Ponemon study: Poor password practices remain rampant

Despite the increasing concern regarding online privacy and the growing number of security breaches, poor password practices continue to prevail in the enterprise.

According to a new survey from the Ponemon Institute, 69% of respondents admitted to sharing passwords with their colleagues to access accounts and 51% said they reuse an average of five passwords across their business and/or personal accounts. The “2019 State of Password and Authentication Security Behaviors Report” also revealed 55% of respondents said they don’t use any form of two-factor authentication at work.

The research, sponsored by authentication vendor Yubico, surveyed 1,761 IT and IT security practitioners in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany and France. The key takeaway from the report, according to Yubico’s chief solutions officer Jerrod Chong, is that poor password practices is an industry-wide problem and companies should work together toward finding areas of improvement, Chong said.

“We need to treat the password problem like a sales problem,” Chong said. “If we treat it as a commodity that needs to be changed out, then I can tell you all the marketers will put their brains into it.”

Francis Dinha, CEO at cybersecurity vendor OpenVPN in Pleasanton, Calif., said the study also shows that users will consistently prioritize convenience over security. “Keeping track of a wide variety of hard-to-remember passwords might be the secure thing to do, but it certainly isn’t convenient, and therefore it’s often neglected.”

While phishing attacks are rampant — with majority of respondents saying they have fallen victim to such attacks — 57% of those who have experienced a phishing attack have not changed their password behaviors, the report found.

Keeping track of a wide variety of hard-to-remember passwords might be the secure thing to do, but it certainly isn’t convenient, and therefore it’s often neglected.
Francis DinhaCEO, OpenVPN

A single phishing email can prove to be detrimental to any organization or individual, said Ben Brown, product specialist at SiteLock, a website security provider based in Scottsdale, Ariz.

These types of poor password practices reinforces that businesses need to implement more aggressive security approaches such as mandatory security training for employees, Brown said in an email interview.

“It is one of the most simple and efficient ways to establish a human firewall within any organization. In fact, many companies are beginning to take this one step further by actively phishing their employees, then delivering additional training to those who click on the phishing link,” he said.

The path to stronger authentication

Chong believes companies should support open standards like Web Authentication to help enable a secure authentication method for end users.

In April last year, FIDO Alliance and the World Wide Web Consortium announced a new password-free protocol for the web called Web Authentication (WebAuthn).

“WebAuthn is part of what we call FIDO2; FIDO2 is comprised of WebAuthn and a spec called Client to Authenticator Protocol (CTAP),” said Andrew Shikiar, chief marketing officer at FIDO Alliance. “WebAuthn is an API that websites can use to enable FIDO’s approach for user authentication; CTAP is the corresponding protocol from FIDO that allows external authenticators to communicate back to the server or service.”

CTAP builds on the prior work in U2F that was popularized by Yubico and others. It also introduces a new use case where the authenticator is not just a security key, but also, for example, “your handset, which can serve as an authenticator to your desktop,” he explained.

FIDO is working with Yubico, Google, Microsoft and 200 other companies in creating stronger authentication standards that prevent phishing, account takeovers and other attacks that prey on the weakness inherent to passwords, Shikiar added.

“FIDO leverages public key cryptography to securely authenticate users — storing a private key safely on the user’s device, with the corresponding public key residing on the service provider’s server,” he said.  “As part of the challenge-response dialogue during authentication there is metadata unique to the website or service that must be present for the private key to complete the authentication process. This — at a high level — is what helps prevent well-designed phishing attacks that might not otherwise be apparent to the user.”

Poor password hygiene

Reducing the reliance on passwords

The majority of respondents in the Yubico report found managing passwords to be “too difficult.” Fifty-seven percent said they would prefer an alternative method to protect their identity and 56% said they would be happy if they didn’t need a password to log in to their online accounts.

On average, respondents report having to spend 12.6 minutes each week entering and/or resetting passwords, according to the report. Additionally, enterprises spend over million dollars a year on password reset alone, Shikiar said.

“There are also a lot of usability challenges, which just about everyone can relate to as a consumer,” he said. “FIDO’s mission has been to reduce reliance on passwords and the shared secret approach to user authentication. We want to have simpler and stronger authentication for users, while also de-risking authentication for businesses.”

Organizations can’t get rid of passwords overnight, “but we are on the path to getting there,” Shikiar said.

“Everything’s aligning in the right direction, with the industry support, the product support and the general realization that with things like phishing, account takeovers, credential harvesting and credential stuffing, the industry needs solutions,” he said.

While there is support from leading browser vendors, he said, Microsoft is one of the key contributors and backers of FIDO2 and WebAuthn, and this functionality is being built into their core platforms. Windows 10 and Windows Hello, for example, can provide an entirely passwordless authentication experience.

“Microsoft is having great success with upgrading their Windows 10 upgrades — as that number ticks up, the number of passwordless enterprises will accelerate accordingly,” Shikiar said.

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For Sale – Asus G11CD Core i5-7400 8GB 1TB GeForce GTX 1060 Windows 10 Gaming Desktop

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by bwfc0907, Jan 20, 2019.

  1. bwfc0907

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    • Intel Core i5 I5-7400 Processor
    • GeForce GTX 1060 Graphics card
    • 8GB RAM
    • Windows 10 (64-bit) Operating System
    • 1TB Hard Drive
    • DVD-RW Optical Drive
    • 1 year warranty
    • Tower Desktop Form Factor

    I have added another HDD and wireless adapter. This is the link to the website I bought from
    Buy Asus G11CD Core i5-7400 8GB 1TB GeForce GTX 1060 Windows 10 Gaming Desktop from Debenhams Plus

    9 months old. 3 month warranty remaining.

    Price and currency: £375
    Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
    Payment method: BT
    Location: Bolton
    Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

    Last edited: Jan 29, 2019

  2. bwfc0907

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    Price reduction

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    How many hdd bays does the tower have mate ? And how many sata ports on board ? I’m after a new Plex server

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    Hope this helps

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    Hi, do you have a link to the motherboard in this pc

  6. bwfc0907

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    Sorry, no

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    I have absolutely no need for a pc other than having an urge to play flight sim x which will not go away , bought the controllers and software last July without having a pc and then thought it was just a phase I was going through in my old age . Sadly for me it’s still playing on my mind so maybe this could do the job without costing me a fortune . Is there any movement on the price ?

  8. bwfc0907

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    Unfortunately I’ve come as low as possible. Sorry

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    Ok no problem i’ll keep looking .

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    Hi.

    Is the 1060 3gb or 6gb?

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5 Powerful Ways to Use Azure IaaS

Following on from our Azure Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) webinar with Microsoft’s Thomas Maurer, in this article we run down 5 of the most important uses of Azure IaaS. On this page, you’ll also find the questions and answers asked by those that attended the live webinar broadcast. There were some fantastic questions asked and some really important aspects covered in the Q&A particularly around specific use cases that many using IaaS will encounter. However, before we go any further, let’s just define what IaaS and what it can do, for those who are new to the topic.

What is Azure IaaS?

Azure IaaS is an instant computing infrastructure operating with VMs running on Azure Compute and all its associated online infrastructure. This includes things like vNets, Network Security Groups, cloud storage….etc..etc. IaaS is most often compared to PaaS (Platform as a Service) in which the customer is simply consuming the core service needed and leaving the management of the individual components underneath to the cloud vendor. An example of PaaS in Azure would be something like Azure Web Apps, or Azure SQL.

Watch the Webinar: How to Supercharge your Infrastructure with Azure IaaS

How to Supercharge your Infrastructure with Azure IaaS

If you want a better understanding of what Azure IaaS can do I strongly recommend you watch the free webinar How to Supercharge your Infrastructure with Azure IaaS presented by myself, Microsoft MVP Andy Syrewicze, and Thomas Maurer, Senior Cloud Advocate on the Azure Engineering Team. During the session, we covered several real-life applications that organizations can leverage Azure IaaS today. We chose to discuss IaaS over PaaS, because IaaS is often the first logical step that organizations take when first getting started with the cloud. The use-cases covered during that webinar include:

  1. Running Web Applications in Azure IaaS
  2. Creative Uses for Nested Virtualization in Azure
  3. Highly Available VMs in Azure IaaS
  4. How to Migrate an On-Premises VM to Azure
  5. Azure Files and Highly Available Storage for IaaS VMs

As these were covered during the webinar, we won’t be covering these listed use-cases in this article.

Note: The webinar page also includes a downloadable version of the presentation slide deck.

I this article, we’ll be covering 5 community suggested use-cases that we didn’t have time to cover during the webinar.

Let’s get started!

1. Active Directory Hosted in Azure in Azure IaaS and Azure AD

When I’m talking with folks about Azure, this is often a big one that I get. What to do with AD in Azure? Most operations folks will be quite familiar with the concept of running redundant domain controllers onsite to handle all things identity for their organization. While this model has served us well on-prem, that doesn’t instantly make it work in a cloud model.

Because of this, it’s important to really plan for what you’re looking for with AD. The simplest way I put it is two options:

  1. If you simply need offsite redundancy for an existing on-prem AD deployment, or you have a disjointed workforce and still want identity services in conjunction with traditional AD, spin up a small VM in Azure, configure VPN services, and replicate to it. Done.
  2. If you utilize Office 365 to date, you’re interested in some of the more advanced features in Azure AD such as password-less sign in, or you’re keeping your IaaS deployments separate from your on-premises stuff (from a security point of view) then use Azure AD.

With that said, this isn’t a one size fits all rule. Realistically, maybe the answer for your organization is a combination of the 2 options. We’ll be covering more about Azure AD and Identity services in Azure here on the Hyper-V blog.

Additionally, we’ve started a discussion thread on the Dojo Forums if you’re interested in discussing this use-case further.

2. Run an Application in an Azure Container Instance

Containers have started taking the industry by storm. Containers and Container Orchestration was a major development area for Microsoft this last year or two, so it didn’t surprise me to see this as a community interested use-case in our IaaS webinar.

While many IT Pros know you can run containers on-prem, many are surprised to hear you can quickly and easily spin up a container in Azure using Azure Container Instances. It’s simply a matter of pointing Azure at the relevant container image you want to use, pass your variables, and let it run.

To date, I’ve covered containers quite a bit on our MSP blog, and will be focusing on Azure Container Instance Specifically in a future post. Like the above AD focused use-case, we’ve started a discussion thread on this use-case as well. We’d love to hear your input.

3. 100% Virtual Office in Hosted in Azure (e.g. 10 Desktops and 1 or 2 Servers)

This was the community submitted use-case I hadn’t considered whatsoever. I was also excited to play it out once I read it as well. The idea here is to have a 100% cloud-based office. Virtual desktops in Azure along with Azure-hosted servers/services to support them. In this scenario, the only thing on-site, would be an endpoint or thin client to remote into the cloud office.

This is certainly doable and could be VERY beneficial for workforces that are spread out. You could use traditional Azure IaaS VMs, or look at some of the new services like Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD). Together these should serve all your compute needs

One thing that does come to mind is internet access. With a deployment like this, connectivity needs to have top priority. Contingencies and backup connections need to be in place in the event the primary connection goes down. An old saying from a buddy of mine comes to mind….. the cloud is great until you can’t get to it. That thought REALLY applies here. No internet, no office, so you’ll want to plan accordingly.

Like the above 2 options, we have a discussion thread setup on our forums. Again, we’d love to hear your thoughts and ideas on this use-case!

4. SQL Server Hosted in Azure IaaS

While this one didn’t make our top three, I did see quite a few mentions of it during our webinar. Mainly, what is the place of SQL running in an Azure VM, vs the SQL DB Service in Azure PaaS?

You would run SQL in an Azure VM, when you want to control the OS stack underneath SQL. Maybe you need that granular access. Maybe you need direct access to the backend. Maybe you want to manage your own patch and maintenance cycles. It these types of situations where you would want to avoid the PaaS model. The model also plays the best when integrating with on-prem systems, or if you want to start utilizing the cloud but maintain as close of similarity as possible with on-prem.

If you’re in a situation where you strictly need a SQL DB, and nothing else. Have a look at Cloud Database as a Service. The big benefit here is you don’t have to worry about the underlying OS and associated infrastructure. Keeping things as simple as possible.

5. Making Azure Work with an On-Premises vSphere Environment

For the 5th most popular use-case suggested by the community for our webinar, we had Azure interoperability with VMware.

Microsoft has put in a lot of work making sure that administrators using VMware on-prem can still take advantage of Azure Cloud Services. With Azure acting as an extension of your datacenter, many Azure services don’t even see the VMware part of your on-prem equipment. They just see the operating systems of your guest VMs.

As for migrations and moving things toward Azure from VMware, this is a highly supported action as well. In our webinar above, Thomas even spent a bit of time talking about migration from VMware to Azure VMs. So, check that out if you haven’t already.

The main thing here is just don’t assume it won’t work because it’s two different vendors. Test things out, read the official documentation. You’ll find that this situation is highly supportable and not too much of a headache at all.

Azure IaaS Webinar Q & A

Below is a full list of the questions asked during the How to Supercharge your Infrastructure with Azure IaaS webinar and their associated answers.

NOTE: If we missed your question or you have a new question about this topic, let us know in the comments below, or let us know on the Dojo Forums if it’s a more involved question!

Q. In your opinion, what is the best advice for an organization just getting started with Azure?

A. Take it slow. Unless there is a burning business need for it, there typically isn’t anything forcing you to move to Azure today. Start with the easy stuff like simple web-apps, offsite backup storage…etc..etc and go from there once your comfortable.

Q. About HA in Azure, the VMs need to have the same “role”? What do you suggest when you need HA for a single VM?

A. Availability Zones and Sets in Azure simply insure that your VMs are not contained within the same defined fault domain in an Azure region. This prevents failure of any fault domain affecting all the VMs in your availability set/zone. You still need to take the steps necessary to cluster your application across multiple VMs.

Q.How would I go about load balancing multiple web server VMs in Azure?

A. Azure has built in load balancer services. For more information see this link!

Q. For companies using Azure Stack, can it be added as a region also? Would it make sense?

A. Azure Stack is not just a new region, it is a new cloud. Thing about it like you would think about Azure Government, Azure China, and the public Azure Cloud. It’s completely separate, but you could still deploy apps on Azure and Azure stack combined.

Q. So with Nested Virtualization, I could backup an entire Hyper-V host and restore it to Azure along with it’s VMs?

A. Kind of. While you wouldn’t be able to restore the host, you could provision a nested Hyper-V host in Azure and recover your VMs to it! You have to manage the virtual networking from the nested hyper-v instance out to the Azure networking fabric, but that’s very doable.

Q. Are Azure Files accessible directly from IaaS? Or is it accessed over public IP PaaS?

A. You attach an Azure IaaS VM to Azure Files just like you would any other server. On-Prem or otherwise.

Q. Can Azure Files have ACLs integrated with Azure AD?

A. Sure can, it’s currently in public preview! More information here!

Q. Does Azure Files effectively replace on-prem file shares?

A. I don’t think on-prem file shares will go away completely. Remember, some applications still have certain latency requirements that Azure files wouldn’t be able to provide.

Q. Can Azure File Sync be used to replace a local file server completely for an SMB?

A. With file sync, you will still have a file server, but it is synced to the cloud. For a small business, I would suggest you look at Office 365 and Sharepoint Online.

Q. Is it possible to connect a Database VM in IaaS, with an application hosted in PaaS?

A. Yes! You can do this over a vNet

Q. Do you recommend a file server hosted on an Azure VM with a VPN connection?

A. You could certainly do this and it would work and is supported. Azure Files would likely fit a large number of use cases as well.

Q. What is the easiest way to migrate SBS 2011 services to Azure?

A. Azure Migrate should help with this.

Q. Do you have any resources to help with Azure Pricing? The Calculator is confusing!

A. You are correct. The calculator has a TON of information in it. If you want a bit of assistance, including some examples, we covered pricing a little in one of our recent eBooks. It’s written from a service provider stand point, but should be helpful even if you don’t fall into that camp.

Q. What About Encryption in Azure and BYOK?

A. Take a look at Azure Key Vault.

Q. Being in an Azure Environment wouldn’t it make the most sense to use Azure Backup?

A. Azure Backup has some major limitations in how you can schedule and store backups. Additionally, there is some specific criteria around the amount of data to be backed up, the number of restore points…etc..etc. Many organizations like to conduct backup/restore operations under the umbrella of their existing backup vendor.

Q. What happens to your SLAs if you don’t select premium storage?

A. The uptime percentage will be lower.

Q. Are the SLAs in Azure Government Different?

A. I’ve not seen or heard anything that states they are different from that of the normal Azure Public cloud. More documentation on Azure Government here. Additionally, I’d ask your rep for more up to date information on the SLAs specifically.

Q. Would you still use Availability Sets with Availability Zones?

A. They really protect against two different issues. An Availability set protects against failures within a datacenter, while an Availability Zone protects against a datacenter failure within an Azure region.

Q. What is the RTO for an unplanned downtime in Azure?

A. The SLAs and associated downtime are defined per service in Azure. The details are provided in the documentation for each service.

Q. Does Azure Migrate allow you to select where the workload goes?

A. Yes!

Q. Do Availability Sets also help with load issues?

A. Availability Sets are more about HA and uptime. They are designed to protect you from equipment failure inside of Azure and not designed to address load concerns.

Q. For Availability Sets, I have to pay for 2 VMs correct?

A. This is correct. At least 2. If your application requirements call for more than 2, you’ll have to pay for more than two. The Availability sets just ensure fault domain separation

Q. Is scaling down storage in Azure possible?

A. Yes. The flexibility/ability to scale up as well as down is one of the most popular features in Azure.

Q. Are Azure File shares public?

A. They can put access limitations in place to suit your needs

Q. How would I go about accessing a VM hosted application in Azure that isn’t web-based?

A. You could use Site-to-Site, or Point-to-site VPNs for this, or one of the other direct connection networking features like an express route.

Q. Is it possible to host a backup domain controller in Azure to support our on-prem DC?

A. Sure! This is a great use-case. You could then access it via VPN or another connectivity option.

Q. Is there a way to test out Azure without having to provide payment details?

A. Take a look at Microsoft Learn. They provide some labs that will actually provide some dedicated free Azure resources for you to work with.

Q. Can you Access Azure Files from on-prem workstations?

A. Yes!

Q. What is used as a firewall for Azure?

A. For IaaS VMs this would be the Network Security Group. More info on that here.

Q. Do you see Azure Virtual Desktops as a financially competitive option compared to an on-prem RDSH setup?

A. Possibly. We’ll have to wait until virtual desktop is out of preview to get a good idea on the pricing and performance before we can make that determination.

Wrap-Up

While we covered each use-case briefly, be sure to check out the applicable forum threads, or let us know what IaaS application you think should be on this list in the comments section below. We’ll be using the feedback gathered here to fashion and prepare more comprehensive materials to surround these technologies for future articles. Help us help you!

If you haven’t done so already, don’t forget to watch the IaaS Azure webinar!

Thanks for reading!

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Author: Andy Syrewicze

What’s in a face? Artificial intelligence deciphers the emotional mysteries of ancient Buddhist statues – Asia News Center

For centuries, the three faces of the Ashura Buddha have looked out from inside the Kofukuji Temple in the ancient Japanese city of Nara. But when devotees and scholars gaze back, what do they see? Or, at least, what do they think they see?

Long and thin with six arms and three heads, the 1,200-year-old masterpiece is both revered as an object of faith and admired as a work of art. It’s even been officially classified as a national treasure. But just as people in the West have long wondered about the enigmatic smile of the Mona Lisa, Ashura’s subtle facial expressions have puzzled people in Japan.

The Kofukuji temple in Nara.

Now researchers have a new way of understanding it and other precious Buddhist statues. By using artificial intelligence (AI) tools, they are unraveling some artistic mysteries.

Take, for instance, the question of whether Ashura is happy or sad. As it turns out, that depends on how you look at the statue. From the right, it appears sadder, and from the left, happier. Also, Ashura’s appearance is that of a 23-year-old, says Professor Syun’ichi Sekine, of Nara University’s Department of Cultural Properties.

Professor Syun’ichi Sekine of the Department of Cultural Properties at Nara University. Credit: Nara University.

For much of last year, Sekine and a team of 18 students analyzed photographic images of more than 200 ancient Buddhist statues, including Ashura, with Azure Cognitive Services’ Face API – an AI tool that is increasingly being used in advertising and entertainment, as well for chatbots.

For the Nara University project, a pre-trained AI system recognized eight types of human expressions: anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, neutral, sadness, and surprise.

With this capability, the researchers were able to sidestep the subjective interpretations of believers and others made over generations and establish what the artists were really trying to convey when they created the statues.

“These Buddhist statues are objects of religious belief. So many Japanese people see different facial expressions according to the mental or emotional state of each worshiper,” Sekine explains.

“We wanted to look at how the statues came to be shaped by their sculptors before they were enshrined in religious surroundings as objects of worship. In other words, we wanted to figure out what the sculptors used as models – the kind of human expressions they used.”

Traditionally, Buddhist statues are not supposed to portray age or emotion, and, except for guardian deities, they are not supposed to have genders. “Their makers were sometimes explicitly told to avoid giving their works any human facial expression or emotional content… embodying the view of Buddha as definitely not being human,” Sekine explains.

According to tradition and belief, the more “indifferent” the face of a Buddha statue looks, the more “perfect” it is. Despite this, scholars believe that the sculptors were often influenced by the tastes and styles of their times as well as the wishes of those who commissioned the statues. For example, joyous expressions were fashionable in one period while angry expressions were favored in another.

As they strove for academic objectivity, the Nara University team were well aware of the sensitivities surrounding their project. It was one reason why they chose AI as a research tool.

A screenshot of the AI system analyzing the facial expressions of the Ashura Buddha. Credit: Nara University.

“Studying this sort of art sometimes requires researchers to judge religious idols. That might mean crossing a line that many believe should not be crossed,” Sekine says. “If people believe it is imprudent for human beings to judge Buddha, then maybe entrusting the process to AI is a way of objectifying such judgments, making them ‘inorganic.’”

The aim of the project was “to provide people with a means for reaffirming the beauty of Buddhism.” And, Sekine believes that new digital technologies will be increasingly used in cultural research.

“Initiatives that combine Buddhism with AI and other present-day technologies are beginning to emerge, albeit, gradually. We think that new approaches to Buddhism through technology are important ways of making Buddhism attractive, particularly to younger generations.”

As a bonus from their research, the team has created a Japanese language website where people can upload facial photos of themselves and have these matched to statues with similar expressions. It’s a way for 21st-century devotees to make personal connections with this ancient art.

ALSO READ: Mixed Reality Museum in Kyoto: A unique insight into centuries-old Japanese artwork

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Author: Steve Clarke

ONC, CMS strive for a competitive healthcare market with open APIs

ORLANDO, Fla. — Federal regulators aim to foster interoperability and increase patient health data access with newly proposed rules, but they’re also hoping to pave the way for a more competitive healthcare market.

Getting there requires transparency, said Don Rucker, national coordinator for health IT, during a press briefing at HIMSS 2019. The proposed rules from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) aim to accomplish this by mandating that the healthcare community use open, standardized APIs. The rules support API-enabled services that focus on patient data and require healthcare organizations to use the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard, developed by nonprofit standards organization Health Level 7 (HL7).

Standardized APIs will make it easier for patients to access their health data using smartphones and other devices, Rucker said. Patients can select a health application of their choosing, enabling them to take their health data wherever they go. The move will also foster a more competitive healthcare market, according to Rucker.

“That’s the point of this, for powerful, pro-consumer markets to develop as opposed to markets geared toward provider convenience,” he said.

ONC is also seeking public commentary on price transparency, which Rucker described as another major component of a competitive healthcare market. It is working to create more visibility when it comes to pricing information in healthcare for tests, medications, lab reports and more.

‘An important step forward’

Stan Huff, chief medical informatics officer at Intermountain Healthcare and an HL7 committee member, said the proposed rules are a “tremendous” advance for interoperability and patient data access.

Don Rucker, national coordinator for health IT, talks to a small group during a media briefing at HIMSS 2019 about how newly proposed rules from ONC and CMS would foster interoperability, patient data access and a competitive healthcare market.
Don Rucker, national coordinator for health IT, talks to a small group during a media briefing at HIMSS 2019.

He also called them “an important step forward” in creating an open marketplace where developers can build useful applications for both patients and providers to see, use and share data, he said.

But Huff said regulators could have focused less on defining scenarios that do not constitute information blocking, which ONC’s proposed rule describes in detail, and focused more on the kind of data access healthcare organizations need to support it.

“I wish they would’ve spent time on making absolutely clear that people have a right to have access to their data and … specifying the standards that would allow people to have access,” he said.

Still, Huff said naming the FHIR standard in the regulations is a “huge step forward” for interoperability — with a caveat: FHIR needs additional implementation guidelines to make it truly plug-and-play interoperable. Including the FHIR standard in the proposed rules will encourage people to work harder on further developing it, he said.

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For Sale – Mac Mini (Late 2014) – 1.4GHZ – 4GB – 500GB

Good Afternoon!

After having a little clear out, I’ve got two Mac Minis which are no longer needed… They were in a small office, but have been sat on a shelf since we upgraded a couple of months ago! £220 each including delivery.

They are both 1.4GHZ – 4GB – 500GB, and in mint condition (fully boxed).

Will be sent via courier.

Price and currency: 220
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BACS
Location: Hampshire
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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