisitions.

 Schedule availability – pricing and availability page

Schedule price changes in advance. For example, change the base price a month after the app has been published.

Schedule price changes – pricing and availability page

There are many more options to configure sales, including using percentage values (such as “30% off”), viewing sales options in the currency that makes sense to you, configuring sales globally or for specific markets, offering discounts to customers that own one of your other apps (for example “50% off if you own this other game”) and the ability to target a discount to a segment of customers (such as those that have not made any Store purchases so far).

Sales drive purchases, so try them out!

Configure sales – Pricing and availability page

How sales show up in the Store

We also heard that you wanted a more efficient way to understand all prices, for all markets. You can now view all possible price tiers in Excel. Go to the Pricing and availability page, select view table, and you can view and export the table to CSV.

Viewing all price tiers – Pricing and availability page

Use Dev Center through a modern and efficient dashboard experience

The Dev Center dashboard has been redesigned based on your feedback to help you be more productive. It has a clean new interface, beautiful analytics, new account-level pages, integrated app picker and streamlined program switching. These are a few of the things that make the new dashboard more useful, particularly for accounts with multiple apps, games or programs.

Dev Center redesign

Debug your apps more effectively by using CAB files

 We heard a lot of feedback on having access to CAB files to help debugging apps, and improve the quality and performance of your apps and games. The Health report lets you pinpoint which OS and app version configurations generate the most crashes, and provides links to failure details with individual CAB files. These CAB files are only available for customers running any of the Windows Insider flights of Windows 10 (slow or fast), so not all failures will include the CAB download option. 

Access to failure downloads – health analytics page

Implications of these changes if you are using the Windows Store submission API

If you use the Windows Store submission API to manage your apps and games, please be aware of the following:

  • If you manage prices using the Submission API, you’ll have to use new price tiers. To do that, manually update your app or game once, so you can view the new price tiers, accept them, and then update your Submission API code to use these new price tier values, which can be found in the price table on the pricing and availability page in Dev Center, as described above.
  • The Windows Store submission API does not support all the new Store listing capabilities You can add the new assets using the Dev Center dashboard, and the submission API will be updated later in July to let you manage these new assets through the API. More details about the upcoming API capabilities, including trailers and game options, can be found.
  • If you use the StoreBroker PowerShell module to simplify using the Windows Store submission API, you can keep using it to manage the same listing asset types you are managing today. However, you won’t be able to upload the new asset types using StoreBroker until the StoreBroker team publishes an update in a few more weeks, and you pick up that update.

Read this previous blog post to learn about all the recently added Store features, and try all the features that are live today. If you have any issues finding or using these features, please let us know using the feedback link in Dev Center (upper right of the dashboard).

The End of an Era – Next Steps for Adobe Flash

Today, Adobe announced that Flash will no longer be supported after 2020. Microsoft will phase out support for Flash in Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer ahead of this date.

Flash led the way on the web for rich content, gaming, animations, and media of all kinds, and inspired many of the current web standards powering HTML5. Adobe has partnered with Microsoft, Google, Mozilla, Apple, and many others, to ensure that the open web could meet and exceed the experiences that Flash has traditionally provided. HTML5 standards, implemented across all modern browsers, provide these capabilities with improved performance, battery life, and increased security. We look forward to continuing to work with Adobe and our industry partners on enriching the open web without the need for plug-ins.

We will phase out Flash from Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer, culminating in the removal of Flash from Windows entirely by the end of 2020. This process began already for Microsoft Edge with Click-to-Run for Flash in the Windows 10 Creators Update. The process will continue in the following phases:

  • Through the end of 2017 and into 2018, Microsoft Edge will continue to ask users for permission to run Flash on most sites the first time the site is visited, and will remember the user’s preference on subsequent visits. Internet Explorer will continue to allow Flash with no special permissions required during this time.
  • In mid to late 2018, we will update Microsoft Edge to require permission for Flash to be run each session. Internet Explorer will continue to allow Flash for all sites in 2018.
  • In mid to late 2019, we will disable Flash by default in both Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Users will be able to re-enable Flash in both browsers. When re-enabled, Microsoft Edge will continue to require approval for Flash on a site-by-site basis.
  • By the end of 2020, we will remove the ability to run Adobe Flash in Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer across all supported versions of Microsoft Windows. Users will no longer have any ability to enable or run Flash.

This timeline is consistent across browsers, including Google, Mozilla, and Apple. We look forward to continuing our close collaboration with Adobe, other browser vendors, and the publishing community, as we evolve the future of the web for everyone.

— John Hazen, Principal Program Manager Lead, Microsoft Edge

Register now for Microsoft Edge Web Summit 2017

Registration is now open for Microsoft Edge Web Summit 2017. Join the Microsoft Edge team in Seattle on September 13th for a jam-packed day of energetic technical sessions looking at what’s new, and what’s next, for the web on Windows. Space is limited and reservations are on a first-come, first-served basis, so book your seat today!

Duotone photo of Seattle with superimposed text reading "Microsoft Edge Web Summit 2017, September 13th, 2017, Seattle, WA"

Microsoft Edge Web Summit is a free conference presented by the engineers building Microsoft Edge. The main track consists of 14 jam-packed technical sessions, covering everything from performance, accessibility, and test guidance, to brand-new tools and APIs for building Progressive Web Apps on Windows, adding payments and biometric authentication to your sites, and building modern layouts with new CSS features like CSS Grid.

This year, we’re introducing a new Hallway Track, where you can meet with engineers from across Microsoft to solve real problems today, and build invaluable connections for the future. Looking to reduce a troublesome performance issue? Struggling with best practices for accessibility? Eager to get started with WebVR? Curious about Bash on Windows? We’ve got you covered. The Hallway Track connects you one-to-one with Microsoft engineers throughout the day for tangible results you can take back to your site or app.

We’re excited to meet developers around the world face to face, and look forward to seeing you here in Seattle, WA! Space is limited and reservations are on a first-come, first-served basis, so book your seat today. Can’t make it? Don’t worry – though there’s no substitute for attending in person, we’ll be streaming live on Channel 9 all day (no registration required), and recorded sessions will be available after the fact.

If you have any questions about the event, you can reach the event team on Twitter @MSEdgeDev or by email at edgesummit@microsoft.com. See you there!

Microsoft Edge Web Summit logo (two line-art alpine summits, with stylized angle brackets superimposed above them)

Kyle Pflug, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge