Curing diseases and delivering effective treatments with the cloud

Researchers trying to cure some of the world’s least-understood diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, are discovering new and exciting opportunities in the cloud. With the ability to instantly access vast amounts of computing power, and without the burden of large initial investments or ongoing costs, cloud technology is making it easier for healthcare organizations to study complex disorders and develop innovative new treatments. This is helping lead to an era of more precise and effective medicine.

Although the healthcare industry has used distributed computing networks to tackle large-scale health challenges before—such as the Folding@Home project, which allows individual PC users to contribute unused computing cycles to study how protein misfolding can lead to disease—there are a number of benefits to using a modern cloud computing solution. Cloud-based artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) tools, for example, are helping healthcare organizations become more efficient and medical researchers develop better treatments for diseases.

Here are a few ways the cloud is powering healthcare research that’s leading to new cures, while also making the industry more efficient and secure.

Curing Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s using the cloud

Together, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s afflict over 50 million people worldwide. Although the complexity of these disease processes has made finding cures elusive, the cloud’s ability to effortlessly scale resources and instantly tap into significant amounts of computing power is helping researchers gain a better understanding of these diseases faster.

One example: Researchers have built a comprehensive digital model of the human neurological system at comparatively low cost through quicker, on-demand access to high-performance technology stacks. Biotech startup NeuroInitiative uses virtualized GPUs in the cloud to create a general model of the nervous system, a strategy that has proved 40 times faster than using physical GPUs. “The need for lots of GPUs in a pay-as-you-go, easy-to-use model led us to the cloud from day one,” said Andy Lee, co-founder of NeuroInitiative. “We can spin up a 100,000-core cluster in minutes and stop paying for it after experiments finish.”

Using this technology, researchers have been able to simulate a variety of different treatments for neurological diseases. NeuroInitiative alone has identified more than 25 promising drug targets for Parkinson’s. They’ll be ready for human clinical trials in two to three years—half the time it typically takes for preclinical work.

Speeding up treatments with AI and ML

As more healthcare organizations embrace digital technology, they are dealing with increasing volumes of data, which must be quickly processed and analyzed in order to be meaningful. This is just the sort of work cloud-based AI and ML tools are designed to do. Just like on-premises AI and ML systems, these cloud-based tools can help humans handle routine and time-consuming tasks with unmatched speed and accuracy. Plus, these tools don’t require any special knowledge or equipment to set up, making data processing more cost-effective.

However, there’s more to be saved than money. When it comes to the development and distribution of new treatments, fast data analysis can also help combat diseases and save lives. Genomics researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, for example, needed a way to analyze and sequence large sets of genomic data with a limited set of resources. Using cloud-based AI tools from Microsoft Genomics, as well as Azure Data Lake Analytics, they were able to download their data, and then use AI to quickly process and archive it. “The tool can uniformly realign everything and let me do the variant calling for the analysis I want,” said Dr. Robert Klein, head of the Klein Lab at the Icahn School. They are scaling up their research as a result.

Likewise, Intelligent Retinal Imaging Systems (IRIS) wanted to build a platform that could detect diabetic retinopathy, a form of vision loss that can develop rapidly. To help make tests more accessible, they designed a system doctors can use to quickly analyze images of retinas and detect anomalies using ML algorithms. All doctors have to do is send a retinal image to IRIS, which then processes it using Azure Service Bus and Azure Machine Learning Package for Computer Vision. Within 24 hours, doctors receive an enhanced image back with anomalies identified, making it easy for them to give a final diagnosis. “We went from zero to 300,000 patients examined in under five years,” said Jonathan Stevenson, chief strategy and information officer at IRIS. “There is no way we could have done that without Azure.”

Automatically securing healthcare data

Privacy and security have long been concerns in healthcare, and they’ve taken on a much larger significance with the digitization of the industry. Organizations that want to modernize their operations without sacrificing security can use the cloud as an alternative to siloing all their patient records on site.

One of the most effective ways to do this is by choosing a cloud solution that comes with HIPAA and HITRUST compliance. Instead of having to worry about properly storing, accessing, and analyzing sensitive health data, an organization can simply transfer patient information to their cloud, where it will automatically adhere to secure data regulations. Another layer of protection is to use cloud services that emphasize security from the ground up. This includes introducing security elements at every phase, from the initial hardware components to the final transfer of information.

Cloud technology means better treatments are on the way for some of humanity’s most difficult diseases. By giving researchers easy and scalable access to computing resources, cloud technology is helping to reduce the time it takes to test hypotheses, increase the iteration of promising ideas and treatment methods, and develop new cures. It’s also allowing healthcare organizations to modernize without neglecting security. All this is helping to make medicine more effective, accessible, and timely. For doctors, researchers, and patients, the future of healthcare is in the cloud.

To stay up to date on the latest news about Microsoft’s work in the cloud, bookmark this blog and follow us on TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn.

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Author: Steve Clarke

All-flash startup Storbyte previews Eco-Flash file system

Newcomer Storbyte has launched a flash storage array that puts a twist on solid-state storage.

Breaking new ground with flash is a tough task, considering the market is already flooded with flash arrays from large and small vendors. Storbyte plans to stand out with a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), modified data striping and a new file system for its Eco-Flash storage that its founders described as “hardware-defined storage.”

Storbyte, based in Washington, D.C., emerged from stealth in 2018 with Eco-Flash. Its 2019 roadmap includes the general availability of the Storbyte file system, which is in early customer deployments.

Integrated Hydra ASIC chip

Drive vendors use techniques such as overclocking to boost write performance, but that can lead to data loss when the flash cell starts to degrade.

The Eco-Flash drive algorithm is modified RAID 0 that stripes data across 16 memory modules in a manner similar to disk striping. The system’s ASIC presents flash targets as a single drive to an operating system or application. In addition to Eco-Flash drives, customers can buy the storage with conventional SSDs.

The flash-striping method was devised by Storbyte CTO Joe Drissel, one of the company’s founders.

Storbyte built its Hydra ASIC directly on Eco-Flash drives to handle garbage collection and mitigate large-block-small-block conflicts. A single Eco-Flash drive integrates five Hydra chips, one of which serves as master controller.

A 4U Storbyte appliance scales to 48 drives and 8 PB of usable flash with the vendor’s Compound Optimized Data Reduction. Effective flash on a midrange 2U system scales to 2.6 PB. The Eco-Flash 1U building block tops out at 655 TB.

Eco-Flash uses a modified ZFS file system, with support for other established file systems. Storbyte’s chief marketing officer, Diamond Lauffin, said the forthcoming Storbyte file system will scale to tens of millions of IOPS without dedicated parity or rebuild spares.

“We give you a true multinode environment. That’s what [having] two file systems will allow us to do. We’ve got autotiering, sophisticated replication and are just adding a few features” before general availability, he said.

Lauffin said striping to multiple modules helps to prolong flash in write-intensive environments.

The Storbyte file system is one of a half-dozen product rollouts scheduled during the first quarter. Lauffin said the new file system is already installed with several large customer installations.

Storbyte CEO Steve Groenke said the file system is a key piece of Storbyte’s hardware-defined storage system.

“It’s not just the Eco-Flash drive, but the entire system [that was] intelligently designed,” Groenke said.

Eco-Flash and software-defined storage

Storage analysts see OEM deals with software-defined storage vendors as Storbyte’s most likely path to market.

“Storbyte has done some clever innovation on hardware, but they don’t have much in the way of software, so they’ll have to partner with somebody to have a complete system,” said Marc Staimer, an analyst at Dragon Slayer Consulting.

George Crump, an analyst at Storage Switzerland, said he sees Storbyte as an alternative to the x86 hardware typically used by software-defined storage vendors.

“The default thing is [for a vendor] to buy a storage server and throw drives in it. Those boxes are relatively simple. You get OK performance, availability and efficiency, but you don’t get anything great,” Crump said. “I think Storbyte has the potential to become the hardware for software-defined storage companies to run on.”

The startup’s founders Drissel, Groenke and Lauffin are funding the privately-held company. Only one of the three has extensive storage experience. Drissel’s expertise is cybersecurity, and Groenke has been an executive at healthcare and engineering firms. Lauffin is the storage guy of the group. He ran sales at tape vendor Qualstar in the 1990s and was a founder of disk vendor Nexsan in 2001.

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Author:

For Sale – Gaming PC Core i5 2500k, MSI GTX970

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by GooN3r, Dec 23, 2018.

  1. GooN3r

    Active Member

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    Core i5 2500k
    Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd. Z68AP-D3
    8MB Corsair DDR3
    60 GB Corsair Force 3 SSD
    MSI GTX 970
    Corsair TX750 PSU
    Corsair Full Tower
    Corsair Liquid CPU Cooler
    LG Bluray Disc Drive
    Windows 10

    As you can see there is slight damage to the front audio out port on the breakout panel but the rear port works fine. The computer is used but in good condition.

    Any questions just ask

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Price and currency: £300
    Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
    Payment method: Bank Transfer, Cash on Collection
    Location: Watford
    Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

  2. GIBSrUS

    GIBSrUS

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    Hi there, do you know what corsair cooler it is please? How is the life on the SSD (not too much of an issue, just want to make sure it doesnt die quickly!)

  3. GooN3r

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    I’ll check in the morning and get back to you.

  4. GooN3r

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    The cooler model is Corsair CWCH60, the SSD is in good working order, I have a screenshot from the disk management utility showing this.

    Hope this helps.

    Last edited: Dec 24, 2018

  5. GIBSrUS

    GIBSrUS

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    Thats good thanks.

    I’m looking for a budget build and this looks good. Would you accept 220 though and I can collect please?

  6. GooN3r

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    Can you make it £250?

  7. GIBSrUS

    GIBSrUS

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    I could meet you at 235, but that was all of my budget, so I’ll have to make do without a bigger SSD!

  8. GooN3r

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    Make it £240 and you have a deal.

  9. GIBSrUS

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    Alright go on then.

  10. GooN3r

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    Cool move to PM

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Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 18309 available now! – Windows Developer Blog

Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 18309 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 18309 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.
The Preview SDK can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.
For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum. For new developer feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice

This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017. You can install this SDK and still also continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 build 1809 or earlier to the Microsoft Store.
The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download Visual Studio 2017 here.
This build of the Windows SDK will install on Windows 10 Insider Preview builds and supported Windows operating systems.
In order to assist with script access to the SDK, the ISO will also be able to be accessed through the following URL: https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?prd=11966&pver=1.0&plcid=0x409&clcid=0x409&ar=Flight&sar=Sdsurl&o1=18309 once the static URL is published.

Message Compiler (mc.exe)

The “-mof” switch (to generate XP-compatible ETW helpers) is considered to be deprecated and will be removed in a future version of mc.exe. Removing this switch will cause the generated ETW helpers to expect Vista or later.
The “-A” switch (to generate .BIN files using ANSI encoding instead of Unicode) is considered to be deprecated and will be removed in a future version of mc.exe. Removing this switch will cause the generated .BIN files to use Unicode string encoding.
The behavior of the “-A” switch has changed. Prior to Windows 1607 Anniversary Update SDK, when using the -A switch, BIN files were encoded using the build system’s ANSI code page. In the Windows 1607 Anniversary Update SDK, mc.exe’s behavior was inadvertently changed to encode BIN files using the build system’s OEM code page. In the 19H1 SDK, mc.exe’s previous behavior has been restored and it now encodes BIN files using the build system’s ANSI code page. Note that the -A switch is deprecated, as ANSI-encoded BIN files do not provide a consistent user experience in multi-lingual systems.

Change to effect graph of the AcrylicBrush
In this Preview SDK, we’ll be adding a blend mode to the effect graph of the AcrylicBrush called Luminosity. This blend mode will ensure that shadows do not appear behind acrylic surfaces without a cutout. We will also be exposing a LuminosityBlendOpacity API available for tweaking that allows for more AcrylicBrush customization.
By default, for those that have not specified any LuminosityBlendOpacity on their AcrylicBrushes, we have implemented some logic to ensure that the Acrylic will look as similar as it can to current 1809 acrylics. Please note that we will be updating our default brushes to account for this recipe change.
TraceLoggingProvider.h  / TraceLoggingWrite
Events generated by TraceLoggingProvider.h (e.g. via TraceLoggingWrite macros) will now always have Id and Version set to 0.
Previously, TraceLoggingProvider.h would assign IDs to events at link time. These IDs were unique within a DLL or EXE, but changed from build to build and from module to module.

Additions:

namespace Windows.AI.MachineLearning {
public sealed class LearningModelSession : IClosable {
public LearningModelSession(LearningModel model, LearningModelDevice deviceToRunOn, LearningModelSessionOptions learningModelSessionOptions);
}
public sealed class LearningModelSessionOptions
public sealed class TensorBoolean : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorBoolean CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorBoolean CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, bool[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorDouble : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorDouble CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorDouble CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, double[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorFloat : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorFloat CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorFloat CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, float[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorFloat16Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorFloat16Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorFloat16Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, float[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorInt16Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorInt16Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorInt16Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, short[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorInt32Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorInt32Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorInt32Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, int[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorInt64Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorInt64Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorInt64Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, long[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorInt8Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorInt8Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorInt8Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, byte[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorString : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorString CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, string[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorUInt16Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorUInt16Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorUInt16Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, ushort[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorUInt32Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorUInt32Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorUInt32Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, uint[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorUInt64Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorUInt64Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorUInt64Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, ulong[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
public sealed class TensorUInt8Bit : IClosable, ILearningModelFeatureValue, IMemoryBuffer, ITensor {
void Close();
public static TensorUInt8Bit CreateFromBuffer(long[] shape, IBuffer buffer);
public static TensorUInt8Bit CreateFromShapeArrayAndDataArray(long[] shape, byte[] data);
IMemoryBufferReference CreateReference();
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel {
public sealed class Package {
StorageFolder EffectiveLocation { get; }
StorageFolder MutableLocation { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.AppService {
public sealed class AppServiceConnection : IClosable {
public static IAsyncOperation SendStatelessMessageAsync(AppServiceConnection connection, RemoteSystemConnectionRequest connectionRequest, ValueSet message);
}
public sealed class AppServiceTriggerDetails {
string CallerRemoteConnectionToken { get; }
}
public sealed class StatelessAppServiceResponse
public enum StatelessAppServiceResponseStatus
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Background {
public sealed class ConversationalAgentTrigger : IBackgroundTrigger
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls {
public sealed class PhoneLine {
string TransportDeviceId { get; }
void EnableTextReply(bool value);
}
public enum PhoneLineTransport {
Bluetooth = 2,
}
public sealed class PhoneLineTransportDevice
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls.Background {
public enum PhoneIncomingCallDismissedReason
public sealed class PhoneIncomingCallDismissedTriggerDetails
public enum PhoneTriggerType {
IncomingCallDismissed = 6,
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls.Provider {
public static class PhoneCallOriginManager {
public static bool IsSupported { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.ConversationalAgent {
public sealed class ConversationalAgentSession : IClosable
public sealed class ConversationalAgentSessionInterruptedEventArgs
public enum ConversationalAgentSessionUpdateResponse
public sealed class ConversationalAgentSignal
public sealed class ConversationalAgentSignalDetectedEventArgs
public enum ConversationalAgentState
public sealed class ConversationalAgentSystemStateChangedEventArgs
public enum ConversationalAgentSystemStateChangeType
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Preview.Holographic {
public sealed class HolographicKeyboardPlacementOverridePreview
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Resources {
public sealed class ResourceLoader {
public static ResourceLoader GetForUIContext(UIContext context);
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Resources.Core {
public sealed class ResourceCandidate {
ResourceCandidateKind Kind { get; }
}
public enum ResourceCandidateKind
public sealed class ResourceContext {
public static ResourceContext GetForUIContext(UIContext context);
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.UserActivities {
public sealed class UserActivityChannel {
public static UserActivityChannel GetForUser(User user);
}
}
namespace Windows.Devices.Bluetooth.GenericAttributeProfile {
public enum GattServiceProviderAdvertisementStatus {
StartedWithoutAllAdvertisementData = 4,
}
public sealed class GattServiceProviderAdvertisingParameters {
IBuffer ServiceData { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Devices.Enumeration {
public enum DevicePairingKinds : uint {
ProvidePasswordCredential = (uint)16,
}
public sealed class DevicePairingRequestedEventArgs {
void AcceptWithPasswordCredential(PasswordCredential passwordCredential);
}
}
namespace Windows.Devices.Input {
public sealed class PenDevice
}
namespace Windows.Devices.PointOfService {
public sealed class JournalPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities {
bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
}
public sealed class JournalPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob {
void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
}
public sealed class PaymentDevice : IClosable
public sealed class PaymentDeviceCapabilities
public sealed class PaymentDeviceConfiguration
public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetConfigurationResult
public sealed class PaymentDeviceOperationResult
public sealed class PaymentDeviceTransactionRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceTransactionResult
public sealed class PaymentMethod
public enum PaymentMethodKind
public enum PaymentOperationStatus
public enum PaymentUserResponse
public sealed class PosPrinter : IClosable {
IVectorView SupportedBarcodeSymbologies { get; }
PosPrinterFontProperty GetFontProperty(string typeface);
}
public sealed class PosPrinterFontProperty
public sealed class PosPrinterPrintOptions
public sealed class ReceiptPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities, ICommonReceiptSlipCapabilities {
bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
}
public sealed class ReceiptPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob, IReceiptOrSlipJob {
void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
void StampPaper();
}
public struct SizeUInt32
public sealed class SlipPrinterCapabilities : ICommonPosPrintStationCapabilities, ICommonReceiptSlipCapabilities {
bool IsReversePaperFeedByLineSupported { get; }
bool IsReversePaperFeedByMapModeUnitSupported { get; }
bool IsReverseVideoSupported { get; }
bool IsStrikethroughSupported { get; }
bool IsSubscriptSupported { get; }
bool IsSuperscriptSupported { get; }
}
public sealed class SlipPrintJob : IPosPrinterJob, IReceiptOrSlipJob {
void FeedPaperByLine(int lineCount);
void FeedPaperByMapModeUnit(int distance);
void Print(string data, PosPrinterPrintOptions printOptions);
}
}
namespace Windows.Devices.PointOfService.Provider {
public sealed class PaymentDeviceCloseTerminalRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceCloseTerminalRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnection : IClosable
public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnectionTriggerDetails
public sealed class PaymentDeviceConnectorInfo
public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetTerminalsRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceGetTerminalsRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDeviceOpenTerminalRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceOpenTerminalRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentAuthorizationRequest
public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentAuthorizationRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentRequest
public sealed class PaymentDevicePaymentRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDeviceReadCapabilitiesRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceReadCapabilitiesRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDeviceReadConfigurationRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceReadConfigurationRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDeviceRefundRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceRefundRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTokenRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTokenRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTransactionRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceVoidTransactionRequestEventArgs
public sealed class PaymentDeviceWriteConfigurationRequest
public sealed class PaymentDeviceWriteConfigurationRequestEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.Globalization {
public sealed class CurrencyAmount
}
namespace Windows.Graphics.DirectX {
public enum DirectXPrimitiveTopology
}
namespace Windows.Graphics.Holographic {
public sealed class HolographicCamera {
HolographicViewConfiguration ViewConfiguration { get; }
}
public sealed class HolographicDisplay {
HolographicViewConfiguration TryGetViewConfiguration(HolographicViewConfigurationKind kind);
}
public sealed class HolographicViewConfiguration
public enum HolographicViewConfigurationKind
}
namespace Windows.Management.Deployment {
public enum AddPackageByAppInstallerOptions : uint {
LimitToExistingPackages = (uint)512,
}
public enum DeploymentOptions : uint {
RetainFilesOnFailure = (uint)2097152,
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Devices {
public sealed class InfraredTorchControl
public enum InfraredTorchMode
public sealed class VideoDeviceController : IMediaDeviceController {
InfraredTorchControl InfraredTorchControl { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Miracast {
public sealed class MiracastReceiver
public sealed class MiracastReceiverApplySettingsResult
public enum MiracastReceiverApplySettingsStatus
public enum MiracastReceiverAuthorizationMethod
public sealed class MiracastReceiverConnection : IClosable
public sealed class MiracastReceiverConnectionCreatedEventArgs
public sealed class MiracastReceiverCursorImageChannel
public sealed class MiracastReceiverCursorImageChannelSettings
public sealed class MiracastReceiverDisconnectedEventArgs
public enum MiracastReceiverDisconnectReason
public sealed class MiracastReceiverGameControllerDevice
public enum MiracastReceiverGameControllerDeviceUsageMode
public sealed class MiracastReceiverInputDevices
public sealed class MiracastReceiverKeyboardDevice
public enum MiracastReceiverListeningStatus
public sealed class MiracastReceiverMediaSourceCreatedEventArgs
public sealed class MiracastReceiverSession : IClosable
public sealed class MiracastReceiverSessionStartResult
public enum MiracastReceiverSessionStartStatus
public sealed class MiracastReceiverSettings
public sealed class MiracastReceiverStatus
public sealed class MiracastReceiverStreamControl
public sealed class MiracastReceiverVideoStreamSettings
public enum MiracastReceiverWiFiStatus
public sealed class MiracastTransmitter
public enum MiracastTransmitterAuthorizationStatus
}
namespace Windows.Networking.Connectivity {
public enum NetworkAuthenticationType {
Wpa3 = 10,
Wpa3Sae = 11,
}
}
namespace Windows.Networking.NetworkOperators {
public sealed class ESim {
ESimDiscoverResult Discover();
ESimDiscoverResult Discover(string serverAddress, string matchingId);
IAsyncOperation DiscoverAsync();
IAsyncOperation DiscoverAsync(string serverAddress, string matchingId);
}
public sealed class ESimDiscoverEvent
public sealed class ESimDiscoverResult
public enum ESimDiscoverResultKind
}
namespace Windows.Networking.PushNotifications {
public static class PushNotificationChannelManager {
public static event EventHandler ChannelsRevoked;
}
public sealed class PushNotificationChannelsRevokedEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.Perception.People {
public sealed class EyesPose
public enum HandJointKind
public sealed class HandMeshObserver
public struct HandMeshVertex
public sealed class HandMeshVertexState
public sealed class HandPose
public struct JointPose
public enum JointPoseAccuracy
}
namespace Windows.Perception.Spatial {
public struct SpatialRay
}
namespace Windows.Perception.Spatial.Preview {
public sealed class SpatialGraphInteropFrameOfReferencePreview
public static class SpatialGraphInteropPreview {
public static SpatialGraphInteropFrameOfReferencePreview TryCreateFrameOfReference(SpatialCoordinateSystem coordinateSystem);
public static SpatialGraphInteropFrameOfReferencePreview TryCreateFrameOfReference(SpatialCoordinateSystem coordinateSystem, Vector3 relativePosition);
public static SpatialGraphInteropFrameOfReferencePreview TryCreateFrameOfReference(SpatialCoordinateSystem coordinateSystem, Vector3 relativePosition, Quaternion relativeOrientation);
}
}
namespace Windows.Security.DataProtection {
public enum UserDataAvailability
public sealed class UserDataAvailabilityStateChangedEventArgs
public sealed class UserDataBufferUnprotectResult
public enum UserDataBufferUnprotectStatus
public sealed class UserDataProtectionManager
public sealed class UserDataStorageItemProtectionInfo
public enum UserDataStorageItemProtectionStatus
}
namespace Windows.Storage.AccessCache {
public static class StorageApplicationPermissions {
public static StorageItemAccessList GetFutureAccessListForUser(User user);
public static StorageItemMostRecentlyUsedList GetMostRecentlyUsedListForUser(User user);
}
}
namespace Windows.Storage.Pickers {
public sealed class FileOpenPicker {
User User { get; }
public static FileOpenPicker CreateForUser(User user);
}
public sealed class FileSavePicker {
User User { get; }
public static FileSavePicker CreateForUser(User user);
}
public sealed class FolderPicker {
User User { get; }
public static FolderPicker CreateForUser(User user);
}
}
namespace Windows.System {
public sealed class DispatcherQueue {
bool HasThreadAccess { get; }
}
public enum ProcessorArchitecture {
Arm64 = 12,
X86OnArm64 = 14,
}
}
namespace Windows.System.Profile {
public static class AppApplicability
public sealed class UnsupportedAppRequirement
public enum UnsupportedAppRequirementReasons : uint
}
namespace Windows.System.RemoteSystems {
public sealed class RemoteSystem {
User User { get; }
public static RemoteSystemWatcher CreateWatcherForUser(User user);
public static RemoteSystemWatcher CreateWatcherForUser(User user, IIterable filters);
}
public sealed class RemoteSystemApp {
string ConnectionToken { get; }
User User { get; }
}
public sealed class RemoteSystemConnectionRequest {
string ConnectionToken { get; }
public static RemoteSystemConnectionRequest CreateFromConnectionToken(string connectionToken);
public static RemoteSystemConnectionRequest CreateFromConnectionTokenForUser(User user, string connectionToken);
}
public sealed class RemoteSystemWatcher {
User User { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition {
public enum CompositionBitmapInterpolationMode {
MagLinearMinLinearMipLinear = 2,
MagLinearMinLinearMipNearest = 3,
MagLinearMinNearestMipLinear = 4,
MagLinearMinNearestMipNearest = 5,
MagNearestMinLinearMipLinear = 6,
MagNearestMinLinearMipNearest = 7,
MagNearestMinNearestMipLinear = 8,
MagNearestMinNearestMipNearest = 9,
}
public sealed class CompositionGraphicsDevice : CompositionObject {
CompositionMipmapSurface CreateMipmapSurface(SizeInt32 sizePixels, DirectXPixelFormat pixelFormat, DirectXAlphaMode alphaMode);
}
public sealed class CompositionMipmapSurface : CompositionObject, ICompositionSurface
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadow : CompositionObject
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadowCaster : CompositionObject
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadowCasterCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable
public enum CompositionProjectedShadowDrawOrder
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadowLegacyCaster : CompositionObject
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadowLegacyCasterCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadowLegacyReceiver : CompositionObject
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadowLegacyReceiverUnorderedCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadowLegacyScene : CompositionObject
public enum CompositionProjectedShadowPolicy
public sealed class CompositionProjectedShadowReceiver : CompositionObject, IIterable
public sealed class CompositionRadialGradientBrush : CompositionGradientBrush
public class CompositionTransform : CompositionObject
public sealed class CompositionVisualSurface : CompositionObject, ICompositionSurface
public sealed class Compositor : IClosable {
CompositionProjectedShadow CreateProjectedShadow();
CompositionProjectedShadowCaster CreateProjectedShadowCaster();
CompositionProjectedShadowLegacyCaster CreateProjectedShadowLegacyCaster();
CompositionProjectedShadowLegacyReceiver CreateProjectedShadowLegacyReceiver();
CompositionProjectedShadowLegacyScene CreateProjectedShadowLegacyScene();
CompositionRadialGradientBrush CreateRadialGradientBrush();
CompositionVisualSurface CreateVisualSurface();
}
public interface ICompositorPartner_ProjectedShadow
public interface ICompositorPartner_ProjectedShadowLegacy
public interface IVisualElement
public sealed class UIContentRoot
public sealed class UIContext
public class Visual : CompositionObject {
CompositionProjectedShadowReceiver ReceivedShadows { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition.Interactions {
public enum InteractionBindingAxisModes : uint
public sealed class InteractionTracker : CompositionObject {
public static void SetBindingMode(InteractionTracker boundTracker1, InteractionTracker boundTracker2, InteractionBindingAxisModes axisMode);
}
public sealed class InteractionTrackerCustomAnimationStateEnteredArgs {
bool IsFromBinding { get; }
}
public sealed class InteractionTrackerIdleStateEnteredArgs {
bool IsFromBinding { get; }
}
public sealed class InteractionTrackerInertiaStateEnteredArgs {
bool IsFromBinding { get; }
}
public sealed class InteractionTrackerInteractingStateEnteredArgs {
bool IsFromBinding { get; }
}
public class VisualInteractionSource : CompositionObject, ICompositionInteractionSource {
public static VisualInteractionSource CreateFromIVisualElement(IVisualElement source);
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition.Scenes {
public enum SceneAlphaMode
public enum SceneAttributeSemantic
public sealed class SceneBoundingBox : SceneObject
public class SceneComponent : SceneObject
public sealed class SceneComponentCollection : SceneObject, IIterable, IVector
public enum SceneComponentType
public class SceneMaterial : SceneObject
public class SceneMaterialInput : SceneObject
public sealed class SceneMesh : SceneObject
public sealed class SceneMeshMaterialAttributeMap : SceneObject, IIterable, IMap
public sealed class SceneMeshRendererComponent : SceneRendererComponent
public sealed class SceneMetallicRoughnessMaterial : ScenePbrMaterial
public sealed class SceneModelTransform : CompositionTransform
public sealed class SceneNode : SceneObject
public sealed class SceneNodeCollection : SceneObject, IIterable, IVector
public class SceneObject : CompositionObject
public class ScenePbrMaterial : SceneMaterial
public class SceneRendererComponent : SceneComponent
public sealed class SceneSurfaceMaterialInput : SceneMaterialInput
public sealed class SceneVisual : ContainerVisual
public enum SceneWrappingMode
}
namespace Windows.UI.Core {
public sealed class CoreWindow : ICorePointerRedirector, ICoreWindow {
UIContext UIContext { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Core.Preview {
public sealed class CoreAppWindowPreview
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input {
public class AttachableInputObject : IClosable
public enum GazeInputAccessStatus
public sealed class InputActivationListener : AttachableInputObject
public sealed class InputActivationListenerActivationChangedEventArgs
public enum InputActivationState
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input.Preview {
public static class InputActivationListenerPreview
}
namespace Windows.UI.Input.Spatial {
public sealed class SpatialInteractionManager {
public static bool IsSourceKindSupported(SpatialInteractionSourceKind kind);
}
public sealed class SpatialInteractionSource {
HandMeshObserver TryCreateHandMeshObserver();
IAsyncOperation TryCreateHandMeshObserverAsync();
}
public sealed class SpatialInteractionSourceState {
HandPose TryGetHandPose();
}
public sealed class SpatialPointerPose {
EyesPose Eyes { get; }
bool IsHeadCapturedBySystem { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Notifications {
public sealed class ToastActivatedEventArgs {
ValueSet UserInput { get; }
}
public sealed class ToastNotification {
bool ExpiresOnReboot { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.ViewManagement {
public sealed class ApplicationView {
string PersistedStateId { get; set; }
UIContext UIContext { get; }
WindowingEnvironment WindowingEnvironment { get; }
public static void ClearAllPersistedState();
public static void ClearPersistedState(string key);
IVectorView GetDisplayRegions();
}
public sealed class InputPane {
public static InputPane GetForUIContext(UIContext context);
}
public sealed class UISettings {
bool AutoHideScrollBars { get; }
event TypedEventHandler AutoHideScrollBarsChanged;
}
public sealed class UISettingsAutoHideScrollBarsChangedEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.UI.ViewManagement.Core {
public sealed class CoreInputView {
public static CoreInputView GetForUIContext(UIContext context);
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.WindowManagement {
public sealed class AppWindow
public sealed class AppWindowChangedEventArgs
public sealed class AppWindowClosedEventArgs
public enum AppWindowClosedReason
public sealed class AppWindowCloseRequestedEventArgs
public sealed class AppWindowFrame
public enum AppWindowFrameStyle
public sealed class AppWindowPlacement
public class AppWindowPresentationConfiguration
public enum AppWindowPresentationKind
public sealed class AppWindowPresenter
public sealed class AppWindowTitleBar
public sealed class AppWindowTitleBarOcclusion
public enum AppWindowTitleBarVisibility
public sealed class CompactOverlayPresentationConfiguration : AppWindowPresentationConfiguration
public sealed class DefaultPresentationConfiguration : AppWindowPresentationConfiguration
public sealed class DisplayRegion
public sealed class FullScreenPresentationConfiguration : AppWindowPresentationConfiguration
public sealed class WindowingEnvironment
public sealed class WindowingEnvironmentAddedEventArgs
public sealed class WindowingEnvironmentChangedEventArgs
public enum WindowingEnvironmentKind
public sealed class WindowingEnvironmentRemovedEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.UI.WindowManagement.Preview {
public sealed class WindowManagementPreview
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml {
public class UIElement : DependencyObject, IAnimationObject, IVisualElement {
Vector3 ActualOffset { get; }
Vector2 ActualSize { get; }
Shadow Shadow { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty ShadowProperty { get; }
UIContext UIContext { get; }
XamlRoot XamlRoot { get; set; }
}
public class UIElementWeakCollection : IIterable, IVector
public sealed class Window {
UIContext UIContext { get; }
}
public sealed class XamlRoot
public sealed class XamlRootChangedEventArgs
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls {
public sealed class DatePickerFlyoutPresenter : Control {
bool IsDefaultShadowEnabled { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty IsDefaultShadowEnabledProperty { get; }
}
public class FlyoutPresenter : ContentControl {
bool IsDefaultShadowEnabled { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty IsDefaultShadowEnabledProperty { get; }
}
public class InkToolbar : Control {
InkPresenter TargetInkPresenter { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty TargetInkPresenterProperty { get; }
}
public class MenuFlyoutPresenter : ItemsControl {
bool IsDefaultShadowEnabled { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty IsDefaultShadowEnabledProperty { get; }
}
public class RichEditBox : Control {
void CopySelectionToClipboard();
void CutSelectionToClipboard();
void PasteFromClipboard();
}
public sealed class TimePickerFlyoutPresenter : Control {
bool IsDefaultShadowEnabled { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty IsDefaultShadowEnabledProperty { get; }
}
public class TwoPaneView : Control
public enum TwoPaneViewMode
public enum TwoPaneViewPriority
public enum TwoPaneViewTallModeConfiguration
public enum TwoPaneViewWideModeConfiguration
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.Maps {
public sealed class MapControl : Control {
bool CanTiltDown { get; }
public static DependencyProperty CanTiltDownProperty { get; }
bool CanTiltUp { get; }
public static DependencyProperty CanTiltUpProperty { get; }
bool CanZoomIn { get; }
public static DependencyProperty CanZoomInProperty { get; }
bool CanZoomOut { get; }
public static DependencyProperty CanZoomOutProperty { get; }
}
public enum MapLoadingStatus {
DownloadedMapsManagerUnavailable = 3,
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.Primitives {
public sealed class AppBarTemplateSettings : DependencyObject {
double NegativeCompactVerticalDelta { get; }
double NegativeHiddenVerticalDelta { get; }
double NegativeMinimalVerticalDelta { get; }
}
public sealed class CommandBarTemplateSettings : DependencyObject {
double OverflowContentCompactYTranslation { get; }
double OverflowContentHiddenYTranslation { get; }
double OverflowContentMinimalYTranslation { get; }
}
public class FlyoutBase : DependencyObject {
bool IsConstrainedToRootBounds { get; }
bool ShouldConstrainToRootBounds { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty ShouldConstrainToRootBoundsProperty { get; }
XamlRoot XamlRoot { get; set; }
}
public sealed class Popup : FrameworkElement {
bool IsConstrainedToRootBounds { get; }
bool ShouldConstrainToRootBounds { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty ShouldConstrainToRootBoundsProperty { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Core.Direct {
public enum XamlPropertyIndex {
AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeCompactVerticalDelta = 2367,
AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeHiddenVerticalDelta = 2368,
AppBarTemplateSettings_NegativeMinimalVerticalDelta = 2369,
CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentCompactYTranslation = 2384,
CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentHiddenYTranslation = 2385,
CommandBarTemplateSettings_OverflowContentMinimalYTranslation = 2386,
FlyoutBase_ShouldConstrainToRootBounds = 2378,
FlyoutPresenter_IsDefaultShadowEnabled = 2380,
MenuFlyoutPresenter_IsDefaultShadowEnabled = 2381,
Popup_ShouldConstrainToRootBounds = 2379,
ThemeShadow_Receivers = 2279,
UIElement_ActualOffset = 2382,
UIElement_ActualSize = 2383,
UIElement_Shadow = 2130,
}
public enum XamlTypeIndex {
ThemeShadow = 964,
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Documents {
public class TextElement : DependencyObject {
XamlRoot XamlRoot { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Hosting {
public sealed class ElementCompositionPreview {
public static UIElement GetAppWindowContent(AppWindow appWindow);
public static void SetAppWindowContent(AppWindow appWindow, UIElement xamlContent);
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Input {
public sealed class FocusManager {
public static object GetFocusedElement(XamlRoot xamlRoot);
}
public class StandardUICommand : XamlUICommand {
StandardUICommandKind Kind { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Media {
public class AcrylicBrush : XamlCompositionBrushBase {
IReference TintLuminosityOpacity { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty TintLuminosityOpacityProperty { get; }
}
public class Shadow : DependencyObject
public class ThemeShadow : Shadow
public sealed class VisualTreeHelper {
public static IVectorView GetOpenPopupsForXamlRoot(XamlRoot xamlRoot);
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Media.Animation {
public class GravityConnectedAnimationConfiguration : ConnectedAnimationConfiguration {
bool IsShadowEnabled { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Web.Http {
public sealed class HttpClient : IClosable, IStringable {
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TryDeleteAsync(Uri uri);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TryGetAsync(Uri uri);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TryGetAsync(Uri uri, HttpCompletionOption completionOption);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TryGetBufferAsync(Uri uri);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TryGetInputStreamAsync(Uri uri);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TryGetStringAsync(Uri uri);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TryPostAsync(Uri uri, IHttpContent content);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TryPutAsync(Uri uri, IHttpContent content);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TrySendRequestAsync(HttpRequestMessage request);
IAsyncOperationWithProgress TrySendRequestAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, HttpCompletionOption completionOption);
}
public sealed class HttpGetBufferResult : IClosable, IStringable
public sealed class HttpGetInputStreamResult : IClosable, IStringable
public sealed class HttpGetStringResult : IClosable, IStringable
public sealed class HttpRequestResult : IClosable, IStringable
}
namespace Windows.Web.Http.Filters {
public sealed class HttpBaseProtocolFilter : IClosable, IHttpFilter {
User User { get; }
public static HttpBaseProtocolFilter CreateForUser(User user);
}
}

Migrate Exchange to Office 365 with these tips

As several Microsoft server products are on the verge of losing support, some organizations will likely migrate Exchange to Office 365 or make another messaging platform transition.

In January 2020, both Exchange Server 2010 and Windows Server 2008 will move out of extended support, which will spur some Exchange administrators to prepare for an on-premises upgrade or a move to Exchange Online.

A migration to the cloud might not intimidate experienced admins, but there are sure to be a fair amount of surprises and hidden pitfalls on this journey. Administrators should check this list to circumvent email disruptions, which can befall some Exchange migration projects.

Get updated to avoid compatibility issues

To migrate Exchange to Office 365 or Exchange Server 2019, administrators must first check the version of Microsoft Office and Outlook they use. Older Office suites, such as Office 2007 and 2010, will work with Office 365 to some degree, but newer functionality, such as focused emails and Office Groups, will not.

Organizations on Outlook versions prior to 2013 may find they suffer from connectivity and security errors when connecting to Office 365 or Exchange Online services. To be safe, these organizations should upgrade Office prior to a migration.

To migrate Exchange to Office 365 or Exchange Server 2019, administrators must first check the version of Microsoft Office and Outlook they use.

A migration also requires the latest patches and security updates. Administrators must apply these updates or make other technical changes, such as adjusting the Active Directory (AD) functional level to Windows 2008 R2, if they plan to use Azure AD Connect with password write-back. Failing this, an Exchange hybrid installation cannot proceed because the systems will not meet Microsoft’s minimum requirements.

Don’t overlook third-party and VoIP integrations

Administrators must check for any potential incompatibility of Exchange Online with third-party applications, such as Mitel and Cisco, prior to migrating Exchange to Office 365. Most modern applications use Exchange Web Services to communicate with Exchange objects, but Office 365 introduces a number of new capabilities and security requirements, such as a unified API across all Office 365 workloads and the use of the latest token-based security for communication between voice over IP (VoIP) and Exchange Unified Messaging.

Several third-party vendors retuned their applications to make them compatible with Exchange Online. Exchange administrators must inventory any third-party applications in use, check their compatibility and plan their transition.

Think about the existing unified communications arrangement

Organizations that rely on integrated email and phone system functionality will likely have to adapt during an Exchange migration. These changes relate to the voicemail-to-email function, also known as voicemail transcription.

Microsoft has made significant improvements to its Unified Messaging features as part of the shift from Skype for Business to Microsoft Teams. Microsoft touts some of these new enhancements in Cloud Voicemail, the successor to Exchange Unified Messaging, including deposit function and voicemail answering, voicemail retrieval via Skype for Business Online or the Outlook client, and voicemail management through the Office 365 portal.

But these changes have affected customers who integrated VoIP and Exchange. Exchange administrators must ensure that their current VoIP platform supports Exchange Online and prepare for the transition with that vendor.

Plan for the licenses and time you need

Microsoft licensing is notoriously difficult to understand, and Exchange administrators will have to work hard to find the right Office 365 licenses. Further sowing this confusion, Microsoft continually develops new products and bundles them with existing offerings. It’s imperative for administrators to understand exactly what offerings they need based on business demands.

For example, organizations with several field workers that just need email might only require a cheaper Office 365 F1 license at $4 a month compared to the E1 plan which is $8 a month but offers more services and storage space. In many cases, organizations spend more on licensing for users who do not require advanced functionality.

Timing is key during a migration effort

It might come as a surprise that Microsoft regulates bandwidth during a migration from Exchange to Office 365. This throttling of the mailbox replication service affects all Office 365 migrations, including the cutover, staged and hybrid Exchange migrations. Because throttling controls the speed at which mailboxes migrate online, IT must ensure that they manage their migration batches properly and plan their timeline based on the performance of the initial batches.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Microsoft’s Redmond campus modernization update: Demolition begins – Stories

Stack of white hardhats bearing the Microsoft logo

Today marks the next milestone in Microsoft’s campus modernization effort. Deconstruction is beginning, and buildings will start coming down.

When the project is complete, the new campus will provide a modern workplace and create greater collaboration and community. To commemorate the original buildings, the company offered an exclusive opportunity for a group of employees to say goodbye to the original campus with a demolition party to kick off the destruction. On Tuesday, one employee and nine of his teammates (who collectively donated money to charity to win the experience via the Employee Giving Campaign auction) took to the company’s first buildings equipped with hard hats, sledgehammers and “the claw.” Check out some highlights from the fun below:

“It is great to see the interest and excitement from employees for the campus modernization,” said Michael Ford, Microsoft general manager of global real estate and security. “Our employees are crucial to building an exceptional place to work, and this event was a great way to kick off this journey together.”

Moving forward

Over the next few months, Microsoft will continue the decommissioning and demolition of 13 buildings, embracing sustainable practices throughout the process.

In 2016, Microsoft became the first technology company in the U.S. to be certified Zero Waste for diverting at least 90 percent of its waste from the landfill. The company’s goal with this project is to remain in line with this certification for construction materials and divert a majority of building materials from the landfill. This means focusing on reusing, donating and recycling. From concrete and steel framing to carpets, ceiling tiles, electronic and networking gear, interior debris and loose assets like furniture, chairs and whiteboards, to even the artificial turf outside — most of the materials in the old spaces will find a new life.

“We strive to make a positive impact on the community,” Ford said. “We’re putting a lot of effort behind finding innovative ways to reduce our impact and optimize our resource usage.”

Beyond what is being recycled, the company is also considering where materials will be processed. To maximize sustainability, Microsoft’s construction team is engaging with local waste processing and recycling companies to study and prioritize the hauling distances to further shrink the project’s construction carbon footprint.

“Corporate and environmental responsibility are equally as important as budget and schedule — and we are aligning our design and construction practices with Microsoft’s global corporate responsibility and sustainability missions,” Ford said. “It feels good to know that here in our hometown we’re supporting this vision.”

Follow updates and developments as this project progresses on Microsoft’s Modern Campus site.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

How to Install Hyper-V on Windows Server 2019 {Visual Guide}

This article will take you through installing Windows Server 2019 and then adding Hyper-V.

Already installed Windows Server 2019? Skip to Hyper-V installation

A Note on Hyper-V Server

After a few initial missteps, Microsoft has finally released the gold bits for Windows Server 2019. You can receive it with new hardware or access the releases through your volume license or MSDN page. However, as of this writing, Microsoft has not released the separate Hyper-V Server product (frequently, and incorrectly, called “Hyper-V Core”). When it releases, we will update this note and provide installation instructions.

Server SKUs Only!

This article does not cover installing Client Hyper-V on Windows 10. That process has not changed since initial release. Please refer to our article on Client Hyper-V for Windows 10 installation instructions.

Download Windows Server 2019

The most common ways to get a copy of Windows Server 2019:

  • Download from the evaluation center. Unfortunately, Microsoft has not yet created the evaluation media. We will update this post once they make it available. Assuming that Windows Server 2019 works like previous releases, you can convert an evaluation installation into a permanent installation by adding a retail key. Most other keys will not work.
  • Receive pre-installed on new hardware. Most of these will use OEM installations.
  • Receive DVD media or a download link with new hardware.
  • Receive DVD media or a download link with a retail purchase.
  • Download from your volume license portal.
  • Download from your MSDN portal.

Usually, the biggest difference in media types is whether or not it prompts for a license key.

Non-DVD Install Techniques

If you have DVD media, you can simply insert it in the system’s drive and boot to it. If you have a download, you’ll need to do something else.

  • Burn the ISO image to a DVD. We have done this for long enough that it should be common knowledge. You can right-click the ISO in Windows 10 and burn it that way, or you can find any of dozens of tools to do the job.
  • Create bootable USB media. Download the official tool from Microsoft. It has a simple wizard interface to read install information from an ISO file and place it on a removable USB device. Use them like bootable DVDs.
  • Use Windows Deployment Services.

I will use the USB-style deployment in these instructions, but I will start after boot.

Physical System Prerequisites for Hyper-V Deployment

Hyper-V was built to work on the same broad range of hardware as Windows Server. You do need to take a few pre-cursor steps. You will find all these items in your system’s BIOS/UEFI menu:

  • Enable hardware-based virtualization
  • Disable C States (power management)
  • Consider disabling all power management
  • Enable the Trusted Platform Module (TPM) if your system has one.

The Windows Server 2019 Install Procedure

The following steps walk through Windows Server 2019 Installation from media.

  1. You begin on the language, locale, and input choice screen:
    installing Windows Server 2019
  2. The second screen has the lone Install now button. If you need it, you’ll find the Repair your computer link at the lower left.
    windows server 2019 install
  3. For most installation modes, the wizard will prompt you for an activation key. You can select I don’t have a product key to enter a key later.
  4. Next you will choose the edition and install mode. The available options, and even whether or not this screen even appears, will vary based on your media. The default option will install server in core mode. “Desktop Experience” include the full Windows Server GUI.
  5. You must accept the license terms to move on.
  6. Choose the disk to install on. You can use the toolbar underneath the list of disks to control where to install. If you’d like to partition a volume rather than use an entire disk, click the New button and enter the desired size. Use the Load Driver button if your disk does not appear and you have driver files from the manufacturer.
  7. The wizard will transfer and expand the image files for your selected edition and install mode.

This completes the installation portion. Next, you configure your Windows and Hyper-V installation. How you do that depends on the installation mode that you chose. I will show them separately.

Configuring a New Windows Server 2019 Core Installation

If you chose to install Windows Server in core mode, then you will begin with the standard text-based unlock screen. We begin there.

  1. Enter the Ctrl+Alt+Del key sequence:
    New Windows Server 2019 Core Installation
  2. Windows will prompt you to change the local administrator password. Press Enter:
  3. Enter and confirm your new password. Use Tab to move between fields. Use Enter when finished:
  4. After a brief, perhaps imperceptible delay, you will receive confirmation that your password was changed:
  5. From now on, you will see the standard Ctrl+Alt+Del and password challenges:
  6. In the default configuration, Windows will take you to a standard command prompt:

You have multiple choices on how you proceed from here. I recommend that you do not install Hyper-V until you go through a number of other steps first. To complete the section on Core mode, I will list a few options most helpful in this case. After the graphical startup walk-through, I will give you my recommended checklist. Then I will present Hyper-V installation steps.

Windows Server Core Configuration Options

Windows Server Core looks intimidating to those that have always used Windows’ graphical environment, but I strongly encourage you to stand up to the challenge. Command-line functionality greatly exceeds anything that you can accomplish with a mouse. But, if you’ve never done it before, then you might not even know where to start. You have a plethora of options:

  • sconfig.cmd: Microsoft has deprecated this tool and it might eventually disappear from Windows Server releases. However, you still have it in Windows Server 2019. It’s as good a place to start as any. Just type sconfig and press Enter. You’ll get the following screen:
    Windows Server Core Configuration Options
  • Corefig: I’ve maintained the Corefig project for a few years now, although I have not done much for updating. I am in the process of building up an all-new version 2. For now, version 1.3 works on WS2019 about as well as it worked on 2016.
  • PowerShell: One tool that can solve all of your problems. You just need to know how to use it. I suggest simply using your favorite Internet search engine to look for “powershell >”. You have choices besides interactive mode, though. I like to build up pre-defined scripts for my hosts, such as this one.

The above list focuses on interactive tools. With more up-front effort, you can deploy and configure systems in minutes. Tools include Windows Deployment Services, System Center Virtual Machine Manager, Desired State Configuration, and others.

The next section shows the initial post-install configuration as above, but for a GUI installation. Skip over that section and continue with the vital configuration checklist.

Configuring a New Windows Server 2019 GUI Installation

If you chose to install Windows Server in core mode, then you will begin with a prompt to change the local administrator’s. Enter and confirm your desired password.
New Windows Server 2019 GUI Installation

After that, Windows Server will take you to the standard lock screen, which has not changed since 2016:

When you log in, Server Manager will open automatically, as it always has. It will also encourage you to install Windows Admin Center.

I assume that most people choose to use the full GUI installation for familiarity reasons. Therefore, I classify the initial configuration of Windows Server GUI mode under “common knowledge” and will not give any further information on that. If you are new to Windows Server and don’t know how to do these things, I don’t recommend starting with a Hyper-V installation.

Hyper-V Pre-Installation Checklist

Perform these steps on your newly-installed Windows Server 2019 deployment prior to installing Hyper-V.

Installing Hyper-V on Windows Server 2019

All right, you have all of the preliminary work out of the way. You can install Hyper-V in three ways: PowerShell, dism.exe, and Server Manager. I listed those in my preferred order.

Note: Regardless of installation method, your host will reboot twice to enable Hyper-V.

Install Hyper-V with PowerShell

PowerShell is the fastest and easiest way to install Hyper-V. It works on Core and GUI equally well. Just remember to start PowerShell in an elevated prompt if using a GUI-mode install.

Install Hyper-V with DISM

You have to type a bit more to get DISM to work, but you can run it from the standard elevated command prompt:

Once this command completes, it will ask if you want to restart the computer.

Install Hyper-V from Server Manager

The Server Manager technique is, by far, the longest, most painful, and most confusing. I recommend that you choose either of the other two.

Most people that use Server Manager modify the local system. You can connect to a remote system from Server Manager’s home page. You can then pick it instead of the local system at the correct point.

  1. On the home page, click Add roles and features:
  2. Click Next on the introductory screen.
  3. Choose Role-based or feature-based installation.
  4. If you do nothing on the Select destination server screen, you will change roles on the local server. If you added a remote server prior to starting the wizard, you can modify roles there. Choose the desired system and click Next.
  5. Check the Hyper-V role.
  6. When prompted, you can add the management tools as well. You do not need to do so. If you prefer, you can Cancel here and select individual management components on the next screen.
  7. On the Features page, you can pick a different selection of management tools, if you wish.
  8. You will get an introductory screen specific to Hyper-V. It talks about some of the same things we went over in the the pre-installation checklist above.
  9. You can now pick a physical Ethernet adapter to host a Hyper-V virtual switch. I highly recommend that you skip this page unless you want only defaults. You can set up networking later.
  10. You can choose the initial Live Migration security control. The settings shown only apply to Shared Nothing Live Migration, not clustered Live Migrations. I prefer Kerberos because of the security and the ease of initiating migrations. You can always change this option later.
  11. Here, you can change the default storage location for virtual machines and virtual hard disks. As with the other settings, you can change these later.
  12. The final screen allows you to review the basic options that you chose and optionally export them. It also allows you to enable an automatic reboot to enable Hyper-V. Click Install when ready.

Once all the reboots have completed, you’re ready to start creating and running virtual machines.

Hyper-V Post-Installation Checklist

Hyper-V in Windows Server 2019 continues the established tradition of needing very little post-install configuration. I’ve listed the options that typically draw the most interest:

  • Networking — we have a full how-to guide to help you through the steps
    • Create any desired teams
    • Create one virtual switch
    • As an alternative to the above two steps, create a switch-embedded team
  • Host configuration options — use Set-VMHost or Hyper-V Manager
    • Default virtual machine configuration storage location
    • Default virtual machine virtual disk storage location
    • Live Migration security settings (for non-cluster migrations only)
    • Live Migration performance settings

I recommend that you take a look through the activities available to you. Most cannot be set in the GUI. Start your discovery in PowerShell:

Take some time to go through the cmdlets to see what they can offer.

What’s Next After a New Hyper-V Installation

You’ve now set yourself up with a brand new Hyper-V installation running on Windows Server 2019. Go forth and virtualize!

If you get stuck, I’m here to help – let me know in the comments below or head on over to the Altaro Dojo Forums and ask the community! I’m also active on the forums so I’ll post my reply as soon as possible.

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Author: Eric Siron

Toshiba set to launch 16 TB HDD for cloud-scale users

Toshiba’s newly disclosed 16 TB hard disk drives may not be the only 16 TB HDDs launched in 2019, but they will likely be the first with “good, old-fashioned” drive technology.

On Monday, Toshiba said it will begin sampling a 7,200 rpm MG08 Series 16 TB HDD this year. It will target cloud service providers and hyperscale customers trying to reduce their datacenter footprints and lower costs by deploying ultra-high-density, power-efficient storage drives.

Cloud-scale users should have a few options this year because Toshiba is not the only vendor with a 16 TB HDD in the works. In December, Seagate claimed internal test units achieved 16 TB of capacity using its heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology. Western Digital also disclosed plans to launch a 16 TB HDD that uses microwave-assisted magnetic recording (MAMR) technology.

Unlike its rivals, Toshiba is not using energy-assisted technology to produce the near-line MG08 Series HDD. Scott Wright, director of HDD product marketing at Toshiba, said Toshiba’s 16 TB drive will use “good, old-fashioned” conventional magnetic recording (CMR) technology.

Until the 16 TB HDDs ship, the highest capacity drive in the market is Western Digital’s 15 TB HDD that uses shingled magnetic recording (SMR) technology. SMR-based HDDs are best suited to sequential data writes, in contrast to CMR HDDs that enable random writes across the entire disk. SMR HDD adoption has been limited because users need to make host-side adjustments to deploy them.

Designed for tier 2 storage use cases

Toshiba’s new 7,200 rpm 16 TB HDD is designed for tier 2 storage use cases – mainly file- and object-based workloads — in servers equipped with storage drives.

The new Toshiba MG08 Series 16 TB HDD supports 12 Gbps SAS and 6 Gbps SATA, but Wright said he expects the SATA interface to dominate. The drives carry a 550 TB per year workload rating and 2.5-million-hour mean time to failure (MTTF) rating.

Wright said improvements to the design of the magnetic recording head will help to boost the performance of the 16 TB HDD over its current 14 TB model. He said the sustained data transfer rate is up 4%, and write IOPS will improve by 7% with the SAS model and crack double digits with the SATA HDD.

Wright expects the cost per TB of the Toshiba MG08 Series 16 TB HDD to remain flat in comparison to the 14 TB model.

Helium-sealed design

Wright said Toshiba plans to use MAMR and is researching HAMR technology for future drives. But, in the meantime, the MG08 Series 16 TB HDD will use the same nine-platter, helium-sealed mechanical design that Toshiba introduced with its prior 14 TB HDD. Helium helps to minimize internal aerodynamic drag and turbulence and enable the use of thinner disks to boost density.

John Rydning, a research vice president at IDC, said using the nine-disk product strategy with proven CMR technology should help Toshiba to improve time-to-market competitiveness. He said Toshiba lagged Seagate and Western Digital with previous generations of 3.5-inch 8 TB, 10 TB, 12 TB and 14 TB HDDs.

Toshiba runs a distant third to Seagate and Western Digital in capacity-optimized HDDs. IDC’s third-quarter unit shipment statistics for those 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch hard disks show Seagate in the lead at 48.9%, Western Digital at 41.4%, and Toshiba at 9.7%.

Toshiba has a chance to be first to market with its 16 TB HDD, though. Wright estimated general availability for the MG08 Series could be mid-year, with volume shipments in the second half of 2019. Seagate and Western Digital have not disclosed timetables beyond saying they expect to ship 16 TB HDDs this year.

Seagate, WD prep 16 TB HDDs

Seagate and Western Digital used eight disks with their helium-based 14 TB HDDs. WD confirmed last month that its MAMR-based 16 TB HDD will also have eight platters. A Seagate spokesperson said shipments of its HAMR-based 16 TB HDDs – which analysts said likely use eight platters – are planned for late 2019.

John Chen, a vice president at Trendfocus, said whether a 16 TB HDD uses eight or nine disks and conventional or energy-assisted technology should not matter to end users if they can meet their performance, power and price needs. He said the costs of a nine-disk 16 HDD will be roughly equivalent to an eight-platter 16 TB MAMR drive.

Chen added that manufacturing costs for HAMR-based HDDs could initially be higher than the alternatives, but he expects they will decline over time as the technology matures and volume shipments ramp.

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For Sale – Custom Built Water Cooled High End PC

Hi,for sale is my High End Custom Built Water Cooled PC and specs are as follows.
Selling as a complete sale and will not seperate any items listed.

Intel Core i7-7700K 4.2 GHz QuadCore 8MB Cache Processor.Professionally Delidded with EK Supremacy Water Block Cooled.
Palit GeForce® GTX 1080 Ti Founders Edition with EK-FC Titan Pascal Water Block Cooled.
Gigabyte GA-Z270X-Gaming 7 MotherBoard.
Corsair CMK16GX4M2B3200C16 Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4 3200 MHz C16 XMP 2.0 High Performance Desktop Memory Kit, Black.
Intel 600p 512GB M.2 NVMe PCIe SSD/Solid State Drive. Win 10 os Installed.
Kingston 480 GB SV300S37A/480G V300 SATA 3 Solid State Drive.
Super Flower Leadex Platinum 850W Fully Modular “80 PLUS PLATINUM” Power Supply.
Phanteks Evolv ATX Case with Left Side Tempered Glass Panel.
5X NB-eloop B12-P Ultra Silent Bionic Loop Radiator and Case Fans.
All Water Cooling Fittings and Fixtures are High End EK From Pump and Blocks To Piping and Connectors.I have also included a self made Drainage pipe and extra tubing.
Corsair Lapdog Gaming Control Center.
Corsair K70 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard MX Speed.
Corsair Sabre RGB Gaming Mouse.
Windows 10 Pro with all drivers and bios updated.

LAPDOG is an ultimate gaming control center which revolutionizes PC gaming in any room.As you can see from the pictures(which do not include the tv or sound equipment in the sale),i use this primarily on a 65inch tv and i sit at least 9 feet away in comfort.
This System Build is set to deafult 4.2gig profile and can play the majority of current games at max settings,on a 4k tv at 60fps and can be overclocked to 5gig plus with ease if needed with stable low temps.Whether gaming,video,photo editing or music is your thing,this High End Custom Built PC will suit your requirements and does not look out of place in any Living Room,Bedroom or Office.
All boxes are provided and paperwork if needed.
Majority of purchases are from Overclockers or Corsair.
This has cost me,at the time of build,over £3000 and i am reluctantly selling for £1500 or very nearest offer,to put towards another expensive build.If you know your Computers then you know this is a very fair Sale Price.
I have had a lot of enjoyment from this build and now feel it is time for another project.
All items are sold from a smoke free home and Cash on Collection only is preferred because of the weight and liquid content.
Any questions feel free to contact me.
Thanks.

Price and currency: £1500
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: Cash on collection
Location: Stoke On Trent
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

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By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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At CES, Dell and Alienware show off new and improved PC, software and gaming innovations | Windows Experience Blog

Building on more than 30 years of purposeful innovation, Dell unveiled at CES 2019 a host of new and improved products and software experiences across its award-winning Latitude, XPS and Inspiron portfolios.

Latitude 7400 2-in-1

Because everyone can use more time, the new Latitude 7400 2-in-1 has the ability to wake itself and be ready to go before you even touch it. The world’s first PC to use a proximity sensor enabled by Intel Context Sensing Technology, it includes ExpressSign-in. It detects your presence, wakes the system and immediately scans for facial recognition to log you in with Windows Hello. Just sit down with your device and start working without a touch, without a password. And when you step away for a break, it will know you’re gone and lock itself to preserve battery life and maintain security.
A CES 2019 Innovation Honoree, the Latitude 7400 2-in-1 is the world’s smallest commercial 14-inch 2-in-1. It will also be the first Latitude to use Dell’s ocean-bound plastics packaging. This Latitude is also expected to deliver the longest battery life in its class. It’s designed for 24 hours of run time [1] on a single charge, and Dell’s ExpressCharge gets the battery back up to 80 percent in just an hour.
Dell Latitude 7400 2-in-1 will be available in early March, starting at $1,599.

XPS 13

Also announced at CES, Dell has added a new top-mounted innovative webcam and a new frost color option to the XPS 13, the highest performance 13-inch laptop in its class and now even more powerful with the latest quad-core 8th Generation Intel processors. Another CES 2019 Innovation Honoree and Dell’s most award-winning product ever, the XPS 13 is sought-after by professionals and consumers alike. At just 2.25mm, Dell’s smallest HD webcam ever enables the XPS to maintain its trend-defining Infinity Edge display despite moving the camera to the top of the display for a better video experience. The XPS 13 is also the first laptop in Dell’s portfolio to launch Dolby Vision, unleashing the potential of HDR to deliver ultra-vivid picture quality.
The Dell XPS 13 is available on Dell.com starting at $899.99 and Microsoft.com and in limited quantities in select Microsoft stores.

13-inch Inspiron 7000 2-in-1

In other news, the new 13-inch and 15-inch Inspiron 7000 2-in-1 devices now include a first-of-a-kind Active Pen garage that provides storage for the included full-size Active Pen [2]. The new keyboard combines the power button and fingerprint reader into a new power key, simplifying the look and making way for a number pad, available now for the first time on a narrow-border 15-inch 2-in-1.
The devices also include innovative Adaptive Thermal technology that enables each system to adjust its performance profile based on usage, generating less heat when you’re watching movies on your lap and ramping up to maximum power for productivity on a desk. Hot air is directed out of hidden vents through the hinge, removing hot-spots and preventing accidental blockage from a pillow or couch cushion.
Dell Inspiron 7000 2-in-1 is expected be available mid-2019.
Dell Cinema, the most immersive content experience on a PC (available on XPS and Inspiron 7000 laptops), continues to advance with new features and updates. Sit back and enjoy richer, deeper colors with CinemaColor 2.0, enhanced by Dolby Vision on the XPS and select Inspiron PCs. Dolby Vison content can deliver highlights up to 40 times brighter, and blacks up to 10 times darker. CinemaSound 2.0 enhances volume, bass and dialogue. Sound Optimization on Dell’s 2-in-1s automatically adjusts equalization for the best experience, no matter the position of the device. Waves MaxxAudio NX tracks head movements via the device’s webcam to provide 360 audio enhancement, keeping the sound oriented with the user’s position.
Additionally, CinemaStream 2.0 enhances the video streaming experience with up to 10 times less buffering and up to six times improvement in video quality [3]. It automatically detects and prioritizes the most critical network traffic to maximize bandwidth for live-streaming and video chats for a seamless, stutter-free experience.
Since its launch at CES 2018, Dell Mobile Connect has facilitated more than 30 million phone calls and text messages, helping users avoid having to split their attention between their PC and smartphone. Dell has strengthened this offering with the additional functionality of wireless file transfer capability, allowing Android users to drag and drop any file from their phone to their PC and vice versa, even without an internet connection.
Dell is also revealing a cutting-edge future capability of integrating the smartphone into the VR experience, allowing VR gamers to receive notifications, conduct phone calls, reply to text messages and even access all their mobile applications by pulling up a virtual 3D model of their phone and operating it with touch inside the VR experience.
Dell Mobile Connect is available on XPS, Inspiron, Vostro, Alienware and Dell G Series devices.
Also at CES, Dell and Alienware are bringing innovation front and center to satisfy the growing PC gaming market, with high-end, thin, light and affordable machines for amateur and professional gamers. They’re also partnering with esports brands like Team Liquid and Riot Games to make the gaming experience more competitive, personalized and accessible.
Alienware marks CES 2019 as a brand milestone with the debut of a totally new design identity, Alienware Legend, which sets a new bar of excellence for what gamers want most – performance and function. Alienware evaluated multiple concepts and chose one that was the biggest and boldest departure from its current look and the sea of sameness in the industry.
Alienware Legend stays true to the brand’s core design tenets, taking cues from its deep roots in sci-fi culture and its early industrial designs, to distinguish the brand from the rest of the industry. The new Legend design is optimized with cutting-edge thermal and cooling technology to achieve and sustain unparalleled power, improved AlienFX lighting, ultra-thin screen borders, and a new “three-knuckle hinge” design which reduces the overall dimension while creating a stronger assembly, all combining to yield the ultimate gaming experience.

Alienware Area-51m

Alienware Area-51m, the world’s most powerful 17-inch gaming laptop [4], is the first product to reflect the new Legend brand identity, almost 20 years after Alienware launched the first gaming laptop with upgradeable graphics, praised for its performance and expect to garner multiple CES awards.
This second flagship notebook with upgradeable graphics and processors is the first and only laptop with a 9th Generation 8-core desktop processor, 64 GB [5] of memory, 2.5 Gbps Ethernet technology, upgradeable graphics [6] and desktop processors, and a 17-inch laptop with a narrow-bezel display with 144 Hz. The Area-51m also has cutting-edge thermal and cooling technology, with 50 percent more performance and 32 percent less volume than its predecessor.
It’s also packed with an array of gaming must-haves, including the latest Tobii eye-tracking technology and the latest Alienware Command Center.
Alienware Area-51m with Legend design will start to ship on Jan. 29, starting at $2,549.

Alienware m17

Alienware also introduced its thinnest and lightest 17-inch gaming notebook, the new Alienware m17, adding to the recently announced Alienware m15, for gamers on-the-go who prioritize weight and thinness for mobility. Powerful enough to handle high-graphic games, yet portable enough to take with you from destination to destination, the m15 weighs only 4.76 pounds [7], while the m17 is just 5.79 pounds.

Alienware m15

Available now: Alienware m15, starting at $1,379.99.
Available on Jan. 29: Alienware m15 with NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20 Series GPU, starting at $1,579.99; Alienware m17, starting at $1,649.99.

Dell G7 17

For those looking for an affordable yet powerful gaming system (or buying their first gaming system), check out the new G Series. The G5 15 and G7 (in both 15-inch and 17-inch models) are redesigned to deliver enhanced performance with upscale features in a sleek chassis.
The thinnest G series to date with beautiful narrow borders, the G5 and G7 incorporate 8th Generation Intel CFL-H 6-core CPUs and the latest NVIDIA RTX graphics up to 2080, optimized for demanding AAA game titles and versatility for everyday use. They also come with the option of a blazing 144 Hz refresh rate, G-Sync display panels, a 4-zone RGB keyboard with customizable backlighting, and will now ship for the with Alienware Command Center for the first time. The Dell G5 15 Special Edition is also available in alpine white, with a clear panel on the bottom of the system to show off the blue fans of the cooling system.
Available Jan. 29: Dell G5 15, starting at $999.99; Dell G7 17, starting at $1,380; and Dell G7 15, starting at $1,099.
Alienware made more than 30 updates to its proprietary Alienware Command Center, the central hub where users can customize all aspects of their experience including system and peripheral lighting, power management, thermal control, overclocking, audio and content organization.
Alienware Command Center now offers GPU overclocking (and underclocking), an Alienware first, allowing changes to take effect at the system level and work in conjunction with CPU and RAM overclocking as well as thermals; and user interface improvements to make Alienware Command Center easier to use.
Alienware doubles down on esports through continued Team Liquid expansion in 2019, with the opening of their second training facility in Utrecht, Netherlands, the future European headquarters and additional training hub for Team Liquid athletes competing across the world. Team Liquid athletes will now stream, train and even help in the development across the full portfolio of Alienware desktops, laptops, premium displays, gaming headsets and peripherals.
Nurturing further innovation in the multibillion-dollar esports industry, Alienware has forged a new multi-year partnership with Riot Games. A year in the making, this new partnership is designed to help gamers become esports players and help professionals compete at a higher level.
For professionals, Alienware Aurora desktops and AW2518H monitors will facilitate the NA LCS (North America League Championship Series), EU LCS (Europe League Championship Series) and a mix of global competitions such as MSI (Mid-Season Invitational), ASE (All-Star Event) and WC (World Championship). For fans, Alienware will introduce a special VIP seating section at the playoffs and finals of LoL tournaments, offering select fans the opportunity to play while they watch.
Visit the Dell CES 2019 press site for product information, images, releases and more.
 [1] 24-hour run time based on MobileMark 2014 tests using optional 78WHr battery[2] The first 2-in-1 with a full-size pen garage in the hinge. Based on Dell internal analysis, November 2018.[3] Based on Dell internal analysis, November 2018.[4] When equipped with Intel Core 19-9900K processor, 64GB of DDR4 2666MHz memory and NVIDIA GeForce RTX (8GB) graphics. Based on internal analysis of competitive gaming laptops as of Dec 2018.[5] System memory may be used to support graphics, depending on system memory size and other factors.[6] Limited to same generation of NVIDIA RTX 20 Series[7] Weights vary depending on configuration and manufacturing variability.