Easily Choose Your Route with Bing Maps Traffic Coloring

There is an old saying that you don’t know where you are going until you get there. With Bing Maps new route coloring feature, you will know right away where the delays will be along your selected route so you can change your route, your plans or your destination based on the route ahead!

For example, if you are leaving Redmond Town Center for Westlake Center in Seattle, you can see the delays on WA-520 W and I-90 W before you decide which route to take. Also, with our new route labels showing the travel mode, distance and time of each route, you can easily compare and toggle between the different routes quickly on the map.

Bing Maps Traffic Coloring

Bing Maps Traffic Coloring

While blue means no traffic delays, the orange and red colors highlight moderate to heavy traffic delays on the route. These are calculated based on a combination of current traffic updates and predictions from historic data depending on the length of the route.

Traffic coloring not only helps you select the best route for your trip, but can also be very useful when there are major traffic delays due to inclement weather, big events, accidents, or road construction nearby. For example, if there is an MLB or NFL game in town, you can avoid the most impacted roads near the event and choose an option that offers the least delays.

In addition, if you need to take a ferry as part of your route, Bing Maps visualizes the ferry segments using dashes to differentiate that part of the trip. The image below illustrates the route between Bellevue and Bainbridge Island in Washington State. Bing Maps highlights the ferry segment between Seattle and Bainbridge with a dashed line.

Bing Maps Traffic Coloring Ferry Route

The Bing Maps Routing and Traffic Team is constantly working to make navigation and route planning easier for our users. To try out the traffic coloring feature, go to https://www.bing.com/maps.

 – Bing Maps Team

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Author: Microsoft News Center

What’s new for container identity

Identity is a crucial component of any application. Whether you’re authenticating users on a web app or trying to query data from a back-end server, chances are you’ll need to integrate with an identity provider. Containerized applications are no exception, which is why we’ve included support for Active Directory identities in Windows Containers from the beginning. Now that Windows Server 2019 has released, we’d like to show you what we’ve been working on the last 3 years to make Windows container identity easier and more reliable.

If you’d like to jump straight into the documentation on container identity, head on over to https://aka.ms/contianers/identity

Improved Reliability

When we launched support for containers in Windows Server 2016, we set off on an adventure to redefine how people manage their apps. One of those innovations was the use of a group managed service account (gMSA) to replace the computer identity in containers. Before containers were a thing, you would typically domain-join your computer and use its implicit identity or a service account to run the app. With containers, we wanted to avoid the complexity of domain join since it would quickly become difficult to manage short-lived computer objects in Active Directory. But we knew apps would still need to use AD identities, so we came up with a solution to assign a gMSA to the container computer account at runtime. This gave the container a similar experience to being domain joined, but let multiple containers use the same identity and avoided having to store sensitive credentials in the container image.

As more customers started using gMSA with a wide variety of applications, we identified two issues that affected the reliability of gMSA with containers:

  1. If the hostname of the container did not match the gMSA name, certain functionality like inbound NTLM authentication and ASP.NET Membership role lookups would fail. This was an easy doc fix, but led to a new problem…
  2. When multiple containers used the same hostname to talk to the same domain controller, the last container would supersede the others and terminate their connections, resulting in random authentication failures.

To address these issues, we changed how the container identifies itself on the network to ensure it uses its gMSA name for authentication regardless of its hostname and made sure multiple connections with the same identity are properly supported. All you need to do to take advantage of this new behavior is upgrade your container host and images to Windows Server 2019 or Windows 10 version 1809.

Additionally, if you were unable to use gMSA identities with Hyper-V isolated containers in Windows versions 1703, 1709, and 1803, you’ll be glad to know that we’ve fixed the underlying issue in Windows Server 2019 and Windows 10 version 1809. If you can’t upgrade to the latest version of Windows, you can also use gMSAs with Hyper-V isolation on Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10 version 1607.

Better docs and tooling

We’ve invested in improving our documentation to make it easier for you to get started using gMSAs with your Windows containers. From creating your first gMSA account, updating your Dockerfile to help your app use the gMSA, and troubleshooting tips for when things go wrong, you’ll find it all at https://aka.ms/containers/identity.

As part of the documentation upgrade, we’ve also made it easier to get the Credential Spec PowerShell module. The source code still lives on GitHub, but you can now easily download it from the PowerShell Gallery by running Install-Module CredentialSpec. There are also a few improvements under the hood, including better support for child domains and improved validation of the account information.

Kubernetes Support

Finally, we’re excited to announce that alpha support for gMSA with Windows containers is shipping with Kubernetes version 1.14! Kubernetes takes care of copying credential specs automatically to worker nodes and adds role-based access controls to limit which gMSAs can be scheduled by users. While gMSA support is not yet ready for production use, you can try it by enabling alpha features as described in the Kubernetes gMSA docs.

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Author: Ryan Puffer

Atlassian, AgileCraft join to scale Agile development

The latest acquisition in the DevOps space could help enterprises extend their Agile development practices to address companywide objectives.

Atlassian, a provider of team collaboration software tools, has agreed to buy AgileCraft, a provider of enterprise Agile planning software, based in Austin, Texas. The acquisition aims to help scale Agile development practices from a team level to departments, divisions and across an entire enterprise.

AgileCraft’s software enables enterprises to create a master plan of their key projects, map those projects to the required resources, and identify the cost and expected value of the work that teams perform across the company.

Atlassian’s enterprise customers want to use the company’s tools to support collaboration and Agile development across all teams in the enterprise, said Cameron Deatsch, vice president of product at Atlassian.

The company began some internal projects to meet those needs, but noticed some big enterprise customers, such as Anthem, AT&T, Fidelity and Nielsen, used AgileCraft alongside Jira tools to meet their scaling needs. They used Jira for all of the team collaboration tasks, but everything above that — including enterprise planning, portfolio planning and divisional planning — was done with AgileCraft, he said.

Cameron Deatsch, vice president of product, AtlassianCameron Deatsch

Atlassian explored a partnership with AgileCraft, but decided an acquisition was a better fit, he added.

While Atlassian tools, such as Jira, help development teams collaborate, AgileCraft’s software connects these teams’ work to the strategic objectives of the overall enterprise and provides visibility into their work production. AgileCraft supports Agile frameworks, including the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and others.

This move strengthens Atlassian, which is good at the team and developer level, but weak at the portfolio management layer, said Thomas Murphy, an analyst at Gartner.

“[Atlassian] provides AgileCraft with a huge audience as the chosen SAFe-compliant solution that will disrupt lots of different elements of the market,” Murphy said. These elements include competitors such as CollabNet VersionOne, CA’s Rally and services companies, such as cPrime, that implement SAFe for Atlassian.

The $166 million deal is expected to close next month. For fiscal year 2019, Atlassian expects AgileCraft to add up to $2 million to Atlassian’s revenue.

Support for competing stacks

What makes AgileCraft interesting is the platform’s focus on helping enterprises figure out how to replicate DevOps success by holistically looking at and correlating the business and financial side of things and DevOps process flows.
Torsten Volkanalyst, Enterprise Management Associates

AgileCraft’s value stream management technology provides joint visibility for Atlassian’s own stack into Azure DevOps Server, Rally and various continuous delivery tools.

“What makes AgileCraft interesting is the platform’s focus on helping enterprises figure out how to replicate DevOps success by holistically looking at and correlating the business and financial side of things and DevOps process flows,” said Torsten Volk, an analyst at Enterprise Management Associates, based in Boulder, Colo.

Atlassian’s addition of a DevOps analytics platform could replicate the success of one or two high-performing DevOps teams across the entire enterprise, Volk said.

“Considering the lack of competition in this arena, I think the $166 million could prove to be money well spent,” he said.

A key question is whether AgileCraft customers will face pressure to move to the Atlassian stack. Most enterprises use a variety of different products at the teamwork level. AgileCraft connects to Atlassian competitors’ products, such as Azure DevOps Server, but Atlassian will not interfere with those relationships and plans to maintain and improve those connectors, Deatsch said.

“We want to make sure we can connect all that work, whether they are on the Atlassian stack or not,” he said.

AgileCraft not only gives Atlassian a way to bolster Agile development teams that use its various tools, such as Jira, Trello and Confluence, but it also opens up longer-tail work scenarios that Atlassian hasn’t traditionally served, said Chris Marsh, an analyst at 451 Research.

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Windows 10 Tip: Grammar tools | Windows Experience Blog

Did you know you can identify parts of speech with different colors, thanks to the Windows 10 October 2018 Update?  
Microsoft Edge is the only browser with Microsoft Learning Tools built-in that help improve reading and focus.  
Now you can separate words into syllables and highlight parts of speech, such as nouns, verbs and adjectives. Along with highlighting parts of speech, you can now also change the color as well as turn on an indicator right over what you’ve highlighted, making it much easier to identify the part of speech. 
Check it out in action: 

If you like this, check out more Windows 10 Tips. 

For Sale – 27″ iMac 2009 i5/256gb SSD/8gb ram

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by mushk1n, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. mushk1n

    Well-known Member

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    For sale is my late 2009 27″ iMac. I’ve upgraded the HDD to an evo850 and now it runs great. Condition is generally good, nothing major to report. Only thing that doesn’t seem to work is the Bluetooth – not sure why, although doesn’t impact me as all the devices I use are dongles or wired. It’s possibly a module that can just be swapped out or I may have justjust accident dislodged it when swapping the SSD? If Bluetooth is important to you then this may not be for you

    Must be collected.

    Comes with genuine apple wired TKL keyboard no mouse.

    Price and currency: 300
    Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
    Payment method: BT / Cash
    Location: Sheffield
    Advertised elsewhere?: advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

    Last edited: Mar 10, 2019

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Microsoft, UW demonstrate first fully automated DNA data storage

Researchers from Microsoft and the University of Washington have demonstrated the first fully automated system to store and retrieve data in manufactured DNA — a key step in moving the technology out of the research lab and into commercial datacenters.

In a simple proof-of-concept test, the team successfully encoded the word “hello” in snippets of fabricated DNA and converted it back to digital data using a fully automated end-to-end system, which is described in a new paper published March 21 in Nature Scientific Reports.

DNA can store digital information in a space that is orders of magnitude smaller than datacenters use today. It’s one promising solution for storing the exploding amount of data the world generates each day, from business records and cute animal videos to medical scans and images from outer space.

Microsoft is exploring ways to close a looming gap between the amount of data we are producing that needs to be preserved and our capacity to store it. That includes developing algorithms and molecular computing technologies to encode and retrieve data in fabricated DNA, which could fit all the information currently stored in a warehouse-sized datacenter into a space roughly the size of a few board game dice.

“Our ultimate goal is to put a system into production that, to the end user, looks very much like any other cloud storage service — bits are sent to a datacenter and stored there and then they just appear when the customer wants them,” said Microsoft principal researcher Karin Strauss. “To do that, we needed to prove that this is practical from an automation perspective.”

Information is stored in synthetic DNA molecules created in a lab, not DNA from humans or other living things, and can be encrypted before it is sent to the system. While sophisticated machines such as synthesizers and sequencers already perform key parts of the process, many of the intermediate steps until now have required manual labor in the research lab. But that wouldn’t be viable in a commercial setting, said Chris Takahashi, senior research scientist at the UW’s Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering.

“You can’t have a bunch of people running around a datacenter with pipettes — it’s too prone to human error, it’s too costly and the footprint would be too large,” Takahashi said.

YouTube Video

For the technique to make sense as a commercial storage solution, costs need to decrease for both synthesizing DNA — essentially custom building strands with meaningful sequences — and the sequencing process that extracts the stored information. Trends are moving rapidly in that direction, researchers say.

Automation is another key piece of that puzzle, as it would enable storage at a commercial scale and make it more affordable, Microsoft researchers say.

Under the right conditions, DNA can last much longer than current archival storage technologies that degrade in a matter of decades. Some DNA has managed to persist in less than ideal storage conditions for tens of thousands of years in mammoth tusks and bones of early humans, and it should have relevancy as long as people are alive.

The automated DNA data storage system uses software developed by the Microsoft and UW team that converts the ones and zeros of digital data into the As, Ts, Cs and Gs that make up the building blocks of DNA. Then it uses inexpensive, largely off-the-shelf lab equipment to flow the necessary liquids and chemicals into a synthesizer that builds manufactured snippets of DNA and to push them into a storage vessel.

When the system needs to retrieve the information, it adds other chemicals to properly prepare the DNA and uses microfluidic pumps to push the liquids into other parts of the system that “read” the DNA sequences and convert it back to information that a computer can understand. The goal of the project was not to prove how fast or inexpensively the system could work, researchers say, but simply to demonstrate that automation is possible.

One immediate benefit of having an automated DNA storage system is that it frees researchers up to probe deeper questions, instead of spending time searching for bottles of reagents or repetitively squeezing drops of liquids into test tubes.

“Having an automated system to do the repetitive work allows those of us working in the lab to take a higher view and begin to assemble new strategies — to essentially innovate much faster,” said Microsoft researcher Bichlien Nguyen.

The team from the Molecular Information Systems Lab has already demonstrated that it can store cat photographs, great literary works, pop videos and archival recordings in DNA, and retrieve those files without errors in a research setting. To date they’ve been able to store 1 gigabyte of data in DNA, besting their previous world record of 200 MB.

To store data in DNA, algorithms convert the 1s and 0s in digital data to ACTG sequences in DNA. Microsoft and University of Washington researchers stored and retrieved the word “hello” using the first fully automated system for DNA storage.

The researchers have also developed techniques to perform meaningful computation — like searching for and retrieving only images that contain an apple or a green bicycle — using the molecules themselves and without having to convert the files back into a digital format.

“We are definitely seeing a new kind of computer system being born here where you are using molecules to store data and electronics for control and processing. Putting them together holds some really interesting possibilities for the future,” said UW Allen School professor Luis Ceze.

Unlike silicon-based computing systems, DNA-based storage and computing systems have to use liquids to move molecules around. But fluids are inherently different than electrons and require entirely new engineering solutions.

The UW team, in collaboration with Microsoft, is also developing a programmable system that automates lab experiments by harnessing the properties of electricity and water to move droplets around on a grid of electrodes. The full stack of software and hardware, nicknamed “Puddle” and “PurpleDrop,” can mix, separate, heat or cool different liquids and run lab protocols.

The goal is to automate lab experiments that are currently being done by hand or by expensive liquid handling robots — but for a fraction of the cost.

Next steps for the MISL team include integrating the simple end-to-end automated system with technologies such as PurpleDrop and those that enable searching with DNA molecules. The researchers specifically designed the automated system to be modular, allowing it to evolve as new technologies emerge for synthesizing, sequencing or working with DNA.

“What’s great about this system is that if we wanted to replace one of the parts with something new or better or faster, we can just plug that in,” Nguyen said. “It gives us a lot of flexibility for the future.”

Top image: Microsoft and University of Washington researchers have successfully encoded and retrieved the word “hello” using this new system that fully automates DNA storage. It’s a key step in moving the technology out of the lab and into commercial datacenters.

Related to DNA storage:

Jennifer Langston writes about Microsoft research and innovation. Follow her on Twitter.

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Author: Steve Clarke

XenData backup packages Wasabi in new cloud product

XenData and Wasabi have combined for a new cloud storage archiving service that incorporates XenData backup software and Wasabi’s public cloud.

XenData Cloud File Storage Service includes a Wasabi cloud subscription. The vendors said the service can reduce the cost of archiving data to the cloud, because Wasabi does not charge egress fees to recover data.

XenData Cloud File Gateway allows applications on local servers to read and write to clouds, and XenData FS Mirror enables file structures to be mirrored to a cloud. That provides the backup and disaster recovery features.

XenData markets its Cloud File Storage Service for active archive. Active archive data does not need to be modified and is accessed infrequently, yet it’s read frequently enough that it does not belong in cold storage. Active archive data is usually housed in a lower-performing storage media, such as tape or disk.

XenData CEO Phil Storey said Wasabi’s pricing model makes it an attractive partner.

“AWS and Azure, they both include these really hefty egress charges,” Storey said. “That’s pretty scary for a lot of people, because they don’t know how much downloading they really do, so they don’t know what the cost is going to be.”

XenData sells tape, disk and cloud archiving products. It also offers a migration service to help customers move data off of tape and into clouds or an updated tape format.

Screenshot of XenData FS Mirror's interface
XenData FS Mirror, when combined with XenData Cloud File Gateway, lets users mirror files to cloud storage.

Media gives Wasabi and XenData backup a starring role

Christophe Bertrand, senior analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group, based out of Milford, Mass., said the media industry fits the bill for active archive perfectly. Media companies have important data that cannot be deleted; it never needs to be modified and occasionally needs to be pulled back into a production environment.

AWS and Azure, they both include these really hefty egress charges. That’s pretty scary for a lot of people, because they don’t know how much downloading they really do, so they don’t know what the cost is going to be.
Phil StoreyCEO, XenData

“You may need a clip, something from a long time ago, for a news piece,” Bertrand said. “But you’re not going to keep everything on expensive disk.”

Storey said 95% of XenData backup customers do active archive, and the vendor has several media and entertainment customers. He said TV stations often move their data to tape as soon as a project finishes, but may still need old clips occasionally. XenData Cloud File Storage Service would allow these customers to keep video on the cloud and pull it back when needed.

XenData Cloud File Gateway currently works with Microsoft Azure, and Storey said the next expected version of the software will support AWS. However, the Wasabi partnership brings cloud capability to file-based applications that do not natively support Amazon S3 object storage.

Storey said the partnership is the first time XenData has bundled its software with a cloud service provider. XenData Cloud File Storage Service customers will receive one bill for Cloud File Gateway, XenData FS Mirror and Wasabi cloud storage, priced at 1 cent per gigabyte, per month, for data stored in the Wasabi cloud. The service is in customer preview, with full availability expected in May.

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For Sale – 27″ iMac 2009 i5/256gb SSD/8gb ram

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by mushk1n, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. mushk1n

    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,762
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    South Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +146

    For sale is my late 2009 27″ iMac. I’ve upgraded the HDD to an evo850 and now it runs great. Condition is generally good, nothing major to report. Only thing that doesn’t seem to work is the Bluetooth – not sure why, although doesn’t impact me as all the devices I use are dongles or wired. It’s possibly a module that can just be swapped out or I may have justjust accident dislodged it when swapping the SSD? If Bluetooth is important to you then this may not be for you

    Must be collected.

    Comes with genuine apple wired TKL keyboard no mouse.

    Price and currency: 300
    Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
    Payment method: BT / Cash
    Location: Sheffield
    Advertised elsewhere?: advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

    Last edited: Mar 10, 2019

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