Azure Site Recovery – case of the “network connection failure”

Luís Caldeira is one of our early adopters who had pinged us with an interesting error. Thanks for reaching out to us Luís and sharing the details of your setup. I am sure this article will come handy to folks who hit this error at some point.

Some days back, Luís sent us a mail informing that his enable-protection workflow was consistently failing with a “network connection failure” error message. He indicated that he had followed the steps listed in the tutorial (http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/hyper-v-recovery-manager-azure/). He had:

  • Setup SCVMM 2012 R2
  • Created the Site Recovery vault, uploaded the required certificate
  • Installed & configured the Microsoft Azure Site Recovery Provider in the VMM server
  • Registered the VMM server
  • And finally installed the Microsoft Azure Recovery Services agent in each of his Hyper-V servers.

He was able to view his on-prem cloud in the Azure portal and could configure protection policies on it as well. However, when he tried to enable protection on a VM, the workflow failed and he saw the following set of tasks in the portal:

image

Clicking on ‘Error Details’ showed the following information:

image 

Hmm, not too helpful? Luís thought as much as he reached out to us with the information through our internal DL. We did some basic debugging by looking at the Hyper-V VMMS event viewer logs and the Microsoft Azure Recovery Services event viewer log. Both of them pointed to a failure in the network with the following error message”

image

A snip of the error message (after removing the various Id’s): “The error message read “Could not replicate changes for virtual machine VMName due to a network communication failure. (Virtual Machine ID VMid, Data Source ID sourceid, Task ID taskid)”

The message was less cryptic but still did not provide a solution. The network connection from the Hyper-V server seemed okay as Luis was able to access different websites from the box. He was able to TS into other servers, firewall looked ok and inbound connection looked good as well. The Azure portal was able to enumerate the VMs running on the Hyper-V server – but the enable replication call was failing.

You are bound to see more granular error messages @ C:Program FilesMicrosoft Azure Recovery Services AgentTempCBEngineCurr.errlog  and we proceeded to inspect that file. The trace indicated that the name resolution to the Azure service happened as expected but “the remote server was timing out (or) connection did not happen”

Ok, so DNS was ruled out as well. We asked Luis to help us understand the network elements in his setup and he indicated that he had a TMG proxy server. We logged into the proxy server and enabled real time logs in the TMG proxy server. We retried the workflow and the workflow promptly failed – but interestingly, the proxy server did not register any traffic blip. That was definitely odd. So browsing from the server worked but connection to the service was failed. Hmm.

But the lack of activity in the TMG server indicated a local failure atleast. We were not dealing with an Azure service side issue and that ruled out 50% of potential problems. At a high level, the agent (Microsoft Azure Recovery Services) which is installed in the Hyper-V server acts as a “data mover” to Azure. It is also responsible for all the authentication and connection management when sending replica data to Azure. This component was built on top of a previously released component of the Windows Azure Online Backup solution and enhanced to support this scenario.

The good news is that the agent is quite network savvy and has a bunch of configurations to tinker around. One such configuration is the proxy server which is got by opening the “Microsoft Azure Backup” mmc. Click on the “Change properties” in the Actions menu.

image

We clicked on the “Proxy configuration” tab to set the proxy details in Luís’s setup.

image

After setting the proxy server, we retried the workflow… and it failed yet again. Luis then indicated that he was using an authenticated proxy server. Now things got interesting – as the Microsoft Azure Recovery Services agent runs in System context (unlike, say IE which runs in the user context), we needed to set the proxy authentication parameters. In the same proxy configuration page as above, we now provided the user id and password.

image

Now, when we retried the replication – voila! the workflow went through and initial replication was on it’s way. The same can be done using the Set-OBMachineSetting cmdlet (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh770409.aspx)

Needless to say, once the issue was fixed, Luís took the product out on a full tour and he totally loved it (ok, I just made up the last part).

I encourage you to try out ASR and share your feedback. It’s extremely easy to set it up and provides a great cloud based DR solution.

You can find more details about the service @ http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/services/site-recovery/. The documentation explaining the end to end workflows is available @ http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/hyper-v-recovery-manager-azure/. And if you have questions when using the product, post them @ http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsazure/en-US/home?forum=hypervrecovmgr or in this blog. You can also share your feedback on your favorite features/gaps @ http://feedback.azure.com/forums/256299-site-recovery

Weekend Reading: July 4th Edition—ISTE conference shows off Office Mix, OneNote and partner apps

In this edition of Weekend Reading, we’ve got stories on The International Society for Technology in Education conference, the latest schools to use Surface and profiles on Office exec Julia White and Tyler Schrenk, who overcame a life-changing injury with help from Surface Pro and Xbox.

At the recent ISTE 2014 conference in Atlanta, Microsoft shared how teachers are using Office Mix and OneNote. Since the customer preview for Office Mix became available in May, teachers have been using the tool in unexpected ways that are influencing how Microsoft will continue to evolve it. For Cary Academy in North Carolina, OneNote helps bridge devices with students’ learning objectives. Microsoft’s partners also unveiled transformational tools that support 21st-century learning: the AssistX TestPolicy app and the Sebit Global Education Cloud, VCloud.

The Selinsgrove Area School District in rural Pennsylvania, and St. Thomas School, a K-8 school in Washington state, are on opposite coasts, but they share one thing: They’re using Surface. In the past year, teachers and students in 30 markets around the world have adopted Surface, including the Supreme Education Council of Qatar, Tuckahoe Common School District, St. Andrews Anglican College, St. Patrick’s College, Williston Northampton School, Twickenham Academy and CDI College.

A profile on Julia White, general manager of product marketing for Office, shows how she embraces change and fights to move both technology and business to its future state – and how a leather jacket has become her signature accessory. At the San Francisco launch event for Office for iPad, she was Satya Nadella’s co-presenter at his first appearance as the CEO of Microsoft in the Bay Area tech industry and media epicenter.

WR_Julia White

Following a life-changing injury, Tyler Schrenk uses the Surface Pro with speech recognition software and an Xbox One to help him connect.The quick connections many take for granted – email, online news websites, Facebook and other social media – slowed dramatically for Schrenk because it was hard to adapt technology to his new circumstances. Now, he’s able to check his email, follow his favorite sports teams, read the newspaper and look at the weather. He’s also enrolled in computer science classes at a local community college and hopes one day to find employment in programming.

With the acquisition of SyntaxTree, creators of the UnityVS plugin for Visual Studio, Microsoft has the opportunity to integrate support for Unity even more deeply into Visual Studio.UnityVS enables Unity developers to take advantage of the productivity of Visual Studio to author, browse and debug the code for their Unity applications. Already, dozens of the biggest names in game development rely on Visual Studio and the UnityVS plugin.

clip_image002

We saw the U.S. debut of the Lumia 635 and a bonanza of Windows Phone and Windows apps, many of them new or on sale. The Lumia 635, which comes with Windows Phone 8.1 and the Cortana personal digital assistant, will be available at both T-Mobile and MetroPCS beginning in July. When you get that phone, install the App of the Week, Adobe Photoshop Express. The Staff App Pick, the Good.Co app for Windows, helps you find out if you’re a good fit for that dream job. The latest Red Stripe Deals sale sparkles with games like “Bejeweled LIVE.” The Indie Game Spotlight Collection collects some monthly standouts from a growing community of independent developers, and the Windows Phone Blog focuses on 10 of those. The Conversations blog also weighed in on their top 10 favorite Windows Phone games for June. New titles from Gameloft also give you more choices for play. You can also find a round-up of apps that help you bring your favorite TV shows on-the-go.

clip_image003

In this week’s installment of Snaps, Microsoft Stories’ digital photo album, the team wishes you a very sweet Fourth of July with this tasty take on the Microsoft logo, spotted backstage at a recent press event.

clip_image005

This week on the Microsoft Facebook page, we introduced you to Julian Mayor, who mixed Victorian furniture with Xbox control. Read his story, and tell us what you’ve created using #ICreatedThis.

clip_image007

Thanks for checking out this edition of Weekend Reading. Hope you’re enjoying your holiday! See you next week!

Posted by Athima Chansanchai
Microsoft News Center Staff

Weekend Reading: July 4th Edition—ISTE conference shows off Office Mix, OneNote and partner apps

In this edition of Weekend Reading, we’ve got stories on The International Society for Technology in Education conference, the latest schools to use Surface and profiles on Office exec Julia White and Tyler Schrenk, who overcame a life-changing injury with help from Surface Pro and Xbox.

At the recent ISTE 2014 conference in Atlanta, Microsoft shared how teachers are using Office Mix and OneNote. Since the customer preview for Office Mix became available in May, teachers have been using the tool in unexpected ways that are influencing how Microsoft will continue to evolve it. For Cary Academy in North Carolina, OneNote helps bridge devices with students’ learning objectives. Microsoft’s partners also unveiled transformational tools that support 21st-century learning: the AssistX TestPolicy app and the Sebit Global Education Cloud, VCloud.

The Selinsgrove Area School District in rural Pennsylvania, and St. Thomas School, a K-8 school in Washington state, are on opposite coasts, but they share one thing: They’re using Surface. In the past year, teachers and students in 30 markets around the world have adopted Surface, including the Supreme Education Council of Qatar, Tuckahoe Common School District, St. Andrews Anglican College, St. Patrick’s College, Williston Northampton School, Twickenham Academy and CDI College.

A profile on Julia White, general manager of product marketing for Office, shows how she embraces change and fights to move both technology and business to its future state – and how a leather jacket has become her signature accessory. At the San Francisco launch event for Office for iPad, she was Satya Nadella’s co-presenter at his first appearance as the CEO of Microsoft in the Bay Area tech industry and media epicenter.

WR_Julia White

Following a life-changing injury, Tyler Schrenk uses the Surface Pro with speech recognition software and an Xbox One to help him connect.The quick connections many take for granted – email, online news websites, Facebook and other social media – slowed dramatically for Schrenk because it was hard to adapt technology to his new circumstances. Now, he’s able to check his email, follow his favorite sports teams, read the newspaper and look at the weather. He’s also enrolled in computer science classes at a local community college and hopes one day to find employment in programming.

With the acquisition of SyntaxTree, creators of the UnityVS plugin for Visual Studio, Microsoft has the opportunity to integrate support for Unity even more deeply into Visual Studio.UnityVS enables Unity developers to take advantage of the productivity of Visual Studio to author, browse and debug the code for their Unity applications. Already, dozens of the biggest names in game development rely on Visual Studio and the UnityVS plugin.

clip_image002

We saw the U.S. debut of the Lumia 635 and a bonanza of Windows Phone and Windows apps, many of them new or on sale. The Lumia 635, which comes with Windows Phone 8.1 and the Cortana personal digital assistant, will be available at both T-Mobile and MetroPCS beginning in July. When you get that phone, install the App of the Week, Adobe Photoshop Express. The Staff App Pick, the Good.Co app for Windows, helps you find out if you’re a good fit for that dream job. The latest Red Stripe Deals sale sparkles with games like “Bejeweled LIVE.” The Indie Game Spotlight Collection collects some monthly standouts from a growing community of independent developers, and the Windows Phone Blog focuses on 10 of those. The Conversations blog also weighed in on their top 10 favorite Windows Phone games for June. New titles from Gameloft also give you more choices for play. You can also find a round-up of apps that help you bring your favorite TV shows on-the-go.

clip_image003

In this week’s installment of Snaps, Microsoft Stories’ digital photo album, the team wishes you a very sweet Fourth of July with this tasty take on the Microsoft logo, spotted backstage at a recent press event.

clip_image005

This week on the Microsoft Facebook page, we introduced you to Julian Mayor, who mixed Victorian furniture with Xbox control. Read his story, and tell us what you’ve created using #ICreatedThis.

clip_image007

Thanks for checking out this edition of Weekend Reading. Hope you’re enjoying your holiday! See you next week!

Posted by Athima Chansanchai
Microsoft News Center Staff

Weekend Reading: July 4th Edition—ISTE conference shows off Office Mix, OneNote and partner apps

In this edition of Weekend Reading, we’ve got stories on The International Society for Technology in Education conference, the latest schools to use Surface and profiles on Office exec Julia White and Tyler Schrenk, who overcame a life-changing injury with help from Surface Pro and Xbox.

At the recent ISTE 2014 conference in Atlanta, Microsoft shared how teachers are using Office Mix and OneNote. Since the customer preview for Office Mix became available in May, teachers have been using the tool in unexpected ways that are influencing how Microsoft will continue to evolve it. For Cary Academy in North Carolina, OneNote helps bridge devices with students’ learning objectives. Microsoft’s partners also unveiled transformational tools that support 21st-century learning: the AssistX TestPolicy app and the Sebit Global Education Cloud, VCloud.

The Selinsgrove Area School District in rural Pennsylvania, and St. Thomas School, a K-8 school in Washington state, are on opposite coasts, but they share one thing: They’re using Surface. In the past year, teachers and students in 30 markets around the world have adopted Surface, including the Supreme Education Council of Qatar, Tuckahoe Common School District, St. Andrews Anglican College, St. Patrick’s College, Williston Northampton School, Twickenham Academy and CDI College.

A profile on Julia White, general manager of product marketing for Office, shows how she embraces change and fights to move both technology and business to its future state – and how a leather jacket has become her signature accessory. At the San Francisco launch event for Office for iPad, she was Satya Nadella’s co-presenter at his first appearance as the CEO of Microsoft in the Bay Area tech industry and media epicenter.

WR_Julia White

Following a life-changing injury, Tyler Schrenk uses the Surface Pro with speech recognition software and an Xbox One to help him connect.The quick connections many take for granted – email, online news websites, Facebook and other social media – slowed dramatically for Schrenk because it was hard to adapt technology to his new circumstances. Now, he’s able to check his email, follow his favorite sports teams, read the newspaper and look at the weather. He’s also enrolled in computer science classes at a local community college and hopes one day to find employment in programming.

With the acquisition of SyntaxTree, creators of the UnityVS plugin for Visual Studio, Microsoft has the opportunity to integrate support for Unity even more deeply into Visual Studio.UnityVS enables Unity developers to take advantage of the productivity of Visual Studio to author, browse and debug the code for their Unity applications. Already, dozens of the biggest names in game development rely on Visual Studio and the UnityVS plugin.

clip_image002

We saw the U.S. debut of the Lumia 635 and a bonanza of Windows Phone and Windows apps, many of them new or on sale. The Lumia 635, which comes with Windows Phone 8.1 and the Cortana personal digital assistant, will be available at both T-Mobile and MetroPCS beginning in July. When you get that phone, install the App of the Week, Adobe Photoshop Express. The Staff App Pick, the Good.Co app for Windows, helps you find out if you’re a good fit for that dream job. The latest Red Stripe Deals sale sparkles with games like “Bejeweled LIVE.” The Indie Game Spotlight Collection collects some monthly standouts from a growing community of independent developers, and the Windows Phone Blog focuses on 10 of those. The Conversations blog also weighed in on their top 10 favorite Windows Phone games for June. New titles from Gameloft also give you more choices for play. You can also find a round-up of apps that help you bring your favorite TV shows on-the-go.

clip_image003

In this week’s installment of Snaps, Microsoft Stories’ digital photo album, the team wishes you a very sweet Fourth of July with this tasty take on the Microsoft logo, spotted backstage at a recent press event.

clip_image005

This week on the Microsoft Facebook page, we introduced you to Julian Mayor, who mixed Victorian furniture with Xbox control. Read his story, and tell us what you’ve created using #ICreatedThis.

clip_image007

Thanks for checking out this edition of Weekend Reading. Hope you’re enjoying your holiday! See you next week!

Posted by Athima Chansanchai
Microsoft News Center Staff

Microsoft joins key industry groups to deliver on promise of the Internet of Things

The following post is from Kevin Dallas, General Manager, IoT, Microsoft.


The Internet of Things (IoT) represents an undeniable opportunity across a range of industries, a topic many of my colleagues have covered at length over the past few months. We believe that there is a critical set of work our industry must undertake in order to make sure we deliver the right set of platforms and services to realize the IoT opportunity.

Microsoft is committed to being an active participant in these discussions, and today I am pleased to share that we are joining two key industry efforts to help drive the right set of industry outcomes for IoT:

· Microsoft has joined the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) and its founding members AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM and Intel in a collaboration that extends across industry, academia and government. The IIC’s goal is to reduce customers’ required time and complexity for building intelligent systems through open interoperability standards and common architectures to connect smart devices, machines, people, processes and data.

· Microsoft has joined the AllSeen Alliance, which was established in December 2013 to address a major challenge facing IoT, enabling smart, connected devices and objects to work together regardless of brand, operating system and other infrastructure considerations. AllSeen Alliance members are collaborating on a universal software framework, based on AllJoyn open source code, which allows devices to autonomously discover and interact with nearby products regardless of their underlying proprietary technology or communications protocols. Microsoft joins Cisco, Haier, LG, Panasonic, Qualcomm Connected Experiences Inc., Sharp, Silicon Image, Technicolor and TP-Link, in addition to more than 40 other member companies.

We believe the promise of IoT lies in making new and existing devices smarter by connecting them to services in the cloud. At Microsoft, we are focused both on a powerful device platform and great services through Microsoft Azure to deliver great technology to developers, partners and customers.

In order for us to collectively realize the full potential of IoT, it’s imperative we have the right conversations as a community to enable these new and emerging devices and cloud services to be able to communicate and interact properly. It’s a big moment for the industry, and we face a critical choice – do we adopt a standards-based approach that enables scale and interoperability, or do we allow the industry to fracture into miniature ecosystems that encourage lock-in and forces customers to work harder to get the benefit out of the more than 212 billion “connected things” IDC predicted we’ll see by the end of 2020?

In many ways, our opportunity is similar to the early days of the Web. Imagine if the http protocol was not a standard adopted by everyone? Would the Web have been as impactful in creating the global connectivity and business opportunities that have defined the past two decades? These are industry challenges. No single company will solve these problems, and the need to make sure we are on the right path together is stronger than ever as new devices and services are launched almost every day.

Our recent Windows, Azure Intelligent Systems Service, and Azure Machine Learning announcements represent some of our most recent examples of the investments we’re making in a comprehensive and robust M2M/SCADA platform to power the Internet of Your Things.

We look forward to engaging with IIC and AllSeen Alliance members to develop technologies that will improve peoples’ lives while fostering the interoperability, security and the dependability of the systems on which the world is built.

Is Office exec Julia White the face of a new Microsoft?

Editor’s note: The following is a post from Thomas Kohnstamm, a writer for microsoft.com/stories.


To say that a lot was at stake would be an understatement.

The San Francisco launch event for Office for iPad was Satya Nadella’s first appearance as the CEO of Microsoft in the Bay Area tech industry and media epicenter. And Office for iPad represents Nadella’s determination to create a mobile first, cloud first Microsoft that is committed to making cloud services like Office available on every device, no matter the platform.

As Nadella’s co-presenter, Julia White, general manager of product marketing for Office, was praised for her energetic hands-on demo – but also her sense of style.

“I think Julia White’s very cool leather jacket should have its own Twitter account,” tweeted Mashable editor Lance Ulanoff at the recent Office for iPad launch event in San Francisco. Eventually everyone from tech bloggers to the New York Post weighed in on White’s sartorial triumph.

Typically, tech product launches don’t spark viral fashion discussions (at least not complimentary ones), but then, this wasn’t just any product launch.

Despite the fact that White is a 13-year veteran of the company, she embraces change and fights to move both technology and business to its future state. She’s never been afraid to challenge the conventional thinking and stand out from the crowd.

Read the full profile at microsoft.com/stories.

Microsoft joins key industry groups to deliver on promise of the Internet of Things

The following post is from Kevin Dallas, General Manager, IoT, Microsoft.


The Internet of Things (IoT) represents an undeniable opportunity across a range of industries, a topic many of my colleagues have covered at length over the past few months. We believe that there is a critical set of work our industry must undertake in order to make sure we deliver the right set of platforms and services to realize the IoT opportunity.

Microsoft is committed to being an active participant in these discussions, and today I am pleased to share that we are joining two key industry efforts to help drive the right set of industry outcomes for IoT:

· Microsoft has joined the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) and its founding members AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM and Intel in a collaboration that extends across industry, academia and government. The IIC’s goal is to reduce customers’ required time and complexity for building intelligent systems through open interoperability standards and common architectures to connect smart devices, machines, people, processes and data.

· Microsoft has joined the AllSeen Alliance, which was established in December 2013 to address a major challenge facing IoT, enabling smart, connected devices and objects to work together regardless of brand, operating system and other infrastructure considerations. AllSeen Alliance members are collaborating on a universal software framework, based on AllJoyn open source code, which allows devices to autonomously discover and interact with nearby products regardless of their underlying proprietary technology or communications protocols. Microsoft joins Cisco, Haier, LG, Panasonic, Qualcomm Connected Experiences Inc., Sharp, Silicon Image, Technicolor and TP-Link, in addition to more than 40 other member companies.

We believe the promise of IoT lies in making new and existing devices smarter by connecting them to services in the cloud. At Microsoft, we are focused both on a powerful device platform and great services through Microsoft Azure to deliver great technology to developers, partners and customers.

In order for us to collectively realize the full potential of IoT, it’s imperative we have the right conversations as a community to enable these new and emerging devices and cloud services to be able to communicate and interact properly. It’s a big moment for the industry, and we face a critical choice – do we adopt a standards-based approach that enables scale and interoperability, or do we allow the industry to fracture into miniature ecosystems that encourage lock-in and forces customers to work harder to get the benefit out of the more than 212 billion “connected things” IDC predicted we’ll see by the end of 2020?

In many ways, our opportunity is similar to the early days of the Web. Imagine if the http protocol was not a standard adopted by everyone? Would the Web have been as impactful in creating the global connectivity and business opportunities that have defined the past two decades? These are industry challenges. No single company will solve these problems, and the need to make sure we are on the right path together is stronger than ever as new devices and services are launched almost every day.

Our recent Windows, Azure Intelligent Systems Service, and Azure Machine Learning announcements represent some of our most recent examples of the investments we’re making in a comprehensive and robust M2M/SCADA platform to power the Internet of Your Things.

We look forward to engaging with IIC and AllSeen Alliance members to develop technologies that will improve peoples’ lives while fostering the interoperability, security and the dependability of the systems on which the world is built.

Microsoft joins key industry groups to deliver on promise of the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) represents an undeniable opportunity across a range of industries, a topic many of my colleagues have covered at length over the past few months. We believe that there is a critical set of work our industry must undertake in order to make sure we deliver the right set of platforms and services to realize the IoT opportunity.

Microsoft is committed to being an active participant in these discussions, and today I am pleased to share that we are joining two key industry efforts to help drive the right set of industry outcomes for IoT:

· Microsoft has joined the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) and its founding members AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM and Intel in a collaboration that extends across industry, academia and government. The IIC’s goal is to reduce customers’ required time and complexity for building intelligent systems through open interoperability standards and common architectures to connect smart devices, machines, people, processes and data.

· Microsoft has joined the AllSeen Alliance, which was established in December 2013 to address a major challenge facing IoT, enabling smart, connected devices and objects to work together regardless of brand, operating system and other infrastructure considerations. AllSeen Alliance members are collaborating on a universal software framework, based on AllJoyn open source code, which allows devices to autonomously discover and interact with nearby products regardless of their underlying proprietary technology or communications protocols. Microsoft joins Cisco, Haier, LG, Panasonic, Qualcomm Connected Experiences Inc., Sharp, Silicon Image, Technicolor and TP-Link, in addition to more than 40 other member companies.

