Noise-cancelling headphones, smart glasses: how technology is making museums more accessible | Microsoft On The Issues

Museums are places for people to immerse themselves in culture, as well as learn, create, share and interact.

Being accessible — designed for everyone — is one way museums can maximize that role, and a growing number are working hard to do just that to serve the more than  one billion people worldwide experience some form of disability.

Here is how technology is helping museums get closer to the communities they serve.

Noise-cancelling headphones

We don’t all experience the world in the same way — everyone is different. People with autism, for example, may find certain situations cause a sensory overload.

New York’s Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum offers noise-cancelling headphones for people who might have auditory over-stimulation. This museum also helps parents of children with sensory processing disabilities plan their visits by emailing them images and illustrations in advance.

Museums in Chicago (including the Shedd Aquarium, the Field Museum and the Chicago Children’s Museum) also help visitors plan their trips through an app that highlights exhibitions that are sensory friendly.

[Subscribe to Microsoft On The Issues for more on the topics that matter most.]

Audio descriptions

Statue and El Prado Museum

Tactile displays and audio descriptions can help bring museum experiences to life.

The Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C., are giving visitors who are blind or with low vision a rich and rewarding experience through their smartphones or smart glasses. Using a video-streaming service, users are connected to an “agent” who provides a bespoke, detailed description of their surroundings.

The use of Braille descriptions has become increasingly common in museums around the world, and one Spanish institution has improved upon that. Madrid’s Prado Museum has made parts of its collection tactile, allowing visitors to be hands-on with the exhibitions.

The Louvre in Paris, and the Guggenheim Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, have all established tactile tours, where visitors can touch the art on display or touch casts of well-known works.

Hearing loops

Field Museum of Natural History

Tools such as hearing loops — also known as audio induction loops — use wireless signals to transmit audio directly to someone’s hearing aid and can be used in a variety of settings, including museum exhibitions. The Met in New York is just one example of this.

Another New York museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, has been trying something different. It has developed a series of vlogs, or video blogs, with messages, explanations and exhibition information in sign language.

As well as opening up the museum’s content to visitors with hearing loss and deafness, the museum, on its website, says it hopes to “create a communications laboratory to expand the ASL vocabulary of contemporary art terms,” referring to American Sign Language.

The Dutch Rijksmuseum believes everyone should be able to access information on the art in their own language. It recently launched a video tour in Dutch Sign Language integrated in its app. The tour has been set up in close collaboration with and by deaf entrepreneurs.

Immersive experiences

Rocket Garden at Kennedy Space Center

A few years ago, the Pokémon Go craze took off, introducing many people to the possibilities of augmented reality. By creating immersive experiences, AR and other technology is being used to reimagine the way visitors relate to museums and historic sites.

You can take an AR tour of Pompeii, where a headset will put you right in the heart of the vibrant Roman city that was destroyed by the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.

Visitors to Bone Hall, in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., meanwhile, can use AR to view the exhibits in a new light seeing the skeletons appear as living creatures.

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles is using technology to bring cars from Hollywood alive with a mixed reality exhibition using Microsoft’s HoloLens technology. The “Worlds Reimagined” experience explores classic and futuristic cars from films and video games, including “Back to the Future” and the video game franchise “Halo.”

Other museums are using this technology to bring new experiences to their patrons including the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York with “Defying Gravity”; and the Museum of Flight’s mobile VR experiences in Washington state. The Musée des Plans-Reliefs in Paris used AI to create a digital twin of the historic Mont-Saint- Michel, which had to be captured from every angle.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy captured the Space Race zeitgeist, when he said: “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” The Kennedy Space Center in Florida uses immersive technologies to recapture that energy, excitement and enthusiasm. At its “Heroes & Legends” exhibition, visitors can experience spacewalks, look inside space capsules and feel close to the action.

By bringing the past to life in a way that adds richness and depth, and, of course, accessibility, technology is helping museums reach a wider audience.

For more on these innovations and on accessibility initiatives at Microsoft, visit microsoft.com/en-us/accessibility and follow @MSFTIssues

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Author: Microsoft News Center

New Salesforce FoundationConnect designed for grantmakers

Salesforce.org has announced FoundationConnect, a grants management system designed to ease the management of the philanthropic lifecycle.

Nonprofits and grantmakers are generally slowed down using antiquated processes, according to Salesforce.org, which is the philanthropic arm of the Salesforce. It claims that 13% of every grant is used to administer the grant.

In an attempt to remedy this, Salesforce.org has introduced FoundationConnect, a CRM platform that includes an application and grantee portal; reviewer portal; grant awards and management; report tracking; outcomes measurement; and payment and budget tracking.

The application and grantee portal allows grantseekers to look for and apply to new grants, communicate with foundation staff and submit status reports. The reviewer portal allows outside reviewers to access applications and provide feedback. Staff can also monitor progress and identify conflicts of interest while using Salesforce FoundationConnect.

The grant awards and management system gives grantmakers a one-stop place to streamline grants management processes and manage relationships with board members, reviewers, applicants, grantees and partners.

