Windows 10 Tip: Keep your apps organized with virtual desktops

Happy Monday! We’ve showed you how you can easily view and manage all the apps and programs you have open at once with Task View and Snap – today, we’re going to show you how you can keep your open apps better organized with virtual desktops in Windows 10.

Here’s how to get started with virtual desktops:

To create a new virtual desktop, select the Task View button on the Windows Taskbar (or hit Windows key + Tab)

To create a new virtual desktop, select the Task View button on the Windows Taskbar (or hit Windows key + Tab) – then, select New desktop near the lower-right corner of the screen. You can switch between virtual desktops by selecting the Task View button, and then the thumbnail for the virtual desktop you want.

Move an app from one virtual desktop to another:

Move an app from one virtual desktop to another. Select the Task View button, and right-click on the thumbnail of the app you want to move

Select the Task View button, and right-click on the thumbnail of the app you want to move. Select Move to, and then select the virtual desktop where you want to move the app.

Have a great week!

What tools troubleshoot Autodiscover in Exchange Online?

Think a move to the cloud means you’ll never have to troubleshoot connectivity issues again? In reality, these…

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types of problems won’t disappear and might be more difficult to solve because you only have control and visibility into part of the application.

Various tools diagnose and troubleshoot problems with Autodiscover, a web service in Microsoft Exchange Online that enables mailbox admins to configure user profile settings.

Use the Outlook troubleshooting utility

Outlook has a built-in Autodiscover troubleshooting tool. To access it, hold down Ctrl and right-click the Outlook icon in the system tray. This brings up a box labeled “Test Email AutoConfiguration,” as shown in Figure 1.

Outlook Autodiscover tool
Figure 1: The Outlook Autodiscover tool displays how Office 365 sends Autodiscover information to the client.

This test shows how the client receives — or does not receive — Autodiscover information from Office 365. This tool runs as part of Outlook on the user’s PC: If the organization’s network configuration causes the Autodiscover problem, this tool responds as if the Autodiscover endpoint is offline. To get the correct results, run the test several times from both inside and outside the organization’s network.

Try the Remote Connectivity Analyzer

The Microsoft Remote Connectivity Analyzer is a web-based tool that identifies issues with Office 365 applications (Figure 2). Click on the Office 365 tab and select the Outlook Autodiscover test under Microsoft Office Outlook Connectivity Tests.

Microsoft Remote Connectivity Analyzer
Figure 2: Use the Microsoft Remote Connectivity Analyzer to address Office 365 problems.

The Microsoft Remote Connectivity Analyzer runs tests external to the organization’s network. If these tests pass, but the test run from the Outlook client does not, the issue resides with network access to Office 365.

Run the Support and Recovery Assistant

The last tool to try is the Microsoft Support and Recovery Assistant for Office 365 (Figure 3).

Support and Recovery Assistant
Figure 3: The Microsoft Support and Recovery Assistant for Office 365 walks the administrator through the diagnostic process with a series of questions to identify the Autodiscover problem.

The Support and Recovery Assistant asks a series of questions to assist administrators with various Office 365 issues. Depending on the test, the Support and Recovery Assistant might connect to Office 365 from the PC or from test resources that Microsoft maintains, such as the Remote Connectivity Analyzer.

If the Autodiscover issue remains unresolved, open a case with Microsoft Support.

Next Steps

Methods to correct mail flow trouble in Exchange

How Autodiscover works in a hybrid configuration

Free utilities to help admins monitor, manage Exchange

Dig Deeper on Microsoft Outlook

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