For Sale – High Spec Gaming Rig

Top spec gaming pc.

Handles everything in Ultra settings

Intel i7 6700K (unlocked)
GTX 1070 8GB Aero OC Edition
16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4,
Gigabyte Z170-Gaming K3 motherboard,
Corsair H55 Hydro series liquid CPU cooler,
120GB Samsung 850 EVO SSD,
WD 1TB HDD,
Corsair CX600 PSU,
NZXT Phantom 410 case (white)
OS Windows 10 Home,
Razer Deathstalker keyboard,
Razer Death Adder Chroma mouse

Bought it on here a few months back.
Unfortunately life finds away to screw my fun and my family is due to grow so the short lived fun has to end! :)

I live in the midlands (Warwick) but travel around with work down to London and Kent so can organise a drop off / meet up within a reasonable distance

Any questions, thrown them my way.

Price and currency: 800
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: BT
Location: Midlands / London
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
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By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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For Sale – Gaming PC

I am selling my gaming PC with monitor and keyboard.

Specs are :

Intel i7 6700k Skylake Processor
Asus Rog Max VIII Ranger Z170 Motherboard
4x 4gb Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000 Memory
1TB Western Digital WD10EZEX Sata 3 HDD
120gb Kingston HX Savage SSD
Corsair H110i GT Cpu Cooler
EVGA Supernova G2 1000w 80 Plus Gold Modular Power Supply
Zotac GeForce GTX1070 Amp Extreme 8gb Graphics Card
Corsair Carbide Air 540 Case
Acer G277hu 27″ WQHD Monitor

Pictures to follow.

Looking for £900 collected.
Will not courier.

Price and currency: 900.00
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: Cash on Collection
Location: East London, Near Stratford
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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For Sale – Apple Mac Mini Quad Core i7 2.3Ghz late 2012 USB 3.0 1TB / 8GB PRICE DROPPED

Apple Mac Mini

Full working order
Intel Quad Core i7 cpu running at 2.3GHz (With turbo boost up to 3.3GHz)

2x 1TB Hard Drives

8GB Memory (Easily to upgrade to 16GB though)

Comes with Wi-Fi & Bluetooth 4x fast USB 3.0 ports, HDMI output, SD card, Ethernet and a Thunderbolt port

Wiped and reformatted

Complete with box, and Apple Wireless/Bluetooth mouse and keyboard

Any questions just ask.

Split postage costs, your option on how its posted. Prefer royal mail parcel force / special delivery.

Price dropped from £500 to £400

Price and currency: 400
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank transfer / PayPal / Cash on Collection
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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How to Restart your App Programmatically

For some apps (especially games) it is not uncommon for the app to get into a state where it needs to restart – perhaps after a license update, after installing downloadable content, its caches have become corrupt or unwieldy, or for any other reason where the app needs to refresh state from scratch. In earlier releases, your only option would have been to prompt the user to close and relaunch, or to call CoreApplication.Exit – and both options provide sub-optimal user experience.

We have therefore introduced a new API that enables an app to request immediate termination and restart, and to pass arbitrary arguments into the fresh instance. In this post, we’ll look at how this works and how you can build it into your app. This is available now in Insider builds from Build 16226 onwards, along with the corresponding SDK.

Here’s a sample app, called TestRestart. 

The app provides a ListView of cities on the left, the currently-selected city on the right and a TextBox for providing arguments to the app when it is restarted. When the user taps the Request Restart button, the app will terminate and restart itself, passing in the supplied arguments. The new API, RequestRestartAsync, is exposed as a static method on the CoreApplication object. It takes a string parameter, which can be any string value you like – including input from the user or another external entity. If you do choose to accept input in this way, it is your responsibility to validate it correctly to make sure it conforms to whatever constraints you choose to impose. You should do this validation on input, before passing it to RequestRestartAsync. In this sample app, we’re expecting the user to type in the name of a city.


async private void DoRestartRequest()
{
    bool isValidPayload = false;
    string payload = restartArgs.Text;
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(payload))
    {
        foreach (ImageViewModel imageItem in imageListView.Items)
        {
            if (imageItem.Name == payload)
            {
                isValidPayload = true;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    if (isValidPayload)
    {
        AppRestartFailureReason result =
            await CoreApplication.RequestRestartAsync(payload);
        if (result == AppRestartFailureReason.NotInForeground ||
            result == AppRestartFailureReason.RestartPending ||
            result == AppRestartFailureReason.Other)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("RequestRestartAsync failed: {0}", result);
        }
    }
}

To mitigate privacy concerns, an app is only permitted to restart itself if it is in the foreground at the time it makes the request. When the app restarts, it restarts with normal UI – that is, as a normal foreground window. If we were to permit a background task or minimized app to restart, the result would be unexpected to the user. This is why the API is framed as a request. If the request is denied, the app would need to handle the failure – perhaps by waiting until it is in the foreground and trying again. If you were to request a restart and then through some twist of logic managed to request it again before the system started the operation, then you’d get the RestartPending result, although this is an edge case. You’re unlikely to ever get the other result – unless something goes wrong in the platform.

Note that this is the only significant constraint, but you should use this API carefully. For example, you probably should not use it if your app was not originally launched by the user – for example, if it was launched as the result of a share or picker operation. Restarting in the middle of one of those contract operations would certainly confuse the user.

If the request is granted, the app is terminated and then restarted. There are many different ways to activate an app: in addition to a regular launch activation, apps can choose to support file activation, protocol activation, share or picker activation and so on. The list is documented here. For the restart case, the app will be activated as a regular launch – just as if the user had closed the app manually and tapped its tile to launch it again – but including the arbitrary arguments supplied earlier (if any).

In your App class, you should handle this by overriding the OnActivated method. Test the ActivationKind, and if it’s ActivationKind.Launch, then the incoming IActivatedEventArgs will be a LaunchActivatedEventArgs. From this, you can get hold of the incoming activation arguments. For a regular user-initiated launch, the Arguments will be empty, so if it’s not empty you could simply infer that this is a restart activation. You can also check the PreviousExecutionState, which for a restart operation will be set to Terminated.

Although the arguments might have originated from an untrusted source (eg, the user), you should have done the validation before requesting restart. If so, you can consider them trustworthy when you receive them in OnActivated.


protected override void OnActivated(IActivatedEventArgs args)
{
    switch (args.Kind)
    {
        case ActivationKind.Launch:
            LaunchActivatedEventArgs launchArgs = args as LaunchActivatedEventArgs;
            string argString = launchArgs.Arguments;

            Frame rootFrame = Window.Current.Content as Frame;
            if (rootFrame == null)
            {
                rootFrame = new Frame();
                Window.Current.Content = rootFrame;
            }
            rootFrame.Navigate(typeof(MainPage), argString);
            Window.Current.Activate();
            break;
    }
}

What you do with the incoming arguments is entirely up to you. In this app, we’re simply passing them on to the MainPage. In the MainPage in turn, we have an override of OnNavigatedTo which uses the string to select an item in the ListView:


protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)

{
    string payload = e.Parameter as string;
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(payload))
    {
        foreach (ImageViewModel imageItem in imageListView.Items)
        {
            if (imageItem.Name == payload)
            {
                imageListView.SelectedItem = imageItem;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

As you can see, the CoreApplication.RequestRestartAsync method is a simple API. You can use it to terminate your app immediately, and have it restart as if by user action, with the additional option of passing in arbitrary arguments on activation.

Sample Code here.

Construct a chain of commands with the PowerShell pipeline

Administrators new to PowerShell can construct intricate workflows within a single line of code once they learn how to tap into the automation tool’s piping abilities.

The ability to take output from one command and send it as input to the next command with the PowerShell pipeline is a major feature that sets PowerShell apart from other scripting languages. The pipeline links multiple commands to perform complex actions, such as configuration changes. In other operating systems such as Linux, the shell needs to parse the text output from a command before it can work with the data.

It’s useful to think of PowerShell objects as analogous to a car, and the methods as the actions a car can take, such as moving forward or backward. Usually, an administrator would need a separate script for each method, but the PowerShell pipeline enables admins to consolidate those scripts and pass — or pipe — rich objects from one command to another.

The PowerShell pipeline helps condense code. For example, take the script below:

$service = Get-Service -Name XXX

$serviceName = $service.Name

Stop-Service -Name $serviceName

The administrator can shorten this code with the PowerShell pipeline to chain commands to pass the objects. The previous script is now one line of code that begins the task and stops it automatically when it completes:

Get-Service -Name XXX | Stop-Service

This video tutorial further explains what the PowerShell pipeline is and demonstrates how it works with real-life examples. 

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