We believe the promise of IoT lies in making new and existing devices smarter by connecting them to services in the cloud. At Microsoft, we are focused both on a powerful device platform and great services through Microsoft Azure to deliver great technology to developers, partners and customers.

In order for us to collectively realize the full potential of IoT, it’s imperative we have the right conversations as a community to enable these new and emerging devices and cloud services to be able to communicate and interact properly. It’s a big moment for the industry, and we face a critical choice – do we adopt a standards-based approach that enables scale and interoperability, or do we allow the industry to fracture into miniature ecosystems that encourage lock-in and forces customers to work harder to get the benefit out of the more than 212 billion “connected things” IDC predicted we’ll see by the end of 2020?

In many ways, our opportunity is similar to the early days of the Web. Imagine if the http protocol was not a standard adopted by everyone? Would the Web have been as impactful in creating the global connectivity and business opportunities that have defined the past two decades? These are industry challenges. No single company will solve these problems, and the need to make sure we are on the right path together is stronger than ever as new devices and services are launched almost every day.

Our recent Windows, Azure Intelligent Systems Service, and Azure Machine Learning announcements represent some of our most recent examples of the investments we’re making in a comprehensive and robust M2M/SCADA platform to power the Internet of Your Things.

We look forward to engaging with IIC and AllSeen Alliance members to develop technologies that will improve peoples’ lives while fostering the interoperability, security and the dependability of the systems on which the world is built.

Is Office exec Julia White the face of a new Microsoft?

Editor’s note: The following is a post from Thomas Kohnstamm, a writer for microsoft.com/stories.


To say that a lot was at stake would be an understatement.

The San Francisco launch event for Office for iPad was Satya Nadella’s first appearance as the CEO of Microsoft in the Bay Area tech industry and media epicenter. And Office for iPad represents Nadella’s determination to create a mobile first, cloud first Microsoft that is committed to making cloud services like Office available on every device, no matter the platform.

As Nadella’s co-presenter, Julia White, general manager of product marketing for Office, was praised for her energetic hands-on demo – but also her sense of style.

“I think Julia White’s very cool leather jacket should have its own Twitter account,” tweeted Mashable editor Lance Ulanoff at the recent Office for iPad launch event in San Francisco. Eventually everyone from tech bloggers to the New York Post weighed in on White’s sartorial triumph.

Typically, tech product launches don’t spark viral fashion discussions (at least not complimentary ones), but then, this wasn’t just any product launch.

Despite the fact that White is a 13-year veteran of the company, she embraces change and fights to move both technology and business to its future state. She’s never been afraid to challenge the conventional thinking and stand out from the crowd.

Read the full profile at microsoft.com/stories.

Is Office exec Julia White the face of a new Microsoft?

To say that a lot was at stake would be an understatement.

The San Francisco launch event for Office for iPad was Satya Nadella’s first appearance as the CEO of Microsoft in the Bay Area tech industry and media epicenter. And Office for iPad represents Nadella’s determination to create a mobile first, cloud first Microsoft that is committed to making cloud services like Office available on every device, no matter the platform.

As Nadella’s co-presenter, Julia White, general manager of product marketing for Office, was praised for her energetic hands-on demo – but also her sense of style.

“I think Julia White’s very cool leather jacket should have its own Twitter account,” tweeted Mashable editor Lance Ulanoff at the recent Office for iPad launch event in San Francisco. Eventually everyone from tech bloggers to the New York Post weighed in on White’s sartorial triumph.

Typically, tech product launches don’t spark viral fashion discussions (at least not complimentary ones), but then, this wasn’t just any product launch.

Despite the fact that White is a 13-year veteran of the company, she embraces change and fights to move both technology and business to its future state. She’s never been afraid to challenge the conventional thinking and stand out from the crowd.

Read the full profile at microsoft.com/stories.