Noise-cancelling headphones, smart glasses: how technology is making museums more accessible | Microsoft On The Issues

Museums are places for people to immerse themselves in culture, as well as learn, create, share and interact.

Being accessible — designed for everyone — is one way museums can maximize that role, and a growing number are working hard to do just that to serve the more than  one billion people worldwide experience some form of disability.

Here is how technology is helping museums get closer to the communities they serve.

Noise-cancelling headphones

We don’t all experience the world in the same way — everyone is different. People with autism, for example, may find certain situations cause a sensory overload.

New York’s Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum offers noise-cancelling headphones for people who might have auditory over-stimulation. This museum also helps parents of children with sensory processing disabilities plan their visits by emailing them images and illustrations in advance.

Museums in Chicago (including the Shedd Aquarium, the Field Museum and the Chicago Children’s Museum) also help visitors plan their trips through an app that highlights exhibitions that are sensory friendly.

[Subscribe to Microsoft On The Issues for more on the topics that matter most.]

Audio descriptions

Statue and El Prado Museum

Tactile displays and audio descriptions can help bring museum experiences to life.

The Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C., are giving visitors who are blind or with low vision a rich and rewarding experience through their smartphones or smart glasses. Using a video-streaming service, users are connected to an “agent” who provides a bespoke, detailed description of their surroundings.

The use of Braille descriptions has become increasingly common in museums around the world, and one Spanish institution has improved upon that. Madrid’s Prado Museum has made parts of its collection tactile, allowing visitors to be hands-on with the exhibitions.

The Louvre in Paris, and the Guggenheim Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, have all established tactile tours, where visitors can touch the art on display or touch casts of well-known works.

Hearing loops

Field Museum of Natural History

Tools such as hearing loops — also known as audio induction loops — use wireless signals to transmit audio directly to someone’s hearing aid and can be used in a variety of settings, including museum exhibitions. The Met in New York is just one example of this.

Another New York museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, has been trying something different. It has developed a series of vlogs, or video blogs, with messages, explanations and exhibition information in sign language.

As well as opening up the museum’s content to visitors with hearing loss and deafness, the museum, on its website, says it hopes to “create a communications laboratory to expand the ASL vocabulary of contemporary art terms,” referring to American Sign Language.

The Dutch Rijksmuseum believes everyone should be able to access information on the art in their own language. It recently launched a video tour in Dutch Sign Language integrated in its app. The tour has been set up in close collaboration with and by deaf entrepreneurs.

Immersive experiences

Rocket Garden at Kennedy Space Center

A few years ago, the Pokémon Go craze took off, introducing many people to the possibilities of augmented reality. By creating immersive experiences, AR and other technology is being used to reimagine the way visitors relate to museums and historic sites.

You can take an AR tour of Pompeii, where a headset will put you right in the heart of the vibrant Roman city that was destroyed by the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.

Visitors to Bone Hall, in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., meanwhile, can use AR to view the exhibits in a new light seeing the skeletons appear as living creatures.

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles is using technology to bring cars from Hollywood alive with a mixed reality exhibition using Microsoft’s HoloLens technology. The “Worlds Reimagined” experience explores classic and futuristic cars from films and video games, including “Back to the Future” and the video game franchise “Halo.”

Other museums are using this technology to bring new experiences to their patrons including the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York with “Defying Gravity”; and the Museum of Flight’s mobile VR experiences in Washington state. The Musée des Plans-Reliefs in Paris used AI to create a digital twin of the historic Mont-Saint- Michel, which had to be captured from every angle.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy captured the Space Race zeitgeist, when he said: “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” The Kennedy Space Center in Florida uses immersive technologies to recapture that energy, excitement and enthusiasm. At its “Heroes & Legends” exhibition, visitors can experience spacewalks, look inside space capsules and feel close to the action.

By bringing the past to life in a way that adds richness and depth, and, of course, accessibility, technology is helping museums reach a wider audience.

For more on these innovations and on accessibility initiatives at Microsoft, visit microsoft.com/en-us/accessibility and follow @MSFTIssues

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Field Nation One aims for better employee management

In an effort to simplify the management of a blended workforce, Field Nation has launched Field Nation One — a single platform for onboarding and organizing talent, managing project workflow and reporting.

According to Field Nation, 80% of companies use a mix of W-2 employees, contractors and vendors to complete work, which it claims leads businesses to spend too much time managing employees. Field Nation One was created to help businesses organize and recruit workers, expand coverage, manage projects, receive real-time updates and schedule W-2 employees.

Field Nation One enables users to group different types of workers into talent pools based on skill, location or experience. That way, projects can be routed to the appropriate worker to fill coverage gaps.

Additionally, Field Nation One users have access to the Field Nation Marketplace, allowing them to browse and recruit workers to build talent pools and provide a custom onboarding process for each worker. Using Field Nation Marketplace, Field Nation claims One users can expand talent pools further by recruiting workers in different markets.

LinkedIn uses an applicant tracking system called Talent Hub that works similarly. It can be used to source, hire and manage a talent pool.

The platform consists of programs to create and route a project, assign a worker, process payments and analyze end results. According to Field Nation, using a single integrated system decreases overhead costs.

There is also a mobile app available with One, which allows businesses to manage project workflow by receiving real-time updates when technicians arrive at a location and provide a service.

The One platform also allows businesses to access all W-2 employee schedules and apply filters, such as background checks, location and type of work, and then use that information to create and assign a work order in the calendar.

SAP SuccessFactors is another complete human capital management suite. It provides software for core HR responsibilities such as payroll and benefits, in addition to software for recruiting, onboarding, performance/goals management, succession and development planning, workforce analytics, and reporting and workforce planning.

Field Nation One is available now.

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For Sale – Custom Loop RGB Watercooled Gaming PC Intel Core i7 16GB GTX 1080 1TB SSD

Custom Water Cooled Gaming PC

Built by myself around a year ago.
My goal when building this was to have top-notch gaming performance with the best possible thermals and acoustics in a compact chassis. The case is one of the smallest Micro ATX chassis’ on the market. The custom loop keeps everything cool and quiet.
This PC has never been overclocked, there was simply never a need to.
This PC can handle any game you throw at it while remaining cool and quiet.

The specs are:
InWin 301 Case
Intel Core i7 4790k
MSI Nvidia Gefore GTX 1080 OC
960GB Kingston SSD
650W Corsair Power Supply
MSI Z97M-G43 Motherboard
Thermaltake CPU Block
Alphacool GPU Block Custom painted in white
2x 240mm radiators
DDC Pump with an actual glass reservoir
Countless fittings
Aigo RGB remote controlled fans
NZXT Grip+ v2 fan controller(the fans can be controlled via Windows software and are preset for optimal noise/performance)
Genuine Windows 10 Home installed

This item is collection only due to the liquid cooling, however if you’re an experienced PC builder/modder i might agree to ship this drained for you to fill.

If you have any questions at all please get in touch.

This sale is for the PC ONLY! No accessories are included.

Price and currency: 1000
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: BT or cash
Location: Warrington
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Noise-cancelling headphones, smart glasses: how technology is making museums more accessible | Microsoft On The Issues

Museums are places for people to immerse themselves in culture, as well as learn, create, share and interact.

Being accessible — designed for everyone — is one way museums can maximize that role, and a growing number are working hard to do just that to serve the more than  one billion people worldwide experience some form of disability.

Here is how technology is helping museums get closer to the communities they serve.

Noise-cancelling headphones

We don’t all experience the world in the same way — everyone is different. People with autism, for example, may find certain situations cause a sensory overload.

New York’s Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum offers noise-cancelling headphones for people who might have auditory over-stimulation. This museum also helps parents of children with sensory processing disabilities plan their visits by emailing them images and illustrations in advance.

Museums in Chicago (including the Shedd Aquarium, the Field Museum and the Chicago Children’s Museum) also help visitors plan their trips through an app that highlights exhibitions that are sensory friendly.

[Subscribe to Microsoft On The Issues for more on the topics that matter most.]

Audio descriptions

Statue and El Prado Museum

Tactile displays and audio descriptions can help bring museum experiences to life.

The Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C., are giving visitors who are blind or with low vision a rich and rewarding experience through their smartphones or smart glasses. Using a video-streaming service, users are connected to an “agent” who provides a bespoke, detailed description of their surroundings.

The use of Braille descriptions has become increasingly common in museums around the world, and one Spanish institution has improved upon that. Madrid’s Prado Museum has made parts of its collection tactile, allowing visitors to be hands-on with the exhibitions.

The Louvre in Paris, and the Guggenheim Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, have all established tactile tours, where visitors can touch the art on display or touch casts of well-known works.

Hearing loops

Field Museum of Natural History

Tools such as hearing loops — also known as audio induction loops — use wireless signals to transmit audio directly to someone’s hearing aid and can be used in a variety of settings, including museum exhibitions. The Met in New York is just one example of this.

Another New York museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, has been trying something different. It has developed a series of vlogs, or video blogs, with messages, explanations and exhibition information in sign language.

As well as opening up the museum’s content to visitors with hearing loss and deafness, the museum, on its website, says it hopes to “create a communications laboratory to expand the ASL vocabulary of contemporary art terms,” referring to American Sign Language.

The Dutch Rijksmuseum believes everyone should be able to access information on the art in their own language. It recently launched a video tour in Dutch Sign Language integrated in its app. The tour has been set up in close collaboration with and by deaf entrepreneurs.

Immersive experiences

Rocket Garden at Kennedy Space Center

A few years ago, the Pokémon Go craze took off, introducing many people to the possibilities of augmented reality. By creating immersive experiences, AR and other technology is being used to reimagine the way visitors relate to museums and historic sites.

You can take an AR tour of Pompeii, where a headset will put you right in the heart of the vibrant Roman city that was destroyed by the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.

Visitors to Bone Hall, in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., meanwhile, can use AR to view the exhibits in a new light seeing the skeletons appear as living creatures.

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles is using technology to bring cars from Hollywood alive with a mixed reality exhibition using Microsoft’s HoloLens technology. The “Worlds Reimagined” experience explores classic and futuristic cars from films and video games, including “Back to the Future” and the video game franchise “Halo.”

Other museums are using this technology to bring new experiences to their patrons including the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York with “Defying Gravity”; and the Museum of Flight’s mobile VR experiences in Washington state. The Musée des Plans-Reliefs in Paris used AI to create a digital twin of the historic Mont-Saint- Michel, which had to be captured from every angle.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy captured the Space Race zeitgeist, when he said: “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” The Kennedy Space Center in Florida uses immersive technologies to recapture that energy, excitement and enthusiasm. At its “Heroes & Legends” exhibition, visitors can experience spacewalks, look inside space capsules and feel close to the action.

By bringing the past to life in a way that adds richness and depth, and, of course, accessibility, technology is helping museums reach a wider audience.

For more on these innovations and on accessibility initiatives at Microsoft, visit microsoft.com/en-us/accessibility and follow @MSFTIssues

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Plattner: Cloud is the way forward for S/4HANA systems

At Sapphire Now 2019, SAP committed to the public cloud and announced HANA Cloud Services, which is aimed at making the SAP HANA database more accessible and affordable. The message from SAP was clear: Companies need more flexibility than on-premises systems offer, and S/4HANA systems will now provide that kind of flexibility. Another major theme of this year’s conference is that companies need to understand how their customers feel about products if they are going to thrive in the “experience economy.”

In a wide-ranging interview, SAP co-founder Hasso Plattner discussed the state of the company, its ever-expanding product lines and why cloud is crucial to the company going forward. In the first part of a two-part Q&A, he detailed the evolution of the SAP HANA database and how it’s now positioned as a generic database for applications other than SAP’s.

Here, he discusses why the cloud is the best environment for the future growth for S/4HANA systems and the role that Qualtrics will play in helping the company develop better products. He also tells why the recent SAP restructuring that included layoffs and executive changes makes the company more dynamic.

Editor’s note: This interview was edited for length and clarity.

Are you satisfied with the growth of SAP S/4HANA systems, particularly the cloud version?

Hasso Plattner Hasso Plattner

Hasso Plattner: There are 3,500 productive S/4HANA systems now and something like 10,000 contracts, mainly on premises. Despite all of the advantages of the cloud and everybody talking about the cloud, [many companies] around the world are still on premises because they have trust issues. We have done the same combing of the public cloud version of S/4HANA that we did now for HANA Cloud Services [SAP HANA database]. We have scratched functions that we don’t believe will be necessary for the next 10 years.

What are some of the differences between S/4HANA Cloud and the on-premises versions?

Plattner: Functionality in Materials Management has changed. S/4HANA in the public cloud will be the most modern system and the lead system from now on for all development. If we do something new, we’ll do it there first and then it will drip down to the on-premises systems. The on-premises systems will be there five years from now. How many I don’t know.

The cloud is totally superior because we can permanently update the system and we get feedback from the customers. It’s set up for faster development, more precise development and more market relevant development, so the development will be much better. We have built some new products, including SAP Data Warehouse Cloud and HANA Cloud Services, and we have a development speed that we haven’t had since the 1990s.

How can Qualtrics help SAP understand its customers better?

Plattner: We get feedback from customers every day, but with Qualtrics, we want to [work on that]. We have currently 82 feedback opportunities identified and work on three or four of them. That’s 82 possible feedbacks we can gather with regards to products, to services and to our maintenance habits. And guess what? Software companies like us don’t like feedback. Developers don’t like to look in the mirror. I always suffered from that.

But I read blogs, and I read your comments even if I don’t like them and check whatever the truth is. The truth is hard to digest for everybody, and if you have Qualtrics as a means to get anonymous feedback, we need this. We need this up to the top to [SAP CEO] Bill McDermott and down to the people who build the systems far underneath the development managers, that they have a feeling.

Can you provide an example of how knowing your customers’ feelings about products is critical to a company’s success?

Plattner: In the first 10 years of SAP, because we did development, sales and service in one person, I did all three of those. So everybody I had in development also installed systems, and some of us tried to sell systems, which gave us feedback automatically. But when you sit behind sales, presales and product management deep in some development organization, you have no real empathy for the customer because you don’t know the customer.

I personally told the German automotive companies that if they want to sell in America, they needed coffee holders. And guess what? Porsche denied that it needed coffee holders until the very last minute; they denied that they had to make changes to the Porsche 911 so women can drive it. There were things in the Porsche that were not good for females. The door handles broke fingernails. The clutch was too hard because it was poorly designed. Their answer? Porsche is for men! I told them then you will have problems in America with just men. One year later, they were nearly bankrupt, but they brought in engineers from Toyota who found these shortcomings instantly.

Today, I think it’s 30% are women buying Porsches in America. So I promise that, if it’s the last thing I do at SAP, it’s that we become a listening company — and Qualtrics is the means for that.

Why was the recent SAP restructuring done, which included layoffs and executive changes?

Plattner: We are very happy with what we did and how we did it, but you can’t do it perfectly. For example, in Germany, we asked people if they wanted to take a package and made it attractive so they’d say ‘OK.’ We had to make this offer to everybody, even the ones we wanted to keep because they have to have the privilege to say ‘No’ to the offer. So we lost people that we didn’t want to lose because they took the package. We reduced the workforce to close to 5%, and there are disgruntled people. You can’t avoid that. But we now have significant capacity to hire people. I can tell you that, in our development organization, the dynamic is completely different.

Executive editor David Essex contributed to this report.

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Author:

For Sale – Custom Loop RGB Watercooled Gaming PC Intel Core i7 16GB GTX 1080 1TB SSD

Custom Water Cooled Gaming PC

Built by myself around a year ago.
My goal when building this was to have top-notch gaming performance with the best possible thermals and acoustics in a compact chassis. The case is one of the smallest Micro ATX chassis’ on the market. The custom loop keeps everything cool and quiet.
This PC has never been overclocked, there was simply never a need to.
This PC can handle any game you throw at it while remaining cool and quiet.

The specs are:
InWin 301 Case
Intel Core i7 4790k
MSI Nvidia Gefore GTX 1080 OC
960GB Kingston SSD
650W Corsair Power Supply
MSI Z97M-G43 Motherboard
Thermaltake CPU Block
Alphacool GPU Block Custom painted in white
2x 240mm radiators
DDC Pump with an actual glass reservoir
Countless fittings
Aigo RGB remote controlled fans
NZXT Grip+ v2 fan controller(the fans can be controlled via Windows software and are preset for optimal noise/performance)
Genuine Windows 10 Home installed

This item is collection only due to the liquid cooling, however if you’re an experienced PC builder/modder i might agree to ship this drained for you to fill.

If you have any questions at all please get in touch.

This sale is for the PC ONLY! No accessories are included.

Price and currency: 1000
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: BT or cash
Location: Warrington
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Go to Original Article
Author: