Helping refugees and displaced persons by shifting the approach to how we help nonprofits – Microsoft on the Issues

Teenage girl with arm around another girl
Photo credit: Andrew Oberstadt/IRC

Every year on June 20, World Refugee Day, the world focuses its attention on the growing crisis of human displacement; a mounting global tragedy, as there are more refugees today than any time seen since World War II.

A few months ago, I was humbled by my first visit to the Kakuma Refugee Camp, a United Nations camp that opened in 1992 following the arrival of the 23,000 “Lost Boys of Sudan.” The camp was designed to provide capacity for approximately 70,000 residents and now has nearly 190,000 refugees from more than 20 countries. I was awestruck by the vastness of the camp and inspired by the stories of the refugees and the amazing efforts of humanitarian organizations to create opportunities for them.

International Rescue Committee CEO David Miliband
International Rescue Committee CEO David Miliband. Photo credit: Kellie Ryan/IRC

Seeing the Kakuma camp opened my eyes to the scale and graveness of today’s refugee crisis. It also reaffirmed my conviction that the world needs to do more to respond.  As International Rescue Committee CEO David Miliband writes in his book “Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time ,” “Refugees and displaced people have lost everything. But the refugee crisis is also about ‘us’ – what we, living in far greater comfort, stand for, and how we see our place in the world. It is a test of our character. Pass the test and rescue not just refugees but ourselves.” The challenge is immense with over 70 million refugees and internally displaced people.  At Microsoft we certainly don’t have all the answers, but we do know that in order to do more, we also must shift our lens from a traditional approach of corporate social responsibility, to an approach of total social impact to better support the crucial work of nonprofits.

Our response starts with the commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) created by the United Nations. These are benchmarks that paint the vision that the global community wants to see and what we aspire to, across the government, nonprofit and private sectors. But the world needs more than the goals; it needs the resources to achieve them, and according to the United Nations Sustainable Development Group there is a $2.5 trillion dollar annual funding gap across the SDGs. Well-resourced organizations around the world – public and private – will need to do more to make up this gap. Beyond the foundational moral imperative of doing more, there is a strong long-term business case. A recent analysis shows that by meeting the SDG goals, we will unleash an estimated $12 trillion of market opportunities and create 380 million new jobs by 2030.

At Microsoft, we are working to better address this opportunity through our core philanthropic initiatives focused on equipping underserved communities around the world with the digital skills they need to effectively participate in the 21st century economy.  We are also working to amplify the impact of our employee engagement and giving.  However, we are going beyond traditional philanthropic models and creating a social business focused on helping nonprofits access deeper levels of innovation to address social challenges – using our technology and expertise to help humanitarian organizations scale the impact of the workers on front lines, manage and allocate aid, and help populations who need it most. All incremental profits generated from this affordable social business model are then reinvested into philanthropy and innovation for the nonprofit sector. This creates a self-reinforcing flywheel that fuels more impact. By integrating philanthropy with affordably designed social business models we create a total social impact plan that has the ability to scale innovation and impact beyond more traditional approaches.

Outlined below are two examples of how we are leveraging this model to invest in solutions to better support refugees, displaced people, and the communities that host them:

Artificial intelligence to support refugees and displaced people: Last year at the UN General Assembly, Microsoft built on its longstanding support to humanitarian organizations with AI for Humanitarian Action, a $40 million, five-year program. Through AI for Humanitarian Action, we are harnessing the power of artificial intelligence and machine learning to improve the lives of over 70 million displaced people in the world, nearly 26 million of whom are refugees.

As a part of this work, today we are announcing AI for Humanitarian Action projects with two nonprofit organizations, Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (ASAP) and KIND, to help combat wrongful deportation of asylum seekers in the United States. Both organizations provide legal assistance to asylum seekers and governments’ current processes are challenging while the cases are time sensitive. ASAP works with approximately 3,000 asylum seekers on any given day connecting them with the tools they need to take control of their legal cases and advocate for their families. Using Microsoft speech-to-text artificial intelligence and an Azure-based database, ASAP and KIND are partnering with volunteers and other legal aid organizations to assist families fleeing persecution in their home countries. The AI tool helps their respective staffs efficiently track changing court dates and prioritize cases most in need of emergency legal services.

Digital skills to empower refugees and displaced people: Refugees and displaced people live lives that are disrupted, often forced from the information and basic resources we sometimes take for granted. Yet, they have tremendous energy and are a force for positive change in the world. That’s why we must use the power of technology to route information, skills and knowledge in better ways to displaced people, using technology channels to provide access to education, and help them pursue a new future. Microsoft is working with a number of organizations providing digital skills, including:

  • International Rescue Committee (IRC) to create sustainable programming for refugees and displaced populations around the world, and increasing the efficiency and efficacy of the IRC staff who serve them. This includes “Digital Skills for New Americans in the U.S.,” and “Technology for Livelihoods in Crisis” in Jordan. These programs are designed to be contextually relevant for refugees and the job markets in these countries to find new ways to empower refugees, including women and girls. Through this partnership with Microsoft, IRC aims to create a foundation for career development programming that will be delivered to 45,000 IRC clients over the next five years in the U.S., and to eventually expand trainings for refugee and displaced clients across Europe, the Middle East and Africa. These programs build on deep investments by Microsoft in IRC programs that help IRC provide humanitarian aid and digital skills to crisis-effected communities.
  • Norwegian Refugee Council to deliver education services and solutions to help 400,000 displaced people with digital skills enabling new opportunities.
  • United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to reach over 25,000 refugee young women and men in Kakuma by 2020 with access to accredited, quality and relevant digital learning and market-oriented training opportunities. The partnership will include training and knowledge sharing with UNHCR international teams and local partners, who will help deliver the content. It’s the first stage of a project we intend to scale across multiple countries.
  • UNICEF to ensure that displaced children and young people have access to the education skills they need, are better prepared to reach their potential and are enabled to be the future leaders our world will need. UNICEF and Microsoft, together with the University of Cambridge, are partnering to develop a digital platform, “The Learning Passport,” that will facilitate learning opportunities for displaced young people within and across borders.

As I reflect on my Kakuma visit, it is a vivid memory for me that lives are at stake. I encourage us all to continue working to think how your organization can make an impact. We must push the boundaries of our traditional philanthropic and business models so that our social impact is proportionate to the power and resources we command. We have an obligation and an opportunity to advance a future for everyone. Together, we can do more.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

DataRobot acquisition of ParallelM to enhance AI management

DataRobot acquired ParallelM, a startup vendor of a machine learning model management, deployment and monitoring platform, in a move to give users more control over their AI lifecycles.

It’s the fourth DataRobot acquisition in two years. The machine learning and data science vendor made its latest purchase in February 2019, when it bought collaborative data platform Cursor.

The deal, revealed June 20, comes amid a spate of major software acquisitions, some of them multibillion-dollar deals such as Google’s acquisition of Looker and Salesforce’s purchase of Tableau.

The price of the DataRobot acquisition of ParallelM, a privately funded company founded in 2016, was not disclosed. DataRobot is also privately held.

Complementary products

For DataRobot, the acquisition will help strengthen its machine learning capabilities and helps put DataRobot into a better space for production, said Dave Schubmehl, research director for AI software platforms, content analytics and discovery systems at IDC.

The acquisition makes a lot of sense for DataRobot.
Dave SchubmehlResearch director for AI software platforms, content analytics and discovery systems at IDC

“The acquisition makes a lot of sense for DataRobot, and I think it puts them into a good space in the marketplace,” he said. “We’re seeing a lot of people move to experimentation to production now [with machine learning].”

The MCenter platform, ParallelM’s featured product, enables users to create a rule-based environment to more easily track and manage their data and machine learning models in real time. Collaborations with infrastructures such as Apache Spark, Kubernetes and TensorFlow also ease model deployment for MCenter users.

ParallelM, named a “cool vendor in data science and machine learning” by Gartner last year, has long been a partner of DataRobot, offering integrations with DataRobot’s machine learning and data science platform.

DataRobot, ParallelM, Jeremy Achin, Sivan Metzger, DataRobot acquisition of ParallelM
DataRobot CEO Jeremy Achin and ParallelM CEO Sivan Metzger

“We are working on a product integration plan that will include parts of what ParallelM has built and some items that DataRobot has built to create our new MLOps [machine learning and operations] product,” said Sivan Metzger, CEO of ParallelM, based in Sunnyvale, Calif.

With the acquisition, DataRobot will expand its platform’s model monitoring, management and governance capabilities, Metzger said.

DataRobot will continue to support ParallelM customers while the vendors integrate technologies, he added.

ParallelM has also partnered with other companies in the past, including H20.ai. Schubmehl noted he is interested to see if ParallelM will continue support for those partnerships.

Staying ahead of the market

The acquisition, along with DataRobot’s other recent purchases, puts the company in a good position among independent AI vendors, Schubmehl said.

The pickups of other complementary vendors “make sense if DataRobot wants to be one of those top five vendors going forward in the machine learning platforms area,” he said. He added that, over the next several years, DataRobot has the potential to become one of those top vendors.

“They’re definitely making the right moves,” he said.

As of June 20, all ParallelM employees have become DataRobot employees.

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Wanted – Ryzen 5 + MB combo and or i5 7600K cpu (see details below)

Hi all, I’m upgrading my spare PC from a G4560 cpu. So I’m looking for either a

i7 6700k.
i5 7600K cpu
i5 7600 cpu
i5 7500 cpu
One of the above cpu’s is needed if I stay with my LGA 1151 socket existing set up.

OR:
An amd Micro ATX motherboard and cpu combo

So if I go the amd route I’d need a mixture of the below

Micro ATX B350 or B450 motherboard and

ryzen 5 1600 or 1600x (with stock cooler)
ryzen 7 1700 or 1700x (with stock cooler)
ryzen 5 2600 0r 2600x (with stock cooler)

I know the ryzen 3600 etc will be out in a month or so so I’m looking for someone who is getting ready for that change and will have some of the above components spare and looking for a quick sale.

let me know what you have and the price including delivered to Northern Ireland. Naturally, the MB and CPU need to be in full working order. If nothing interesting comes up I may just wait for the new ryzens myself.

I can pay via Bank Transfer or PPG………thanks

Location: Londonderry

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Helping refugees and displaced persons by shifting the approach to how we help nonprofits – Microsoft on the Issues

Teenage girl with arm around another girl
Photo credit: Andrew Oberstadt/IRC

Every year on June 20, World Refugee Day, the world focuses its attention on the growing crisis of human displacement; a mounting global tragedy, as there are more refugees today than any time seen since World War II.

A few months ago, I was humbled by my first visit to the Kakuma Refugee Camp, a United Nations camp that opened in 1992 following the arrival of the 23,000 “Lost Boys of Sudan.” The camp was designed to provide capacity for approximately 70,000 residents and now has nearly 190,000 refugees from more than 20 countries. I was awestruck by the vastness of the camp and inspired by the stories of the refugees and the amazing efforts of humanitarian organizations to create opportunities for them.

International Rescue Committee CEO David Miliband
International Rescue Committee CEO David Miliband. Photo credit: Kellie Ryan/IRC

Seeing the Kakuma camp opened my eyes to the scale and graveness of today’s refugee crisis. It also reaffirmed my conviction that the world needs to do more to respond.  As International Rescue Committee CEO David Miliband writes in his book “Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time ,” “Refugees and displaced people have lost everything. But the refugee crisis is also about ‘us’ – what we, living in far greater comfort, stand for, and how we see our place in the world. It is a test of our character. Pass the test and rescue not just refugees but ourselves.” The challenge is immense with over 70 million refugees and internally displaced people.  At Microsoft we certainly don’t have all the answers, but we do know that in order to do more, we also must shift our lens from a traditional approach of corporate social responsibility, to an approach of total social impact to better support the crucial work of nonprofits.

Our response starts with the commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) created by the United Nations. These are benchmarks that paint the vision that the global community wants to see and what we aspire to, across the government, nonprofit and private sectors. But the world needs more than the goals; it needs the resources to achieve them, and according to the United Nations Sustainable Development Group there is a $2.5 trillion dollar annual funding gap across the SDGs. Well-resourced organizations around the world – public and private – will need to do more to make up this gap. Beyond the foundational moral imperative of doing more, there is a strong long-term business case. A recent analysis shows that by meeting the SDG goals, we will unleash an estimated $12 trillion of market opportunities and create 380 million new jobs by 2030.

At Microsoft, we are working to better address this opportunity through our core philanthropic initiatives focused on equipping underserved communities around the world with the digital skills they need to effectively participate in the 21st century economy.  We are also working to amplify the impact of our employee engagement and giving.  However, we are going beyond traditional philanthropic models and creating a social business focused on helping nonprofits access deeper levels of innovation to address social challenges – using our technology and expertise to help humanitarian organizations scale the impact of the workers on front lines, manage and allocate aid, and help populations who need it most. All incremental profits generated from this affordable social business model are then reinvested into philanthropy and innovation for the nonprofit sector. This creates a self-reinforcing flywheel that fuels more impact. By integrating philanthropy with affordably designed social business models we create a total social impact plan that has the ability to scale innovation and impact beyond more traditional approaches.

Outlined below are two examples of how we are leveraging this model to invest in solutions to better support refugees, displaced people, and the communities that host them:

Artificial intelligence to support refugees and displaced people: Last year at the UN General Assembly, Microsoft built on its longstanding support to humanitarian organizations with AI for Humanitarian Action, a $40 million, five-year program. Through AI for Humanitarian Action, we are harnessing the power of artificial intelligence and machine learning to improve the lives of over 70 million displaced people in the world, nearly 26 million of whom are refugees.

As a part of this work, today we are announcing AI for Humanitarian Action projects with two nonprofit organizations, Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (ASAP) and KIND, to help combat wrongful deportation of asylum seekers in the United States. Both organizations provide legal assistance to asylum seekers and governments’ current processes are challenging while the cases are time sensitive. ASAP works with approximately 3,000 asylum seekers on any given day connecting them with the tools they need to take control of their legal cases and advocate for their families. Using Microsoft speech-to-text artificial intelligence and an Azure-based database, ASAP and KIND are partnering with volunteers and other legal aid organizations to assist families fleeing persecution in their home countries. The AI tool helps their respective staffs efficiently track changing court dates and prioritize cases most in need of emergency legal services.

Digital skills to empower refugees and displaced people: Refugees and displaced people live lives that are disrupted, often forced from the information and basic resources we sometimes take for granted. Yet, they have tremendous energy and are a force for positive change in the world. That’s why we must use the power of technology to route information, skills and knowledge in better ways to displaced people, using technology channels to provide access to education, and help them pursue a new future. Microsoft is working with a number of organizations providing digital skills, including:

  • International Rescue Committee (IRC) to create sustainable programming for refugees and displaced populations around the world, and increasing the efficiency and efficacy of the IRC staff who serve them. This includes “Digital Skills for New Americans in the U.S.,” and “Technology for Livelihoods in Crisis” in Jordan. These programs are designed to be contextually relevant for refugees and the job markets in these countries to find new ways to empower refugees, including women and girls. Through this partnership with Microsoft, IRC aims to create a foundation for career development programming that will be delivered to 45,000 IRC clients over the next five years in the U.S., and to eventually expand trainings for refugee and displaced clients across Europe, the Middle East and Africa. These programs build on deep investments by Microsoft in IRC programs that help IRC provide humanitarian aid and digital skills to crisis-effected communities.
  • Norwegian Refugee Council to deliver education services and solutions to help 400,000 displaced people with digital skills enabling new opportunities.
  • United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to reach over 25,000 refugee young women and men in Kakuma by 2020 with access to accredited, quality and relevant digital learning and market-oriented training opportunities. The partnership will include training and knowledge sharing with UNHCR international teams and local partners, who will help deliver the content. It’s the first stage of a project we intend to scale across multiple countries.
  • UNICEF to ensure that displaced children and young people have access to the education skills they need, are better prepared to reach their potential and are enabled to be the future leaders our world will need. UNICEF and Microsoft, together with the University of Cambridge, are partnering to develop a digital platform, “The Learning Passport,” that will facilitate learning opportunities for displaced young people within and across borders.

As I reflect on my Kakuma visit, it is a vivid memory for me that lives are at stake. I encourage us all to continue working to think how your organization can make an impact. We must push the boundaries of our traditional philanthropic and business models so that our social impact is proportionate to the power and resources we command. We have an obligation and an opportunity to advance a future for everyone. Together, we can do more.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Threat Stack Cloud Security Platform adds application security

Cloud security and compliance vendor Threat Stack introduced a new product for unified application security, Threat Stack Application Security Monitoring. The new offering extends security and observability across the entire cloud stack, from the cloud management console to the application layer.

Threat Stack Application Security Monitoring, or AppSec Monitoring, will be included with the Threat Stack Cloud Security Platform, bringing application runtime protection and risk detection capabilities to the vendor’s flagship product.

According to the vendor, Threat Stack AppSec Monitoring enables users to accurately identify risk and ongoing attacks across their cloud environment by linking information from the cloud management console, containers, container orchestration and application layers.

Threat Stack AppSec Monitoring includes the following features:

  • Proactive risk reduction: Uses contextual information across the cloud stack to help developers reduce risk during development.
  • Targeted real-time attack blocking: Enables users to selectively block attacks like cross-site scripting, SQL injection and NoSQL injection without blocking legitimate traffic.
  • Improved insight across the stack: Allows data connection across the entire software development cycle, reducing false positives.
  • Developer context and e-learning: Provides in-depth context and risk reduction recommendations on every alert, helping developers learn best practices for secure coding.

Cloud services and cloud architectures are increasing in adoption. Gartner predicts that the cloud services market will grow 17.5% in 2019, from $182.4 billion in 2018 to $214.3 billion in 2019. Specifically, cloud application services account for the largest portion of the cloud market, forecasted to reach $94.8 billion by 2019.

Threat Stack's new application security monitoring tool shows all detected and blocked attacks in its user dashboard.
Threat Stack Application Security Monitoring detects and blocks attacks, while still allowing legitimate traffic.

Because of the growing popularity, Threat Stack claims it’s necessary to deliver and boost cloud application security. Threat Stack AppSec Monitoring is automatically included in the Threat Stack Cloud Security Platform at no additional cost.

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For Sale – Low range gaming PC (self Built) and 24” Monitor

i am selling my gaming PC which i have used for nearly 3 years with great care. it still gives great performance with no issues.

specs –

Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-78LMT-USB3
GPU: GeForce GTX 750ti
CPU: AMD FX 6300 6core
RAM: 8GB
Internal Storage: 240GB Kingston SSD
OS: Windows 10 Pro

Asking price £220

also have a HP Pavilion 24 inch full HD IPS monitor for sale at just £80.

collection is preferred but delivery by post can be also done if buyers arrange it (delivery cost has to be added by buyer).

20190513_090042.jpg 20190513_090102.jpg 20190513_090122.jpg 20190513_085436.jpg 20190513_085831.jpg 20190513_085849.jpg 20190513_085643.jpg

thanks

Price and currency: £80-£220
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Paypal/BT
Location: london
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

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Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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