2018 M&A in storage centered on flash, cloud and backup

There were no blockbuster mergers and acquisitions with a direct impact on the enterprise data storage market in 2018. Instead, vendors filled gaps in their product portfolios with small deals.

The most significant 2018 M&A deal in technology was IBM’s $34 billion purchase of open source software vendor Red Hat. But, while Red Hat will bring its Ceph and Gluster storage software to IBM’s storage portfolio, those technologies were hardly the focus of the acquisition. Cloud computing was the main driver.

Truly storage-centric 2018 M&A was hard to assess from a dollars-and-cents perspective because most of the deals were so small that financial terms were undisclosed. All 2018 deals paled in comparison to Dell’s $60 billion-plus deal for EMC, the estimated $18 billion sale of Toshiba’s memory business to a Bain Capital-led consortium and Broadcom’s $5.9 billion purchase of storage networking specialist Brocade. Those three blockbusters all took place since 2016.

Microsoft kicked off 2018 with its purchase of Avere Systems for an undisclosed sum. The Avere deal gave Microsoft high-performance file system and caching technologies that can span on-premises and public cloud deployments.

High-performance computing (HPC) specialist DataDirect Networks (DDN) acquired flash and hybrid array vendor Tintri for $60 million after Tintri filed for bankruptcy in July. A month later, all-flash array vendor Pure Storage picked up software-defined storage startup StorReduce for its data-reducing deduplication technology, and low-end NAS specialist Drobo joined forces with enterprise SAN vendor Nexsan under the name StorCentric.

In October, flash array pioneer Violin Systems scooped up the X-IO Storage division of X-IO Technologies to broaden its product line. Despite its pending IBM acquisition, Red Hat bought hybrid cloud data management startup NooBaa in November.

The backup space was also busy with 2018 M&A news, as Carbonite, Druva, Kaseya, Rubrik and Veeam Software acquired companies.

Below is a review of 2018 M&A in the enterprise data storage industry:

Microsoft enhances hybrid cloud options

Microsoft bolstered its hybrid cloud story with the January purchase of Avere Systems. The deal gave Microsoft NFS and SMB file-based storage for Linux and Windows clients running in the public cloud, on premises or in a hybrid mix of the two. Avere’s physical and virtual FXT Edge Filer appliances use a combination of file system and caching technologies to boost the performance of compute-intensive applications.

Avere vFXT for Microsoft Azure launched in public preview in September, and Microsoft pledged to support Avere vFXT on other public cloud platforms such as AWS and Google Cloud Platform. Microsoft also plans to continue to upgrade and support the Avere FXT physical appliance.

Flash-focused 2018 M&A

DDN rescued troubled Tintri and pledged to restore support to its customer base, enhance its product roadmap and hire 100 new employees. Tintri’s analytics-driven flash and hybrid storage arrays should help to broaden DDN’s customer base into mainstream enterprise IT. Tintri claimed around 1,500 customers, including Fortune 1000 companies such as Advanced Micro Devices, Avaya, Chevron and Comcast.

Pure Storage said its acquisition of StorReduce would facilitate the addition of deduplication technology to its FlashBlade file and object storage. Pure Storage president David Hatfield said the company also plans to extend StorReduce’s cloud partnerships.

Violin’s purchase of X-IO Storage also had a deduplication angle. X-IO’s deduplication process is designed to minimize hardware resources, and Violin plans to integrate the technology to optimize price and performance. X-IO Storage’s Intelligent Storage Element (ISE) flash and hybrid storage arrays can complement Violin’s technology, as the flash pioneer tries to reverse its fortunes after emerging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2017. X-IO’s ISE targeted small- to medium-sized enterprises, whereas Violin focused on extreme performance for larger enterprises.

X-IO reorganized in 2016 following substantial operating losses and split into X-IO Storage and Axellio divisions the following year. Violin acquired the X-IO Storage division. X-IO’s edge computing and hyper-converged systems are now sold under the Axellio brand name.

Drobo and Nexsan will operate as independent divisions of the newly formed StorCentric. Nexsan’s product line includes the all-flash and hybrid Unity Unified Storage for block and file workloads, high-density E-Series SAN storage and Assureon archive storage. Drobo targets small and medium-sized businesses with its disk and hybrid SAN, NAS and direct-attached storage.

Red Hat acquired Israel-based NooBaa technology to bolster its existing storage software, including Ceph and OpenShift Container. NooBaa’s software is designed to help application developers manage data storage services across clouds.

Backup mergers and acquisitions

On the data protection front, Carbonite purchased fellow cloud backup pioneer Mozy, a subsidiary of Dell Technologies, for $145.8 million. Both companies initially focused on consumers, but Mozy expanded to business users when EMC bought the company in 2007. Mozy joined Dell in 2016 as part of the EMC transaction.

Carbonite’s Mozy deal extended the Boston vendor’s recent string of acquisitions. Carbonite picked up Datacastle’s endpoint backup and Double-Take Software’s high-availability technology in 2017 and Seagate’s EVault cloud backup and disaster-recovery-as-a-service business in 2015.

Veeam spent $42.5 million to buy N2WS, which focuses on cloud-native enterprise backup and recovery for AWS workloads. Veeam, which had been an investor in N2WS, is operating it as an independent company.

In another AWS-focused acquisition, data protection and management vendor Druva scooped up CloudRanger for an undisclosed sum and integrated the Irish startup’s technology into its Cloud Platform. CloudRanger provides backup and disaster recovery (DR) capabilities for AWS services, such as Elastic Compute Cloud, Elastic Block Store, Relational Database Service, and Redshift cloud data warehouse. CloudRanger claimed to have more than 300 customers, including NASCAR, Rockwell Collins and Vanderbilt University.

In another backup-related transaction, Rubrik bought startup Datos IO for an undisclosed sum to expand its cloud data management capabilities. Datos IO focuses on the backup and recovery of cloud-based NoSQL databases and big data file systems. The Datos IO customer base includes Cardinal Health, eBay, Expedia, Home Depot, Macy’s, T-Mobile and Verizon.

IT infrastructure management vendor Kaseya closed two deals in 2018. The company merged with partner Unitrends, a backup and DR software and hardware provider, and acquired cloud-to-cloud backup specialist Spanning Cloud Apps. Spanning and Unitrends run independently within Kaseya, and all three are controlled by Insight Venture Partners.

The Kaseya Unified Backup appliance combines backup, ransomware detection and cloud-based backup and DR services and resulted from Kaseya’s work with Unitrends. Kaseya Office 365 Backup powered by Spanning is available as part of the Kaseya Unified Backup Suite.

Large storage vendors quiet on 2018 M&A front

Storage vendors who helped drive M&A activity in recent years were quiet in 2018. Western Digital, which spent $19 billion on SanDisk and $4.8 billion on HGST since 2012, made no acquisitions last year. EMC had been a frequent acquirer of storage companies before the Dell merger, but Dell EMC made only one small deal in 2018. It acquired DataFrameworks for its ClarityNow software that helps managed file and object data.

NetApp, No. 2 behind Dell in networked storage revenue, also made one small deal in 2018. NetApp acquired StackPointCloud in September and quickly launched NetApp Kubernetes Service based on its new StackPointCloud technology.

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For Sale – MAC MINI LATE 2012 UPGRADED

For sale is my Mac Mini Late 2012 model, boxed with original lead and HDMI – DVI cable.

Intel i5 2.5 GHz and comes with 8gig ram and this model can be upgraded to a total of 16gig. I have put a SSD as the boot drive and moved the 500gig hard disc to the lower drive bay with a data doubler kit.

There is a couple of tiny and i mean tiny nicks to the left of the shell but apart from those this is a very clean example.

I will deauthorise this from my icloud account and put a fresh install of High Sierra which is on it now, or I can put the latest Mojave on if you so wish.

Full specs here

Mac mini “Core i5” 2.5 (Late 2012) Specs (Late 2012, MD387LL/A, Macmini6,1, A1347, 2570): EveryMac.com

some images of the actual mac mini showing the two tiny nicks with a 5 pence to give you an idea how small they are.

Price and currency: 350
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG, BACS, CASH
Location: Washington, Tyne & Wear
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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At CES 2019, ASUS unveils new ZenBooks, StudioBook, 3 additions to the VivoBook family and gaming laptops | Windows Experience Blog

At CES 2019, ASUS unveiled two new ZenBooks, a StudioBook and three additions to the VivoBook family – as well as the latest from the Republic of Gamers and TUF lines.

The ZenBook S13 (UX392) is an ultrabook that combines powerful performance and portability in a small chassis. The 13.9-inch Full HD display is surrounded by ASUS’ most impressive NanoEdge display to date – an ultra-thin 4-sided bezel, providing the industry’s biggest screen-to-body ratio at 97 percent. The thinnest laptop at 12.9 mm with discrete graphics (provided by the NVIDIA GeForce MX150) and the latest quad-core processor, the Intel Core i7 Whiskey Lake CPU, the ZenBook S13 pushes the boundaries for what’s possible inside a 13-inch laptop. It can deftly tackle video encoding; or aggressive multitasking, like processing photos while switching between productivity apps, emails and web browsing. There’s ample space with 1 TB of PCIe x4 storage, and the 50Wh battery is enough to last a full day. While everything inside is packed in tightly, nothing about it feels cramped. The backlit keyboard spans almost the full width of the laptop. Underneath is a roomy trackpad with an integrated fingerprint sensor that makes for quick and convenient login via Windows Hello.
Squeezing more components into the same package as the first ZenBook S13 required a bit of ingenuity from ASUS’ engineering team, which also succeeded in meeting the military-grade MIL-STD-810G durability standard. To ensure no space was wasted, the metal chassis is CNC-milled from a block of aluminum, allowing the lid to be carved out, complete with the complex cuts surrounding the keyboard, without creating any unnecessary gaps.

The ZenBook 14 (UX431) balances value and performance to deliver a sleek, more-affordable ultrabook that doesn’t compromise on power. Lifting the lid reveals a 14-inch glass panel with a full HD 1920×1080 resolution. This premium design unit is packed full of the latest technology, including Intel 8th Generation Core processors, NVIDIA GeForce MX150 graphics and the latest connectivity options. These days, 8 GB of system memory is a common luxury for mobile multi-tasking, but the UX431 is available with up to 16 GB of RAM to ensure seamless switching between tasks. On top of that, up to 1 TB of PCIe-attached solid-state storage gives you a powerful combination of low latency and high capacity. You’ll have a hard time filling such a spacious drive, and everything you install will launch lightning fast.
When you want to concentrate on the task at hand or just need a boost from some music while you work, you can do it with the ZenBook 14’s four speakers. In addition to the pair of upward firing speakers flanking the keyboard, there are two more speakers on the underside of the laptop, and any muffling from the desk is reduced thanks to the ErgoLift hinge. Powered by a Smart Amplifier, the Harmon Kardon-certified setup employs advanced signal processing to deliver wide frequency response, powerful bass, and especially crisp sound. When the ZenBook 14 becomes available, it’ll start at $749.
Both the ZenBook 14 and ZenBook S13 come in Utopia Blue.

Consumers will also see the debut of the ASUS StudioBook S (W700), a new breed of workstation to support the demands of the modern content creator. Built based on feedback directly from industry professionals, StudioBook S packs a 17-inch display into a compact 15-inch body, and weighs in at just five pounds. With an Intel Xeon processor and NVIDIA Quadro P3200 graphics, it’s capable of handling a variety of complex workloads while balancing day-to-day tasks.
The bezels on either side measure just 5.3 mm, resulting in a truly expansive display that feels more like a desktop monitor. The panel itself covers 97 percent of the DCI-P3 color space, which is much wider than the sRGB color gamut used by typical PCs, so it’s capable of displaying a broader range of colors. It’s Pantone Validated to ensure the colors seen on the screen are accurate, too. Each panel is factory-calibrated to delta E < 2 before it ships out, which matches the spec for ASUS’ ProArt monitors and actually exceeds the Pantone requirement. Wide 178-degree viewing angles ensure colors stay vivid and bright, and the 180-degree hinge enables a wider range of positions for the display, which can be useful when showing work to clients and collaborating on projects with coworkers. ASUS also introduced the world to the 14-inch VivoBook 14 (X412) and the 15.6-inch VivoBook 15 (X512). All the new models feature frameless NanoEdge displays with at least an up to 88 percent screen-to-body ratio for immersive viewing. The slim bezel allows a large display to fit into a smaller chassis, effectively reducing the laptop footprint for a more compact and portable machine. These laptops are powered by up to an 8th Generation Intel Core i7 processor with up to NVIDIA GeForce MX130 discrete graphics, and include the ErgoLift hinge that tilts the keyboard to replicate the feel of a desktop keyboard for a more comfortable typing experience. The VivoBooks also support Intel Optane memory, which intelligently accelerates hard disk performance, speeds up multitasking and app-loading times, and reduces boot-up and resume times. In addition, dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi connections provide speeds of up to 867Mbps — six times faster [1] than 802.11n — for seamless video-streaming, and smooth web-surfing. VivoBook also features Bluetooth 4.2. VivoBook 14 and VivoBook 15 are available in different finishes to suit your style. Transparent Silver provides a sleek and sophisticated look, or go for Slate Grey for a more understated approach. Set the trend with the uniquely iridescent Peacock Blue: a unique option that changes color when you look at it from different angles. If you really want to stand out, there’s Coral Crush with its bright finish. The new VivoBook 14 features the new NumberPad — a novel solution to the lack of a dedicated numeric keypad on small laptops. In normal use, NumberPad is a large glass-covered Windows Precision Touchpad with multi-gesture support. A tap of the NumberPad icon on the touchpad turns it into an LED-illuminated keypad with a familiar layout for easy data entry. An optional fingerprint sensor built into the touchpad provides one-touch access with Windows Hello, so logging in has never been easier or more secure. There’s also a full-size backlit keyboard that’s perfect for working in dim environments. But that’s not all – ASUS also revealed several gaming updates at CES. ASUS Republic of Gamers (ROG) announced the latest additions to the ROG arsenal of the world’s best gaming gear, including the all-new, ultra-versatile ROG Mothership (GZ700), a 17.3-inch Full HD detachable gaming laptop equipped with up to a factory-overclocked Intel Core i9 processor and NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 graphics card; and the ROG Zephyrus S (GX701) below, the world’s slimmest gaming laptop with an up to 8th Gen Intel Core processor and NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 with Max-Q Design graphics. ROG has reimagined the form factor of gaming laptops with ROG Mothership, moving from a design that traditionally sits flat to one that stands tall to draw more air into its advanced cooling system. Its keyboard detaches and folds to fit different scenarios, giving you the freedom to find the perfect position. The innovative design also leaves enough room to put all the speakers right below the screen. Other products on display at the ROG Media Showroom include a lineup of refreshed Windows 10 gaming laptops — Zephyrus S (GX531GX/GW/GV), SCAR II, Hero II, G703 and GX701 — that now come equipped with NVIDIA GeForce 20 series graphics cards [2]. The ROG Huracan G21CX has also been upgraded with a new CPU and GPU to improve its power and outperform the competition. Gaming can be an expensive hobby, but you don’t need to drop thousands of dollars on a laptop to play your favorite titles. With the right mix of components, affordable gaming laptops – such as ASUS’ new TUF Gaming FX505DY and TUF Gaming FX705DY laptops – can add up to more than the sum of their parts. AMD’s Ryzen processors have taken desktops by storm and TUF Gaming laptops lead the deployment of the newest version. Otherwise known as Picasso, this 2nd Gen Ryzen Mobile APU is built with industry-leading 12nm technology. The Ryzen 5 3550H chip powering the FX505DY and FX705DY boasts four cores and eight threads that deliver capable performance for popular games and everyday work. Multithreaded performance is particularly strong, yet the processor fits into a 35W power envelope that doesn’t compromise battery life. The TUF Gaming AMD Editions pair Picasso with up to 32GB of RAM, so they’re primed for productive multitasking and light content creation. A range of storage options makes it easy to tailor to your needs and budget, though every configuration mixes faster solid state storage with a higher-capacity hard drive to offer speed where you need it, alongside plenty of room for larger game libraries. Slim bezels frame the NanoEdge screens to further enhance immersion and shrink the overall footprint, while reinforced bodies help the machines survive daily wear and tear. Intelligently specced and carefully built, these AMD Editions balance performance and affordability to provide a better experience in your favorite games. Find out more about all these releases at ASUS and the introduction page for the new ROG product line.  [1] 5.78 times increase for 867Mbps (2×2 802.11ac) versus 150Mbps (1×1 802.11n). Unless otherwise stated, Wi-Fi performance figures are based on theoretical performance. Actual performance may vary in real-world situations. [2] Specific GPU varies among ROG laptop models. Please consult individual product page for more information.

Compliance with GDPR in Exchange requires extra effort

Even at U.S.-based companies, Exchange administrators need to know what the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation covers and what they can do with their messaging platform to maintain compliance.

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) protects the personal information of people living in European Union (EU) countries by setting rules on how that data can be collected, used and stored. Compliance with GDPR affects IT professionals who work in organizations with an EU footprint no matter where they are based. For example, if a U.S. company falls victim to a data breach that leaks the personal data of EU citizens, then that company could be penalized heavily as a result.

Admins need to work with the legal and management teams to ensure their organization meets its obligations. Part of an IT professional’s job is to make sure the legal team understands what is technically possible; the legal team ensures that those technical decisions maintain compliance with the applicable laws. The following guidelines can help Exchange administrators strive toward compliance with GDPR and their email system.

How to determine GDPR’s reach

For Exchange administrators, compliance with GDPR relates to any email from a person in the EU.

GDPR covers personal data, which is any data from the individual’s private, professional or public life, such as their names, email addresses or computer IP address.

GDPR applies to an organization when:

  • the organization controlling the data originates in the EU;
  • the subject of the data lives in the EU; or
  • the organization controlling the data uses another organization to process the data that is based in the EU.

For Exchange administrators, compliance with GDPR relates to any email from a person in the EU. Exchange administrators that work for organizations that operate in the EU or that have EU-based customers should prepare themselves and their systems for any requests related to the regulation.

However, GDPR includes language that excludes governments from its requirements for law enforcement and national security.

GDPR personal data
The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation affects companies that handle any information that can be used to identify people. This chart lists the data covered by GDPR.

Knowing where GDPR and Exchange intersect

Exchange administrators need to know the rights GDPR grants to data subjects and how to reach compliance with GDPR in the following areas:

  • Data protection: GDPR requires organizations that process personally identifiable information (PII) to protect data by design. The specific configurations that guarantee data protection vary by application, but organizations can meet this clause by implementing standard best practices. In short, by following Microsoft’s guidelines during the deployment stage, administrators can avoid trouble with GDPR.
  • Pseudonymization: GDPR recommends the use of data encryption to protect data subjects. Exactly what encryption should be applied and when is more of a gray area. There are several different types of native encryption technologies and innumerable third-party options for on-premises Exchange, each designed for a different purpose. What works for your organization will require meeting with the legal team to produce a policy on what email to encrypt and what technology to use.
  • Right of access: GDPR subjects have the right to access their personal data and know how that data is processed. Exchange administrators can support the compliance team via an eDiscovery search if they receive what’s called a data subject request. Compliance with GDPR requires an organization that holds a data subject’s information to act on these requests promptly when possible. Administrators should familiarize themselves with this search function to find the pertinent material if a request arrives.
  • Right to erasure: Data subjects have the right to have their personal data removed upon request. This is more limited than the right to be forgotten originally proposed as part of GDPR. Administrators need to support the removal of PII information upon request. The policies and procedures most organization use to maintain Exchange focus on retaining information, not deleting it. New policies to comply with this aspect of GDPR can require some significant effort, as they entail the removal of data from backups, data redundancy, offline files and more to ensure PII is properly deleted.

GDPR adds an extra layer of difficulty to the complications around compliance. GDPR requires organizations to have an appointed data protection officer and a process to notify the proper groups in the event of a data breach. A compliance officer should have a hand in the design and implementation of an Exchange system to reduce the strain associated with GDPR.

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Tribune Publishing cyberattack raises attribution questions

A cyberattack on Tribune Publishing Company LLC this weekend disrupted the printing operations of several major newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune, but questions remain about the nature and attribution of the incident.

The Tribune Publishing cyberattack, which was initially discovered Friday, involved malware that affected several of the company’s systems for producing and printing its newspapers. Those systems are shared not only by several Tribune Publishing newspapers but other third-party publications such as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. Tribune Publishing sold the Los Angeles Times and other California-based publications earlier last year to investment firm Nant Capital, but the newspapers still use the Tribune’s production platform.

As a result, several newspapers’ operations were disrupted over the weekend. For example, a company statement in the Chicago Tribune said Saturday’s print issue was shipped without paid death notices and classified ads, while other papers such as the South Florida Sun Sentinel were unable to deliver print issues at all. The Tribune Publishing cyberattack did not affect any websites or mobile applications, according to the statement, and there was no evidence that customers’ financial data or personally identifiable information were affected.

Tribune Publishing didn’t specify the type of malware that infected its systems, but the Los Angeles Times cited anonymous sources that claimed Ryuk ransomware was behind the disruption. Ryuk was first detected in August by cybersecurity vendor Check Point Software Technologies; Check Point’s research described the ransomware as “targeted and well-planned,” earning more than $640,000 in bitcoin payments. Check Point also said Ryuk’s campaign and malicious code bore similarities to the Hermes ransomware, which was attributed to North Korean state-sponsored hackers known as the Lazarus Group.

The Los Angeles Times report led some media outlets to speculate that North Korean nation-state hackers were behind the Tribune Publishing cyberattack. However, some infosec experts cautioned against attributing the attack. Robert Lee, founder and CEO of Dragos, an industrial control system security vendor based in Hanover, Md., said more information is needed before an accurate assessment of the attack can be made.

“The only thing being highlighted in certain media outlets is transitive attribution because of links observed in different malware families. This is sloppy and will lead to numerous inaccuracies,” Lee wrote in a blog post.

In addition, threat detection vendor CrowdStrike told The New York Times that it had observed Ryuk ransomware being used by suspected Eastern European cybercriminals. Check Point itself noted in its research that Ryuk could either be the work of the Lazarus Group “or the work of an actor who has obtained the HERMES source code.”

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For Sale – MAC MINI LATE 2012 UPGRADED

For sale is my Mac Mini Late 2012 model, boxed with original lead and HDMI – DVI cable.

Intel i5 2.5 GHz and comes with 8gig ram and this model can be upgraded to a total of 16gig. I have put a SSD as the boot drive and moved the 500gig hard disc to the lower drive bay with a data doubler kit.

There is a couple of tiny and i mean tiny nicks to the left of the shell but apart from those this is a very clean example.

I will deauthorise this from my icloud account and put a fresh install of High Sierra which is on it now, or I can put the latest Mojave on if you so wish.

Full specs here

Mac mini “Core i5” 2.5 (Late 2012) Specs (Late 2012, MD387LL/A, Macmini6,1, A1347, 2570): EveryMac.com

some images of the actual mac mini showing the two tiny nicks with a 5 pence to give you an idea how small they are.

Price and currency: 350
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG, BACS, CASH
Location: Washington, Tyne & Wear
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Author: