Wanted – WFH SFF or Chromebox (budget)

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by IceAx, Apr 17, 2019.

  1. IceAx

    Active Member

    Joined:
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    Morning all

    Does anyone have a cheapie SFF or chromebox they are looking to shift for working from home.

    just needs to be able to run a browser with tabs open etc – would probably run linux on SFF.

    Thanks
    A

    Location: Warrington

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Announcing the Insider Dev Tour 2019! – Windows Developer Blog

Hello Friends!
Each year after Microsoft Build, we run a world-wide developer event to bring all the latest Microsoft 365 technology to you, in person.
Through the collaboration between the MVP (Most Valuable Professionals) and RD (Regional Directors) communities, Dev Collective, Windows, Office, Developer Tools, and the Insider Team, we’ve expanded the content this year to bring you even more developer awesomeness. More code. More demos. More useful knowledge.
You’ll enjoy an inside peek into some of tomorrow’s innovative dev tech, as well as practical information you can use today. Plus, you’ll gain valuable access to a peer network along with exposure to all-star devs from a wide range of tech disciplines.
Imagine new ways to build Microsoft 365 user experiences when the Insider Dev Tour comes to you this year. Just starting out? No worries, the tour is curated for everyone—from hobbyists to students to experts alike.
Agenda varies by location, but you can expect to find developer demo-focused practical sessions with topics such as:

Introduction to Microsoft Graph Services
Web Development with NodeJS and Microsoft Developer Tools
Embedded and IoT Solutions with Microsoft Windows IoT Core
Command Line / Terminal and Windows Subsystem for Linux
Coding your Future with the Windows Insider Program
Desktop Apps with the Microsoft Graph
UWP User Interfaces with the latest APIS and OSS libraries
Developing with the New Edge Browser
Desktop Apps with .NET Core
AI Platform / Machine Learning on Windows
Progressive Web Apps with the New Edge
NET Core 3.0
Build apps for Microsoft Teams with Microsoft Graph and Web Technology

The day will start, of course, with a great keynote that covers the best from Microsoft Build.
We’re rolling out locations over the next week. You may not see your city on the site on day 1, but they’re all coming. Here’s a list of some of the countries we’re running events in this year, in partnerships with the local communities:

Africa
Mauritius, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa

Asia / Pacific
Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan

Europe
Austria, Belgium, France, Italy, Germany, Netherlands, Portugal, Russia, Spain, St Petersburg, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom

North America
Canada (Toronto) and United States (Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New York, Texas, Utah, Washington DC)

South America
Brazil, Chile, Colombia

If your local city is not yet open for registration, be sure to check back next week and register!
Whether you’re interested in Microsoft Windows, Teams, Graph, Identity or IoT, the Insider Dev Tour has you covered. Interested in developing with the latest dev tools like VS Code, the Windows Subsystem for Linux, and Visual Studio? Yes. We have that. Web dev? We made sure you’re covered with content on JavaScript, Node, ASP.Net, and tools.
Find your local event and register now!
Thank you, and see you there!
Pete & Dona (@pete_brown, @donasarkar)
#InsiderDevTour
Updated May 16, 2019 10:25 am

How to add the App Compatibility Feature on Demand to Server Core

Microsoft’s App Compatibility Feature on Demand increases the number of applications that work with Server Core without adding the overhead costs, security risks or performance hits of a full Windows Server Desktop Experience.

A lack of application compatibility and management tools has prevented organizations from readily adopting Server Core. The App Compatibility Feature on Demand gives applications that depend on graphical components the binaries and packages they need to run on the minimal OS.

Before you start using the App Compatibility feature to bring greater functionality to Server Core, you must set up a Server Core deployment.

Why should you run Server Core?

Microsoft released the Server Core installation option with Windows Server 2008, and it persists today in Windows Server 2019. Server Core removes the Explorer GUI and uses a subset of the .NET Framework to increase the performance and security of the server. Servers with unnecessary features present a larger attack surface, and servers with less CPU and memory overhead can perform faster.

To ensure Server Core machines run as leanly as possible, you can use PowerShell to remove the underlying Windows server role and feature binaries from the server:

Get-WindowsFeature | Where-Object -FilterScript { $_.InstallState -eq 'Available' } | Remove-WindowsFeature -Remove

If you don’t know how to manage servers without a GUI, you will not be able to use Server Core. Server Core has a text-based local administrative interface that you invoke with sconfig from the shell prompt.

The Server Core local management utility
Sconfig is the Server Core local management utility.

Sconfig brings up a simple menu to perform basic server management, such as configuring TCP/IP or joining an Active Directory domain. You can manage remotely with PowerShell or use Windows Admin Center.

Windows Admin Center
Admins use the Windows Admin Center interface to manage servers.

Windows Admin Center combines the functionality from Server Manager and the old Microsoft Management Consoles in a lightweight, browser-based console. You cannot install Admin Center on domain controllers, and it doesn’t include every management capability.

You can also use Remote Server Administration Tools on Windows 10 management workstations to get the Microsoft Management Consoles and PowerShell modules required to manage Windows Server with Desktop Experience and Server Core remotely.

Which servers can run Server Core?

Unless you have a compelling business or application need, you should deploy all new servers in the Server Core configuration. For existing servers running in Desktop Experience mode, you have three choices: Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019.

Deploy the App Compatibility Feature on Demand to better adapt Windows Server 2019 Server Core deployments to their application workloads.

In Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019, you can only choose between Server Core and Desktop Experience during initial OS installation. Windows Server 2012 R2 gives you three UI experiences: Server with a full Explorer GUI, Minimal Server Interface and Server Core without GUI. In Windows Server 2012 R2, you can use the Install-WindowsFeature and Uninstall-WindowsFeature PowerShell cmdlets to switch among the different GUI layers. Microsoft removed that capability in Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019, which means you must get your server OS installations right the first time or reinstall.

Deploy the App Compatibility Feature on Demand to better adapt Windows Server 2019 Server Core deployments to their application workloads.

How to install App Compatibility Feature on Demand

Download the Windows Server 2019 Feature on Demand ISO image file from the Microsoft Evaluation Center or through your Visual Studio Online or Microsoft Developer Network web download portal.

Download the ISO file to a server — named adVM in this example — and share it in a directory named fodshare. From an elevated PowerShell console on Server Core box, run the following commands:

net use z: \dc-01fodshare
Mount-DiskImage -ImagePath Z:Windows_InsiderPreview_ServerCoreAppCompatibility_17709.iso
DISM /Online /Add-Capability /CapabilityName:"ServerCore.AppCompatibility~~~~0.0.1.0" /Source:Z: /LimitAccess
Restart-Computer -Force

The net use command mounted the file share on the local Server Core box. The Mount-DiskImage cmdlet mounted the ISO locally. The DISM (Deployment Image Servicing and Management) command extracted the App Compatibility packages and installed them.

If you want Internet Explorer 11 available on the server, then run the DISM command:

Dism /online /add-package:Z:"Microsoft-Windows-InternetExplorer-Optional-Package~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~.cab"

Restart the Server Core box to complete the configuration.

Feature on Demand accesses File Explorer and Performance Monitor on Server Core.
Feature on Demand limited GUI support on Server Core

If Server Core runs SQL Server, then you can run SQL Server Management Studio locally. Some GUI tools that run locally on Server Core with Features on Demand include Device Manager, Disk Management, Event Viewer, Failover Cluster Manager, File Explorer, Microsoft Management Console, Performance Monitor, Resource Monitor and Windows PowerShell.

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Author:

Wanted – WFH SFF or Chromebox (budget)

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by IceAx, Apr 17, 2019.

  1. IceAx

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Messages:
    2,384
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    Warrington
    Ratings:
    +155

    Morning all

    Does anyone have a cheapie SFF or chromebox they are looking to shift for working from home.

    just needs to be able to run a browser with tabs open etc – would probably run linux on SFF.

    Thanks
    A

    Location: Warrington

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Microsoft’s AI for Accessibility grant winners: ‘You want to be seen as the person you are’ – Stories

Dexter Ang and his mom sit together
Dexter Ang says it was his mother who inspired him to help develop a nerve-sensing wearable device that can be used to control digital devices. (Photo courtesy of Dexter Ang)

Every day, Dexter Ang was growing more frustrated as he watched his mother deal with the indignities of ALS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. She was diagnosed with it in 2014.

The progressive disease attacks nerve cells that control muscles throughout the body. Over time – for many, anywhere from a year to decades – it robs people of their ability to walk, to use their arms and hands, to talk and ultimately, to breathe independently.

Ang had been working in Chicago in the financial world of high-frequency trading before his mother was diagnosed. He decided to move to Boston to help take care of her. Over the course of a year, there were fewer activities she could do with her hands. Eventually, she couldn’t use utensils to eat. She couldn’t dress herself. And she couldn’t maneuver the mouse to use her laptop, which she relied on for reading e-books from the library.

“I asked her when the last time was that she had read a book, and she said six weeks — because she couldn’t click a mouse,” Ang says. “That just made me tremendously sad, because that was one of the only things that she could still enjoy, and that was just gone.”

Ang, a graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with a degree in mechanical engineering, spent months meeting with experts and poring over information about existing technologies to see if there were any that could help his mother.

“Ultimately, a lot of it was not useful — it was complicated and not well-designed,” he says. He credits his mother for inspiring him with a question she asked: What if a person could use their nerve signals to help control a mouse?

Ang wanted to learn more, returned to MIT as a graduate student and co-founded Pison Technology. The company, one of the AI for Accessibility grantees, is developing a nerve-sensing wearable, similar in appearance to a watch, to control digital devices using small, micro-movements of the hands and arms.

“Our proprietary technology can sense nerve signals on the surface of the skin,” Ang says. “Our machine-learning algorithms can classify those voltage signals into discernable actions,” such as simulating a mouse click to help interact with a computer.

In 2016, the ALS Association awarded an ALS Assistive Technology prize to Ang and Pison co-founder David Cipoletta.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 18894 available now! – Windows Developer Blog

Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 18894 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 18894 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.
The Preview SDK can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.
For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum. For new developer feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice.

This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017 and 2019. You can install this SDK and still also continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 build 1903 or earlier to the Microsoft Store.
The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download the Visual Studio 2019 here.
This build of the Windows SDK will install ONLY on Windows 10 Insider Preview builds.
In order to assist with script access to the SDK, the ISO will also be able to be accessed through the following static URL: https://software-download.microsoft.com/download/sg/Windows_InsiderPreview_SDK_en-us_18894_1.iso.

Message Compiler (mc.exe)

Now detects the Unicode byte order mark (BOM) in .mc files. If the .mc file starts with a UTF-8 BOM, it will be read as a UTF-8 file. Otherwise, if it starts with a UTF-16LE BOM, it will be read as a UTF-16LE file. If the -u parameter was specified, it will be read as a UTF-16LE file. Otherwise, it will be read using the current code page (CP_ACP).
Now avoids one-definition-rule (ODR) problems in MC-generated C/C++ ETW helpers caused by conflicting configuration macros (e.g. when two .cpp files with conflicting definitions of MCGEN_EVENTWRITETRANSFER are linked into the same binary, the MC-generated ETW helpers will now respect the definition of MCGEN_EVENTWRITETRANSFER in each .cpp file instead of arbitrarily picking one or the other).

Windows Trace Preprocessor (tracewpp.exe)

Now supports Unicode input (.ini, .tpl, and source code) files. Input files starting with a UTF-8 or UTF-16 byte order mark (BOM) will be read as Unicode. Input files that do not start with a BOM will be read using the current code page (CP_ACP). For backwards-compatibility, if the -UnicodeIgnore command-line parameter is specified, files starting with a UTF-16 BOM will be treated as empty.
Now supports Unicode output (.tmh) files. By default, output files will be encoded using the current code page (CP_ACP). Use command-line parameters -cp:UTF-8 or -cp:UTF-16 to generate Unicode output files.
Behavior change: tracewpp now converts all input text to Unicode, performs processing in Unicode, and converts output text to the specified output encoding. Earlier versions of tracewpp avoided Unicode conversions and performed text processing assuming a single-byte character set. This may lead to behavior changes in cases where the input files do not conform to the current code page. In cases where this is a problem, consider converting the input files to UTF-8 (with BOM) and/or using the -cp:UTF-8 command-line parameter to avoid encoding ambiguity.

TraceLoggingProvider.h

Now avoids one-definition-rule (ODR) problems caused by conflicting configuration macros (e.g. when two .cpp files with conflicting definitions of TLG_EVENT_WRITE_TRANSFER are linked into the same binary, the TraceLoggingProvider.h helpers will now respect the definition of TLG_EVENT_WRITE_TRANSFER in each .cpp file instead of arbitrarily picking one or the other).
In C++ code, the TraceLoggingWrite macro has been updated to enable better code sharing between similar events using variadic templates.

Removal of IRPROPS.LIB
In this release irprops.lib has been removed from the Windows SDK. Apps that were linking against irprops.lib can switch to bthprops.lib as a drop-in replacement.

The following APIs have been added to the platform since the release of Windows 10 SDK, version 1903, build 18362.
Additions:

namespace Windows.Foundation.Metadata {
public sealed class AttributeNameAttribute : Attribute
public sealed class FastAbiAttribute : Attribute
public sealed class NoExceptionAttribute : Attribute
}
namespace Windows.Graphics.Capture {
public sealed class GraphicsCaptureSession : IClosable {
bool IsCursorCaptureEnabled { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Management.Deployment {
public enum DeploymentOptions : uint {
AttachPackage = (uint)4194304,
}
}
namespace Windows.Networking.BackgroundTransfer {
public sealed class DownloadOperation : IBackgroundTransferOperation, IBackgroundTransferOperationPriority {
void RemoveRequestHeader(string headerName);
void SetRequestHeader(string headerName, string headerValue);
}
public sealed class UploadOperation : IBackgroundTransferOperation, IBackgroundTransferOperationPriority {
void RemoveRequestHeader(string headerName);
void SetRequestHeader(string headerName, string headerValue);
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition.Particles {
public sealed class ParticleAttractor : CompositionObject
public sealed class ParticleAttractorCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable, IVector
public class ParticleBaseBehavior : CompositionObject
public sealed class ParticleBehaviors : CompositionObject
public sealed class ParticleColorBehavior : ParticleBaseBehavior
public struct ParticleColorBinding
public sealed class ParticleColorBindingCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable, IMap
public enum ParticleEmitFrom
public sealed class ParticleEmitterVisual : ContainerVisual
public sealed class ParticleGenerator : CompositionObject
public enum ParticleInputSource
public enum ParticleReferenceFrame
public sealed class ParticleScalarBehavior : ParticleBaseBehavior
public struct ParticleScalarBinding
public sealed class ParticleScalarBindingCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable, IMap
public enum ParticleSortMode
public sealed class ParticleVector2Behavior : ParticleBaseBehavior
public struct ParticleVector2Binding
public sealed class ParticleVector2BindingCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable, IMap
public sealed class ParticleVector3Behavior : ParticleBaseBehavior
public struct ParticleVector3Binding
public sealed class ParticleVector3BindingCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable, IMap
public sealed class ParticleVector4Behavior : ParticleBaseBehavior
public struct ParticleVector4Binding
public sealed class ParticleVector4BindingCollection : CompositionObject, IIterable, IMap
}
namespace Windows.UI.ViewManagement {
public enum ApplicationViewMode {
Spanning = 2,
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.WindowManagement {
public enum AppWindowPresentationKind {
Spanning = 4,
}
public sealed class SpanningPresentationConfiguration : AppWindowPresentationConfiguration
}