In report tracking, grantmakers can monitor scheduled grantee status reports and review reports in real time as soon as they’re reported. Teams can also collaborate on expected outcomes, track outputs and report on portfolio performance in the outcomes measurement system.

Additionally, the payment and budget tracking section enables users to set up payment schedules and monitor an organization’s grants and program budgets.  

Users can also use Salesforce FoundationConnect to integrate with email tools such as Gmail, Outlook or Office 365. That allows users to view and work in Salesforce in the same screen as their inbox.

FoundationConnect falls under the umbrella of Salesforce.org’s Nonprofit Cloud. The Nonprofit Cloud was designed specifically for nonprofits to enable them to gain a complete view of constituents, track and measure impact in real time, raise more resources by unlocking donor data and give constituents a personalized experience. It also gives nonprofits access to the Salesforce CRM at a discounted price.

FoundationConnect is available now.

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For Sale – Intel NUC DN2820FYKH with 300Gb Drive, 4Gb Ram and Licenced Windows 10

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by lscolman, Apr 26, 2019.

  1. lscolman

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    Hi,

    For sale an Intel NUC. Cracking machine, that can be mounted on a wall mount or the back of a monitor. Supplied with original packaging and all original supplied accessories.

    Spec’s are here

    Intel® NUC Kit DN2820FYKH Product Specifications

    Cheers, Lee

    Price and currency: 110
    Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
    Payment method: Bank Transfer, Paypal or Cash on Collection
    Location: Sunderland, North East England
    Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Noise-cancelling headphones, smart glasses: how technology is making museums more accessible | Microsoft On The Issues

Museums are places for people to immerse themselves in culture, as well as learn, create, share and interact.

Being accessible — designed for everyone — is one way museums can maximize that role, and a growing number are working hard to do just that to serve the more than  one billion people worldwide experience some form of disability.

Here is how technology is helping museums get closer to the communities they serve.

Noise-cancelling headphones

We don’t all experience the world in the same way — everyone is different. People with autism, for example, may find certain situations cause a sensory overload.

New York’s Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum offers noise-cancelling headphones for people who might have auditory over-stimulation. This museum also helps parents of children with sensory processing disabilities plan their visits by emailing them images and illustrations in advance.

Museums in Chicago (including the Shedd Aquarium, the Field Museum and the Chicago Children’s Museum) also help visitors plan their trips through an app that highlights exhibitions that are sensory friendly.

[Subscribe to Microsoft On The Issues for more on the topics that matter most.]

Audio descriptions

Statue and El Prado Museum

Tactile displays and audio descriptions can help bring museum experiences to life.

The Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C., are giving visitors who are blind or with low vision a rich and rewarding experience through their smartphones or smart glasses. Using a video-streaming service, users are connected to an “agent” who provides a bespoke, detailed description of their surroundings.

The use of Braille descriptions has become increasingly common in museums around the world, and one Spanish institution has improved upon that. Madrid’s Prado Museum has made parts of its collection tactile, allowing visitors to be hands-on with the exhibitions.

The Louvre in Paris, and the Guggenheim Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, have all established tactile tours, where visitors can touch the art on display or touch casts of well-known works.

Hearing loops

Field Museum of Natural History

Tools such as hearing loops — also known as audio induction loops — use wireless signals to transmit audio directly to someone’s hearing aid and can be used in a variety of settings, including museum exhibitions. The Met in New York is just one example of this.

Another New York museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, has been trying something different. It has developed a series of vlogs, or video blogs, with messages, explanations and exhibition information in sign language.

As well as opening up the museum’s content to visitors with hearing loss and deafness, the museum, on its website, says it hopes to “create a communications laboratory to expand the ASL vocabulary of contemporary art terms,” referring to American Sign Language.

The Dutch Rijksmuseum believes everyone should be able to access information on the art in their own language. It recently launched a video tour in Dutch Sign Language integrated in its app. The tour has been set up in close collaboration with and by deaf entrepreneurs.

Immersive experiences

Rocket Garden at Kennedy Space Center

A few years ago, the Pokémon Go craze took off, introducing many people to the possibilities of augmented reality. By creating immersive experiences, AR and other technology is being used to reimagine the way visitors relate to museums and historic sites.

You can take an AR tour of Pompeii, where a headset will put you right in the heart of the vibrant Roman city that was destroyed by the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.

Visitors to Bone Hall, in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., meanwhile, can use AR to view the exhibits in a new light seeing the skeletons appear as living creatures.

The Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles is using technology to bring cars from Hollywood alive with a mixed reality exhibition using Microsoft’s HoloLens technology. The “Worlds Reimagined” experience explores classic and futuristic cars from films and video games, including “Back to the Future” and the video game franchise “Halo.”

Other museums are using this technology to bring new experiences to their patrons including the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York with “Defying Gravity”; and the Museum of Flight’s mobile VR experiences in Washington state. The Musée des Plans-Reliefs in Paris used AI to create a digital twin of the historic Mont-Saint- Michel, which had to be captured from every angle.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy captured the Space Race zeitgeist, when he said: “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.” The Kennedy Space Center in Florida uses immersive technologies to recapture that energy, excitement and enthusiasm. At its “Heroes & Legends” exhibition, visitors can experience spacewalks, look inside space capsules and feel close to the action.

By bringing the past to life in a way that adds richness and depth, and, of course, accessibility, technology is helping museums reach a wider audience.

For more on these innovations and on accessibility initiatives at Microsoft, visit microsoft.com/en-us/accessibility and follow @MSFTIssues

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Zoom Phone adds support for third-party calling services

Businesses can now connect third-party calling services to Zoom Phone, the cloud PBX offering the video conferencing provider launched earlier this year. Zoom also this week certified additional desk phones for the product and announced its imminent launch in the United Kingdom and Australia.

Zoom Phone’s new bring-your-own-carrier option will let businesses test the cloud service without giving up management of phone numbers or abandoning investments in Session Initiation Protocol trunks and other calling infrastructure, said Irwin Lazar, analyst at Nemertes Research, based in Mokena, Ill.

The setup will also allow businesses to use advanced services that are only usually available from telecommunication service providers, such as virtual remote numbers and toll-free messaging, Lazar said. Plus, it’s usually cheaper to buy access to the public switched telephone network (PSTN) from a telco than from a unified-communications-as-a-service (UCaaS) vendor.

Microsoft Teams, which competes with Zoom in the video conferencing and collaboration market, supports a similar bring-your-own-carrier feature, called direct routing.

“Zoom’s launch of a third-party telephony [and] SIP trunking option is a clever move,” said Elka Popova, analyst at Frost & Sullivan. “Many businesses have existing telco relationships and can get better deals on calling plans from their current providers.”

Zoom has expanded its new PBX service significantly since launching the product in January. Most recently, the vendor integrated the product with contact center platforms from Twilio and Five9 and with customer relationship management vendor Salesforce.

Zoom Phone added support for desk phones from Yealink and Poly in March, and the vendor certified 10 additional devices from those vendors this week. More than 50 desk phones from the two vendors are now compatible with the Zoom product.

Zoom Phone will launch in beta in the United Kingdom and Australia on May 19, its first expansion beyond North America. The vendor said it expected to make the product generally available in those countries this summer.

Zoom, RingCentral extend partnership

Screenshot of Zoom Phone
Zoom Phone comes with desktop and mobile clients, and it works with desk phones from Yealink and Poly.

Zoom’s continued expansion of its cloud PBX offering has fueled speculation that it is looking to become a full-fledged UCaaS provider — a move that would bring it into competition with longtime partner RingCentral.

Last month, however, Zoom and RingCentral announced a multiyear extension of their partnership to bundle access to  Zoom’s video conferencing and RingCentral’s cloud PBX service.

“Zoom and [RingCentral] just announced an expanded partnership, so I don’t expect Zoom to try and become a full-fledged UCaaS provider,” Lazar said. “I think their service will still primarily be aimed at SMBs or companies with simple calling needs.”

Demand for traditional PSTN calling appears to be on the decline, as cloud meeting platforms such as Zoom and Cisco Webex have increasingly become the preferred method of communication for many organizations, Lazar said.

Zoom Phone is available only to businesses already subscribed to the vendor’s flagship video conferencing product.

“We can only speculate what Zoom’s future plans are,” Popova said. “In my opinion, it will make sense for them to eventually also offer UCaaS as a stand-alone option and/or lead with UCaaS, rather than offer it as an add-on to the video services.”

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For Sale – Custom Loop RGB Watercooled Gaming PC Intel Core i7 16GB GTX 1080 1TB SSD

Custom Water Cooled Gaming PC

Built by myself around a year ago.
My goal when building this was to have top-notch gaming performance with the best possible thermals and acoustics in a compact chassis. The case is one of the smallest Micro ATX chassis’ on the market. The custom loop keeps everything cool and quiet.
This PC has never been overclocked, there was simply never a need to.
This PC can handle any game you throw at it while remaining cool and quiet.

The specs are:
InWin 301 Case
Intel Core i7 4790k
MSI Nvidia Gefore GTX 1080 OC
960GB Kingston SSD
650W Corsair Power Supply
MSI Z97M-G43 Motherboard
Thermaltake CPU Block
Alphacool GPU Block Custom painted in white
2x 240mm radiators
DDC Pump with an actual glass reservoir
Countless fittings
Aigo RGB remote controlled fans
NZXT Grip+ v2 fan controller(the fans can be controlled via Windows software and are preset for optimal noise/performance)
Genuine Windows 10 Home installed

This item is collection only due to the liquid cooling, however if you’re an experienced PC builder/modder i might agree to ship this drained for you to fill.

If you have any questions at all please get in touch.

This sale is for the PC ONLY! No accessories are included.

Price and currency: 1000
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: BT or cash
Location: Warrington
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Author: