Microsoft Europe’s 10 biggest stories of 2018 – Microsoft News Centre Europe

This year has been incredibly busy for Microsoft in Europe. We’ve launched new products, worked with customers and partners to deliver cutting-edge technology solutions, and worked towards our mission of helping every person and organisation achieve more.

We’ve rounded up ten of the biggest stories from the past year below, with the option to click on through to each one to read them in full. Thanks for reading, and have a Happy New Year!

Volkswagen’s future of connected, shareable cars

VW connected car concept

For German car manufacturer Volkswagen, the future of the car goes beyond a mere four-wheeled chauffer and errand-runner. Our cars will also integrate with our lives in ways never before thought possible. Earlier this year, the company revealed its plans for the Volkswagen Automotive Cloud – a platform which will create a seamless experience for drivers from the moment they enter, use, and leave their cars, ushering in a new era of truly connected vehicles.

Powered by Microsoft’s Azure cloud and IoT Edge platform, the Automotive Cloud will allow drivers to effortlessly remain in control of their professional and personal lives. From entering the car to the same music they were just listening to in their living room, to managing their appointments and carrying out work meetings via Skype, the car will evolve into an invaluable physical, and digital, assistant.

Read the full story

This time it’s personal: the financial industry is banking on AI to better serve customers

Brown wallet with cards

The financial services industry is undergoing a massive transformation. Financial technology companies (fintechs) are challenging traditional enterprises, while players from other sectors such as retail and technology are entering their turf. In addition, customers are increasingly demanding predictive, proactive and proximate services. Today’s financial institutions need to ensure that every customer interaction – no matter the channel – goes off without a hitch and delivers value if they want to be industry leaders tomorrow.

Microsoft EMEA President Michel van der Bel had the pleasure of discussing the transformation of the financial services industry with Spiros Margaris, venture capitalist, senior advisor, and international AI, blockchain and fintech influencer. Click below for their full discussion and insights.

Read the full story

The future of fashion and retail

Fashion designer sketching from above

Today’s successful retailers challenge the fundamental assumptions of commerce, from the ways in which physical spaces can be used to create unique customer experiences, to featuring products and services that one cannot find elsewhere to resurrecting the art of selling. The digital transformation of the retail (and indeed, any other) industry is no longer about simply managing costs and increasing efficiency. Rather, it enables companies to react to brutally competitive market forces with new service models, business practices, supply chains and more. At the heart of this retail revolution lies data, alongside the tools required to analyze it to help businesses continuously evolve, improve, and grow – all while creating and maintaining customer loyalty, and remaining competitive.

Read the full story

Medicine Man: How AI is bringing humanity back into healthcare

“When mistakes happen, patients die. I remember thinking to myself ‘What is going on here?’ We can do better. We should do better.”

When Simon Kos practiced critical care medicine in intensive care and anaesthesia early on in his career, digital technology was not well established. “I saw mistakes – avoidable mistakes – happen all around me,” he states. Now Chief Medical Officer at Microsoft, Kos is at the forefront of a medical revolution. His ambition is infectious, and his passion is fuelled by his first-hand experiences of the power that technological transformation, such as artificial intelligence (AI), can bring to our lives.

Read the full story

Knowledge is the best defence

keyboard, side view

If you were asked to pick the most vulnerable demographic to tech support scams, chances are your answer would lean towards the older generation. Traditionally, the elderly have less experience/knowledge of technology, and could therefore be more at risk of falling victim to these scams.

Microsoft’s survey results, however, show that Gen Z, millennials and males are the most vulnerable to tech support scams – a surprising revelation, given that the younger generation is, on the whole, more digitally savvy. This, however, appears to be the cause of their overconfidence and false sense of security – these groups are the most likely to lose money after continuing an interaction with scammers. These demographics, the results show, engage in riskier online behavior such as visiting torrent sites, have a greater familiarity with technology companies than older generations, and are potentially hurt by overconfidence in their device and web expertise.

Read the full story

POLITICO Europe elects Microsoft technology to power its innovative new Elections Hub

EU flag

In collaboration with Microsoft, POLITICO Europe launched a new Elections hub to report on the upcoming 2019 European Parliamentary elections. One of the key features of the hub is a stunning interactive data visualization – built with Microsoft Power BI. The team at POLITICO Europe seeks to bring an unprecedented degree of education and insight to the European electorate as they navigate the complicated election process, which spans thousands of candidates and hundreds of parties across the EU’s 27 member nations. POLITICO Europe’s leaders worked with Microsoft to envision new ways of reporting likely outcomes of the election, and break down complex issues like coalition building, to show individual voters the impact of their vote, and draw new participants into the democratic process.

Read the full story

The secret of productivity

Office workers in a discussion

While there’s no doubt that moving data to the cloud, adopting Artificial Intelligence, and implementing remote working tools is helping businesses to scale and innovate like never before, the question on leaders’ minds is not if, but how, to digitally transform. Leaders must focus on how can technology empower their employees and drive growth.

To help businesses understand how to best empower their workforce, Microsoft spoke to more than 20,000 people working in medium and large companies, from a range of industries, in 21 different countries across Europe. Respondents were asked about the technology they use at work, and their attitudes towards their job and their job performance.

The findings clearly show that to compete in today’s cloud-first world, quality tools alone aren’t enough: for technology to be most effective, it needs to sit within a strong digital culture.

Read the full story

Girls in STEM: the importance of role models

Two children learning to code on a laptop

Research from Microsoft reveals that the number of girls interested in STEM across Europe, on average, almost doubles when they have a role model to inspire them. The findings from a Europe-wide study of girls and young women shows that in general, there is a clear link between role models and an increased passion for science, technology, engineering and maths subjects, with more interest in careers in these fields, and greater self-confidence.

Microsoft’s research stands alongside organisations such as UNESCO and Accenture in providing data and insights around the importance of role models in STEM, with the hope that educators, policy makers, NGOs and the private sector can all work together and invest towards bridging the digital skills gap of the future. With women only making up 30 percent of Europe’s ICT workforce and an expected shortage of up to 500,000 ICT workers by 2020, this is an issue we must all address today – and role models could help.

Read the full story

Healthcare with heart

Medical science continues to progress, allowing doctors to push the boundaries and always achieve more. One such example is the implantation of heart valves via the groin – a procedure which has reached full swing in recent years due to it shorter recovery period and less invasive nature. Some questions, however, are still asked. Are costly procedures such as this as successful as scientific studies are? Do these innovative techniques have the effect of reducing mortality? Are the results as good in one hospital as in the other?

“Such information is crucial for all members of our multidisciplinary team of doctors, carers and paramedics – they allow us to further improve the quality of our care,” says Dr Karl Dujardin, a cardiologist at Delta General Hospital, Roeselare, in Belgium. Although these questions seem simple, it was almost impossible, until recently to answer them, he states. While both Dr Dujardin and his colleagues kept records of their procedures, for example, they lacked an overall vision of the effectiveness of the treatment – and this is where technology comes in.

Read the full story

Transforming a thousand-year-old city into mixed reality

The island of Mont Saint Michel

In the 17th century, before the advent of drones, planes, or even balloons, the solution to creating accurate representations of areas was as time-consuming, as it was beautiful. Plan-relief maps (scale models of landscapes and buildings,) were hand-crafted in meticulous detail, recreating locations of interest in ways that no other means at the time could match.

Coveted by military leaders such as Napoleon and King Louis XIV, these plan-relief maps provided topographic details of landscapes, such as hills and harbours, in addition to showing off the layouts of cities and their fortifications. This is the story of the map of Mont-Saint-Michel—a rocky headland off the Normandy coast, with a stunning Benedictine abbey – and how it was recreated in Mixed Reality.

Read the full story

Go to Original Article
Author: Steve Clarke

Why dating app security flaws should concern enterprises

Dating app security flaws could jeopardize more than just users’ personal information.

By hosting personal information and private conversations, dating apps put users in a vulnerable position. But enterprises with BYOD models may also be at risk. Several cybersecurity vendors have noted in recent years that many popular data apps have glaring weaknesses and vulnerabilities.

For example, in a 2017 study conducted by Kaspersky examined nine such apps and found they were susceptible to man-in-the-middle attacks and put private messages and access tokens at risk. In addition, researchers were able to identify 60% of users’ pages on various social media, including Facebook and LinkedIn, as well as their full names and surnames using information from popular dating apps.

