Mixer Builds Custom Golf Carts for Post Malone to Game and Stream at Posty Fest – Xbox Wire

Mixer is teaming up with multi-platinum recording artist Post Malone, to give him and fans the ultimate festival experience, Posty-style, at his inaugural music festival, Posty Fest. We’ll be serving looks in customized golf carts that are tricked out from top to bottom with Post Malone in mind.

The custom designed Mixer HypeCart, comes equipped with a 40-inch HD screen TV, a custom Posty Fest Xbox One X console, 13-inch, one hundred spoke rims, and will be a fully-operational livestreaming machine to give you an inside look at the festival as Post Malone streams live behind-the-scenes from the carts the day before the festival on Saturday, October 27 starting at 2 p.m. PDT.

Tune in to the Mixer Post Malone Channel and see Post Malone answer fan questions, drive around the venue for an exclusive sneak peek of the festival, and for a chance to win a customized Posty Fest Xbox One X console. Post Malone will also be playing the latest games available on Xbox Game Pass, so be sure to tune in to see if Post Malone games as well as he performs!

But that’s not all. It wouldn’t be a Post Malone golf cart if it didn’t have a cooler for his beverages as well as three cameras so fans won’t miss a second of all the good Posty vibes.

Oh and, we didn’t stop with just one. We’ve created two of these monster machines. A second green, Xbox-themed golf cart is ready to take on the scene. Both the Mixer and Xbox golf carts will be at future events as well so be on the lookout for them!

All of this is part of Mixer’s collaboration with Posty Fest, taking place in Dallas, Texas on Sunday, October 28.

Don’t miss the pre-Posty Fest livestream with Post Malone on the Mixer Post Malone Channel on Saturday, October 27 starting at 2 p.m. PDT.

We’re hyped for this one!

Get-Counter: Use PowerShell to Get Hyper-V Performance Data

In my last article, I left you with some PowerShell technique for getting Hyper-V performance counters from Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) using Get-CimInstance. I’ll admit that getting the information from WMI is bit advanced. But PowerShell has another cmdlet called Get-Counter that might be able to simplify the process. Although I expect you’ll want to massage this output as well. Don’t worry. I’ve got plenty of code examples to get you started.

The code I’m going to show you should work against a remote server. Although as a last resort you could run my commands in a remote session using Invoke-Command. To make things easy for you to follow along, I’m going to set a variable for the computer I want to query, just as I did in previous articles. In this case, this will be my Windows 10 laptop running Hyper-V.

The Get-Counter cmdlet can list all available counter sets. For our purposes naturally, we are interested in Hyper-V counters.

How to use Get-Counter cmdlet

get-counter list

In my setup, I am always most concerned about memory usage since that is the one resource that is always limited for me. So I only care about dynamic memory

dynamic mem list get-counter

The key bit of information is the list of counters. These are the things I can get data on. Here’s the really cool part. I can pipe this output back to Get-Counter and get results for all available counters and instances.

I saved the results to a variable so I can re-use it.

dynamic mem counters get-counter

The output of Get-Counter is great to look at but a bit cumbersome. The CounterSamples property lists the counter and value. In the value, you can see the computername, (YPJH10) and the virtual machine name like SRV1 and DOM1. You may prefer a better look at this data.

Here I’ve created a formatted table grouped by each instance name.

dynamicmemtable

The Path values are a bit redundant so I’ll clean them up a bit with the help of a regular expression.

( can get the counter itself by splitting the path to get the last part. The regular expression pulls out the Hyper-V hostname from between the slashes.

dynamicmemtable2

This is a bit prettier and easier to read, but I can’t do much with it other than sending to a file or printer. But since performance counters are about reporting anyway that doesn’t matter a great deal. In fact, I know how much you all love HTML reports so here’s something you can use to create another version of this information.

This script is designed to report on the Hyper-V dynamic memory counters, but you could modify it for probably any counter set. You could also modify it to limit reporting to a specific virtual machine by inserting some code to filter on the Instance. This script includes a CSS style sheet embedded into the report that will display table rows in alternate colors.

dynamic mem html get-counter

I think by now your head is spinning with PowerShell code so I’ll wrap it up for now so you have some time to try these things out. I hope you are finding these excursions into performance counters with PowerShell useful because I have a few more things in mind to share with you. In the meantime kick the samples around, in a test environment of course, and let me know what you think in the comments section below!

Want to learn more neat tips using PowerShell? Check out these 5 PowerShell Hacks for Hyper-V!

Are you having trouble getting your PowerShell scripts to run properly? Find out Why Your Hyper-V PowerShell Commands Don’t Work (and how to fix them)

IBM storage products get another NVMe booster shot

IBM dropped its quarterly wave of storage products this week, focusing mainly on latency-lowering NVMe technologies and managing growing volumes of unstructured data.

IBM followed through on its roadmap to broaden support for end-to-end NVMe from application servers to storage arrays with the launch of a new Storwize V7000 system. The Storwize V7000 is the first IBM midtier system to add support for NVMe-oF, offering a Fibre Channel (FC) option.

Other IBM storage products launched or upgraded include Spectrum Virtualize, Spectrum Discover, Storage Insights, IBM Cloud Object Storage, a FlashSystem A9000R array and a TS1160 enterprise tape drive.

“This is just another example that we’re in the year of NVMe,” said Scott Sinclair, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group. “Storage vendors are embracing the benefits of NVMe technology to provide higher storage performance and more efficient data access.”

Eric Burgener, an IDC analyst, said it’s important for IBM to extend NVMe support across its portfolio. IDC research predicts that, by 2021, systems that use NVMe rather than SCSI as a foundation technology will generate at least half of external primary storage revenue.

“We’ve had all this infrastructure modernization going on and the new workloads that need to be managed include a lot of real-time big data analytics that you just really can’t run on SCSI,” Burgener said. “There are workloads that absolutely have to have NVMe in the mix.”

IBM’s FlashSystem 900 enabled NVMe over InfiniBand early this year, and the FlashSystem 9100 shipped in August with end-to-end NVMe support.

IBM Storwize V7000 all-flash array
IBM Storwize V7000 is a midrange all-flash array that supports end-to-end NVMe.

NVMe over Fibre Channel support

IBM now supports the NVMe over FC transport option in storage products that use its Spectrum Virtualize software, including the new Storwize V7000. Customers that purchased IBM’s SAN Volume Controller, FlashSystem 9100 and V9000 or Storwize V7000F after September 2016 can enable NVMe over FC through a nondisruptive update of the IBM Spectrum Virtualize code. IBM plans to add support for NVMe over Ethernet through Spectrum Virtualize in 2019, according to Eric Herzog, chief marketing officer and vice president of worldwide storage channels at IBM.

Like many IBM storage products, the new Storwize V7000 ships with Spectrum Virtualize software to deliver enterprise data services to IBM and third-party storage systems. These services include snapshots, replication, at-rest encryption and artificial intelligence-based data tiering.

The Storwize V7000 now includes hardware-based compression and encryption to minimize the performance impact of those functions. Herzog said IBM uses extra processor chips in its new FlashCore Modules to enable the hardware-based at-rest data encryption and compression.

A new NVMe-based 19.2 TB FlashCore Module also serves to boost the density of the Storwize system. The all-flash Storwize V7000 offers a maximum raw capacity of 461 TB per control enclosure and as much as 32 PB in a four-way cluster. Flash drive capacity options are 4.8 TB, 9.6 TB and 19.2 TB, and IBM claims it can deliver 5-to-1 data compression.

Enabling off-the-shelf NVMe SSDs

Storwize ships with IBM’s new 2.5-inch FlashCore Modules by default, but customers can choose industry standard NVMe-based SSDs or add HDDs from third-party vendors. Herzog said IBM’s FlashCore Modules offer higher performance, lower latency and a longer seven-year warranty than open-market SSDs that are typically guaranteed for three to five years.

Burgener said IBM’s shift to enable the use of off-the-shelf NVMe SSDs “basically shows that they don’t feel there’s that much of a performance difference associated with custom hardware anymore.”

“If you want to run inline data services, like compression and encryption, you can do that with lower latencies on those FlashCore Modules. But if you’re not interested in that, then the NVMe SSDs are actually a less expensive option. That, to me, is their future direction,” Burgener said.

Also among new IBM storage products is a new 18 TB custom flash module that can double the maximum capacity of its FlashSystem 900. A new 15.36 TB flash module boosts storage density in IBM’s high-end DS8880F arrays targeting the Unix, Linux and mainframe markets. A new DS8880 zHyperLink card improves latency.

IBM also added an entry-level configuration of the FlashSystem A9000R system designed for cloud storage.

Spectrum Discover product aimed at ‘data oceans’

IBM’s new Spectrum Discover product is designed to automate the cataloging of unstructured data through standard metadata and newly created custom metadata to facilitate data analytics, governance and storage optimization. The software deploys as a VMware virtual appliance and includes an API to enable data analytics, compliance and other applications to access the metadata.

“Forget data lakes. You’ve now got oceans of data. How are you going to leverage that ocean of data to get value out of it?” Herzog said.

Using custom metadata tags, Spectrum Discover can help to speed the data scanning process, especially with compliance applications that need to search through potentially billions of files, Herzog said. With analytics workloads, data scientists often must work with storage administrators to prepare the data, and Spectrum Discover could automate and streamline the process, he added.

“The fastest array in the world won’t help if you don’t know what your data is,” wrote Steve McDowell, an analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy, in an email. “IBM’s Spectrum Discover will solve real-world problems in data management. I think we’ll see others emulating IBM on this front.”

Spectrum Discover is based on technology from IBM Research and supports unstructured data in IBM Cloud Object Storage System and IBM Spectrum Scale. IBM plans to add support for Dell EMC Isilon next year.

More updates to IBM storage products

An update to IBM’s free cloud-based Storage Insights resource management tool adds capabilities to create and schedule customized reports and diagnose SAN bottlenecks. AI technology can detect storage network gridlock, triggering an alert for an IBM support technician to contact the customer. The first version of Storage Insights became generally available last February.

IBM’s pay-for-what-you-use Storage Utility Offering can now enable dual-system high-availability configurations at a starting monthly rate that’s only 20% more than the cost to lease a single system. The IBM Storage Utility Offering also added support for a data protection product, the TS7760 virtual tape library.

Updates to IBM storage products aren’t restricted to flash. The new entry-level TS1160 enterprise tape drive improves performance; supports write once, ready many (WORM) for users in regulated industries; and boosts capacity to 20 TB, a doubling of the prior TS1150 model. IBM’s TS3500 and TS4500 libraries support the new tape drive.

IBM Cloud Object Storage also adds new WORM capability for low-cost mirrored and concentrated dispersal mode configurations. The product also supports more concurrent use cases with a 50% increase in the maximum number of support vaults per system.

Next year, IBM plans to support NVMe in its Cloud Object Storage, as the supported servers that run the software add NVMe-based flash drives. NVMe over Ethernet support is on IBM’s 2019 roadmap for Spectrum Accelerate, with the FlashSystem A9000/R, and Spectrum Virtualize.

FlashSystem A9000/R is also expected to use AI technology to automate data deduplication and ease capacity management next year.

Also in 2019, IBM plans to expand its AI reference architectures with an Nvidia option, building on the Power AI reference architecture the company unveiled in June.

The latest updates to IBM storage products also included SAP HANA certification for its FlashSystem 9100 and new Storwize V7000, Spectrum Protect, Spectrum Copy Data Management and Spectrum Virtualize. IBM certified FlashSystem 9100 with Epic electronic healthcare records management software this year and plans to add support for Meditech next year. IBM also expects to extend solutions support to blockchain next year.

For Sale – Acer Predator XB271H Gaming Monitor 170hz G-sync 1ms

Amazing 27″ monitor for sale.

This thing is an absolute beast, however I’m upgrading to 4k and need to sell.

It’s really hard for me to part with this monitor as it’s been the central part of my build.

Collection only or if you pay for courier I will get it delivered.

Price and currency: 400
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank Transfer or Paypal Gift
Location: Nottingham
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Use Microsoft SCVMM to clone a VM

Using System Center Virtual Machine Manager to clone a VM is relatively easy. It only takes a few clicks to have a cloned VM running on the Hyper-V host of your choice, but you should clone a VM that has already been generalized.

In SCVMM you can clone running, paused or shutdown VMs. Before the release of SCVMM 2012 R2, you had to stop the VM before you could execute the cloning process.

Why clone a VM?

One reason to use cloning is for rapid VM deployment. Cloning a running production VM is also beneficial if you run a mission-critical VM. For example, you don’t need to take the VM offline to test an upgrade. You can clone the running VM, test the upgrade and then apply the upgrade to the production VM if it’s successful.

With the cloning process, you can keep a copy of a critical VM to restore it in case of failure. Furthermore, you can copy a cloned VM to the SCVMM library and you can use it to create VM templates.

Requirements of SCVMM clone VM

Before you proceed with the cloning process, there are some requirements you must meet. You must run SCVMM 2012 R2 or later versions so you can see the option to clone a VM.

You can clone an existing VM, but cloning a nongeneralized VM might cause issues. Microsoft recommends generalizing a VM using the Sysprep tool before cloning it. The VM must be deployed on the Hyper-V host or stored in the SCVMM library. Other than those requirements, you must have sufficient permissions to initiate the cloning process.

Steps to clone a VM

Even if you clone an already generalized VM, SCVMM runs the Sysprep tool to generalize it again after cloning to avoid any duplicate security identifier issues. The steps for cloning are quite simple. All you need to do is find the VM you want to clone and then click on the clone action.

In SCVMM, go to the Virtual Machine tab. Right click on the VM you want to clone, click Create and then click Clone, as shown in Figure A below.

SCVMM clone VM
Figure A. Clone a VM using SCVMM

Next, you will be presented with a cloning wizard. You must provide an identity for the cloned VM, configure hardware for the VM and select the destination for the VM. SCVMM helps you deploy the VM to the target host, which isn’t the case when you use the cloning process in Hyper-V Manager.

Handy PowerShell ISE add-ons for server administrators

IT workers are notorious for their steadfast ways. If it’s not broke — and is still covered under support — don’t change it.

Microsoft’s deprecation of Windows PowerShell with the open source PowerShell Core coincides with the company’s recommendation for administrators to move their coding development from the PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE) to VS Code.

Longtime users of PowerShell ISE might be reluctant to switch for a few reasons. Some coders prefer how ISE’s console displays command output. Others want features that aren’t available in VS Code that make their jobs easier, such as Snippets.

Another reason for staying behind is the various PowerShell ISE add-ons that are part of the customized workflow setup that administrators rely on to manage their on-premises infrastructure and to handle various tasks in the Azure cloud platform.

Until some of the functionality available in some of the more helpful PowerShell ISE add-ons gets ported over to VS Code, there’s still some life left in the venerable script editor. Here is a list of some of the extensions that PowerShell ISE stalwarts still find viable despite Microsoft’s shift to VS Code.

The ISESteroids add-on

Advanced PowerShell scripters who stick with PowerShell ISE usually list ISESteroids as their main reason for staying put. ISESteroids — as the name implies — adds some muscle to PowerShell ISE with several enhancements to produce code more efficiently, such as its code refactoring feature and how it oversees the use of variables, which can be a boon in particularly complicated projects.

Unlike most other PowerShell ISE add-ons, ISESteroids is a bit pricey at $190; but for many longtime users, it’s well worth the cost.

Azure Automation PowerShell ISE add-on

Until some of the functionality available in some of the more helpful PowerShell ISE add-ons gets ported over to VS Code, there’s still some life left in the venerable script editor.

Administrators can use their PowerShell skills in the Microsoft cloud using the Azure Automation feature to set up repetitive tasks or to manage resources. IT workers can develop runbooks for various tasks such as deploying virtual machines or backing up data. The Azure portal is one way to produce runbooks, but some administrators with more advanced needs can put together a PowerShell script for Azure while working in PowerShell ISE.

The Azure Automation PowerShell ISE add-on inserts a menu interface in PowerShell ISE for administrators who use runbooks in the Microsoft cloud. Instead of going to the Azure portal to work with code, this PowerShell ISE add-on gives administrators a familiar workspace in which to build, test, publish and schedule runbooks.

The ISE Git add-on

One of the perks of VS Code is its integration with Git to help administrators maintain control over their code versions. Git offers a number of advantages, such as tracking changes to code, undoing mistakes and sharing scripts.

Noted PowerShell expert Mike Robbins cooked up his own PowerShell ISE add-on a few years back that administrators have found useful to perform a similar task. Robbins’s blog explains the system requirements and provides a comprehensive tutorial to get this add-on working on your Windows 10 machine.

The Command add-on

Another PowerShell ISE add-on makes life easier for scripting administrators. Enabled after picking the Show-Command add-on from the View menu, the Command add-on connects to the help system in PowerShell and generates a catalog of available cmdlets with examples of usage and parameters. This can be helpful for administrators who use a number of modules and need a way to stay on top of all the PowerShell commands at their disposal.

How Can Autonomous Drones Help the Energy and Utilities Industry?


Welcome to How AI Transform Business, a new series featuring insights from conversations with Microsoft partners who are combining deep industry knowledge with AI in novel ways and, in doing so, creating leading-edge intelligent business solutions for our digital age.

Our first episode features eSmart Systems, which is in the business of creating solutions to accelerate global progress towards sustainable societies. Headquartered in the heart of Østfold county, Norway, eSmart Systems develops digital intelligence for the energy industry and for smart communities. The company is strategically co-located with the NCE Smart Energy Markets cluster and the Østfold University College and thrives in a very innovative environment. When it comes to next-generation grid management systems, or efficiently running operations for the connected cities of the future or driving citizen engagement, the company is at the forefront of digital transformation.

We recently caught up with Davide Roverso, Chief Analytics Officer at eSmart Systems. Davide has many interesting things to share about where and how AI is being applied in the infrastructure industry. Among other things, he talks about how utilities companies are forced to fly manned helicopters missions over live electrical power lines today, just to perform routine inspections, and how – using AI – it is possible to have safer and more effective inspections that do not expose humans to this sort of risk.


Davide Roverso, Chief Analytics Officer, eSmart Systems, in conversation with Joseph Sirosh,
Chief Technology Officer of Artificial Intelligence in Microsoft’s Worldwide Commercial Business.

Video and podcasts versions of this session are available via the links below. Alternatively – just continue reading a transcript of their conversation below.

Joseph Sirosh: Davide, would you tell a little about eSmart Systems and yourself?

Davide Roverso: eSmart Systems is a small Norwegian startup, was established in 2013. The main area in which we work is building SaaS for the energy and utilities sector. So basically, it was founded by a group of people that had been working together for over 20 years in the energy and utilities space. They were first working a lot on power exchange software, and delivered power exchange to California, among others. And then, about 2012, they went for a kind of exploration trip to the US, to Silicon Valley and that area, and they visited Google and Amazon and Microsoft and Cloudera and tried to find what were the new biggest trends. And they came back home with a clear idea that they had to focus on cloud and AI. And of course, they used that in their core business and that was power and utilities.

So that’s how eSmart Systems started.

JS: And so, you have an analytics team, or now is it an AI team?

DR: We have 10 data scientists, so more than 10% of the company is data scientists, so we have a big focus on AI. When I started in eSmart Systems about three years ago we were just two, so I built quite a good group since then. And we use machine learning in a lot of different areas. Two main areas are specifically time series analysis and predictions, and the other is more on analyzing images – we use that for inspecting, for instance, power lines with drones.

JS: You must have a lot of interesting projects. So, tell me, in the power and utilities industry, where is AI used?

DR: Well, we mainly work with the DSOs, distribution system operators, which are kind of responsible for distributing power to end users. Up to few years ago they were basically operating blind because the last lowest voltage network is not instrumented. But since the introduction of smart meters, every home now – well in most of the European countries they are rolling out smart meters and the same in most of the US – every home now basically has a sensor. So now, suddenly they have much more data they can use to more intelligently steer the grid. So, there AI we use mostly to make predictions of loads and consumption from different types of customers, both household and industry customers.

And this is very important information, especially now, with the large introduction of distribution energy resources – all the renewables that are coming online. A lot of people are installing solar panels on the roofs. A lot of end users are now what we call prosumers, so they both produce and consume electricity, so there’s a two-way flow of power and data. So, there are lots of opportunities to optimize this new kind of smart grid that is becoming more and more widespread now.

JS: Very interesting. So, what are some of the most exciting AI applications that you have seen now in the power industry and in what you are doing?

DR: We are developing some very exciting applications in the space of inspections. We are combining AI with drones. Of course, the electrical infrastructure is relatively old and requires quite a lot of maintenance and inspections. And, so far, these inspections have been mostly done manually, so periodically people actually walk along the lines and climb up the poles and check infrastructure. And the last few years they have started using helicopters, and they fly helicopters – quite dangerous missions because they have to be quite close to the power lines, and every year there are reports of near incidents. So, it is quite an expensive process, but it is, of course, necessary, and even more necessary as the infrastructure ages even more.

So, the idea here is to use drones to have a cheaper, more effective inspection. And here, it is very exciting to use all the new technology that we have today for this kind of image intelligence that we have, with deep networks and convolutional neural networks. So, recognizing infrastructure, recognizing different types of faults and anomalies.

“It is very exciting to use all the new technology that we have today… with deep networks and convolutional neural networks, [for] recognizing infrastructure, recognizing different types of faults and anomalies.”

JS: And so, how do you use the cloud?

DR: Our systems are basically deployed in the cloud. So, the smart meter / smart grid systems, they collect data from smart meters and upload everything in the cloud. And all the analysis – all the machine learning and AI – happens in the cloud. And the same for the drones. Well, there are different missions. If it’s kind of a periodic inspection, then time is not the big issue, you can analyze the images in batch, and then we use cloud for that. So, we upload – it can be hundreds of thousands of images – and process them in the cloud.

JS: So, what is the advantage that cloud brings you, cloud and AI together?

DR: It is scalability. Regardless of how many drones or how many pictures our customers are sending to the systems, we are able to serve those.

JS: Near instantly being able to provision as many resources as you want. Okay, that’s very good.

DR: Also, edge is very important, it’s not just the cloud, the intelligent…

JS: Intelligent cloud and intelligent edge.

DR: Because if you’re on a mission for finding a fault or outage as quickly as possible then you need intelligence on the edge. And you also need that if you want to have autonomous drones, of course. Because today, we still don’t have fully autonomous drones – we still have pilots that remotely pilot the drones – but of course, the longer-term vision is to have fully autonomous drones.


JS: So, have you developed a prototype of autonomous drones that can follow power lines?

DR: Yes, to follow power lines and then position itself in the optimum spots to take the correct pictures for the detailed inspection. So the drone is not doing the detailed inspection – that happens in the cloud – but is using edge AI to localize the components, the assets that we need to inspect and take the right pictures and then move on to the next.

JS: Is AI scary?

DR: Not today. But it can be, in the future, you know. Your probably read Bostrom’s book “Superintelligence” that came out in 2014, I think. So, he envisioned like a superintelligence that will take over, and we will not even notice that because it will come so fast we won’t realize. But this is a long time away. But anyway, today there are philosophical and ethical questions that are important to ask ourselves. And there are big institutes both in the UK and in the US that focus on that, so that’s important. But todays technologies can be weaponized in a way, so there is that kind of scary side of it, of using AI without ethical controls, for autonomous weapons. So, there are some initiatives there. In my opinion, there should be an international agreement on how to control autonomy.

JS: But all technologies are the same way, I would think.

DR: Of course.

JS: What are some of the most exciting AI developments you have seen recently?

DR: Well, of course, all the developments around visual intelligence as I call it – so all the analysis of images, segmentation, detecting objects, and things like that with deep neural networks, and convolutional neural networks – it’s very exciting. And one very exciting development is, of course, self-driving cars. That, for me, is very exciting, and I use it a lot as an example in my presentations because it both showcases vision development / technological development but also its an application that basically touches almost everyone. Everyone drives a car, at least in the developed world, so it’s one of the applications that will come – that we will feel – much more quickly than other ones. But, of course, all the developments around language and speech recognition, and all these new intelligent systems and bots that are coming, it’s very exciting developments. From the research point of view, I like a lot of what is happening around the games and gaming in AI. You know, we both started working on AI in the nineties, and at that time, well since the beginning, AI has been applied to games – from checkers, and then chess, Deep Blue beating Kasparov in ’97, and then, more recently, of course, AlphaGo, and AlphaZero, even more exciting and now the latest one with Open AI playing Dota 2 – so, it’s a very nice way of developing new concepts. It doesn’t have direct applications in the real world, but it develops kind of fundamental capabilities that real world systems are going to need.

JS: Any thoughts about the applications of AI outside of the power industry, some of the most exciting other areas that you might be able to go into?

DR: Yeah, well – basically all the work that we are doing both around images and inspections is applicable to other…

JS: … all types of inspections. Yeah, one thing I heard sometime recently was about inspecting for lightning strikes on aircraft. And they were looking to see if you can use AI to identify, because today again somebody has to climb the airplane and go look at spots and see if there has been a lightning strike.

DR: Or inspecting like pipelines, or railways – any kind of infrastructure.

JS: Or even assets, even just counting assets, is one thing I heard, which was interesting.

DR: Almost limitless amount of applications.

JS: Very exciting. Any concluding thoughts on AI and its applications?

DR: Well, it’s very exciting times. I’ve been working in AI for 30 years and finally we see a lot of traction, and we see an explosion of applications and interest and money nonetheless coming into AI. And real applications that are both helpful and exciting.

JS: And do you think AI is being democratized – made available to software developers much more easily?

DR: Yeah, definitely. Today, basically anyone can experiment with AI. Maybe it’s still difficult to make an application that is production-ready if you are not a data scientist because you can fall in many places – you can make a lot of mistakes if you don’t know what you’re doing. But you can experiment and generate something useful in a much easier way than before. So, there’s been a lot of progress around that and there is going to be more progress – I cannot even say in the years to come, just weeks!

JS: Wonderful, it’s been a pleasure talking to you.

DR: Thank you, it’s been a pleasure.

“It’s very exciting times. I’ve been working in AI for 30 years and finally we see a lot of traction, and we see an
explosion of applications and interest…”

We hope you enjoyed this post. This being our first episode in the series, we are eager to hear your feedback, so please share your thoughts and ideas below.

The AI / ML Blog Team

Resources

Igneous Systems takes on unstructured data management

Startup Igneous Systems is moving beyond data protection with a set of services designed to manage large sets of unstructured data.

Igneous Systems, based in Seattle, is adding DataDiscover and DataFlow services, packaging them with its DataProtect backup and archiving. The three as-a-service offerings allow customers to protect, find and index data and move it around intelligently.

The complete Igneous Systems package will include data intelligence, data protection and data movement for file and object data, delivered as a cloud-native service. The vendor positions itself as one of the few that can offer a complete unstructured data management package at massive scale.

Igneous claimed it can deliver data scan and compare rates of around 420,000 files per second, per job, and move more than 21,000 files per second, per job, at a throughput of 1.2 GBps for small configurations. Its services can handle hundreds of concurrent jobs.

Igneous Systems’ DataDiscover and DataFlow are in the early access stage, and Igneous expects to make them generally available in early 2019.

Igneous seeks to close ‘dramatic gap’

According to Allison Armstrong, vice president of marketing at Igneous Systems, backup and recovery was no longer enough to deal with the rapid growth of unstructured data.

Data protection and archive are not the only facets of unstructured data management.
Allison Armstrongvice president of marketing, Igneous Systems

“Data protection and archive are not the only facets of unstructured data management,” Armstrong said. “Over the last year, we really started to see a dramatic gap that’s been created in the enterprise market for a broader set of unstructured data management solutions.”

Christophe Bertrand, senior analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group in Milford, Mass., said the challenge is managing data as it grows into the petabyte range.

“What’s interesting here is the addition of the ability to figure out that bank or ocean of data and find out what might be needed, tag it, analyze it and move it around,” Bertrand said of the new Igneous services.

Bertrand said the as-a-service component to the Igneous Systems offerings allows the vendor to handle software updates and infrastructure, lowering the IT burden on customers.

Igneous DataFlow will automate workflows for processes such as machine learning and bioinformatics pipelines, as well as IoT data workflows. Igneous Systems described particular use cases for its offerings in bioinformatics, which could benefit greatly from a high-ingest, low-maintenance unstructured data management service.

“I think it’s going to be very valuable for high-performance-computing-driven workflows where people need to build a very powerful service or system that allows them to really crunch a lot of data, so they can apply smart systems to them,” Bertrand said. “The twist [Igneous Systems is] adding is they’re doing it as a service and adding a couple of components, which make it a lot more useable and implementable.”

For Sale – Intel NUC 5i5RYK, Core i5 5250U @1.6GHz, 8GB Ram, 111GB SSD

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by Petey, Jul 30, 2018.

  1. Petey

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    I have an Intel NUC 5i5RYK, Core i5 5250U @1.6GHz, 8GB Ram, 111GB SSD running on Windows 10 Pro. It has original box and instructions.

    It was used solely for running a Plex Media Server.

    I’m looking for £220.00 inc postage.

    Price and currency: £285.00 **dropped to £220.00**
    Delivery:
    Delivery cost is included within my country
    Payment method: PayPal
    Location: Romford
    Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018

  2. Petey

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  3. Petey

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    Price drop to £275.00

  4. Petey

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  5. How did it perform running Plex?

    I’ve been after one of these for a while but have never gotten round to it. Ideally would have liked the i7 model but I’m wondering if I can be swayed for the right deal. Argh. Wouldn’t be using it for Plex but there’d definitely be some element of hosting media and automated download scripts.

  6. Petey

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    I never experienced any problems with running Plex. My collection of movies consists of mostly Blu-ray and HD-DVD rips all at high profile with handbrake and it never struggled with any of them. My collection was stored on 2 external USB-3 drives.

    Of course I don’t know what your requirements are in terms of hosting media but an i5 is plenty capable in terms of playback.

  7. Buurman

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    would you consider selling just the NUC? I’ve already got RAM/SSD that I can use

  8. Petey

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    Sorry but I’m looking to sell it as a complete package.

  9. Still available Petey?

    I’m still torn between this and a Mini ITX build but will see what I can dig up second hand for the ITX build and take it from there.

    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018

  10. Petey

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    Yeah, still available.

  11. Petey

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  13. Petey

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  15. JAYKOP

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    Hello do you know if this will play 4K 60 as definitely interested

  16. Petey

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    I only ever used the NUC as a Plex Media Server with 1080p content and it played everything fine, so I can’t say first hand that it can do 4K 60.

    However; I’ve done a little research on the intel site and it does appear that 4K 60 is possible over mini display port. I’ve attached a screenshot of the processor specs from the intel site (3rd link below).

    Product specs for the NUC5i5RYK
    Intel community post asking the same 4K 60 question
    Product specs for the i5-5250U

  17. Petey

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