Working together to bring broadband to rural Veterans – Microsoft on the Issues

Our nation’s Veterans have contributed to our country in so many ways, in countless locations around the globe. When they return home, many Veterans who reside in rural areas are not able to access broadband internet which is critical to using telehealth services, gaining educational opportunities, and growing a small business or running a family farm.

There are 2.7 million Veterans enrolled in Veterans Affairs (VA) who are living in rural communities, 42% of them do not have internet access at home which could support their use of VA telehealth services, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’, Veterans Health Administration’s Office of Rural Health. These rural Veterans live in areas where access to fast, reliable internet service may be limited or inaccessible and are facing higher rates of unemployment, longer drives to reach the nearest clinics and medical centers, and lower levels of educational attainment compared to their urban counterparts. Connectivity has the potential to improve this reality — with broadband, they can access telehealth services offered by the VA, identify and compete for well-paying jobs, improve and grow their own businesses, and take advantage of online education classes.

Microsoft and VA have been strategic partners, working together to improve the lives of Veterans, for more than 20 years. Today, I’m excited to share that Microsoft will begin expanding that work by helping VA to help bring connectivity to many Veterans living in rural towns and communities. Microsoft and its partners will be working with VA to provide capital, technology expertise, and training resources to bring broadband access to people in these underserved communities. Our hope is that this effort will unlock new economic opportunities, while also enhancing quality of life.

Through the partnership, we’ll help VA identify communities with Veterans in need and work with our internet service provider (ISP) partners across the nation to bring broadband services to those regions. Following our Airband Initiative model, we’ll also provide the Veterans in these newly connected communities with digital skills training so they can take advantage of the tools and services connectivity enables, including critical telehealth services provided by VA.

In the past 22 months, through the Microsoft Airband Initiative, we have seen firsthand just how many communities lack connectivity at broadband speeds and how this can hinder growth and new opportunities. We’ve also seen that partnering with ISPs to serve those most in need is an effective strategy to make progress quickly on this important issue. Our work with VA builds on those lessons and approach, which has resulted in partnerships that will bring connectivity to 1 million unserved rural residents in 16 states to date, with a plan to reach 3 million by 2022.

This also builds on our commitment to the military and Veteran community. We’re passionate about our work with this community and take a holistic approach to helping Veterans gain the critical career skills required for today’s digital economy through career training and re-training, soft-skills support, and hiring. The company’s cornerstone Veteran program, Microsoft Software & Systems Academy (MSSA), provides the Veteran community with an 18-week (or two nine-week terms) training for high-demand careers, with graduates gaining an interview for a full-time career at Microsoft or one of the company’s more than 400 hiring partners. We’re also proud of our strong network of partners, all of whom champion our same vision to assist the community.

We owe it to the men and women who have sacrificed so much for our nation. Veterans living in rural communities deserve to have the broadband internet access enjoyed by many who live in urban areas. Addressing the broadband gap across the country requires innovative solutions from both the public and private sectors, and we hope this partnership will help us make significant progress toward closing the connectivity gap for the Veteran community.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Lumina launches Radiance, a data risk management platform

Lumina has launched Radiance — a SaaS platform that collects and analyzes data to help prevent risks and threats.

According to Lumina, Radiance uses deep web listening algorithms to uncover risk, provide timely and actionable information, and help prevent catastrophic loss. The Radiance platform uses Open Source Intelligence (OS-INT), Internet Intelligence (NET-INT) and Human Intelligence (HUM-INT) for risk detection.

  • OS-INT is a deep web listening tool that uses machine learning and AI to assess and prioritize risk. Names entered into OS-INT are correlated with content related to 20 different risk factors and cross-referenced with more than 1 million queries into Lumina’s proprietary databases of risk. Prioritized results are delivered in about five minutes, whereas, Lumina claims, a manual search of the same size would take a person more than 3.5 years to complete.
  • NET-INT detects means, motivation and target for attack planning. Its algorithms continuously identify, monitor, capture and prioritize IP addresses exhibiting abnormal behavior across multiple risk dimensions. According to Lumina, the platform collects and stores more than 1 million interactions every day.
  • HUM-INT is powered by the See Something Say Something app, a crowdsourced mobile application that enables users to confidentially report concerns in real time. A centralized management portal enables users to access real-time threats to geofenced locations.

Radiance searches the web and prioritizes current behaviors to predict future action. Lumina claims this is an advantage because other technologies often focus only on historical behavior.

Additionally, clients can integrate their own structured and unstructured data into Radiance, which enables correlation of internal databases against publicly available data.

Dig Deeper on Data management resources

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For Sale – HTPC – Fractal Design Case, 1TB SSD, 16GB RAM, SFX PSU (ITX Form Factor)

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by ZeeStar, May 8, 2019.

  1. ZeeStar

    ZeeStar

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    907
    Products Owned:
    0
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    0
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +57

    Just gathering interest at the moment to see if anyone wants this setup. If someone is interested, I will have to backup my drives before sending out.

    I have for sale my beloved HTPC which has been used over the past 2 years as a Plex Media Server. It is quite highly spec’d and runs my 4K content without a hiccup. Please see specs and individual prices below:

    Fractal Design Node 804

    PC Case (Windowed) – £60
    Intel i5 4590 Processor – £65
    MSI Z87i AC ITX Motherboard – £70
    HyperX 16GB DDR3 RAM – £80
    SanDisk Ultra II 960GB SSD – £100
    Western Digital 2TB 2.5″ HDD – £50
    Corsair SFX (SFF) Gold Power Supply – £75
    Cooler Master Hyper 212 Processor Cooler – £15

    All the prices above have been based on sold listings on eBay minus fees etc. to make it fair. I’ve obviously paid a lot more for all these components, so will take a massive hit on this.

    Buyer can come round and see it all working before buying, or I can dispatch. I have all the boxes for all the items.

    Price and currency: £500
    Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
    Payment method: PPG or BT
    Location: Birmingham
    Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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SELMA – News | SELMA Hacking Hate

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Former Chef Software CTO talks IT automation, open source

In a market that moves as fast as enterprise IT automation, Chef Software, founded in 2008, is now a venerable elder, and its former CTO is on to the next big thing.

What exactly that will be remains unknown. Chef founder and erstwhile CTO Adam Jacob has no immediate plans to start another company, but when he does, the business model will be open source.

Open source software is near and dear to Jacob’s heart. One of his first activities as a member of Chef’s board of directors was to oversee the company’s transition in April 2019 to a fully open source licensing model, where previously products such as Chef Automate and Chef Habitat ran proprietary code. Jacob foreshadowed the move with a personal manifesto of sorts, dubbed Sustainable Free and Open Source Communities.

Open source software and IT automation are in flux and in the news as Jacob makes his personal career transition. We asked him for his outlook on the future of the IT industry and where he thinks he will make his next contribution.

What’s next for you and for IT automation? Is serverless the next big thing? Anything else you’re tracking?

Adam Jacob, founder and former CTO, ChefAdam Jacob

Adam Jacob: I’ll eventually start another company and do something in enterprise software, because that’s where my expertise is, and that’s what I like. But I don’t know exactly what it’ll be or when.

We have to build the system that makes people effective at adopting new technology — whatever it is, wherever it may be in the stack — that they need to run their business more effectively, instead of just the next platform.

Things like serverless are interesting, because they point the way to the user experience, and they’re going to get adopted and have value. Are they the future of enterprise computing? Maybe for a minute. But then, there’ll be something else. And until we get good at navigating those transitions, which we’re completely bad at right now, I don’t know that it matters.

At Cloud Foundry Summit, the focus was on business outcomes and incorporating things like Kubernetes into the Cloud Foundry platform. But the attendance at that show vs. KubeCon or even last year’s Cloud Foundry Summit was night and day. That doesn’t seem like the industry’s focus right now.

Jacob: No. But even the Cloud Foundry folks came to that revelation through something that wasn’t the purest of doors. They were the ones a generation earlier telling everyone, ‘If you just adopt Cloud Foundry, all your problems go away.’ Now, they’re like, ‘Well, not all the problems, but that’s fine, because we also sucked up Kubernetes for you.’ Maybe. I don’t know.

Meanwhile, there’s a clash in some instances between vendor sustainability and open source business models. How do you think that plays out?

Jacob: There’s no evidence that when things are open source, you make less revenue, which I know sounds weird, because open source means you gave something away for free. Look at Elasticsearch — AWS launched its Elasticsearch service in 2015. [But] Elastic Inc. went public [in October 2018] in the face of competition that supposedly is an existential threat to its economic sustainability. I just don’t buy it.

What people relate to, and what people who buy software want, is a trusted brand that’s putting together a product with security guarantees, product wrapping, marketing that you can use to convince your boss that you should use this tool, and sales reps that have attestations they can make as to its provenance. Nothing changes about the need to buy a product, whether the product is open source or not. My hope for the future is that we get back to that truth. It doesn’t have to be that hard.

If that’s the case, why are companies like Mongo changing the terms of their licensing?

Jacob: I think they believe that their value is actually in the proprietary parts of Mongo. It’s easy for [a vendor] to say that the open source channel isn’t the most relevant, but I think they’re looking at it wrong. The truth is that they have a much bigger channel in open source, even if there are people who don’t pay them. The odds are more in their favor, because there are more of those people in the world.

When I read your post about Chef’s changes and looked at the Sustainable Free and Open Source Communities’ website, it seemed the free software product model was one that you preferred. Is there a right approach?

Are [things like serverless] the future of enterprise computing? Maybe for a minute. But then, there’ll be something else. And until we get good at navigating those transitions, which we’re completely bad at right now, I don’t know that it matters.
Adam JacobFounder and former CTO, Chef Software

Jacob: It is situational. There are examples where I wouldn’t use that. But in the situation that Chef is in, where we are the upstream and produce the vast majority of [the code] and own the brand, when people say what the software is, they’d say, ‘There’s Chef.’ And even if there was another thing — and there’s a community effort right now to build a community distribution of Chef; they’re going to call it Cinc — when you ask them what it is, the answer is that it’s a community distribution of Chef. That’s an important distinction when you’re trying to build a product.

HashiCorp, Puppet, all the infrastructure management vendors, [they] own the [intellectual property] and the upstream, and it’s not clear the model we chose before was better. I’m not convinced that the reason customers bought Chef was because of what I held back. Now, I hold back all of it. [Laughs]

It’s clear how that approach helps Chef, but how does it help customers?

Jacob: All of the reasons you ever buy software from a vendor are as true as they ever were. One of the most challenging things about buying open source software is justifying the transaction. In our traditional model, I give you this free software that you can do enough with to be successful, but hopefully not so successful that you’re not willing to buy my commercial software. For those customers, you help them quite a bit. What you say to them is, ‘If you want to do the work for it to be free, do the work for it to be free.’

Those people will come to Chef and put in effort that they don’t have to put in if I deliver it to their door, which makes the whole ecosystem healthier. Or, they can pay me money, use my version, and I will maintain it for them. That is a much easier thing to discuss. And if you’re going to take a piece of software and stick it on every computer in your enterprise, do you or don’t you want to know where it comes from? I bet you do. It also helps them in that the community around the software is healthy, and that software has a long shelf life.

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For Sale – HTPC – Fractal Design Case, 1TB SSD, 16GB RAM, SFX PSU (ITX Form Factor)

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by ZeeStar, May 8, 2019.

  1. ZeeStar

    ZeeStar

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    904
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings:
    +56

    Just gathering interest at the moment to see if anyone wants this setup. If someone is interested, I will have to backup my drives before sending out.

    I have for sale my beloved HTPC which has been used over the past 2 years as a Plex Media Server. It is quite highly spec’d and runs my 4K content without a hiccup. Please see specs and individual prices below:

    Fractal Design Node 804

    PC Case (Windowed) – £60
    Intel i5 4590 Processor – £65
    MSI Z87i AC ITX Motherboard – £70
    HyperX 16GB DDR3 RAM – £80
    SanDisk Ultra II 960GB SSD – £100
    Western Digital 2TB 2.5″ HDD – £50
    Corsair SFX (SFF) Gold Power Supply – £75
    Cooler Master Hyper 212 Processor Cooler – £15

    All the prices above have been based on sold listings on eBay minus fees etc. to make it fair. I’ve obviously paid a lot more for all these components, so will take a massive hit on this.

    Buyer can come round and see it all working before buying, or I can dispatch. I have all the boxes for all the items.

    Price and currency: £500
    Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
    Payment method: PPG or BT
    Location: Birmingham
    Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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