Some experts argue if a dating app security vulnerability is exploited on a BYOD, hackers could potentially gain access to not only a user’s personal information, but also to sensitive information that could put their enterprise at risk. Therefore, employees who have enterprises’ apps or store work-related data on their devices endanger their employer with the possibility of leaking private information, including the employee address book, phone numbers, geolocation and even confidential corporate data.

And unfortunately for enterprise security, studies show dating app use on mobile devices is most popular. According to a 2017 Statista report, 76% of respondents who used dating apps indicated their smartphone as their primary device of usage, with primarily computer-based users at 72%, and tablet users at 48%.

“We’ve seen a lot of apps that leak usernames and passwords — and about 75% of corporate end users use the same password across both business and personal sites. If you have a dating app that doesn’t protect a login, and if someone gets that info, suddenly they have the keys to the kingdom to login to the enterprise because now the whole data center has been opened up,” said Michael Covington, vice president of product strategy at Wandera, an enterprise mobile security vendor based in London.

The risks are further compounded by the extensive access that many of these apps have to other third-party apps and data on a user’s device. A 2016 study of 25 popular dating apps by IT asset management vendor Flexera Software found that 60% of dating apps can access social networking apps and texting functions; 36%, including Grindr and OkCupid, can access calendars on a device; and 24%, including Blendr, Hinge and Tinder, can access users’ address books.

Dating app security risks

While dating app users volunteer certain information that may seem harmless to enterprises, Bob Kelly, senior product manager at Flexera Software, said users and enterprises alike should consider the related data that can be accessed and the implications of potential data leaks.  

“The problem we see most often is enabling access to things that aren’t inherently understood, for example, location services and access to a microphone or camera. Sometimes it’s not the employee, but the app’s own capability to access things that poses the risk, and the same translates to desktop apps,” Kelly said.

Enterprise concerns about dating app security have existed for some time. In 2015, IBM Security published a research paper titled “Dating Apps Vulnerabilities & Risks to Enterprises,” which found that over 60% of the leading dating apps studied are vulnerable to medium and/or severe vulnerabilities that put application data — as well as data stored on the device — at risk. IBM also found that nearly 50% of organizations analyzed in its research vulnerable dating apps installed on mobile devices used to access business information.

Experts said the security flaws for online dating apps aren’t unique compared to other mobile apps. “Any app installed on a device introduces some level of risk,” Kelly said. “There’s a risk to installing even a reputable app from certain vendors that you trust.”

But dating apps are notable for their popularity, the amount of personal information they contain, and the perceived risk to individual users versus enterprises. “While the vulnerable apps can leak personal user information,” the IBM Security report states, “if corporate data is also located on the device it can affect the enterprise.”

While many of the online dating services analyzed in these security research reports have improved the security of their mobile apps in recent years, vulnerabilities and weaknesses are still common. For example, earlier this year application security testing firm Checkmarx reported serious vulnerabilities with Tinder’s app, including an HTTPS implementation issue that left photos exposed. As a result, a threat actor on the same Wi-Fi network could observe users’ photos and activity, including swipes.

And because many enterprises instill a true BYOD model, enterprises’ ability to limit which apps employees have access to on their personal device is an ongoing struggle. “BYOD is great while it lasts,” Kelly said, “but you can’t really enforce policies on BYOD devices.”

Dating app security risks

The above research reports list several vulnerabilities, weaknesses and threats common to popular dating apps. For example, the specific medium and high severity vulnerabilities that IBM uncovered across the at-risk 60% of leading dating apps include: cross-site scripting (XSS) via man in the middle (MitM), enabled debug flags, weak random number generators (RNG) and phishing via MitM attacks.

An XSS-MitM attack — also known as a session hijacking attack — exploits a vulnerability in a trusted website visited by the targeted victim and gets the website to deliver the malicious script for the attacker. The same-origin policy requires that all content on a webpage comes from the same source. When this policy isn’t enforced, an attacker is able to inject a script and modify the webpage to suit their own purposes. For example, attackers can extract data that will allow the attacker to impersonate an authenticated user or input malicious code for a browser to execute.

Also, debug-enabled application on an Android device may attach to another application and extract data and read or write to the application’s memory. Thus, an attacker can extract inbound information that flows into the application, modify its actions and inject malicious data into it and out of it.

Weak RNGs pose another risk. While some dating apps use encryption with a random number generator, IBM found the generators to be weak and easily predictable, making it easy for a hacker to guess the encryption algorithm and gain access to sensitive information.

In phishing via MitM attacks, hackers can spoof users by creating a fake login screen to trick users into providing their user credentials to access users’ personal information, including contacts who they can also fool by posing as the user. The attacker can send phishing messages with malicious code that could potentially infect contacts’ devices.

Additionally, IBM warned that a phone’s camera or microphone could be turned on remotely through a vulnerable dating app, which could be used to eavesdrop on conversations and confidential business meetings. And in its research, Flexera highlighted how dating apps’ access to location services and Bluetooth communications, among other device features, can be abused by hackers.

One of the more common dating app security risks involves encryption. While many dating apps have implemented HTTPS to protect the transmission of private data to their servers, Kaspersky researchers said many implementations are incomplete or vulnerable to MitM attacks. For example, the Kaspersky report noted Badoo’s app will upload unencrypted user data, including GPS location and mobile operator data, to its servers if it can’t establish an HTTPS connection to those servers. The report also found that more than half of the nine dating apps were vulnerable to MitM attacks even though they had HTTPS fully implemented; researchers discovered that several of the apps didn’t check the validity of SSL certificates trying to connect to the apps, which allows threat actors to spoof legitimate certificates and spy on encrypted data transmissions.

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Author:

For Sale – MAC MINI LATE 2012 UPGRADED

For sale is my Mac Mini Late 2012 model, boxed with original lead and HDMI – DVI cable.

Intel i5 2.5 GHz and comes with 8gig ram and this model can be upgraded to a total of 16gig. I have put a SSD as the boot drive and moved the 500gig hard disc to the lower drive bay with a data doubler kit.

There is a couple of tiny and i mean tiny nicks to the left of the shell but apart from those this is a very clean example.

I will deauthorise this from my icloud account and put a fresh install of High Sierra which is on it now, or I can put the latest Mojave on if you so wish.

Full specs here

Mac mini “Core i5” 2.5 (Late 2012) Specs (Late 2012, MD387LL/A, Macmini6,1, A1347, 2570): EveryMac.com

some images of the actual mac mini showing the two tiny nicks with a 5 pence to give you an idea how small they are.

Price and currency: 350
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG, BACS, CASH
Location: Washington, Tyne & Wear
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Microsoft Europe’s 10 biggest stories of 2018 – Microsoft News Centre Europe

This year has been incredibly busy for Microsoft in Europe. We’ve launched new products, worked with customers and partners to deliver cutting-edge technology solutions, and worked towards our mission of helping every person and organisation achieve more.

We’ve rounded up ten of the biggest stories from the past year below, with the option to click on through to each one to read them in full. Thanks for reading, and have a Happy New Year!

Volkswagen’s future of connected, shareable cars

VW connected car concept

For German car manufacturer Volkswagen, the future of the car goes beyond a mere four-wheeled chauffer and errand-runner. Our cars will also integrate with our lives in ways never before thought possible. Earlier this year, the company revealed its plans for the Volkswagen Automotive Cloud – a platform which will create a seamless experience for drivers from the moment they enter, use, and leave their cars, ushering in a new era of truly connected vehicles.

Powered by Microsoft’s Azure cloud and IoT Edge platform, the Automotive Cloud will allow drivers to effortlessly remain in control of their professional and personal lives. From entering the car to the same music they were just listening to in their living room, to managing their appointments and carrying out work meetings via Skype, the car will evolve into an invaluable physical, and digital, assistant.

Read the full story

This time it’s personal: the financial industry is banking on AI to better serve customers

Brown wallet with cards

The financial services industry is undergoing a massive transformation. Financial technology companies (fintechs) are challenging traditional enterprises, while players from other sectors such as retail and technology are entering their turf. In addition, customers are increasingly demanding predictive, proactive and proximate services. Today’s financial institutions need to ensure that every customer interaction – no matter the channel – goes off without a hitch and delivers value if they want to be industry leaders tomorrow.

Microsoft EMEA President Michel van der Bel had the pleasure of discussing the transformation of the financial services industry with Spiros Margaris, venture capitalist, senior advisor, and international AI, blockchain and fintech influencer. Click below for their full discussion and insights.

Read the full story

The future of fashion and retail

Fashion designer sketching from above

Today’s successful retailers challenge the fundamental assumptions of commerce, from the ways in which physical spaces can be used to create unique customer experiences, to featuring products and services that one cannot find elsewhere to resurrecting the art of selling. The digital transformation of the retail (and indeed, any other) industry is no longer about simply managing costs and increasing efficiency. Rather, it enables companies to react to brutally competitive market forces with new service models, business practices, supply chains and more. At the heart of this retail revolution lies data, alongside the tools required to analyze it to help businesses continuously evolve, improve, and grow – all while creating and maintaining customer loyalty, and remaining competitive.

Read the full story

Medicine Man: How AI is bringing humanity back into healthcare

“When mistakes happen, patients die. I remember thinking to myself ‘What is going on here?’ We can do better. We should do better.”

When Simon Kos practiced critical care medicine in intensive care and anaesthesia early on in his career, digital technology was not well established. “I saw mistakes – avoidable mistakes – happen all around me,” he states. Now Chief Medical Officer at Microsoft, Kos is at the forefront of a medical revolution. His ambition is infectious, and his passion is fuelled by his first-hand experiences of the power that technological transformation, such as artificial intelligence (AI), can bring to our lives.

Read the full story

Knowledge is the best defence

keyboard, side view

If you were asked to pick the most vulnerable demographic to tech support scams, chances are your answer would lean towards the older generation. Traditionally, the elderly have less experience/knowledge of technology, and could therefore be more at risk of falling victim to these scams.

Microsoft’s survey results, however, show that Gen Z, millennials and males are the most vulnerable to tech support scams – a surprising revelation, given that the younger generation is, on the whole, more digitally savvy. This, however, appears to be the cause of their overconfidence and false sense of security – these groups are the most likely to lose money after continuing an interaction with scammers. These demographics, the results show, engage in riskier online behavior such as visiting torrent sites, have a greater familiarity with technology companies than older generations, and are potentially hurt by overconfidence in their device and web expertise.

Read the full story

POLITICO Europe elects Microsoft technology to power its innovative new Elections Hub

EU flag

In collaboration with Microsoft, POLITICO Europe launched a new Elections hub to report on the upcoming 2019 European Parliamentary elections. One of the key features of the hub is a stunning interactive data visualization – built with Microsoft Power BI. The team at POLITICO Europe seeks to bring an unprecedented degree of education and insight to the European electorate as they navigate the complicated election process, which spans thousands of candidates and hundreds of parties across the EU’s 27 member nations. POLITICO Europe’s leaders worked with Microsoft to envision new ways of reporting likely outcomes of the election, and break down complex issues like coalition building, to show individual voters the impact of their vote, and draw new participants into the democratic process.

Read the full story

The secret of productivity

Office workers in a discussion

While there’s no doubt that moving data to the cloud, adopting Artificial Intelligence, and implementing remote working tools is helping businesses to scale and innovate like never before, the question on leaders’ minds is not if, but how, to digitally transform. Leaders must focus on how can technology empower their employees and drive growth.

To help businesses understand how to best empower their workforce, Microsoft spoke to more than 20,000 people working in medium and large companies, from a range of industries, in 21 different countries across Europe. Respondents were asked about the technology they use at work, and their attitudes towards their job and their job performance.

The findings clearly show that to compete in today’s cloud-first world, quality tools alone aren’t enough: for technology to be most effective, it needs to sit within a strong digital culture.

Read the full story

Girls in STEM: the importance of role models

Two children learning to code on a laptop

Research from Microsoft reveals that the number of girls interested in STEM across Europe, on average, almost doubles when they have a role model to inspire them. The findings from a Europe-wide study of girls and young women shows that in general, there is a clear link between role models and an increased passion for science, technology, engineering and maths subjects, with more interest in careers in these fields, and greater self-confidence.

Microsoft’s research stands alongside organisations such as UNESCO and Accenture in providing data and insights around the importance of role models in STEM, with the hope that educators, policy makers, NGOs and the private sector can all work together and invest towards bridging the digital skills gap of the future. With women only making up 30 percent of Europe’s ICT workforce and an expected shortage of up to 500,000 ICT workers by 2020, this is an issue we must all address today – and role models could help.

Read the full story

Healthcare with heart

Medical science continues to progress, allowing doctors to push the boundaries and always achieve more. One such example is the implantation of heart valves via the groin – a procedure which has reached full swing in recent years due to it shorter recovery period and less invasive nature. Some questions, however, are still asked. Are costly procedures such as this as successful as scientific studies are? Do these innovative techniques have the effect of reducing mortality? Are the results as good in one hospital as in the other?

“Such information is crucial for all members of our multidisciplinary team of doctors, carers and paramedics – they allow us to further improve the quality of our care,” says Dr Karl Dujardin, a cardiologist at Delta General Hospital, Roeselare, in Belgium. Although these questions seem simple, it was almost impossible, until recently to answer them, he states. While both Dr Dujardin and his colleagues kept records of their procedures, for example, they lacked an overall vision of the effectiveness of the treatment – and this is where technology comes in.

Read the full story

Transforming a thousand-year-old city into mixed reality

The island of Mont Saint Michel

In the 17th century, before the advent of drones, planes, or even balloons, the solution to creating accurate representations of areas was as time-consuming, as it was beautiful. Plan-relief maps (scale models of landscapes and buildings,) were hand-crafted in meticulous detail, recreating locations of interest in ways that no other means at the time could match.

Coveted by military leaders such as Napoleon and King Louis XIV, these plan-relief maps provided topographic details of landscapes, such as hills and harbours, in addition to showing off the layouts of cities and their fortifications. This is the story of the map of Mont-Saint-Michel—a rocky headland off the Normandy coast, with a stunning Benedictine abbey – and how it was recreated in Mixed Reality.

Read the full story

Go to Original Article
Author: Steve Clarke

Data management trends for 2019: Governance, DataOps, cloud

The data governance mandates of GDPR, the quest for AI-driven analytics and the pull of cloud computing set much of the tone for the efforts of data management and big data teams in 2018. These and related data management trends will further affect the work of data professionals in 2019, according to industry analysts.

For example, organizations increasingly are emphasizing data privacy protections when they put big data applications into production use. That was spurred by the advent of GDPR, the new European Union privacy law that took effect last May. A harbinger of the need for stronger data governance, GDPR was followed in June by the approval of a state law with similar intents in California; the California Consumer Privacy Act’s compliance requirements are due to go into effect at the start of 2020.

The new laws make effective governance of data a priority for data managers and corporate executives, said William McKnight, president of McKnight Consulting Group in Plano, Texas. “People are going to have to gain a better understanding of data lineage, data quality and data access,” McKnight said. “Those shops that have featured data governance are far ahead [in doing so].”

A more orderly data lake

Things are changing even for the Hadoop data lake, once seen as a place in which to toss unsorted raw data for potential analytics uses.

“The renewal of data governance affects the data lake,” McKnight said. “You can’t just throw data there, even if that is what the data scientist wants to do.”

Data governance for the data lake has spawned a heightened focus on data catalogs and metadata tagging processes, he added. The role of data pros is also changing as part of those initiatives and other data management trends — a change that is reflected in the rise of DataOps, McKnight said.

picture of William McKnightWilliam McKnight

This is an offshoot of DevOps methods that strive to streamline application development. In the form of DataOps, McKnight noted, data management teams work to maintain consistent treatment of data and to see that none of it is left behind in the push to full-scale production use across distributed data architectures.

Wayne Eckerson, founder and principal consultant at Eckerson Group in Hingham, Mass., also pointed to DataOps as an emergent new discipline that’s likely to become more prevalent in 2019.

“A lot of user organizations are trying to wrap their minds around DataOps with more agile processes,” Eckerson said. “They’re looking at lean version control and testing — doing all the good software development practices and applying them to the data environment.”

Data management teamwork expands

As they pursue DataOps-oriented practices, data management teams are also working more closely with the business — to the point where their place in the traditional IT structure is also changing.

“We’re seeing a continuing disintermediation of central IT and a related change in data team dynamics,” McKnight said. “Many organizations are acknowledging this as the new way, and it’s reflected in the composition of their IT shops.”

Also notable among data management trends is the growing need for data management and analytics teams to work collaboratively on new types of advanced analytics that take advantage of AI technology, according to Doug Henschen, an analyst at Constellation Research Inc. in Monte Vista, Calif.

picture of Doug HenschenDoug Henschen

Working in unified teams is a key to moving machine learning and deep learning models into production at large scale, Henschen said. It’s a 2018 trend that he expects to see carry through to 2019.

“What’s needed are team-based approaches that knit together data scientists, data analysts, data engineers, developers and business leaders in order to embed models into business applications at scale with ongoing monitoring and optimization,” Henschen said.

For businesses, competitive differentiation will be based partly on how broadly they can make use of data and harness cutting-edge analytics techniques — and “whether they can do it with solid governance and compliance,” Henschen continued. “Data is only as valuable as it is trusted.” He, too, sees data catalogs growing in use as a way to make data more governable.

Look to the cloud as a data platform

Cloud computing is hardly a new trend, but it reached a crescendo of sorts on the data management side in 2018. Cloud databases and data warehouses were central to technology and acquisition moves by AWS, IBM, Microsoft and Oracle. The prospect of big data systems moving to the cloud also lurked behind the merger that Hadoop vendors Cloudera and Hortonworks agreed to in October.

picture of James CurtisJames Curtis

Both Cloudera and Hortonworks faced technology and business challenges as they pursued cloud initiatives that allowed users to swap out the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) for cloud object storage technologies, according to James Curtis, an analyst at 451 Research in New York.

In fact, neither company was touting the term Hadoop much at the time the merger was announced, reflecting the diminished role of HDFS and the MapReduce processing engine and programming framework — the big data platform’s original core components.

“The original underlying processing engine and file format in Hadoop are being superseded. But, while Hadoop will be the elephant not in the room, what Hadoop did is not going away,” Curtis said.

What Hadoop effectively did, he added, was usher in a broad big data ecosystem of open source software components and allow users to apply different processing techniques to different data workloads — two data management trends that are expected to continue with or without Hadoop itself.

picture of Wayne EckersonWayne Eckerson

The cloud-based data warehouse made its first appearance as a technology to watch quite a long time ago. As with big data systems, the shift of more data warehouses to the cloud also now looks inevitable.

“The cloud is where data warehouses are going. The only drawback is the huge volumes of data on premises, but there are tools for that, too,” Eckerson said, referring to software that can help users move their data to the cloud.

Fast deployment, always-on operations and the ability to more easily handle spiky performance are some of the deciding factors in going to the cloud, Eckerson said. He added that more and more often, IT and data management teams are also glad to hand over data infrastructure responsibilities to cloud providers.

Change: Deal with it

The end of the year and beginning of a new one is an arbitrary delimiter for measuring the progress or retreat of technology and data management trends. But it’s crucial that organizations set themselves up to deal with the change that new and emerging trends bring, McKnight said. In 2019, they’ll definitely have more of it to deal with, he predicted.

“We’re going to see accelerating change in the world of data, and we’re also going to see resistance to that change,” McKnight said.

The latter part isn’t new: There always has been a “resistance factor” in organizations, McKnight continued. He said, though, that leading-edge companies increasingly are addressing the internal resistance and “being more progressive in meeting their data needs.”

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Author:

For Sale – Full computer for sale

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by aoc223, Dec 13, 2018.

  1. aoc223

    aoc223

    Novice Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    cheshire
    Ratings:
    +1

    Fully working pc perfect for the office or the kids.
    nice clean condition

    Windows 10 activated
    Microsoft office
    19″ widescreen monitor
    Dvd writer
    2gb ddr3
    E5500 dual core
    320gb hard drive
    Internet ready
    Keyboard
    Mouse

    Price and currency: 65
    Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
    Payment method: cash or bt
    Location: cheshire
    Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

    Last edited: Dec 13, 2018

  2. aoc223

    aoc223

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