Google cloud partners cite Anthos as key Next ’19 technology

John Moore and Spencer Smith

Google cloud partners cited Anthos — the vendor’s newly unveiled hybrid and multi-cloud technology — as a key development that could open cloud opportunities for partners and their customers.

Google debuted Anthos this week at its Google Cloud Next ’19 conference in San Francisco. The offering lets organizations deploy and manage applications on Google Cloud Platform and third-party cloud platforms, such as AWS and Microsoft Azure. Applications can run unmodified in the public cloud or in private data centers, according to the company.

Anthos is a game-changing product that allows you to write your code one time and, without change, be able to automatically run that workload in Google Cloud, Amazon cloud or on your local infrastructure,” said Brian Farrar, partner and founder of Maven Wave, a Google Cloud premier partner based in Chicago.

The technology supports rapid modernization of applications, Farrar said. The tasks involved in modernizing applications for use in the cloud have proven a major hurdle for enterprises attempting to move workloads off of on-premises IT, he noted.

“Google, with Anthos, has eliminated a lot of those challenges,” he said.

Tony Safoian, CEO at SADA Systems Inc., a Google Cloud premier partner based in Los Angeles, agreed Anthos lowers the barriers to entry for enterprise customers. He said Anthos will help organizations get the most efficiency out of DevOps, as they can develop an application “once and not again.”

Aric Bandy, president at Agosto, a Google Cloud premier partner in Minneapolis, called Anthos a “purposeful open source strategy that allows Google to go to market and say, ‘You should be able to run your stack on whatever cloud you choose.'” Anthos is built on open software frameworks such as Kubernetes, Istio and Knative.

Customers adopting AWS and Azure are getting “a lot of lock-in” along with the innovation those clouds provide, Bandy noted. The more open-source-friendly stance, he added, will help Google go toe-to-toe with the other public cloud providers, which Google currently trails with regard to market share.

“That’s a pretty strong way to get aggressive growth happening and take market share from AWS and Microsoft,” Bandy said.

Google Cloud Next 2019: Focus on managed services

Another important theme at Next ’19 was managed services, according to Google cloud partners, who cited growing customer demand for cloud management. Farrar said organizations moving to the cloud encounter new challenges and need help in a range of areas, including billing, support and administration.

“You can’t just walk into the data center and hit the restart button,” he said.

Against that backdrop, Maven Wave unveiled its Google Cloud Platform Managed Services offering, which includes ongoing account management, active monitoring and incident response. In addition, systems integrator Atos and CloudBees, an automated software delivery specialist, launched an application-development-oriented managed service offering for Google Cloud Platform.

Google got into the act, as well, disclosing cloud managed services partnerships with MongoDB, Redis, Elastic, DataStax, Neo4j, InfluxData and Confluent — all open source software providers.

Google, meanwhile, appears to be revamping its relationships with managed service providers. Bandy said the cloud provider has been working to put the right kind of program in place, with the appropriate tooling, to encourage managed service providers (MSPs) to build out Google-based practices.

“Clients need to have a partner ecosystem that they can turn to for managing assets in the cloud,” he said.

HPE makes use of partner advisory board

Hewlett Packard Enterprise is deriving numerous benefits from running a partner advisory board, according to the vendor.

HPE advisory board meetings generally convene about 30 leaders from global partner firms with HPE executives. The most recent meeting, held this week, was conducted over a day and half. It focused on HPE’s hybrid cloud portfolio and the transformation of customer experiences at the edge. As with most HPE partner advisory meetings, attendees were given face time with the vendor’s CEO, Antonio Neri.

“The intent of the partner advisory board … is we are looking to get feedback,” said Paul Hunter, worldwide partner sales leader at HPE.

One of the attendees at the recent meeting was Steinar Sonsteby, CEO of Atea ASA, a European systems integrator based in Oslo, Norway. HPE is among Atea’s top strategic vendor partners.

The HPE advisory board is unique, because it creates an opportunity to network with partner CEOs from around the world, Sonsteby said. “I think one of the reasons why everybody comes all of the time is because that network is important to us,” he said.

The HPE partner advisory board also provides face-to-face access to Neri, who is a regular presence at the meetings, Sonsteby said.

One of Sonsteby’s takeaways from this week’s meeting is that the advisory board attendees agreed on “the fact that HPE has never been better positioned from a technology point of view.” He said there had been a couple of years that had been “a little bit painful. But, right now, everybody feels very good about the positioning, the technology — everything from servers to storage to Aruba and the networking side.”

Advisory board members also agreed HPE could be more aggressive in its sales strategy, he added.

“We are making progress, but there will certainly be more to come,” Hunter said of HPE’s sales organization. 

Additionally, Hunter and Sonsteby said the advisory board gives HPE and its partners a chance to address business areas that are proving challenging — namely, the transition to consumption-based models. Atea, like many of its peers in the channel, have grappled with the transition.

“Partners are struggling with the shift to consumption on multiple dimensions,” Hunter noted.

KSM Consulting enters ‘next phase of growth’

KSM Consulting, a technology services and data analytics consultancy based in Indianapolis, plans to hire 30 new employees within the next four months and expand geographically in light of an ownership change.

Capital Partners, a private equity firm, has acquired a majority interest in the company, which was previously owned by accounting firm Katz, Sapper & Miller. The accounting firm will retain a minority stake in KSM Consulting. KSM Consulting’s president, Mark Caswell, will now take on the role of CEO.

“I think the primary significance [of the ownership change] is that it points to the next phase of growth for us,” Caswell said.

The company, which has grown from 25 to around 130 employees in the last five years, now seeks to bring on 30 new hires in the next 90 to 120 days and a total of 50 to 60 new hires by year’s end.

Caswell said he also plans to expand the company’s geographic reach in addition to strengthening its Indianapolis headquarters. He said he anticipates the company will be able to achieve its growth plans organically, but noted the relationship with Renovus could support growth via acquisition, as well.

Other news

  • Cask LLC has split into two stand-alone businesses, with one focusing on ServiceNow solutions and the other focusing on government services. The ServiceNow business, Cask NX, based in San Diego, will design, develop and implement digital transformation projects using ServiceNow. Cask Government Services, based in Stafford, Va., will provide program management, cybersecurity, logistics, business analysis and engineering services.
  • Corporate investment in the digital future frequently fails to produce a return on investment in the present. That’s one observation from research published by Accenture’s Industry X.0 group. The industrial companies in the survey spent a bit more than $100 billion on digital innovation between 2016 and 2018, but 78% of those firms said they fell short of achieving the expected earnings. The Accenture survey polled 1,350 global C-level management executives.
  • Security vendor Tripwire has revised its channel program to build out its global partnerships. Additionally, the program now features an invitation-only Platinum tier for key strategic alliances, Tripwire said. Tripwire provides security technology for enterprise, industrial and government customers.
  • Information Builders, a business intelligence, analytics and data management vendor, is partnering with Techblocks, an IT consulting company based in Toronto.
  • Nerdio, a company that specialized in Microsoft Azure IT automation, has launched Nerdio for Microsoft Azure Core. The company said the product lets MSPs offer Azure cloud solutions “while on the path to complete virtual desktop-centric IT environments in the cloud.”
  • Managed detection and response vendor eSentire said partner bookings contributed significantly to the company’s 50% year-over-year growth in 2018. The company credited 40% growth to partner bookings last year.
  • MSP software vendor Datto cut the ribbon on a new office in East Greenbush, N.Y. Datto noted that East Greenbush was the former global headquarters of Autotask, which Datto merged with in 2017. Datto said its New York-based employees make up about 30% of its 1,500 employees worldwide.
  • Serenova, a contact-center-as-a-service and workforce optimization vendor, has appointed Brandon Knight as its senior vice president of channel sales. Knight joins Serenova from distributor and master agent Intelisys, where he served as cloud evangelist.

Market Share is a news roundup published every Friday.

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Wanted – Cheap 1150 cpu and DDR3 laptop menory

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by geordieboy25, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. geordieboy25

    geordieboy25

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    Hi guys.

    Just bought a 2nd user laptop and a Lenovo M93P sff.

    None of which came with memory and I’d like a few 4gb ddr3 sticks

    Also the M93P was a barebones kit so would like a cheap cpu. Just wanted to get it up and running, nothing fancy please.

    Thanks

    Location: Newcastle

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  2. maddy

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    CEX are cheap for 4GB DDR3 – £8, or £9.50 posted. They’re the cheapest I’ve found.

    Is your Lenovo one of the tiny range? If it is, make sure you buy an Intel from their “T” series as they tiny ones aren’t designed for the thermal load of a non-T CPU.

    Great little machines.

  3. Krooner

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    I have 2 stick of 4gb DDR3 at home, do you need low voltage ram in the SFF?

  4. geordieboy25

    geordieboy25

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    Not too sure, is it SODIMMS that you have?

  5. Krooner

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    Yes, I know the ultra small form factor units require PC3L is all, not sure about the SFF It was something I ran into on the m92p.

    I have Low voltage sticks, but if it will take standard PC3 then CEX will be 50p per stick cheaper than me.

  6. GIBSrUS

    GIBSrUS

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    Hiya. I have a pentium g3258 if that’s of interest?

  7. geordieboy25

    geordieboy25

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    Thanks but I think I need a “t” series cpu.

  8. Ozzyh

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    @geordieboy25 Are you still after DDR3 laptop RAM? I have 2x 4GB matching sticks if that helps.

  9. geordieboy25

    geordieboy25

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    How much please?

  10. Ozzyh

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    £18 delivered ok? I can send via 1st class recorded Monday morning and you should get Tuesday or Wednesday at the latest as I’m at work till 6pm today.

    Would like to avoid sending normal 1st class as just in case they get lost in the post.

  11. Ozzyh

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    Sorry just to add that the modules are a matching pair of the below. They were inside a HP laptop which my 6yr old daughter was using for playing games to help her read. Moved her onto a PC now.

    Hynix 4GB PC3L – 12800S (part number: HMT351S6EFR8A)

    These are going for about £13 for 4GB on eBay so £18 inc delivery for 8GB is a steal

    Thanks.

  12. Ozzyh

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    Not heard back so i’ll create a For Sale advert as it looks like you’re not interested.

    Thanks.

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In music classroom without instruments, an ensemble of apps play bandleader |

At Kaenoisuksa school, in Chiang Mai, Thailand, we face the unique challenge of bringing music education to roughly 600 students who don’t have the benefit of real instruments to practice with. Adding to the complexity, our student body is a diverse mix Shan, Yunnan and Lahu students who all bring a different set of cultural values and learning techniques to the classroom every day. Our curriculum has to be nimble if it’s going to serve all of their unique needs.

As the school’s music and dramatic arts teacher, it’s my job to find educational solutions that will strike a chord with my students. In the common smartphone, I found a tool perfectly fit for the job—so long as it was equipped with the right apps.

Learning music isn’t just a matter of knowing how to play this song on that instrument. Using Microsoft apps like Office, Sway, OneNote, PowerPoint, Windows Movie Maker and others, I weaved together a 21st-century lesson plan that covered a range of musical topics, from theory to technique to history and cultural context. I call it Mobile Music Learning, and through it, my students have learned both the fundaments of music education as well as the value of technology in exploring their own questions in their own ways.

Things That Worked in My Classroom

  • Mobile VR Thrills: My students loved exploring international music and concert videos with apps like WITHIN and YouTube VR, which help turn your mobile screen into a virtual-reality headset. Access to music videos—from Operas in London to Indonesian dance routines in Bali—seeded them with questions about instruments, dance and other cultural elements that led to lively discussion as a class.
  • Strum Your Screens: Countless apps will turn your phone into a real-live instrument, replete with keys, strings, skins or some other music-making analog of your choosing. This let students get their hands a little dirty with playing where they otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. Even better, they got to do so from home long after class was over—and on just about any instrument they could think of.
  • Tech Does Double Duty: I want my students to learn music education, of course, but through it, I also want them to learn tech fluency. They are emerging into a world where success will depend on their ability to confidently navigate tech tools. Employing integrated apps like Microsoft Sway, Word, PowerPoint and Windows MovieMaker to explore, share and present the material helps them build that confidence along the way.

Practicing an instrument on a smartphone may seem like a novel concept, but for my students, a familiarity with mobile devices meant they brought more confidence to the initial lessons than they might’ve in a class with traditional instruments. The portability of our devices also empowered them to continue exploring the lessons for themselves once class had finished.

By applying the tech tools they’re already familiar with, I encouraged my students to explore, and ultimately synthesize, the subject matter in ways that felt natural to them as digital natives. The result was not only a newfound appreciation for music education but also the fostering of a rich and informed dialogue about other related subjects.

The Mobile Music Learning curriculum I created is little more than a collection of everyday Microsoft software applications. On their own, any one of the apps provides an important, specific tool. When combined in symphony, though, they strike a harmony that is greater than the sum of their unique parts. For my students, that approach helped fuel a modern, imaginative curiosity that made the curriculum more engaging and the group discussion more meaningful.

Ready to unlock limitless learning for your students? Check out our tools for educators. Already experiencing the difference in your classroom? Share your changemaker story with us!

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Author: Microsoft News Center

In music classroom without instruments, an ensemble of apps play bandleader |

At Kaenoisuksa school, in Chiang Mai, Thailand, we face the unique challenge of bringing music education to roughly 600 students who don’t have the benefit of real instruments to practice with. Adding to the complexity, our student body is a diverse mix Shan, Yunnan and Lahu students who all bring a different set of cultural values and learning techniques to the classroom every day. Our curriculum has to be nimble if it’s going to serve all of their unique needs.

As the school’s music and dramatic arts teacher, it’s my job to find educational solutions that will strike a chord with my students. In the common smartphone, I found a tool perfectly fit for the job—so long as it was equipped with the right apps.

Learning music isn’t just a matter of knowing how to play this song on that instrument. Using Microsoft apps like Office, Sway, OneNote, PowerPoint, Windows Movie Maker and others, I weaved together a 21st-century lesson plan that covered a range of musical topics, from theory to technique to history and cultural context. I call it Mobile Music Learning, and through it, my students have learned both the fundaments of music education as well as the value of technology in exploring their own questions in their own ways.

Things That Worked in My Classroom

  • Mobile VR Thrills: My students loved exploring international music and concert videos with apps like WITHIN and YouTube VR, which help turn your mobile screen into a virtual-reality headset. Access to music videos—from Operas in London to Indonesian dance routines in Bali—seeded them with questions about instruments, dance and other cultural elements that led to lively discussion as a class.
  • Strum Your Screens: Countless apps will turn your phone into a real-live instrument, replete with keys, strings, skins or some other music-making analog of your choosing. This let students get their hands a little dirty with playing where they otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. Even better, they got to do so from home long after class was over—and on just about any instrument they could think of.
  • Tech Does Double Duty: I want my students to learn music education, of course, but through it, I also want them to learn tech fluency. They are emerging into a world where success will depend on their ability to confidently navigate tech tools. Employing integrated apps like Microsoft Sway, Word, PowerPoint and Windows MovieMaker to explore, share and present the material helps them build that confidence along the way.

Practicing an instrument on a smartphone may seem like a novel concept, but for my students, a familiarity with mobile devices meant they brought more confidence to the initial lessons than they might’ve in a class with traditional instruments. The portability of our devices also empowered them to continue exploring the lessons for themselves once class had finished.

By applying the tech tools they’re already familiar with, I encouraged my students to explore, and ultimately synthesize, the subject matter in ways that felt natural to them as digital natives. The result was not only a newfound appreciation for music education but also the fostering of a rich and informed dialogue about other related subjects.

The Mobile Music Learning curriculum I created is little more than a collection of everyday Microsoft software applications. On their own, any one of the apps provides an important, specific tool. When combined in symphony, though, they strike a harmony that is greater than the sum of their unique parts. For my students, that approach helped fuel a modern, imaginative curiosity that made the curriculum more engaging and the group discussion more meaningful.

Ready to unlock limitless learning for your students? Check out our tools for educators. Already experiencing the difference in your classroom? Share your changemaker story with us!

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Surface Hub 2S advances Microsoft’s vision to empower teams in today’s modern workplace | Microsoft Devices Blog

Today we joined Steelcase in New York to share our vision for empowering teams and unveiled new details about the Surface Hub 2S product line, introducing the new 85-inch screen size and bringing unprecedented, battery-enabled mobility to the 50-inch collaboration device.

Our best ideas come from when we’re working as a team – focused, engaged, connected.  When Surface started, we were a team of 12 all working together in a secret lab in Redmond. Collaboration was a constant and it was simple – at least in terms of location. Today, we’re a team spread across the globe, working closely with groups across Microsoft not just to build devices, but to create connected and complete experiences.
Surface Hub 2S is a product built to engage and empower teams by bridging digital and physical workspaces, because how we work continues to evolve every day. Not so long ago, the emphasis was on individual productivity. Today that’s changed – the situations we face at work are more complex and solving them requires a variety of skillsets and knowledge.
It’s why people are spending more time than ever before collaborating, and why companies are embracing new ways of working together. People see teamwork as critical to their job, but teams are more global and mobile than ever and being in the same room often isn’t possible. Businesses are looking to technology to close the gap – not only across departments, buildings and time zones, but also to connect different work styles and perspectives.
At Microsoft, we’ve been working on this – empowering people to achieve more, together. We’ve evolved Office into a collaborative suite that lets you work together in real-time from any device. We’ve introduced Microsoft Teams to create one, secure place for teams to access all the tools they need to do their work and added new innovations and enhanced AI to Microsoft Whiteboard. We’ve expanded our Surface family of devices to include not just devices designed for individuals, but also devices purpose-built for teamwork.
Today, we’re excited to share more about how we’re driving the category forward with Surface Hub 2S.

Surface Hub 2S – an all-in-one device built for teamwork
Surface Hub 2S harnesses the full power of Microsoft – Windows 10, Microsoft Teams, Office 365, Microsoft Whiteboard and the intelligent cloud – to unlock the productivity of your team. This new device packs even more performance into a thinner, lighter more versatile design. Forty percent lighter than its predecessor, and with a 60 percent thinner display, Surface Hub 2S fits easily into any space – from a traditional conference room to a compact huddle space. The vibrant 4K+ 50-inch multi-touch display offers an inviting canvas to co-create with the best pen and touch experience and the highest resolution compared to any device in its class. Plus, Surface Hub 2S offers 50 percent faster graphics performance than the original Surface Hub. Surface Hub 2S will start shipping in the U.S.* in June and will be priced at $8,999.99. Surface Hub 2S will be available in the additional Surface Hub markets shortly thereafter.
Teamwork anywhere
Surface Hub 2S gives teams the flexibility to come together wherever they work best. It takes something that has long been a fixture in the conference room – the shared screen – and transforms it into a mobile computer, built for teams. Surface Hub 2S offers the thinnest edge and smallest bezels in its class, bringing you closer to your content and your team and integrating seamlessly into any office environment. When paired with the Steelcase Roam Mobile Stand and APC Charge Mobile Battery, Surface Hub 2S creates a mobile collaboration experience that frees teams from the conference room and allows your ideas to be as mobile as you are – no AC power connectivity required.
Bring remote teams together

Joining a meeting remotely can be painful. It can be hard to stay engaged when you can’t see the people in the room and the content being shared at the same time. Surface Hub 2S helps make meetings more engaging and inclusive of people working remotely. With built-in Microsoft Teams and Skype for Business integration, you can start meetings instantly with one touch. The large true-to-life screen, enhanced 4K camera, crystal clear speakers and far-field mic arrays help everyone on the team – local or remote – see and engage with the meeting content and each other, making it feel almost like everyone is in the same room together.
Stay in the team flow
Too often, great ideas get stuck on the conference room whiteboard and the team’s flow gets broken when the meeting ends. Surface Hub 2S enables teams work digitally all the way through their creative process, with access to the tools they rely on. Easily sign into your Office 365 account to access and interact with the content you need, run must-have Microsoft and business applications natively, and interact naturally with Surface Hub 2 Pen and touch. The Microsoft Whiteboard allows people to collaborate on a shared digital canvas from almost any device so it’s easy to pick up where you left off, keeping teams in their flow.

New options to meet a variety of business needs
We know that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to collaboration. Businesses require choice, flexibility and control over the productivity tools that help enable teamwork. Over the last several months, we have been listening closely to our customers to deliver tailored options to meet a variety of emerging needs. This includes delivering Surface Hub 2S now, with a modular hardware design that will enable customers to unlock new experiences in the future.
Later this year, we will also offer Surface Hub 2 Display, for spaces that need a great pen and touch enabled interactive display, without the compute, as well as a new configuration option for Surface Hub 2S customers to run Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise on their device(s) for specialized app scenarios. We’re also excited to announce that we’re adding an 85-inch version to the Surface Hub family. We will begin testing Surface Hub 2S 85-inch with select customers in early 2020.
We’ve been inspired by how our customers use Surface Hub to transform meetings and collaborate. And we can’t wait to see how businesses across the globe will use Surface Hub 2S to empower their teams to work together in new ways.
 
[*Disclaimer: Surface Hub 2S has not yet been authorized under U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules; actual sale and delivery is contingent on compliance with applicable FCC requirements.]

What service does the Microsoft WSSD program provide?

The Windows Server Software-Defined program is Microsoft’s initiative to validate vendor hardware for software-defined data center deployments.

The Microsoft WSSD program provides vendors with support for product design, validation testing, deployment streamlining and operations tasks, such as systems management. The vendor hardware involved in WSSD validation typically includes servers; network devices, such as network interface cards; storage adapters, such as SAS host bus adapters; and storage devices, including traditional magnetic, solid-state and non-volatile memory devices.

Editor’s note: On March 26, 2019, Microsoft rebranded the WSSD program to Azure Stack HCI. According to a Microsoft official, the WSSD program will remain the same for Windows Server 2016 deployments, while Azure Stack HCI systems will be designated for Windows Server 2019.

Validation process provides reliability

The principal goal of the Microsoft WSSD program is to overcome integration problems that might otherwise delay or complicate enterprise adoption of software-defined data center (SDDC) technologies.

Microsoft’s WSSD offerings work with the software-defined features in Windows Server. This helps customers avoid potential problems that could compromise the production environment.

Vendor HCI offerings undergo a complex testing process that includes building out and stress-testing a range of deployments. In addition, the vendor might need to re-qualify for WSSD certification if it reconfigures or updates its products.

Microsoft WSSD program comes in three flavors

The Microsoft WSSD program has three offerings.

The hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) Standard product combines compute and storage resources within the same server cluster. The HCI Standard deployment simplifies compute and storage in the same highly scalable package. It is suited to small and midsize environments that use Hyper-V.

The Converged Software-Defined Storage (SDS) offering focuses on using servers for simplified, low-cost, enterprise-grade storage that is not a common storage area network or network-attached storage. As with HCI Standard, Converged SDS is basically a cluster of servers designed to scale out. Converged SDS is suitable for organizations of any size.

Finally, the HCI Premium offering builds on the Standard edition by adding software-defined networking capabilities. HCI Premium is meant for large organizations that want SDDC infrastructures that can scale easily. The vendor products validated at the HCI Premium level are mainly intended for large enterprises and service providers.

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We’re increasing our carbon fee as we double down on sustainability

Phot of forest trees being inventoried
Image of trees with data and insights provided by Microsoft AI.

Since 2009, Microsoft has made and met a series of commitments to reduce the company’s carbon footprint. While we’ve made progress toward our goal of cutting our operational carbon emissions by 75 percent by 2030, the magnitude and speed of the world’s environmental changes have made it increasingly clear that we must do more. And we are taking new steps to do just that.

Today, we are announcing that we will nearly double our internal carbon fee to $15 per metric ton on all carbon emissions. This internal Microsoft “tax” was established in 2012 to hold our business divisions financially responsible for reducing their carbon emissions. The funds from this higher fee will both maintain Microsoft’s carbon neutrality and help us take a tech-first approach that will put sustainability at the core of every part of our business and technology to work for sustainable outcomes. In practice, this means we’ll continue to keep our house in order and improve it, while increasingly addressing sustainability challenges around the globe by engaging our strongest assets as a company – our employees and our technologies.

Today, I’d like to share new steps we’re taking in four areas:

Building sustainable campuses and data centers

We will continue to build, renovate and operate our campuses in a manner that reduces our impact on the environment. At our headquarters in Redmond, Washington, we have started work to construct 17 new buildings totaling 2.5 million square feet. We will remove fossil fuels from these new buildings and run this new addition, as well as the rest of our campus, on 100 percent carbon-free electricity. We are also reducing the amount of carbon associated with the construction materials of our new buildings by at least 15 percent, with a goal of reaching 30 percent, through a new online tool. Combined with our smart building technology, Microsoft will be the first large corporate campus to reach zero-carbon and zero-waste goals.

In our data centers, we will continue to focus on R&D for efficiency and renewable energy. In 2016, we announced that we would power our data centers with more renewable energy, setting a 50 percent target by the end of 2018 and topping 60 percent early in the next decade while continuing to improve from there. We hit the first target nearly a year ahead of schedule, and today we are sharing the news that we will reach the 60 percent milestone before the end of this year. We’re therefore setting our next milestone on the path to 100 percent renewable energy, aiming to surpass the 70 percent target by 2023. We’ll also launch a new data-driven circular cloud initiative using the Internet of Things (IoT), blockchain and artificial intelligence (AI) to monitor performance and streamline our reuse, resale and recycling of data center assets, including servers.

We will also add water to our long-standing carbon and energy commitments, launching a new water replenishment strategy where we will replace what our operations consume in water-stressed regions by 2030.

Accelerating research through data science

Data is a critical part of our work and a global transition to a low-carbon future. Data can help tell us about the health of our planet, including the conditions of our air, water, land and the well-being of our wildlife. But we need technology’s help to capture this vast amount of data and convert it into actionable intelligence. Despite living in the Information Age, when it comes to environmental data we are still too often flying without real insights.

We founded our AI for Earth program in 2017 with this challenge in mind. Since then, we’ve launched two new APIs that help provide the scale and flexibility to transform how people working on sustainability issues process data and generate valuable insights. More than 230 grantees are now using Azure and AI to create new models and discover new insights. But we have learned there’s still more we can do to accelerate this work.

Today, we’re committing to hosting the world’s leading environmental data sets on Azure. These large government datasets contain satellite and aerial imagery, among other things, and require petabytes of storage. By making them available in our cloud, we will advance and accelerate the work of grantees and researchers around the world. We will also continue work to bring new APIs and applications to the AI for Earth gallery and mature projects into platform-level services as we’ve done with land cover mapping.

Helping our customers build sustainable solutions

As the world’s needs heighten, we are working more closely than ever with our customers to use digital technology and AI to address sustainability challenges. We are making this an increasing focus across every part of our company, and in the coming months we’ll share more details about our plans to develop and deploy products to facilitate our customers’ and partners’ growth with sustainability in mind.

Already we’re helping empower our customers and partners with new technology to help them drive efficiencies, transform their businesses, and create their own solutions to create a more sustainable planet. At Microsoft we call this infusion of technology tech intensity, and we’re seeing it propel sustainable growth around the globe. Let me share a few examples.

Companies like Ecolab and Ørsted are improving water conservation and efficiency of renewable energy with Microsoft Azure, IoT and AI. Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy has deployed a digital solution called Hermes with autonomous drones to inspect turbines and is now building on this with Azure AI to improve operations further to help make renewable energy more affordable and the future more sustainable. Bühler, one of the world’s leading grain processing providers, keeps food healthy and safe for 2 billion people every day. Their goal is to reduce 30 percent of waste and 30 percent of energy that goes into food production processing for customers by 2020. Silvia Terra, a small start-up, is focused on using AI to improve our understanding of forests and better manage these economic and environmental assets. Through its work with AI for Earth, they’ve completed a national inventory of forests, down to the tree level.

These companies’ technology breakthroughs offer a blueprint for sustainable economic growth. New research we commissioned with Pricewaterhouse Coopers UK (PwC UK) shows that greater adoption of AI across even a few sectors has the potential to boost global GDP by up to 4.4 percent, while also reducing global greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 4 percent. This is approximately 2.4 gigatons of CO2, equivalent to zeroing out the 2030 annual emissions of Australia, Canada and Japan combined.

Advocating for environmental policy change

Finally, public policy has an important role in creating enabling environments to accelerate the reduction of carbon emissions. That is why we’re joining today the Climate Leadership Council (CLC). CLC is an international policy institute founded with business leaders – many of whom are our customers – as well as economists and environmental leaders to promote a national carbon pricing approach. In addition to our internal carbon tax, we supported the recent Washington state ballot measure on pricing carbon and believe it’s time for a robust national discussion on carbon pricing to lower emissions in an economically sound way.

Addressing these global environmental challenges is a big task. Meeting this raised ambition will take the work of everyone across Microsoft, as well as partnerships with our customers, policymakers and organizations around the world. This road map is far from complete, but it’s a first step in our renewed commitment to sustainability. Time is too short, resources too thin and the impact too large to wait for all the answers to act. There’s an incredible opportunity to be realized by acting, supported by data and technology, on climate change. We are starting our journey to embrace that challenge and enhance opportunities for everyone on the planet today.

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Manage Windows containers and Hyper-V containers with these tools

If you have hundreds of containers deployed in your environment, managing each container without a centralized tool can be painful. Luckily, you can use native tools, such as Docker CLI and Windows PowerShell, or a third-party GUI tool to manage Windows and Hyper-V containers.

The initial development of any technology doesn’t often include many management options. The developer typically provides only the necessary tools — via a command line — to manage every aspect of the technology and then provides APIs for vendors to design additional management platforms. When it comes to managing Windows or Hyper-V containers, you can use the Docker command-line interface, PowerShell, RunHCS, and similar command line and GUI tools.

Use Docker CLI to manage Windows containers

Docker CLI is the default tool to manage containers and is most appealing to admins who already use Linux Docker command-line tools. Docker CLI has the capability to manage all Windows container tasks, from creating a container to killing it. Below are some commands using Docker CLI.

Use the following command to start a container with a Nano Server image:

Docker run –it /Microsoft/nanoserver

Use the command below to list Docker processes:

Docker ps –a

Take advantage of container PowerShell commands

If you’re a seasoned Windows admin, you might want to use something you’re already familiar with, such as Windows PowerShell. Fortunately, Microsoft provides similar PowerShell commands to manage containers that are much easier to use than Docker CLI. PowerShell removes the added complexity found in Docker. For example, Docker CLI requires the command syntax to be in lowercase letters.

If you’ve worked with PowerShell for some time, you’ll find it easy to code a container script and have it run when and as needed. As you can see in the PowerShell command below, you aren’t required to ensure that the command syntax is in lowercase:

New-Container –Name TestContainaer –ContainerImageName WindowsServerCore –SwitchName "V1"

Use Docker CLI with PowerShell commands

One of the biggest advantages of using Windows PowerShell to manage containers is that you can use Docker CLI in conjunction with PowerShell. For example, if you want to list container processes with Process ID, executing the command below will give you the desired results:

docker exec -it --privileged admin1 powershell -Command Get-CimInstance Win32_Process | Select-Object ProcessId, CommandLine

Manage containers using RunC or RunHCS

RunHCS is a CLI implementation of the Open Container Initiative specification. RunHCS runs on Windows machines and communicates with Host Compute Service to create and manage containers. For example, to start a container using RunHCS, use the command below:

RunHCS run <–container ID>

Consider third-party container GUI tools

This is where Microsoft still needs to do further development. Unfortunately, Microsoft hasn’t provided a GUI tool for admins to manage Windows or Hyper-V containers. However, there are many third-party tools available you can use. For example, there’s a tool called Windows Server Container Manager that you can download from Microsoft TechNet and test drive on Windows Server 2016 containers.

If you want to use an enterprise-level GUI, Kubernetes is the standard for container management and orchestration. If you have a large number of containers deployed in your environment, Kubernetes provides all necessary functions. On March 25, 2019, Craig Peters, principal program manager of Azure Container Compute, announced that the release of Kubernetes version 1.14 includes support for Windows Server containers.

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New AMD Ryzen PRO, Athlon PRO processors added to AMD lineup

AMD released four new additions to its mobile processor lineup aimed at powering commercial notebooks across a range of budgets and workflows. According to AMD, the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen PRO 3000 series and AMD Athlon PRO 300 series will provide commercial- and enterprise-level users with longer battery life, powerful graphics processing and added security features.

The new line of AMD mobile processors includes the Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U, Ryzen 5 PRO 3500U, Ryzen 3 PRO 3300U and Athlon PRO 300U, all of which feature Radeon Vega graphics. All four processors have a thermal design power of 15 W, which puts this AMD line in the arena of thin laptops.

The 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen PRO series features four cores and up to eight threads, while the AMD Athlon Pro chip has two cores and four threads. The second-gen Ryzen PRO processors are based on 12 nm Zen+ architecture, and the Athlon PRO is based on 14 nm Zen. The inclusion of Athlon PRO in the product line opens opportunities for AMD processors to appear in lower-end laptops.

AMD promises up to 12 hours of battery life for business computers — a 51% increase from older versions — as well as up to 16% improvement in CPU performance from previous generations of AMD chips.

AMD also claimed to outperform competition — Intel being the other top player — on a multitude of fronts. When compared with Intel’s 2017 i7-8650 chip, AMD recorded its Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U chip to be 36% faster in photo editing, 64% faster in 3D modeling and up to 258% faster in visualization; AMD’s graphics success can be attributed to its incorporation of Radeon Vega 10.

According to AMD, the Ryzen PRO and Athlon PRO series are the only processors with a full set of security features built in. AMD GuardMI provides a variety of protections:

  • Secure Boot secures BIOS from power on and prevents threats from reaching critical software.
  • OS security protects against system attacks.
  • Memory encryption protects against cold boot attacks.
  • Trusted application enablement allows Ryzen PRO to run third-party security features.

The new AMD mobile processors could appear in a range of PCs, from low-end systems suitable for web browsing and general office productivity to business systems built for data analysis and video conferencing. AMD also claimed its new processors are suitable for professional-grade notebook tasks, like premium content creation, software development and scientific applications. HP Inc. and Lenovo are two device makers with plans to release commercial notebook products powered by AMD Ryzen PRO and Athlon PRO mobile processors later this quarter.

AMD unveiled a 7 nm gaming GPU in January, and its stock price has increased approximately 50% since, peaking $29.09 in early April. It plans to release another 7 nm architecture,Navi, later this year. Intel’s most recent release was its 2018 ninth-generation Core i9-9900K gaming processor, but the vendor plans to release 10th-gen processors based on 10 nm architecture later this year — and in consumer-grade products by 2020 — that should amplify competition with Intel and Nvidia.

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Wanted – Intel NUC Skull or Hades Canyon.

Yes 16GB is the original RAM and is for sale here, so that option is only available if the RAM doesn’t sell here first!

The 32GB I purchased new from EBay and is HyperX Impact DDR4 2400 RAM

I bought this and another Skull Canyon for learning about a setting up a specific type of VMware cluster for a job I applied for.

I now have this, three Skull Canyons, an i5 NUC and a Celeron NUC and I don’t really need them all!

My plan is to sell a few leaving myself with just the three Skul Cs.

Hopefully that makes sense?

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