In music classroom without instruments, an ensemble of apps play bandleader |

At Kaenoisuksa school, in Chiang Mai, Thailand, we face the unique challenge of bringing music education to roughly 600 students who don’t have the benefit of real instruments to practice with. Adding to the complexity, our student body is a diverse mix Shan, Yunnan and Lahu students who all bring a different set of cultural values and learning techniques to the classroom every day. Our curriculum has to be nimble if it’s going to serve all of their unique needs.

As the school’s music and dramatic arts teacher, it’s my job to find educational solutions that will strike a chord with my students. In the common smartphone, I found a tool perfectly fit for the job—so long as it was equipped with the right apps.

Learning music isn’t just a matter of knowing how to play this song on that instrument. Using Microsoft apps like Office, Sway, OneNote, PowerPoint, Windows Movie Maker and others, I weaved together a 21st-century lesson plan that covered a range of musical topics, from theory to technique to history and cultural context. I call it Mobile Music Learning, and through it, my students have learned both the fundaments of music education as well as the value of technology in exploring their own questions in their own ways.

Things That Worked in My Classroom

  • Mobile VR Thrills: My students loved exploring international music and concert videos with apps like WITHIN and YouTube VR, which help turn your mobile screen into a virtual-reality headset. Access to music videos—from Operas in London to Indonesian dance routines in Bali—seeded them with questions about instruments, dance and other cultural elements that led to lively discussion as a class.
  • Strum Your Screens: Countless apps will turn your phone into a real-live instrument, replete with keys, strings, skins or some other music-making analog of your choosing. This let students get their hands a little dirty with playing where they otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. Even better, they got to do so from home long after class was over—and on just about any instrument they could think of.
  • Tech Does Double Duty: I want my students to learn music education, of course, but through it, I also want them to learn tech fluency. They are emerging into a world where success will depend on their ability to confidently navigate tech tools. Employing integrated apps like Microsoft Sway, Word, PowerPoint and Windows MovieMaker to explore, share and present the material helps them build that confidence along the way.

Practicing an instrument on a smartphone may seem like a novel concept, but for my students, a familiarity with mobile devices meant they brought more confidence to the initial lessons than they might’ve in a class with traditional instruments. The portability of our devices also empowered them to continue exploring the lessons for themselves once class had finished.

By applying the tech tools they’re already familiar with, I encouraged my students to explore, and ultimately synthesize, the subject matter in ways that felt natural to them as digital natives. The result was not only a newfound appreciation for music education but also the fostering of a rich and informed dialogue about other related subjects.

The Mobile Music Learning curriculum I created is little more than a collection of everyday Microsoft software applications. On their own, any one of the apps provides an important, specific tool. When combined in symphony, though, they strike a harmony that is greater than the sum of their unique parts. For my students, that approach helped fuel a modern, imaginative curiosity that made the curriculum more engaging and the group discussion more meaningful.

Ready to unlock limitless learning for your students? Check out our tools for educators. Already experiencing the difference in your classroom? Share your changemaker story with us!

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Google takes a run at enterprise cloud data management

Meeting the needs of enterprise cloud users requires a reset of sorts for Google. It is a consumer-oriented powerhouse and a leader in cutting-edge AI, machine learning and big data, but it has lagged in supporting enterprise cloud data management.

Moving from the cutting edge to the enterprise was a clear goal for Google at its recent Google Cloud Next ’19 user conference. It was the first such event since enterprise computing veteran Thomas Kurian, former president of product development at Oracle, took over Google Cloud operations late last year.

Kurian made clear to conference attendees that Google will make databases and data management integral to its cloud efforts. He pointed to an upcoming beta release of Cloud Data Fusion integration services, new database migration services, AutoML services, and deeper upcoming support for PostgreSQL and SQL Server relational databases as cloud services.

Google intends to broaden its offerings for enterprise cloud data management with these various agreements with third-party software providers — many of which are glad to align with what is considered a top-notch AI operation.

Digging for data

Like others, Google is exploiting cloud’s enhanced scalability and providing computation across availability zones around the world.

That was a factor last year that led information management giant Iron Mountain to partner with Google to develop services to analyze physical and digital data repositories. Inside those repositories resides what some call dark data — dormant data yet to be exploited.

“Cloud is important. Today, as needs require, you have to have computation that scales up and scales down,” said Fidelma Russo, CTO at Iron Mountain, based in Boston. Google’s capabilities in AI and machine learning are a plus when it comes to navigating dark data, she said in a phone interview from the conference floor.

“Google has a large investment in machine learning and AI models,” Russo said. “The tools allow us to provide value to combining the physical world and digital world.”

At Google Cloud Next, Iron Mountain demonstrated the first results of the partnership. The company’s InSight platform employs the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) for portions of AI processing to search many kinds of semi-structured data. At the Google event, Iron Mountain demonstrated InSight’s ability to delve into archives of video highlighting famous baseball players and plays from the archives of a locally based customer — the San Francisco Giants.

Picture of keynote, Google Cloud Next 2019
Data management was a central concern at Google Cloud Next 2019.

Gateway to the graph

Google’s deals last week with open source providers of NoSQL databases show an effort to present an alternative to Amazon Web Services, which some open source database vendors have criticized for its work to commercialize database approaches that sprang up from open source origins.

At Google Cloud Next, the tech giant unveiled strategic partnerships with DataStax, InfluxDB, MongoDB, Neo4j, Redis Labs and others to host data management and analytics on GCP. The deals will enable Google to manage such databases and frameworks via Google Cloud Console and also include unified billing for services.

Cloud is often the first step for IT teams looking to try out new technology.
Lance WalterChief marketing officer, Neo4j

Google, in some cases, has its own databases to offer for these specialized NoSQL options. But improving the lot of special databases expands what is available to cloud customers. For the makers of NoSQL databases — still relatively new to many people — tighter Google cloud integration presents a ready path for new users.

“Every day, more data management happens on the cloud,” said Lance Walter, chief marketing officer at Neo4j, based in San Mateo, Calif. “Cloud is often the first step for IT teams looking to try out new technology.”

There is much new to learn when moving to graph databases, and administration is part of that. Google Cloud Platform can ease the transition, Walter indicated.

“When you deploy a database, you have to think about how to make it scale, or how you secure it,” he said in a phone interview. “GCP takes that friction away from a developer, administrator and user perspective.”

On the maturity curve

While Google long ago gained standing as web moneymaker and an advanced technology house, it has been less notable for supporting ease of migration for existing enterprise data to its cloud.

That could be changing, according to Alok Pareek, founder and executive vice president for products at streaming data integration vendor Striim, based in Palo Alto, Calif.

Google will drive better enterprise targeting by understanding that enterprise users do not terminate all of their on-premises databases in order to move to the cloud, Pareek said.

Striim recently entered a partnership with Google Cloud to offer migration services. Much of what Google is now doing is, in effect, “extending infrastructure for data management on the cloud,” Pareek said.

Before founding Striim, Pareek served in technology positions at GoldenGate and Oracle, after GoldenGate’s acquisition by the database giant. He worked at Oracle for a time in a Thomas Kurian-led group. He said he was impressed with Kurian’s debut at the helm at Google Cloud Next 2019.

“Thomas Kurian understands the maturity curve of IT and data management over the last 30 or 40 years,” Pareek said. An early view is that Kurian’s moves are paying off.

“Google, as a company, has a lot of energy, but Kurian truly understands you just can’t rip and replace. People need to build a bridge,” Pareek said by phone from the conference floor.

Now, in terms of enterprise cloud data management, “Google knows you can’t just shut down what is already running,” he said.

Google Cloud Next ’19 was held April 9 to 11 in San Francisco.

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Author:

For Sale – Mini Water Cooled i7 4770K 256SSD GTX970

Coolermaster Case I thinks it’s the Elite 110 so 210mm x 260 x 280 H x W x D

Water Cooled I7 4770K

Asus Z971 Plus MB WiFi

Coolermaster 800W Silent Pro Gold

Zotac GTX 970 GPU

Team Group Xtreem DDR3 1333 8GB

Samsung 256GB M2
WD Black 500GB Sata

W10 Pro

PC is pretty quiet unless gaming – never had a problem with it. Plays games at 1080p on high settings. Will throw in a Dell S2309WB 1080p monitor and KB/Mouse with all cables.

Price and currency: £350
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT cash on collection
Location: Leicester LE7
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Author:

In music classroom without instruments, an ensemble of apps play bandleader |

At Kaenoisuksa school, in Chiang Mai, Thailand, we face the unique challenge of bringing music education to roughly 600 students who don’t have the benefit of real instruments to practice with. Adding to the complexity, our student body is a diverse mix Shan, Yunnan and Lahu students who all bring a different set of cultural values and learning techniques to the classroom every day. Our curriculum has to be nimble if it’s going to serve all of their unique needs.

As the school’s music and dramatic arts teacher, it’s my job to find educational solutions that will strike a chord with my students. In the common smartphone, I found a tool perfectly fit for the job—so long as it was equipped with the right apps.

Learning music isn’t just a matter of knowing how to play this song on that instrument. Using Microsoft apps like Office, Sway, OneNote, PowerPoint, Windows Movie Maker and others, I weaved together a 21st-century lesson plan that covered a range of musical topics, from theory to technique to history and cultural context. I call it Mobile Music Learning, and through it, my students have learned both the fundaments of music education as well as the value of technology in exploring their own questions in their own ways.

Things That Worked in My Classroom

  • Mobile VR Thrills: My students loved exploring international music and concert videos with apps like WITHIN and YouTube VR, which help turn your mobile screen into a virtual-reality headset. Access to music videos—from Operas in London to Indonesian dance routines in Bali—seeded them with questions about instruments, dance and other cultural elements that led to lively discussion as a class.
  • Strum Your Screens: Countless apps will turn your phone into a real-live instrument, replete with keys, strings, skins or some other music-making analog of your choosing. This let students get their hands a little dirty with playing where they otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. Even better, they got to do so from home long after class was over—and on just about any instrument they could think of.
  • Tech Does Double Duty: I want my students to learn music education, of course, but through it, I also want them to learn tech fluency. They are emerging into a world where success will depend on their ability to confidently navigate tech tools. Employing integrated apps like Microsoft Sway, Word, PowerPoint and Windows MovieMaker to explore, share and present the material helps them build that confidence along the way.

Practicing an instrument on a smartphone may seem like a novel concept, but for my students, a familiarity with mobile devices meant they brought more confidence to the initial lessons than they might’ve in a class with traditional instruments. The portability of our devices also empowered them to continue exploring the lessons for themselves once class had finished.

By applying the tech tools they’re already familiar with, I encouraged my students to explore, and ultimately synthesize, the subject matter in ways that felt natural to them as digital natives. The result was not only a newfound appreciation for music education but also the fostering of a rich and informed dialogue about other related subjects.

The Mobile Music Learning curriculum I created is little more than a collection of everyday Microsoft software applications. On their own, any one of the apps provides an important, specific tool. When combined in symphony, though, they strike a harmony that is greater than the sum of their unique parts. For my students, that approach helped fuel a modern, imaginative curiosity that made the curriculum more engaging and the group discussion more meaningful.

Ready to unlock limitless learning for your students? Check out our tools for educators. Already experiencing the difference in your classroom? Share your changemaker story with us!

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Druva Office 365 backup adds restore options, snaps

Cloud backup vendor Druva sharpened its focus on protecting Microsoft Office 365 with its latest update. 

Druva added granular user-level restores of SharePoint and OneDrive; point-in-time recovery for Exchange email accounts; time-indexed backup snapshots for ransomware recovery; and long-term, lower-cost retention options for Office 365 data.

The Druva Cloud Platform offers a suite of SaaS data protection products that include Salesforce and Office 365 backup. The Druva backup portfolio also protects servers and endpoint devices.

The Druva Office 365 backup enhancements are meant to shore up some of the weaknesses in the SaaS app’s native backup tools. For example, Microsoft backs up SharePoint data every 12 hours and retains it for only 14 days. Restores can only be done as entire instances rather than individual files and require a call to Microsoft support.

“That’s a big gap, because if I want a specific list or document, it’s not possible,” said Prem Ananthakrishnan, vice president of products at Druva.

Ananthakrishnan said the enhancements were driven by customer concerns around Office 365’s lack of granular recovery, inability to recover from a cyberattack or unintentional deletion, and inability to retain data long term. Aside from file-level restores, Druva Office 365 backup addresses the other points by allowing customers to restore to known good copies in the wake of a ransomware attack and store data on Druva’s cloud in a “warm” tier with no penalty to retrieval speed.

Ananthakrishnan said he is seeing more adoption of SaaS applications. As businesses increasingly put their critical data on those cloud-based applications, they take protecting that data more seriously. He noted this attitude is a shift from the earlier days of SaaS applications.

“About 18 months ago, people were still questioning whether they should be protecting the cloud,” Ananthakrishnan said. “I think we’re past that point. We now have thousands of customers who are backing up Office 365.”

Screenshot of Druva Office 365 backup
Druva can do user-level restores of Exchange email accounts.

SaaS provider puts Druva backup to work

WorkForce Software, a SaaS provider of time and attendance software, based in Livonia, Mich., relies extensively on Office 365 and Salesforce and uses Druva backup to protect both.

Peter Webber, director of IT operations at WorkForce Software, said he went with Druva Office 365 backup because he wanted copies to live outside of Microsoft’s cloud.

We initially knew with Office 365 that we wanted to have it backed up in a diverse way from just how Microsoft was doing it. It was important to us that we back it up using a tool that we controlled.
Peter WebberDirector of IT operations, WorkForce Software

“We initially knew with Office 365 that we wanted to have it backed up in a diverse way from just how Microsoft was doing it,” Webber said. “It was important to us that we back it up using a tool that we controlled, independent of Microsoft, and allow us to use a repository other than Microsoft’s cloud.”

Druva replaced WorkForce Software’s on-premises endpoint backup, which was called Symantec NetBackup at the time. WorkForce subsequently acquired smaller companies and inherited their backup infrastructures, which included Veeam Software and Veritas after its spin out from Symantec. Webber said he has worked to phase out his company’s on-premises backup, and Druva has simplified the process because it is a cloud-based service.

“Those classic, legacy backup solutions tend to be really painful to manage and take a lot of admin overhead,” Webber said. “It has been much easier for me to just put a Druva client on the machine or the host and get it rolling instead of trying to work with existing environments.”

Ananthakrishnan said because Druva is cloud-based, buyers don’t need to deal with hardware, sizing or building out infrastructure like for on-premises backup. He said Druva can also make updates available quicker than on-premises applications when Microsoft adds applications or makes other upgrades to Office 365.

Ananthakrishnan said Druva Office 365 backup capabilities must grow along with Office 365. He said he still sees gaps in the backup capabilities of Microsoft Teams, and he said Druva will address those in a coming release.

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Author:

For Sale – Mini Water Cooled i7 4770K 256SSD GTX970

Coolermaster Case I thinks it’s the Elite 110 so 210mm x 260 x 280 H x W x D

Water Cooled I7 4770K

Asus Z971 Plus MB WiFi

Coolermaster 800W Silent Pro Gold

Zotac GTX 970 GPU

Team Group Xtreem DDR3 1333 8GB

Samsung 256GB M2
WD Black 500GB Sata

W10 Pro

PC is pretty quiet unless gaming – never had a problem with it. Plays games at 1080p on high settings. Will throw in a Dell S2309WB 1080p monitor and KB/Mouse with all cables.

Price and currency: £350
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT cash on collection
Location: Leicester LE7
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Go to Original Article
Author: