Gogo’s migration to AWS doesn’t mean lock-in

Gogo’s commitment to place the bulk of its IT operations on AWS echoes the upside to go deep with a single provider, and it shows that traditional vendor lock-in problems take on a new shape in a buyer’s market.

Gogo, an in-flight broadband service provider, has been an AWS customer for more than three years, but the business relationship intensified during the past 12 months with the introduction of Gogo’s next-generation 2Ku service, which takes advantage of Ku-band satellite technology, said Ravi Balwada, senior vice president of software development at the Chicago-based company.

Gogo received high demand for the 2Ku service across its airline partners and realized it needed a more scalable platform to ensure good customer experience, Balwada said. Three years ago, Gogo’s IT assets were mostly in co-located data centers; two weeks ago, the company shut down its data center operations in connection with its all-in cloud migration to AWS, he said.

Gogo has several applications that support its in-flight services, from e-commerce and in-flight entertainment to customer loyalty and experience. Other applications provide functionality for airline crew members, and some are for airline OEMs with equipment that requires internet connectivity. The company also uses third-party SaaS applications to run its corporate processes.

This isn’t merely a lift-and-shift strategy. Gogo has rearchitected about 80% of the apps it’s moved to AWS to take advantage of AWS’ elasticity and, in some cases, serverless functions, Balwada said.

Ravi Balwada, senior vice president of software development, GogoRavi Balwada

The company also moved its legacy database workloads to Amazon Aurora to gain elasticity and consumption-based costs. It continues to use MySQL via AWS’ Relational Database Service, but has moved entirely off its Oracle databases, Balwada said. That cloud database migration is part of Gogo’s general shift to NoSQL architectures, although Oracle’s database is still a top option for relational database workloads, he added.

Gogo’s migration to AWS has also cut down on operational overhead.

“We have moved into a world where we have no DBAs [database administrators],” Balwada said. “We are already a very mature DevOps environment, and we’re moving now more to a NoOps kind of world.”

Gogo’s core consumption of AWS centers on infrastructure components such as EC2, S3 and containers. And the company has looked at the relatively new AWS Fargate service for container management.

“We happen to be at a point where we are looking at ways to further mature our DevOps toolchain,” Balwada said.

Gogo built some degree of cloud portability into the assets in its migration to AWS, but plans to maximize its consumption of AWS’ best features, he said.

“If all we were doing [with AWS] is just running a data center in the cloud, then what’s the point of that?” Balwada said. “Whatever cloud we go into, we want to make sure we get the full value.”

Cloud era adds pragmatism to the lock-in debate

Lock-in is a perennial concern within enterprise IT shops, but the cloud era has altered the stakes, said Dave Bartoletti, an analyst at Forrester Research.

Some companies adopt a multi-cloud strategy to hedge their financial bets, cherry-pick the best capabilities from each player or for compliance issues. Others map an all-in cloud move to a specific platform to accelerate innovation and improve customer experience, he said.

If all we were doing [with AWS] is just running a data center in the cloud, then what’s the point of that? Whatever cloud we go into, we want to make sure we get the full value.
Ravi Balwadasenior vice president of software development, Gogo

A single-provider approach also can sharpen enterprise IT teams’ focus, he said: VMware experts concentrate on what makes sense to move to AWS, and database admins specifically target migrations to Amazon Aurora.

The classic definition of lock-in — a deeply, almost intractable investment in a vendor or specific technologies that don’t deliver enough value for their cost — doesn’t necessarily apply to IaaS and PaaS. The relative stability of cloud services pricing and the rise of open source tools and platforms have given enterprise IT shops a different perspective.

“If I have a containerized app in Kubernetes, I can run it anywhere,” Bartoletti said. “I may have to modify it, but it’s not like in the past where I have to rewrite everything.”

For some customers, all-in doesn’t actually mean full standardization on one platform, said Duncan Jones, an analyst at Forrester Research.

“You can preserve some portability for most of your workloads, so the worst case is you’re only locked in for a few, where you’ve decided the benefits of using AWS’ unique services outweighs the risk,” he said.

Enterprises must still ensure they are treated fairly on pricing and stay ahead of the market technology-wise, Jones said. For public IaaS and PaaS, market forces will keep vendors competitive on price, but the stakes are different with SaaS applications.

“In SaaS, the friction to move can be much higher, which makes the trust question far more important,” he said. “It’s bad enough with one application area such as CRM [customer relationship management], but if you also choose the same vendor for finance, supply chain, HR, etc., then you really are all-in on a single vendor.”

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Windows 10 Tip: Improve focus as you read web articles | Windows Experience Blog

Did you know you can help improve focus while reading web articles by highlighting sets of one, three or five lines, thanks to the Windows 10 October 2018 Update?  
Microsoft Edge is the only browser with Microsoft Learning Tools built-in that help improve reading and focus.  
While you’re in Reading view on Microsoft Edge, you can turn on Line focus in Reading preferences and choose how many lines to see. The lines will move with you as you scroll down the page, making it easier to focus your eye and your attention. 
Check it out in action: 

If you like this, check out more Windows 10 Tips. 

Wanted – HP Microserver Gen 8

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by DarkBlade, Mar 5, 2019.

  1. DarkBlade

    DarkBlade

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    Hi all,

    Looking to pick up a HP Microserver Gen 8. Ideally with 16GB RAM and an E3-1265Lv2 CPU, but a base unit will be fine.
    No storage disks required, may be interested in SSD drive for OS.

    Anyone have one they are thinking of moving on?

    Location: Andover

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Three ways analytics are improving clinical outcomes – Microsoft Industry Blogs

hospital management listening to doctor

According to Accenture Digital Health Technology Vision 2017, 84 percent of healthcare executives believe artificial intelligence (AI) will revolutionize the way they gain information. And many health organizations are already taking advantage of technologies such as AI and advanced analytics to gain insights that help them improve clinical treatment processes and outcomes. In fact, there’s a broad spectrum of use cases for clinical analytics.

Anticipating patient needs

Some of the first ways that health organizations have applied clinical analytics: looking for gaps in care and better predicting patient needs.

That’s becoming especially important with managed care models where health organizations receive reimbursement based not just on episodic health services but also on factors like length of stay (LOS) and readmission rates. Health systems are taking advantage of analytics to help them correlate staffing with anticipated patient needs and better coordinate care so they can improve patient outcomes and reduce LOS and readmission rates.

For example, Steward Health Care analyzed multiple types of data—such as CDC, flu, seasonality, and social data—using Microsoft Azure Machine Learning to predict patient volume so they could staff accordingly.

The results have been impressive. The private hospital operator can predict volumes one to two weeks out with 98 percent accuracy. And it reduced the average LOS for patients by one and a half days. In other words, improved nurse scheduling is helping patients get better faster. It has also increased patient satisfaction. All this, plus: Steward Health Care is saving $48 million per year.

Empowering care teams with predictive care guidance

The next level up in clinical analytics is predictive care guidance. A great example comes from Ochsner Health System—where they’ve integrated AI into patient care workflows.

Care teams there get “pre-code” alerts through an Azure-based platform (from our partner Epic) so they can proactively intervene sooner to help prevent emergency situations. The AI tool analyzes thousands of data points to predict which patients face immediate risks.

“It’s like a triage tool,” says Michael Truxillo, Medical Director of the Rapid Response and Resuscitation Team at Ochsner Medical Center, in this article. “A physician may be supervising 16 to 20 patients on a unit and knowing who needs your attention the most is always a challenge. The tool says, ‘Hey, based on lab values, vital signs, and other data, look at this patient now.’”

During a 90-day pilot project with the tool, Ochsner reduced the hospital’s typical number of codes (cardiac or respiratory arrests) by 44 percent. That incredible number demonstrates the impact AI-driven predictive care guidance can have on clinical outcomes.

Accelerating rare disease diagnoses

Yet another example on the clinical analytics continuum is the work we’re doing with Shire and EURORDIS to accelerate the diagnosis of rare disease. Together, we’ve formed The Global Commission to End the Diagnostic Odyssey for Children with a Rare Disease. As part of the commission’s efforts, phenotypic data (the physical presentation of a person) and genomic data are analyzed to gain insights that could help physicians identify and diagnose patients with a rare disease more quickly.

On average, it takes five years before a rare disease patient—of which approximately half are children—receives the correct diagnosis. Harnessing the power of AI-driven clinical analytics, the alliance aims to shorten the multi-year journey that patients and families endure before receiving a rare disease diagnosis. And that’s one of the most important issues affecting the health, longevity, and well-being for those patients and families.

Those are just a few examples of how AI and advanced analytics can transform healthcare and improve clinical outcomes.

Together with our partners, we’re dedicated to learning and growing alongside our customers and helping them achieve the quadruple aim through clinical analytics and other cloud-based health solutions. We’re also committed to helping them meet their security needs and safeguard the privacy of PHI. And our customers have peace of mind when innovating with us thanks to our Shared Innovation Principles that provide clarity around co-creating technology. We value our customers and partners’ expertise and don’t seek to own it. Rather, we help them monetize their technology assets.

However your health organization wants to use—or advance your use of—clinical analytics, you can learn how to take advantage of AI tools and see more real-world use cases in the e-book: Breaking down AI: 10 real applications in healthcare.

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Author: Steve Clarke

Get a holistic digital transformation strategy or get left behind

BOSTON — The enterprise is rapidly changing and companies need a digital transformation strategy to stay in the game.

That’s what IDC senior vice president and chief research officer, Meredith Whalen, told audience members attending IDC Directions 2019, a technology conference aimed at IT suppliers.

Organizations are going to need a digital transformation strategy to keep pace with the changes, Whalen said, particularly with the growing presence of “unicorns” around the world, which she described as privately held companies valued at $1 billion or higher. Traditional organizations are particularly vulnerable to newer, more innovative competitors that don’t have the burden of maintaining legacy systems.

“There are thousands of these disrupters across dozens of industries, and [traditional organizations] need to go through digital transformation before it’s too late,” Whalen said.

Digital transformation gets real

However, the reinvention of traditional organizations has started and a digital transformation strategy that integrates new technologies to create new business models is developing.

Meredith Whalen, IDC senior vice president at IDC Directions 2019.Meredith Whalen

To illustrate this, Whalen said that by the end of this year, 30% of Global 2000 manufacturers will enter the product-as-a-service business; by 2021, 55% of utilities will derive at least 20% of gross revenue from distributed generation and storage packages; by 2023, 50% of cities will use crowdsourcing for establishing budgets and neighborhood decision-making; and by 2024, 25% of airlines will use blockchain for identity and payments.

“These industries will reshape and redefine themselves and then they configure with other industries to create new digital economies,” Whalen explained.

For example, auto manufacturers need to develop a digital transformation strategy not just around monetizing automobiles, but monetizing the passenger experience as well. She said this is only possible when auto manufacturers work with different industries, such as advertising, the entertainment industry, and transportation services, thereby creating a new economy.

Digitally determined vs. digitally distraught

However, as the new digitally transformed economy takes shape, Whalen predicted there would be a divide between the digital haves and have-nots. IDC estimated that 46% of organizations worldwide are “digitally determined,” and have the right digital transformation strategy and processes for their organization.

Digitally determined organizations are rebooting their culture and recognizing that they have to change the way they work and how they’re organized, Whalen said.

“They organize themselves around one single digital strategy, which means that they have one digital roadmap and tend to have or are moving to one technology footprint,” she said. “They are also making the case to investors that digital has inherent value, so this is something that they should invest in long term.”

The other 54% of organizations are “digitally distraught,” which means they are in danger of being left behind in the digital economy. These organizations may want to undergo a digital transformation, and may even attempt to do so, Whalen said, but they haven’t changed their culture yet and each functional area or line of business tends to have its own approach.

“It’s really hard to make this transformation if everybody’s moving in their own direction … and there’s a technology footprint for every one of the digital strategies as well,” she said. “So you don’t get the ability to scale so effectively.”

Digitally distraught organizations often struggle to demonstrate that digital transformation is good for the company on the whole because they’re working at a project level so they only demonstrate ROI project by project rather than see a cumulative effect.

Digital transformation strategy may pay off

The question most companies have is whether a digital transformation will actually pay off, as the investment is considerable. One IDC study provides evidence that digital transformation is doing just that for manufacturers, according to Whalen.

The report looked at the financials of digital manufacturers and nondigital manufacturers over a four-year period and found that revenue for digital manufacturers grew by 1.2% and profits grew by 2.3%. For nondigital manufacturers, revenue shrunk by 3.1% and profits shrunk by 2.1%.

Still, transforming the way a company operates at every level is not for the faint of heart. “Digital transformation is a business transformation and companies need to break it down and think about transforming culture, transforming the way you engage with customers, transforming the way you manage data and turn it into intelligence, transforming your operating model, and transforming the way you work with employees and the way work gets done,” Whalen said.

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Wanted – HP Microserver Gen 8

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by DarkBlade, Mar 5, 2019.

  1. DarkBlade

    DarkBlade

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    Hi all,

    Looking to pick up a HP Microserver Gen 8. Ideally with 16GB RAM and an E3-1265Lv2 CPU, but a base unit will be fine.
    No storage disks required, may be interested in SSD drive for OS.

    Anyone have one they are thinking of moving on?

    Location: Andover

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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