Microsoft earnings press release available on Investor Relations website – Stories

REDMOND, Wash. — April 24, 2019 — Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday announced that fiscal year 2019 third-quarter financial results are available on its Investor Relations website.

The direct link to the earnings press release is https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Investor/earnings/FY-2019-Q3/press-release-webcast.

As previously announced, the company will host a conference call at 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time. A live webcast of the call can be accessed on Microsoft’s Investor Relations website at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Investor/.

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, financial analysts and investors only:

Investor Relations, Microsoft, (425) 706-4400

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications, (425) 638-7777, rrt@we-worldwide.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links were correct at time of publication, but may since have changed. Shareholder and financial information is available at http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/investor.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18885 | Windows Experience Blog

Hello Windows Insiders, today we are releasing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18885 (20H1) to Windows Insiders in the Fast ring.
NOTE: Windows Insiders on Build 18362.53 who were unable to update to Build 18875 will need to install Build 18362.86 (KB4497093) *FIRST* before being able to receive today’s build. Build 18362.86 includes the fix needed to update to the latest 20H1 builds from Build 18362.53. If you’re already on Build 18875, this build should come through normally.
Earlier this month, we moved the Fast ring forward to 20H1 and merged the small group of Insiders who opted-in to Skip Ahead back into the Fast ring, which means Insiders in the Fast ring and those who opted-in to Skip Ahead are receiving the same builds for now.
IMPORTANT: As is normal with builds early in the development cycle, these builds may contain bugs that might be painful for some. If you take this flight, you won’t be able to switch Slow or Release Preview rings without doing a clean-install on your PC. If you wish to remain on 19H1, please change your ring settings via Settings > Update & Security > Windows Insider Program *before* taking this flight. See this blog post for details.
If you are looking for a complete look at what build is in which Insider ring – head on over to Flight Hub. You can also check out the rest of our documentation here including a complete list of new features and updates that have gone out as part of Insider flights for the current development cycle.

Phone screen now supports additional Android devices
As promised, we have expanded phone screen support to additional phone models – OnePlus 6, OnePlus 6T, Samsung Galaxy S10e, S10, S10+, Note 8, Note 9. Try out phone screen and send us your feedback. We will continue to expand the list of supported devices over time.
Never miss your Android phone’s notifications
Today, we are excited to provide a preview into the newest feature for the Your Phone app – Notifications.
Stop reaching for your phone to check your notifications. Boost your focus and productivity by seeing your phone’s notifications on your PC. You are in control and manage which apps you want to receive notifications from. Dismiss a notification on one device and it goes away on the other.
 
 With this preview, you can:

See incoming phone notifications in real-time
View all of your phone notifications in one place
Customize which notifications you want to receive
Clear notifications individually or all at once

This feature will gradually roll out to Insiders on 19H1 builds. It may take a few days for this feature to show up inside the Your Phone app.
You can use the Your Phone app on any Windows 10 PC running Windows builds 1803 (RS4) or newer and most Android phones running Android version 7.0 or newer.
We look forward to your feedback as we continue to test, learn, and improve the overall experience.
Notifications Requirements

Android devices version 7.0 and greater with at least 1GB of RAM.
Windows 10 PC running Windows builds 1803 (RS4) or newer.
Not supported on devices that have Notification Access disabled by work or other policy.

Known issues

Some notifications may not appear automatically. Please press refresh to see an updated list of notifications.
Notification responses are not supported.

Ever had a word that you just can’t figure out how to spell? Or like to think out loud and wanna automatically jot it all down? In addition to English (United States), we now support dictation when using English (Canada), English (UK), English (Australia), English (India), French (France), French (Canada), German (Germany), Italian (Italy), Spanish (Spain), Spanish (Mexico), Portuguese (Brazil), and Chinese (Simplified, China)
How to try it? Set focus to a text field and press WIN+H! Or you can tap the little microphone button at the top of the touch keyboard. Say what you wanna say, then press WIN+H a second time or tap the mic button to stop the dictation, or let the dictation session time out on its own.

We’d love to hear your feedback – you can report issues or make feature requests under Input & Language > Speech Input in the Feedback Hub.
Notes:

Speech resources will need to be downloaded for dictation to work. To check that they’re available, go to Language Settings, click on the desired language, and then click on Options. If speech resources are available but haven’t been downloaded, there should be a download button.
Dictation is based on the language of your active keyboard. To switch between preferred languages, press WIN + Space.

Based on your feedback, with Feedback Hub version 1.1903, Insiders with Windows set to a language other than English now have the option of browsing English feedback within the Feedback Hub, as well as submitting feedback in English on the New Feedback form.

There’s a new command in Narrator to give a webpage summary! (Narrator + S). Currently this command will give information about hyperlinks, landmarks and headings.
Narrator Find is more reliable in the Chrome web browser.

We fixed an issue that could result in USBs and SD cards being unexpectedly assigned a different drive letter after upgrading.
We fixed an issue that could result in the post install setup message unexpectedly appearing while you were actively using your PC sometime after login.
We’ve improved the layout of the App Volume and Device Preferences page in Sound settings and tweaked the page view for better usability.
We’ve updated the text of the Storage Sense group policies to make them a bit more clear.
We fixed an issue that could result in the “Make Windows better” page appearing after login showing “please wait”, with a progress wheel, for a long period of time. We also fixed an issue that could result in this page unexpectedly appearing while you were interacting with the device sometime after login.
We fixed an issue that could sometimes result in Windows Hello looking for the user and immediately signing them back in right after locking the PC, rather than first prompting with “Welcome back, dismiss the lock screen to sign back in”.
We fixed an issue that could result in some Insiders seeing only a flat blue screen when connecting to a recent build over remote desktop.

There has been an issue with older versions of anti-cheat software used with games where after updating to the latest 19H1 Insider Preview builds may cause PCs to experience crashes. We are working with partners on getting their software updated with a fix, and most games have released patches to prevent PCs from experiencing this issue. To minimize the chance of running into this issue, please make sure you are running the latest version of your games before attempting to update the operating system. We are also working with anti-cheat and game developers to resolve similar issues that may arise with the 20H1 Insider Preview builds and will work to minimize the likelihood of these issues in the future.
Some Realtek SD card readers are not functioning properly. We are investigating the issue.
If you use remote desktop to connect to an enhanced session VM, taskbar search results will not be visible (just a dark area) until you restart explorer.exe.
We’re investigating reports that on certain devices if fast startup is enabled night light doesn’t turn on until after a restart. (Note: The problem will occur on a “cold” reboot or power off / power on. To work around if night light doesn’t turn on, use Start > Power > Restart.)
There’s a noticeable lag when dragging the emoji and dictation panels.
Tamper Protection may be turned off in Windows Security after updating to this build. You can turn it back on.
Some features on Start Menu and in All apps are not localized in languages such as FR-FR, RU-RU, and ZH-CN.

If you install builds from the Fast ring and switch to either the Slow ring or the Release Preview ring, optional content such as enabling developer mode will fail. You will have to remain in the Fast ring to add/install/enable optional content. This is because optional content will only install on builds approved for specific rings.

See if you topped our lists on the new March 2019 Windows Insider Leaderboard and try to make next month’s Leaderboard by giving feedback for new builds, getting upvotes on your feedback, and completing quests—all done through the Feedback Hub.
Learn more about how you can be on the Leaderboard.

Winter is here. Keep up with the final season of Game of Thrones with Bing. Explore the cast and characters, test your knowledge of season 7, and keep track of every episode. Who do you think will win the Iron Throne?
If you want to be among the first to learn about these Bing features, join our Bing Insider Program.
No downtime for Hustle-As-A-Service,Dona

Pica8 Nymble provides branch network automation

Network software maker Pica8 has introduced technology to remotely provision and configure white box switches across branch offices, providing a necessary tool, but no clear overall cost savings, in competing with incumbent vendors like Cisco and Aruba.

This week, Pica8 formally launched its Nymble Automation Framework, which has been generally available since the end of the first quarter. The announcement came the same week Cumulus Networks, another maker of white box switching software, also released enterprise-friendly network management software.  

The Pica8 Nymble announcement came almost a year after the vendor released an application it said would simplify the deployment of branch and campus switches running Pica8’s PicOS network operating system (NOS). The product, PicaPilot, which was for wired infrastructures only, marked the privately held company’s entry into the campus and branch market led by Cisco and Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise company.

What’s in Pica8 Nymble

With Nymble, Pica8 provides network automation and configuration management through the use of an open source platform called Ansible. The technology supports provisioning of PicOS-powered switches, centralized installation of configuration files, and automatic upgrades.

The Nymble framework comprises a web-based interface for creating switch-specific configurations that the software would store in the customer’s database. Connected to the latter is an Ansible-running server connected to the PicOS switches.

The Nymble framework runs on the customer’s cloud computing environment. Pica8 includes the product with a PicOS license.

Customers who deploy Nymble on an open Dell switch, for example, would get hardware support from Dell and software support from Pica8.

Nymble
The automation process flow for Pica8’s Nymble framework

Pica8 versus incumbents

Pica8’s entry into network automation for the branch comes as more established networking vendors offer similar capabilities and more. Cisco and Aruba, for example, are selling management software that spans WANs, as well as wired and wireless LANs.

Network management and automation tools are among the top five most popular areas in IT spending this year, said Bob Laliberte, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group, based in Milford, Mass. Companies want tools that let “IT teams spin up new services more quickly and eliminate time-consuming manual processes.”

The business case for Pica8 as a campus and branch solution would have to be built around saving time and saving money — both.
John Burke Analyst, Nemertes Research

But whether Pica8 or other NOS makers offering software on open hardware provide less expensive networking — based on the total cost of ownership — than proprietary systems is a long-standing debate. In 2015, Forrester Research reported there was “little cost difference” between white box switches and proprietary hardware when both are running merchant silicon.

Therefore, Pica8 will have to show savings that outweigh the risk associated with leaving an incumbent vendor for a smaller, less-established supplier.

“The business case for Pica8 as a campus and branch solution would have to be built around saving time and saving money — both,” said John Burke, an analyst at Nemertes Research.

Nevertheless, an opportunity does exist for vendors focused on open hardware. Burke has found many companies unhappy with their incumbent vendors, citing high costs, feature bloat, and complicated licensing and maintenance.

“If folks have to rip and replace what they have in campus and branch closets to get real SDN [software-defined networking] and automation from their current vendor, that definitely opens the window of opportunity for Pica8,” Burke said.

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Author:

For Sale – Skull Canyon NUC + Other NUCs

——————————————-
= 1 =
This is up for sale bought from here..

For Sale – Intel NUC8i7HVK NUC w/500Gb Evo 970 and 16Gb DDR

I bought 32gb of RAM as it was needed for the project, so you have an option of 16 or 32gb RAM

£715 with 16gb Ram SOLD

Both prices include postage
Will post pictures later this evening.

——————————————-
= 2 =
I have an i5 based NUC in a Fanless Tranquil case.
The NUC is a D54250WYK and specs can be found here:

Intel® NUC Kit D54250WYK Product Specifications

Tranquil PC H22 Fanless NUC Chassis

And here is the info about the other parts..

  • I5 Intel Haswell NUC – Intel® Core™ i5-4250U Processor (3M Cache, up to 2.60 GHz)
  • Tranquil PC H22 Fanless NUC Chassis (supports additional 2.5″ HDD)
  • 8GB G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3 2133MHz SO-DIMM Low-voltage 1.35V laptop memory kit (1x 8GB) CL11
  • Samsung 840 EVO 120GB mSATA Solid State Drive
  • Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 Wi-Fi and Bluetooth card
  • Windows 10 Home License (ESD)


History: I bought this off someone here and it originally had 16GB of RAM, but on arrival it didn’t recognise the full 16GB of RAM.
I removed the memory one by one and found that it wasn’t recognising one of the slots, so removed the RAM and have been using it with 8GB ever since.

I have been using this mainly for occasional use to run Windows 10 for my indoor gym bike as part of a virtual indoor bike trainer (connected to a large TV)

Maybe 3 months ago I have swapped this with an Apple TV (it was a pain to use with a remote keyboard etc) and since then have been using it for running VMWare (it’s running 6.7 currently off a USB stick)

I now have some i7 NUCs and this isn’t needed anymore. Obviously this is now limited to 8GB of RAM which may or may not be an issue. The unit has never missed a beat.

With the fanless case it is not massively heavy, but will not be super cheap to post.

With this in mind I’d be looking for £100 for the unit including postage.

No box, just the NUC, PSU and HDMI cable.

It uses a mini HDMI which I can throw in a cable.


— selling “sold as discussed in thread” —
——————————————-
= 3 =

INTEL NUC NUC5CPYH

Spec:

INTEL NUC NUC5CPYH
– Celeron N3050 @ 1.6GHz
– 8GB DDR3L
– 80GB internal 7200rpm 2.5″ SATA drive
– VGA (HDB15) & HDMI 1.4b
– 4 USB3 & SDXC
– Windows 10 Home License (ESD)

Full specs at:


Intel® NUC Kit NUC5CPYH

In good condition and all works as expected. It has a small internal fan, but CPU is only 6W so very quiet (almost silent). Sorry no box, just the NUC and PSU.

Looking for around £95 including delivery.

— moved to Ebay —
——————————————-
= 4 =
Intel i7 nuc Skull Canyon,
32gb RAM
250GB V-Nand 970 EVO SSD

Warranty until September 2020 via
Warranty Information
Note that I have had a shuffle around as have three of these and now only require one, so two are for sale. The previously mentioned one with damaged screws I am keeping as it doesn’t bother me.

This one has no issues at all and comes with Windows 10 Pro installed (licensed via ESD). If you need to reload (using Microsoft’s media creation tool and a USB stick) it will re-licence when it connects to the internet.

Sold as just the NUC and Power Supply, sorry no box but will be very well packed.

For a complete technical specification please see:

Intel® NUC Kit NUC6i7KYK Product Specifications

£525 including P&P

——————————————-

——————————————-

Price and currency: Various
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG or BT
Location: BRISTOL
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Author:

Breaking Bard: Using Microsoft AI to unlock Shakespeare’s greatest works

Spoiler alert: At the end of Romeo and Juliet, they both die.

OK, as spoilers go, it’s not big. Most people have read the play, watched one of the famous films or sat through countless school lessons devoted to William Shakespeare and his work. They know it doesn’t end well for Verona’s most famous couple.

In fact, the challenge is finding something no one knows about the world-famous, 300-year-old play. That’s where artificial intelligence can help.

Phil Harvey, a Cloud Solution Architect at Microsoft in the UK, used the company’s Text Analytics API on 19 of The Bard’s plays. The API, which is available to anyone as part of Microsoft’s Azure Cognitive Services, can be used to identify sentiment and topics in text, as well as pick out key phrases and entities. This API is one of several Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools available on Azure.

By creating a series of colourful, Power BI graphs (below) showing how negative (red) or positive (green) the language used by The Bard’s characters was, he hoped to shine a new light on some of the greatest pieces of literature, as well as make them more accessible to people who worry the plays are too complex to easily understand.

Harvey said: “People can see entire plotlines just by looking at my graphs on language sentiment. Because visual examples are much easier to absorb, it makes Shakespeare and his plays more accessible. Reading language from the 16th and 17th centuries can be challenging, so this is a quick way of showing them what Shakespeare is trying to do.

“It’s a great example of data giving us new things to know and new ways of knowing it; it’s a fundamental change to how we process the world around us. We can now pick up Shakespeare, turn it into a data set and process it with algorithms in a new way to learn something I didn’t know before.”

What Harvey’s graphs reveal is that Romeo struggles with more extreme emotions than Juliet. Love has a much greater effect on him challenging stereotypes of the time that women – the fairer sex – were more prone to the highs and lows of relationships.

“It’s interesting to see that the male lead is the one with more extreme emotions,” Harvey added. “The longest lines, both positive and negative, are spoken by him. Juliet is steadier; she is positive and negative but not extreme in what she says. Romeo is a fellow of more extreme emotion, he’s bouncing around all over the place.

Macbeth is also interesting because there are these two peaks of emotion, and Shakespeare uses the wives at these points to turn the story. I also looked at Helena and Hermia in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, because they have a crossed-over love story. They are both positive at the start but then they find out something and it gets negative towards the end.”

The project required AI working alongside humans to truly understand and fully appreciate Shakespeare’s plays

His Shakespeare graphs are the final step in a long process. After downloading a text file of The Bard’s plays from the internet, Harvey had to process the data to prepare it for Microsoft’s AI algorithms. He removed all the stage directions, keeping the act and scene numbers, the characters’ names and what they said. He then uploaded the text to Microsoft Cognitive Services API, a set of tools that can be used in apps, websites and bots to see, hear, speak, understand and interpret users through natural methods of communication.

The Text Analytics API is pre-trained with an extensive body of text with sentiment associations. The model uses a combination of techniques during text analysis, including text processing, part-of-speech analysis, word placement and word associations.

After scanning the Shakespeare plays, Microsoft’s NLP tool gave the lines of dialogue a score between zero and one – scores close to one indicated a positive sentiment, and scores close to zero indicated a negative sentiment.

However, before you start imagining a world in which only robots read books before telling humans the gist of what happened, Harvey discovered some unexpected challenges with his test.

While the AI system worked well for Shakespeare plays that contained straightforward plots and dialogue, it struggled to determine if more nuanced speech was positive or negative. The algorithm couldn’t work out whether Hamlet’s mad ravings were real or imagined, whether characters were being deceptive or telling the truth. That meant that the AI labelled events as positive when they negative, and vice-versa. The AI believed The Comedy of Errors was a tragedy because of the physical, slapstick moments in the play.

Everything you need to know about Microsoft’s cloud

Harvey realised that the parts of the plays that dealt with what truly makes us unique as humans – joking, elation, lying, double meanings, subterfuge, sarcasm – could only be noticed and interpreted by human readers. His project required AI working alongside humans to truly understand and fully appreciate Shakespeare.

Harvey insists that his experiments with Shakespeare’s plays are just a starting point but that the same combination of AI and humans can eventually be extended to companies and their staff, too.

“Take the example of customers phoning their energy company,” he said. “With Microsoft’s NLP tools, you could see if conversations that happen after 5pm are more negative than those that happen at 9am, and deploy staff accordingly. You could also see if a call centre worker turns conversations negative, even if they start out positive, and work with that person to ensure that doesn’t happen in the future.

“It can help companies engage with data in a different way and assist them with everyday tasks.”

Harvey also said journalists could use the tool to see how readers are responding to their articles, or social media experts would get an idea of how consumers viewed their brand.

For now, Harvey is concentrating on the Classics and is turning his attention to Charles Dickens, if he can persuade the V&A in London to let him study some of their manuscripts.

“In the V&A manuscripts, you can see where Dickens has crossed out words. I would love to train a custom vision model on that to get a page by page view of his changes. I could then look at a published copy of the text and see which parts of the book he worked on most; maybe that part went well but he had trouble with this bit. Dickens’s work was serialised in newspapers, so we might be able to deduce whether he was receiving feedback from editors that we didn’t know about. I think that’s amazing.”

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Author: Microsoft News Center

How EHT’s black hole image data is stored and protected

On April 10, 2019, the Event Horizon Telescope published the first black hole image, a historic and monumental achievement that included lots of IT wizardry.

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) includes telescopes spread across the world at eight different sites, including the South Pole. Each site captures massive amounts of radio signal data, which goes to processing centers at the MIT Haystack Observatory in Westford, Mass., and the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany.

The data for the now-famous black hole image — captured in 2017 from galaxy M87, 53 million light-years away — required around 3.5 PB of storage. It then took two years to correlate the data to form an image.

The project’s engineers had to find a way to store the fruits of this astronomy at a cost that was, well, less than astronomical.

EHT’s IT challenges included finding the best way to move petabyte-scale data from multiple sites, acquiring physical media that was durable enough to handle high altitudes and a way to protect all of this data cost-effectively.

The cloud is impractical

Normally, the cloud would be a good option for long-term storage of unifying data sourced from multiple, globally distributed endpoints, which was essentially the role of each individual telescope. However, EHT data scientist Lindy Blackburn said cloud is not a cold storage option for the project.

Each telescope records at a rate of 64 Gbps, and each observation period can last more than 10 hours. This means each site generates around half a petabyte of data per run. With each site recording simultaneously, Blackburn said the high recording speed and sheer volume of data captured made it impractical to upload to a cloud.

Picture of EHT's black hole image
Petabytes of raw radio signal data was processed to form the world’s first black hole image.

“At the moment, parallel recording to massive banks of hard drives, then physically shipping those drives somewhere is still the most practical solution,” Blackburn said.

It is also impractical to use the cloud for computing, said Geoff Crew, co-leader of the EHT correlation working group at Haystack Observatory. Haystack is one of EHT’s two correlation facilities, where a specialized cluster of computers combine and process the radio signal data of the telescopes to eventually form a complete black hole image.

There are about 1,000 computing threads at Haystack working on calculating the correlation pattern between all the telescopes’ data. Even that is only enough to play back and compute the visibility data at 20% of the speed at which the data was collected. This is a bottleneck, but Crew said using the cloud wouldn’t speed the process.

“Cloud computing does not make sense today, as the volume of data would be prohibitively expensive to load into the cloud and, once there, might not be physically placed to be efficiently computed,” Crew said.

Crew added that throwing more hardware at it would help, but time and human hours are still spent looking at and verifying the data. Therefore, he said it’s not justifiable to spend EHT’s resources on making the correlators run faster.

Although Blackburn concluded physically transporting the data is currently the best option, even that choice presents problems. One of the biggest constraints is transportation at the South Pole, which is closed to flights from February to November. The cost and logistics involved with tracking and maintaining a multipetabyte disk inventory is also challenging. Therefore, Blackburn is always on the lookout for another method to move petabyte-scale data.

“One transformative technology for the EHT would be if we could send out raw data directly from the telescopes via high-speed communication link, such as via satellite laser relay, and bypass the need to move physical disks entirely,” Blackburn said. “Another more incremental advancement would be a move to solid-state recording, which would be lighter, faster and more compact. However, the timeline for that would depend entirely on the economics of SSD versus magnetic storage costs.”

Chart explaining interferometry
Capturing a black hole 53 million light-years away requires multiple telescopes working together.

Using helium hard drives

Another problem EHT ran into regarding the black hole image data was the frequency at which traditional hard drives failed at high altitudes. Vincent Fish, a research scientist at Haystack who is in charge of science operations, logistics and scheduling for EHT, said each EHT telescope ranged from 7,000 feet above sea level to 16,000 feet.

“For years, we had this problem where hard drives would fail,” Fish said. “At high altitudes, the density of air is lower, and the old, unsealed hard drives had a high failure rate at high altitudes.”

The industry ended up solving this problem for us, and not because we specifically asked them to.
Vincent FishResearch scientist, MIT Haystack Observatory

The solution came in the form of helium hard drives from Western Digital’s HGST line. Hermetically sealed helium drives were designed to be lighter, denser, cooler and faster than traditional hard drives. And because they were self-contained environments, they could survive the high altitudes in which EHT’s telescopes operated.

“The industry ended up solving this problem for us, and not because we specifically asked them to,” Fish said.

EHT first deployed 200 6 TB helium hard drives in 2015, when it was focused on studying the black hole at Sagittarius A* (pronounced Sagittarius A-Star). Blackburn said EHT currently uses about 1,000 drives, some of which have 10 TB of capacity. It also has added helium drives from Seagate and Toshiba, along with Western Digital.

“The move to helium-sealed drives was a major advancement for the EHT,” Blackburn said. “Not only do they perform well at altitude and run cooler, but there have been very few failures over the years. For example, no drives failed during the EHT’s 2017 observing campaign.”

No backup for raw data

After devising a way to capture, store and process a massive amount of globally distributed data, EHT had to find a workable method of data protection. EHT still hasn’t found a cost-effective way to replicate or protect the raw radio signal data from the telescope sites. However, once the data has been correlated and reduced to about tens of petabytes, it is backed up on site on several different RAID systems and on Google Cloud Storage.

“The reduced data is archived and replicated to a number of internal EHT sites for the use of the team, and eventually, it will all be publically archived,” Crew said. “The raw data isn’t saved; we presently do not have any efficient and cost-effective means to back it up.”

Most of our challenges are related to insufficient money, rather than technical hurdles.
Geoff CrewCo-leader of the EHT correlation working group, MIT Haystack Observatory

Blackburn said, in some ways, the raw data isn’t worth backing up. Because of the complexity of protecting such a large amount of data, it would be simpler to run another observation and gather a new set of data.

“The individual telescope data is, in a very real sense, just ‘noise,’ and we are fundamentally interested only in how much the noise between telescopes correlates, on average,” Blackburn said. “Backing up original raw data to preserve every bit is not so important.”

Backing up the raw data for the black hole image may become important if EHT ends up sitting on it for long periods of time as a result of the computational bottlenecks, Blackburn admitted. However, he said he can’t seriously consider implementing a backup process unless it is “sufficiently straightforward and economical.”

Instead, he said he’s looking at where technology might be in the next five or 10 years and determining if recording to hard drives and shipping them to specialized processing clusters will still be the best method to handle petabyte-scale raw data from the telescopes.

“Right now, it is not clear if that will be continuing to record to hard drives and using special-purpose correlation clusters, recording to hard drives and getting the data as quickly as possible to the cloud, or if SSD or even tape technology will progress to a point to where they are competitive in both cost and speed to hard disks,” Blackburn said.

Fish suggested launching a constellation of satellites via spacecraft rideshare initiatives, either through NASA or a private company, isn’t entirely out of reach, either. Whether it’s the cloud or spaceships, the technology to solve EHT’s petabyte-scale problem exists, but cost is the biggest hurdle.

“Most of our challenges are related to insufficient money, rather than technical hurdles,” Crew said.

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Author:

For Sale – Skull Canyon NUC + Other NUCs

——————————————-
= 1 =
This is up for sale bought from here..

For Sale – Intel NUC8i7HVK NUC w/500Gb Evo 970 and 16Gb DDR

I bought 32gb of RAM as it was needed for the project, so you have an option of 16 or 32gb RAM

£715 with 16gb Ram SOLD

Both prices include postage
Will post pictures later this evening.

——————————————-
= 2 =
I have an i5 based NUC in a Fanless Tranquil case.
The NUC is a D54250WYK and specs can be found here:

Intel® NUC Kit D54250WYK Product Specifications

Tranquil PC H22 Fanless NUC Chassis

And here is the info about the other parts..

  • I5 Intel Haswell NUC – Intel® Core™ i5-4250U Processor (3M Cache, up to 2.60 GHz)
  • Tranquil PC H22 Fanless NUC Chassis (supports additional 2.5″ HDD)
  • 8GB G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3 2133MHz SO-DIMM Low-voltage 1.35V laptop memory kit (1x 8GB) CL11
  • Samsung 840 EVO 120GB mSATA Solid State Drive
  • Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 Wi-Fi and Bluetooth card
  • Windows 10 Home License (ESD)


History: I bought this off someone here and it originally had 16GB of RAM, but on arrival it didn’t recognise the full 16GB of RAM.
I removed the memory one by one and found that it wasn’t recognising one of the slots, so removed the RAM and have been using it with 8GB ever since.

I have been using this mainly for occasional use to run Windows 10 for my indoor gym bike as part of a virtual indoor bike trainer (connected to a large TV)

Maybe 3 months ago I have swapped this with an Apple TV (it was a pain to use with a remote keyboard etc) and since then have been using it for running VMWare (it’s running 6.7 currently off a USB stick)

I now have some i7 NUCs and this isn’t needed anymore. Obviously this is now limited to 8GB of RAM which may or may not be an issue. The unit has never missed a beat.

With the fanless case it is not massively heavy, but will not be super cheap to post.

With this in mind I’d be looking for £100 for the unit including postage.

No box, just the NUC, PSU and HDMI cable.

It uses a mini HDMI which I can throw in a cable.


— selling “sold as discussed in thread” —
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= 3 =

INTEL NUC NUC5CPYH

Spec:

INTEL NUC NUC5CPYH
– Celeron N3050 @ 1.6GHz
– 8GB DDR3L
– 80GB internal 7200rpm 2.5″ SATA drive
– VGA (HDB15) & HDMI 1.4b
– 4 USB3 & SDXC
– Windows 10 Home License (ESD)

Full specs at:


Intel® NUC Kit NUC5CPYH

In good condition and all works as expected. It has a small internal fan, but CPU is only 6W so very quiet (almost silent). Sorry no box, just the NUC and PSU.

Looking for around £95 including delivery.

— moved to Ebay —
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= 4 =
Intel i7 nuc Skull Canyon,
32gb RAM
250GB V-Nand 970 EVO SSD

Warranty until September 2020 via
Warranty Information
Note that I have had a shuffle around as have three of these and now only require one, so two are for sale. The previously mentioned one with damaged screws I am keeping as it doesn’t bother me.

This one has no issues at all and comes with Windows 10 Pro installed (licensed via ESD). If you need to reload (using Microsoft’s media creation tool and a USB stick) it will re-licence when it connects to the internet.

Sold as just the NUC and Power Supply, sorry no box but will be very well packed.

For a complete technical specification please see:

Intel® NUC Kit NUC6i7KYK Product Specifications

£525 including P&P

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Price and currency: Various
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG or BT
Location: BRISTOL
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
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