How Can Autonomous Drones Help the Energy and Utilities Industry?


Welcome to How AI Transform Business, a new series featuring insights from conversations with Microsoft partners who are combining deep industry knowledge with AI in novel ways and, in doing so, creating leading-edge intelligent business solutions for our digital age.

Our first episode features eSmart Systems, which is in the business of creating solutions to accelerate global progress towards sustainable societies. Headquartered in the heart of Østfold county, Norway, eSmart Systems develops digital intelligence for the energy industry and for smart communities. The company is strategically co-located with the NCE Smart Energy Markets cluster and the Østfold University College and thrives in a very innovative environment. When it comes to next-generation grid management systems, or efficiently running operations for the connected cities of the future or driving citizen engagement, the company is at the forefront of digital transformation.

We recently caught up with Davide Roverso, Chief Analytics Officer at eSmart Systems. Davide has many interesting things to share about where and how AI is being applied in the infrastructure industry. Among other things, he talks about how utilities companies are forced to fly manned helicopters missions over live electrical power lines today, just to perform routine inspections, and how – using AI – it is possible to have safer and more effective inspections that do not expose humans to this sort of risk.


Davide Roverso, Chief Analytics Officer, eSmart Systems, in conversation with Joseph Sirosh,
Chief Technology Officer of Artificial Intelligence in Microsoft’s Worldwide Commercial Business.

Video and podcasts versions of this session are available via the links below. Alternatively – just continue reading a transcript of their conversation below.

Joseph Sirosh: Davide, would you tell a little about eSmart Systems and yourself?

Davide Roverso: eSmart Systems is a small Norwegian startup, was established in 2013. The main area in which we work is building SaaS for the energy and utilities sector. So basically, it was founded by a group of people that had been working together for over 20 years in the energy and utilities space. They were first working a lot on power exchange software, and delivered power exchange to California, among others. And then, about 2012, they went for a kind of exploration trip to the US, to Silicon Valley and that area, and they visited Google and Amazon and Microsoft and Cloudera and tried to find what were the new biggest trends. And they came back home with a clear idea that they had to focus on cloud and AI. And of course, they used that in their core business and that was power and utilities.

So that’s how eSmart Systems started.

JS: And so, you have an analytics team, or now is it an AI team?

DR: We have 10 data scientists, so more than 10% of the company is data scientists, so we have a big focus on AI. When I started in eSmart Systems about three years ago we were just two, so I built quite a good group since then. And we use machine learning in a lot of different areas. Two main areas are specifically time series analysis and predictions, and the other is more on analyzing images – we use that for inspecting, for instance, power lines with drones.

JS: You must have a lot of interesting projects. So, tell me, in the power and utilities industry, where is AI used?

DR: Well, we mainly work with the DSOs, distribution system operators, which are kind of responsible for distributing power to end users. Up to few years ago they were basically operating blind because the last lowest voltage network is not instrumented. But since the introduction of smart meters, every home now – well in most of the European countries they are rolling out smart meters and the same in most of the US – every home now basically has a sensor. So now, suddenly they have much more data they can use to more intelligently steer the grid. So, there AI we use mostly to make predictions of loads and consumption from different types of customers, both household and industry customers.

And this is very important information, especially now, with the large introduction of distribution energy resources – all the renewables that are coming online. A lot of people are installing solar panels on the roofs. A lot of end users are now what we call prosumers, so they both produce and consume electricity, so there’s a two-way flow of power and data. So, there are lots of opportunities to optimize this new kind of smart grid that is becoming more and more widespread now.

JS: Very interesting. So, what are some of the most exciting AI applications that you have seen now in the power industry and in what you are doing?

DR: We are developing some very exciting applications in the space of inspections. We are combining AI with drones. Of course, the electrical infrastructure is relatively old and requires quite a lot of maintenance and inspections. And, so far, these inspections have been mostly done manually, so periodically people actually walk along the lines and climb up the poles and check infrastructure. And the last few years they have started using helicopters, and they fly helicopters – quite dangerous missions because they have to be quite close to the power lines, and every year there are reports of near incidents. So, it is quite an expensive process, but it is, of course, necessary, and even more necessary as the infrastructure ages even more.

So, the idea here is to use drones to have a cheaper, more effective inspection. And here, it is very exciting to use all the new technology that we have today for this kind of image intelligence that we have, with deep networks and convolutional neural networks. So, recognizing infrastructure, recognizing different types of faults and anomalies.

“It is very exciting to use all the new technology that we have today… with deep networks and convolutional neural networks, [for] recognizing infrastructure, recognizing different types of faults and anomalies.”

JS: And so, how do you use the cloud?

DR: Our systems are basically deployed in the cloud. So, the smart meter / smart grid systems, they collect data from smart meters and upload everything in the cloud. And all the analysis – all the machine learning and AI – happens in the cloud. And the same for the drones. Well, there are different missions. If it’s kind of a periodic inspection, then time is not the big issue, you can analyze the images in batch, and then we use cloud for that. So, we upload – it can be hundreds of thousands of images – and process them in the cloud.

JS: So, what is the advantage that cloud brings you, cloud and AI together?

DR: It is scalability. Regardless of how many drones or how many pictures our customers are sending to the systems, we are able to serve those.

JS: Near instantly being able to provision as many resources as you want. Okay, that’s very good.

DR: Also, edge is very important, it’s not just the cloud, the intelligent…

JS: Intelligent cloud and intelligent edge.

DR: Because if you’re on a mission for finding a fault or outage as quickly as possible then you need intelligence on the edge. And you also need that if you want to have autonomous drones, of course. Because today, we still don’t have fully autonomous drones – we still have pilots that remotely pilot the drones – but of course, the longer-term vision is to have fully autonomous drones.


JS: So, have you developed a prototype of autonomous drones that can follow power lines?

DR: Yes, to follow power lines and then position itself in the optimum spots to take the correct pictures for the detailed inspection. So the drone is not doing the detailed inspection – that happens in the cloud – but is using edge AI to localize the components, the assets that we need to inspect and take the right pictures and then move on to the next.

JS: Is AI scary?

DR: Not today. But it can be, in the future, you know. Your probably read Bostrom’s book “Superintelligence” that came out in 2014, I think. So, he envisioned like a superintelligence that will take over, and we will not even notice that because it will come so fast we won’t realize. But this is a long time away. But anyway, today there are philosophical and ethical questions that are important to ask ourselves. And there are big institutes both in the UK and in the US that focus on that, so that’s important. But todays technologies can be weaponized in a way, so there is that kind of scary side of it, of using AI without ethical controls, for autonomous weapons. So, there are some initiatives there. In my opinion, there should be an international agreement on how to control autonomy.

JS: But all technologies are the same way, I would think.

DR: Of course.

JS: What are some of the most exciting AI developments you have seen recently?

DR: Well, of course, all the developments around visual intelligence as I call it – so all the analysis of images, segmentation, detecting objects, and things like that with deep neural networks, and convolutional neural networks – it’s very exciting. And one very exciting development is, of course, self-driving cars. That, for me, is very exciting, and I use it a lot as an example in my presentations because it both showcases vision development / technological development but also its an application that basically touches almost everyone. Everyone drives a car, at least in the developed world, so it’s one of the applications that will come – that we will feel – much more quickly than other ones. But, of course, all the developments around language and speech recognition, and all these new intelligent systems and bots that are coming, it’s very exciting developments. From the research point of view, I like a lot of what is happening around the games and gaming in AI. You know, we both started working on AI in the nineties, and at that time, well since the beginning, AI has been applied to games – from checkers, and then chess, Deep Blue beating Kasparov in ’97, and then, more recently, of course, AlphaGo, and AlphaZero, even more exciting and now the latest one with Open AI playing Dota 2 – so, it’s a very nice way of developing new concepts. It doesn’t have direct applications in the real world, but it develops kind of fundamental capabilities that real world systems are going to need.

JS: Any thoughts about the applications of AI outside of the power industry, some of the most exciting other areas that you might be able to go into?

DR: Yeah, well – basically all the work that we are doing both around images and inspections is applicable to other…

JS: … all types of inspections. Yeah, one thing I heard sometime recently was about inspecting for lightning strikes on aircraft. And they were looking to see if you can use AI to identify, because today again somebody has to climb the airplane and go look at spots and see if there has been a lightning strike.

DR: Or inspecting like pipelines, or railways – any kind of infrastructure.

JS: Or even assets, even just counting assets, is one thing I heard, which was interesting.

DR: Almost limitless amount of applications.

JS: Very exciting. Any concluding thoughts on AI and its applications?

DR: Well, it’s very exciting times. I’ve been working in AI for 30 years and finally we see a lot of traction, and we see an explosion of applications and interest and money nonetheless coming into AI. And real applications that are both helpful and exciting.

JS: And do you think AI is being democratized – made available to software developers much more easily?

DR: Yeah, definitely. Today, basically anyone can experiment with AI. Maybe it’s still difficult to make an application that is production-ready if you are not a data scientist because you can fall in many places – you can make a lot of mistakes if you don’t know what you’re doing. But you can experiment and generate something useful in a much easier way than before. So, there’s been a lot of progress around that and there is going to be more progress – I cannot even say in the years to come, just weeks!

JS: Wonderful, it’s been a pleasure talking to you.

DR: Thank you, it’s been a pleasure.

“It’s very exciting times. I’ve been working in AI for 30 years and finally we see a lot of traction, and we see an
explosion of applications and interest…”

We hope you enjoyed this post. This being our first episode in the series, we are eager to hear your feedback, so please share your thoughts and ideas below.

The AI / ML Blog Team

Resources

Malwarebytes cybercrime report shows increase in attacks on businesses

A new cybercrime report from Malwarebytes showed total business threat detections are trending upward by 55%, while consumer detections increased by only 4% quarter over quarter.

In the company’s eighth edition of the report, “Cybercrime Tactics and Techniques Q3 2018,” Malwarebytes investigated the statistics, trends and observations over the past three months specifically. After describing the first two quarters as sleepy, researchers found attacks in the third quarter were targeting businesses in full force through exploit kits, ransomware and banking Trojans alike. With the rise in attacks on businesses versus consumers, Malwarebytes said threat actors seem to have realized that “business targets are returning more value for their efforts.”

“We are seeing an increase in cybercrime, at least on the business side, which detected 55% more malware in the last quarter compared to the one prior. That’s 1.7 million more detections,” said Adam Kujawa, director of malware intelligence at Malwarebytes, based in Santa Clara, Calif. “On the consumer side, however, we only saw an increase of 4%, which is kind of irregular, because we’re used to seeing more activity focused on the consumer side, where there are wide nets being cast to capture anyone they can, versus on the business side, where you don’t see as many attacks.”

Kujawa further noted that we’re seeing more information stealers because they need new, fresh data. The cybercrime report also stated that ransomware and banking Trojans have “leaned much harder into their business targets this quarter. Even malware that’s generally favored consumers, such as cryptominers and adware, seems to have graduated to a more professional prey.”

The Malwarebytes report focused on banking Trojans, cryptomining, ransomware, remote access Trojans, adware, exploit kits and data breaches, while highlighting that there has been less ransomware activity this quarter compared with the prior quarters. However, of the ransomware attacks it’s seen, Malwarebytes reported an 88% increase in attacks aimed at businesses, with the majority being GandCrab.

Kujawa said the GandCrab ransomware family has emerged as the most prominent threat, because it’s already been updated twice this quarter with versions 4 and 5.

“V4 had a lot of significant upgrades to its capability, including giving it the ability to encrypt network drives, which is not something that most ransomware we see out there [does]. I mean, if it’s not acting like an additional drive on the system, then ransomware will identify it,” Kujawa said. “But we started seeing more and more ransomware actually go looking for network shares and then gaining access and encrypting all those files. The evolution of this technology is aimed at organizations that are networked so that it can spread the malware throughout, and we’ve seen plenty of GandCrab focused on the business side.”

Despite the dwindling ransomware market, security researchers around the world have found almost 40 new families of ransomware, with some families making updates, resulting in more dangerous and powerful variants.

With GandCrab increasingly spreading, cryptomining has seemingly slowed down. Even though it is still a problem for businesses and consumers, the third-quarter cybercrime report showed the lowest detection count in a year, and Malwarebytes is no longer considering it the most prevalent threat. Malwarebytes researchers said they believe this could be due to the differences between the price of bitcoin and the cost to mine it, even though cybercriminals typically don’t use their own resources for mining.

With businesses becoming the popular targets for threat actors, the cybercrime report noted that consumers may be tempted to let down their security guards. However, Malwarebytes researchers warned that with the continued evolution of the threat landscape, malware authors will likely use consumers for experimentation with new attackers and techniques.

For Sale – Ultra compact gaming HTPC

Ultra compact gaming HTPC

Spec as follows:
Intel i5 6600k Skylake CPU
Cryorig C7 CPU cooler
Asus Z270i Rog Strix itx motherboard
2 x 4GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2400mhz
240GB Kingston Ultra II SATA SSD
Corsair SF450 450w Gold fully modular PSU
Fractal Design Node 202 case
MSI GTX 1060 6GB Gaming X plus – with upgraded faster GDDR5 memory at 9000mhz
2 x Corsair SP120 case fans

Hopefully the photos speak for themselves, this is a nice little build with plenty of power and it runs cool and quiet. It’s a really compact form factor.

There are boxes for most of the major components, the PSU has additional cables, all accessories for the case are included.

The system consumes about 275w of power which hits the sweet spot for being power efficient.

The 2 120mm Corsair fans provide additional cooling and airflow for the GPU. Nvidia’s auto GPU boost feature pushes the core clock to well over 2000mhz maintains a temp around the mid 60s.

The motherboard is high end with software controlled RGB lighting, WiFi, Bluetooth, USB Type C, 2 x M2 slots etc and great overclocking potential.

As all the original boxes are included, postage cost will be quite high due to size and weight.

Any questions, let me know.

Price and currency: 500 no offers
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Swansea
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

How Can Autonomous Drones Help the Energy and Utilities Industry?


Welcome to How AI Transform Business, a new series featuring insights from conversations with Microsoft partners who are combining deep industry knowledge with AI in novel ways and, in doing so, creating leading-edge intelligent business solutions for our digital age.

Our first episode features eSmart Systems, which is in the business of creating solutions to accelerate global progress towards sustainable societies. Headquartered in the heart of Østfold county, Norway, eSmart Systems develops digital intelligence for the energy industry and for smart communities. The company is strategically co-located with the NCE Smart Energy Markets cluster and the Østfold University College and thrives in a very innovative environment. When it comes to next-generation grid management systems, or efficiently running operations for the connected cities of the future or driving citizen engagement, the company is at the forefront of digital transformation.

We recently caught up with Davide Roverso, Chief Analytics Officer at eSmart Systems. Davide has many interesting things to share about where and how AI is being applied in the infrastructure industry. Among other things, he talks about how utilities companies are forced to fly manned helicopters missions over live electrical power lines today, just to perform routine inspections, and how – using AI – it is possible to have safer and more effective inspections that do not expose humans to this sort of risk.


Davide Roverso, Chief Analytics Officer, eSmart Systems, in conversation with Joseph Sirosh,
Chief Technology Officer of Artificial Intelligence in Microsoft’s Worldwide Commercial Business.

Video and podcasts versions of this session are available via the links below. Alternatively – just continue reading a transcript of their conversation below.

Joseph Sirosh: Davide, would you tell a little about eSmart Systems and yourself?

Davide Roverso: eSmart Systems is a small Norwegian startup, was established in 2013. The main area in which we work is building SaaS for the energy and utilities sector. So basically, it was founded by a group of people that had been working together for over 20 years in the energy and utilities space. They were first working a lot on power exchange software, and delivered power exchange to California, among others. And then, about 2012, they went for a kind of exploration trip to the US, to Silicon Valley and that area, and they visited Google and Amazon and Microsoft and Cloudera and tried to find what were the new biggest trends. And they came back home with a clear idea that they had to focus on cloud and AI. And of course, they used that in their core business and that was power and utilities.

So that’s how eSmart Systems started.

JS: And so, you have an analytics team, or now is it an AI team?

DR: We have 10 data scientists, so more than 10% of the company is data scientists, so we have a big focus on AI. When I started in eSmart Systems about three years ago we were just two, so I built quite a good group since then. And we use machine learning in a lot of different areas. Two main areas are specifically time series analysis and predictions, and the other is more on analyzing images – we use that for inspecting, for instance, power lines with drones.

JS: You must have a lot of interesting projects. So, tell me, in the power and utilities industry, where is AI used?

DR: Well, we mainly work with the DSOs, distribution system operators, which are kind of responsible for distributing power to end users. Up to few years ago they were basically operating blind because the last lowest voltage network is not instrumented. But since the introduction of smart meters, every home now – well in most of the European countries they are rolling out smart meters and the same in most of the US – every home now basically has a sensor. So now, suddenly they have much more data they can use to more intelligently steer the grid. So, there AI we use mostly to make predictions of loads and consumption from different types of customers, both household and industry customers.

And this is very important information, especially now, with the large introduction of distribution energy resources – all the renewables that are coming online. A lot of people are installing solar panels on the roofs. A lot of end users are now what we call prosumers, so they both produce and consume electricity, so there’s a two-way flow of power and data. So, there are lots of opportunities to optimize this new kind of smart grid that is becoming more and more widespread now.

JS: Very interesting. So, what are some of the most exciting AI applications that you have seen now in the power industry and in what you are doing?

DR: We are developing some very exciting applications in the space of inspections. We are combining AI with drones. Of course, the electrical infrastructure is relatively old and requires quite a lot of maintenance and inspections. And, so far, these inspections have been mostly done manually, so periodically people actually walk along the lines and climb up the poles and check infrastructure. And the last few years they have started using helicopters, and they fly helicopters – quite dangerous missions because they have to be quite close to the power lines, and every year there are reports of near incidents. So, it is quite an expensive process, but it is, of course, necessary, and even more necessary as the infrastructure ages even more.

So, the idea here is to use drones to have a cheaper, more effective inspection. And here, it is very exciting to use all the new technology that we have today for this kind of image intelligence that we have, with deep networks and convolutional neural networks. So, recognizing infrastructure, recognizing different types of faults and anomalies.

“It is very exciting to use all the new technology that we have today… with deep networks and convolutional neural networks, [for] recognizing infrastructure, recognizing different types of faults and anomalies.”

JS: And so, how do you use the cloud?

DR: Our systems are basically deployed in the cloud. So, the smart meter / smart grid systems, they collect data from smart meters and upload everything in the cloud. And all the analysis – all the machine learning and AI – happens in the cloud. And the same for the drones. Well, there are different missions. If it’s kind of a periodic inspection, then time is not the big issue, you can analyze the images in batch, and then we use cloud for that. So, we upload – it can be hundreds of thousands of images – and process them in the cloud.

JS: So, what is the advantage that cloud brings you, cloud and AI together?

DR: It is scalability. Regardless of how many drones or how many pictures our customers are sending to the systems, we are able to serve those.

JS: Near instantly being able to provision as many resources as you want. Okay, that’s very good.

DR: Also, edge is very important, it’s not just the cloud, the intelligent…

JS: Intelligent cloud and intelligent edge.

DR: Because if you’re on a mission for finding a fault or outage as quickly as possible then you need intelligence on the edge. And you also need that if you want to have autonomous drones, of course. Because today, we still don’t have fully autonomous drones – we still have pilots that remotely pilot the drones – but of course, the longer-term vision is to have fully autonomous drones.


JS: So, have you developed a prototype of autonomous drones that can follow power lines?

DR: Yes, to follow power lines and then position itself in the optimum spots to take the correct pictures for the detailed inspection. So the drone is not doing the detailed inspection – that happens in the cloud – but is using edge AI to localize the components, the assets that we need to inspect and take the right pictures and then move on to the next.

JS: Is AI scary?

DR: Not today. But it can be, in the future, you know. Your probably read Bostrom’s book “Superintelligence” that came out in 2014, I think. So, he envisioned like a superintelligence that will take over, and we will not even notice that because it will come so fast we won’t realize. But this is a long time away. But anyway, today there are philosophical and ethical questions that are important to ask ourselves. And there are big institutes both in the UK and in the US that focus on that, so that’s important. But todays technologies can be weaponized in a way, so there is that kind of scary side of it, of using AI without ethical controls, for autonomous weapons. So, there are some initiatives there. In my opinion, there should be an international agreement on how to control autonomy.

JS: But all technologies are the same way, I would think.

DR: Of course.

JS: What are some of the most exciting AI developments you have seen recently?

DR: Well, of course, all the developments around visual intelligence as I call it – so all the analysis of images, segmentation, detecting objects, and things like that with deep neural networks, and convolutional neural networks – it’s very exciting. And one very exciting development is, of course, self-driving cars. That, for me, is very exciting, and I use it a lot as an example in my presentations because it both showcases vision development / technological development but also its an application that basically touches almost everyone. Everyone drives a car, at least in the developed world, so it’s one of the applications that will come – that we will feel – much more quickly than other ones. But, of course, all the developments around language and speech recognition, and all these new intelligent systems and bots that are coming, it’s very exciting developments. From the research point of view, I like a lot of what is happening around the games and gaming in AI. You know, we both started working on AI in the nineties, and at that time, well since the beginning, AI has been applied to games – from checkers, and then chess, Deep Blue beating Kasparov in ’97, and then, more recently, of course, AlphaGo, and AlphaZero, even more exciting and now the latest one with Open AI playing Dota 2 – so, it’s a very nice way of developing new concepts. It doesn’t have direct applications in the real world, but it develops kind of fundamental capabilities that real world systems are going to need.

JS: Any thoughts about the applications of AI outside of the power industry, some of the most exciting other areas that you might be able to go into?

DR: Yeah, well – basically all the work that we are doing both around images and inspections is applicable to other…

JS: … all types of inspections. Yeah, one thing I heard sometime recently was about inspecting for lightning strikes on aircraft. And they were looking to see if you can use AI to identify, because today again somebody has to climb the airplane and go look at spots and see if there has been a lightning strike.

DR: Or inspecting like pipelines, or railways – any kind of infrastructure.

JS: Or even assets, even just counting assets, is one thing I heard, which was interesting.

DR: Almost limitless amount of applications.

JS: Very exciting. Any concluding thoughts on AI and its applications?

DR: Well, it’s very exciting times. I’ve been working in AI for 30 years and finally we see a lot of traction, and we see an explosion of applications and interest and money nonetheless coming into AI. And real applications that are both helpful and exciting.

JS: And do you think AI is being democratized – made available to software developers much more easily?

DR: Yeah, definitely. Today, basically anyone can experiment with AI. Maybe it’s still difficult to make an application that is production-ready if you are not a data scientist because you can fall in many places – you can make a lot of mistakes if you don’t know what you’re doing. But you can experiment and generate something useful in a much easier way than before. So, there’s been a lot of progress around that and there is going to be more progress – I cannot even say in the years to come, just weeks!

JS: Wonderful, it’s been a pleasure talking to you.

DR: Thank you, it’s been a pleasure.

“It’s very exciting times. I’ve been working in AI for 30 years and finally we see a lot of traction, and we see an
explosion of applications and interest…”

We hope you enjoyed this post. This being our first episode in the series, we are eager to hear your feedback, so please share your thoughts and ideas below.

The AI / ML Blog Team

Resources

Juniper earnings downed by a lack of cloud sales

Juniper Networks said it wouldn’t meet its goal of returning to year-over-year revenue growth in the current quarter because of weak sales to major public cloud providers.

Juniper predicted revenue in the fourth quarter ending in December would reach $1.2 billion, which would amount to a decline from the same period a year ago. The company also reported this week revenue fell 6% in the third quarter ended in September to $1.18 billion, while net income minus one-time items decreased 10% to $191 million.

“I am disappointed in our performance in switching for Q3,” Juniper CEO Rami Rahim told financial analysts during a conference call following the release of Juniper earnings. “I think we can and will do better.”

Sales of switches, routers and software to cloud providers dropped 28% in the third quarter to $250 million. Contributing to the decrease were cloud customers who had previously purchased Juniper’s MX routers switching to the lower price per port PTX routers, said Frank Marsala, an analyst at Gartner.

Also, “the challenges for Juniper remain competitors and slow spending by communications service providers,” Marsala said. Competitors that have cut into Juniper’s customer base include Arista and Nokia.

Rahim expected cloud sales to remain weak through the rest of the year but predicted improvement next year. “I do think 2019 will be a growth year for us in the cloud based on the visibility that we have,” Rahim said during the Juniper earnings call.

I am disappointed in our performance in switching for Q3. I think we can and will do better.
Rami RahimCEO, Juniper

Cloud providers with massive data centers, such as Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon and Google, turn to network hardware suppliers for spine switches and core routers while using white box systems with an open source network operating system for top-of-rack switching, said Brad Casemore, an analyst at IDC.

“The situation is fluid, however, and hyperscalers continuously strive to reduce data center infrastructure costs, including the cost of data center networking — both Capex and Opex,” Casemore said.

Enterprise sales offset cloud slump

Juniper’s weakness in sales to cloud providers was offset in part by an increase in revenue from enterprises. Sales of enterprise hardware and software rose 15% in the third quarter to $386 million.

Revenue listed in Juniper earnings from security products sold to enterprises and communication service providers rose 8% to $77 million.

Juniper rivals Cisco and Arista reported better performance in their most recent quarterly reports. In August, Cisco reported a 6% revenue increase in the quarter ended in July and forecasted a 5% to 7% rise in the current quarter. Arista said revenue in the quarter ended June 30 increased 10%.

The three networking suppliers compete in the data center and more recently in campus and multi-cloud networking. For cloud providers, the three companies have introduced 400 GbE switches and routers, which analysts expect to replace current 100 GbE hardware over the next several years.

For Sale – Intel Skylake-X 7820 CPU with de-lidding kit.

Am selling:

1. Intel Skylake-X 7820 CPU (8 cores / 16 threads) in anti-static box
2. Derbauer Skylake-X delidding tool (£79 on OCUK)
3. Thermal Grizzly Conductanaut Liquid Metal tube (worth £15)
4. Clear nail polish (watch the Gamers Nexus youtube videos to see how this protects CPU surface components from liquid metal shorting) (worth only about £3)

I obtained all of the above and have been planning on de-lidding for months but the i9-9900K is out now and I may go for that despite the bad thermals in reviews regarding the soldered TIM (not as good as liquid metal according to the reviewers).

Anyone de-lidding does so at their own risk and invalidates their Intel warranty. I would advise running (and testing) first without de-lidding to establish a baseline and then seeing how much better/cooler the cpu runs after applying liquid metal (around 20 degree Celsius according to experts – see the Gamers Nexus de-lidding videos for a step by step guide).

£500 for the lot. If I don’t get any takers after a few days I will put it on Ebay but thought I would offer it here first.

Price and currency: £500
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Cleared funds for posting or face to face transaction
Location: London E17
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.