For Sale – Gtx 1080ti Asus rog strix 11gb

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by Danbeaman1991, Aug 8, 2019 at 7:26 PM.

  1. Danbeaman1991

    Danbeaman1991

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    For sale is a used GTX 1080ti asus rog strix 11gb. This is currently in my rig working perfectly and can show running if wanted. Selling due to planned upgrade. I Have the box with all assessories. . Any question dont hesitate to ask.

    Price and currency: 475
    Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
    Payment method: Collection
    Location: Shrewsbury
    Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

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How technology has transformed my working life – Microsoft News Centre Europe

“We’re sorry to announce that the 07:12 Thameslink service to London St. Pancras International has been cancelled. Please stand by for further announcements. We apologise for any inconvenience this may have caused to your journey.”

A few years ago, my working life was very different. For six years, I spent four hours each day crammed across six trains, commuting to work and back. It was financially and emotionally draining, but it was simply the way that things were done.   

It was only two and a half years ago, when I joined Microsoft as editor of its European news centre, that I realised that the traditional way we work, and our accustomed routines, could be different. Today, I have the freedom and flexibility to work from home, with my cat Meze purring away beside me.

I want to share my experiences here, not because I work for Microsoft, but because I’m truly passionate about this new way of working, and am grateful for the hugely positive impact it’s had on my life. This is my future of work.

Microsoft MunichBuilding bridges
On my first day, I had some reservations. They say that no man is an island, but in a professional, geographical sense, I come pretty close – I’m the only one in my direct team that lives and works in the UK. Others are scattered across Germany, Ukraine, Turkey, Bulgaria, and even South Africa – not to mention all the other people I work with around the globe, from the USA to Singapore. Bar the occasional business trips, I attend meetings and work with everyone remotely. It was a daunting prospect. I worried about being isolated, and the quality of work that could be achieved with colleagues that were hundreds of miles away. Would I feel close to them? Would I achieve my best work? Would I make friends?

Three years on, I look back on my first day jitters and realise that they were totally unfounded. Thanks to Teams, I truly feel like I’m working in the same office with my colleagues. A quick question or discussion is a mere chat window away, allowing me to instantly solve problems and give/receive advice – not to mention sending the occasional cat gif or two.

Beyond ad-hoc chats, we use video calls – a prospect which I found daunting, until I actually tried it. There’s something vulnerable, I feel, about putting yourself on camera, and I was worried it would be a distraction. In fact, I’ve found it’s the opposite.

Being able to see the people you’re talking to increases personal connections and engagements. It transforms someone from an ethereal voice to an actual person, and it doesn’t take long for the technology to melt away and become invisible. You’re just a group of people, in a room, having a chat – nothing more, nothing less.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18362.10012 & 18362.10013 (19H2) | Windows Experience Blog

Hello Windows Insiders!Today we are releasing 19H2 Build 18362.10012 and Build 18362.10013 to Windows Insiders in the Slow ring. As a reminder, we are testing the ability to ship these updates with features turned off by default so that we can then turn them on via controlled feature rollouts. This helps us gain better feedback on overall build quality. A subset of Insiders in the Slow ring will have features turned off by default, and another subset will have them turned on by default. This means not everyone in the Slow ring will see new features right away:
IF you are on 19H2 Build 18362.10005 – you will receive Build 18362.10012 today with features turned OFF by default. This includes the below mentioned features as well as the features from the previous release.
IF you are on 19H2 Build 18362.10006 – you will receive Build 18362.10013 with features turned ON by default.
If you’re on the Windows 10 May 2019 Update and just joining your PC into the Slow ring to take 19H2 updates, it’ll be a virtual “coin toss” as to whether your PC gets features turned on or turned off.
Other than one update has features turned off, and the other has features turned on – the two updates released today and highlighted above are identical and contain the following features in addition to the improvements from KB4505903 and the previous 19H2 update:
You can now quickly create an event straight from the Calendar flyout on the Taskbar. Just click on the date and time at the lower right corner of the Taskbar to open the Calendar flyout and pick your desired date and start typing in the text box – you’ll now see inline options to set a time and location.

The navigation pane on the Start menu now expands when you hover over it with your mouse to better inform where clicking goes.
We have added friendly images to show what is meant by “banner” and “Action Center” when adjusting the notifications on apps in order to make these settings more approachable and understandable.

Notifications settings under Settings > System > Notifications will now default to sorting notification senders by most recently shown notification, rather than sender name. This makes it easier to find and configure frequent and recent senders. We have also added a setting to turn off playing sound when notifications appear.
We now show the options to configure and turn off notifications from an app/website right on the notification, both as a banner and in Action Center.
We have added a “Manage notifications” button to the top of Action Center that launches the main “Notifications & actions” Settings page.
We have added additional debugging capabilities for newer Intel processors. This is only relevant for hardware manufacturers.
We have made general battery life and power efficiency improvements for PCs with certain processors.
A CPU may have multiple “favored” cores (logical processors of the highest available scheduling class). To provide better performance and reliability, we have implemented a rotation policy that distributes work more fairly among these favored cores.
As always, Insiders are encouraged to report any issues they experience with these updates through Feedback Hub.
Thanks,Dona and Brandon

7 smart tech developments for people who are blind or have low vision | Microsoft On The Issues

It’s estimated that there are about 36 million people in the world who are blind, and a further 216 million who live with moderate to severe visual impairments. Although the World Health Organization points out that up to 80% of vision impairment around the world is avoidable with better access to treatment, the number of people who are blind or have low vision is rising as the global population ages.

But technology is playing a vital role in tearing down barriers, and artificial intelligence is making real inroads into improving accessibility.

Here are seven examples of how smart technology can be a game-changer, allowing everyone to interact with the world in new ways.

[Subscribe to Microsoft on the Issues for more on the topics that matter most.]

The eye in AI

As we’ve reported, Microsoft’s Seeing AI is an app designed to help people with low vision or who are blind. It enhances the world around the user with rich audio descriptions. It can read a handwritten note or scan a barcode and then tell the user what the product is. Point a camera at something and the app will describe how many people it can see and where they are in the image – center, top left and so on.

3-D Sound Maps

YouTube Video

For a sighted person, walking along the street can mean taking in every detail that surrounds them. Microsoft Soundscape replicates that behavior by building a detailed audio map that relates what’s taking place around a person with visual impairment.

It creates layers of context and detail by drawing on location data, sound beacons and synthesized 3-D stereo sound to build a constantly updating 3-D sound map of the surrounding world.

Knowledge at your fingertips

Braille has been used for nearly 200 years as a tactile way of reading with fingertips. It has now jumped from the page to the screen with the updated version of Narrator, the screen-reader for Microsoft Windows, supporting digital Braille displays and keyboards.

Outside of Microsoft’s efforts, Braille touchscreens that work in the same way as tablets have already proved popular among students and teachers. At the Assistive Technology Industry Association’s 2019 conference in Orlando, Florida, innovations on display included the BraiBook, a Braille e-reader that fits into the palm of a hand, and even an electronic toy called the Braille Buzz, designed to teach Braille to preschoolers.

Beacons of change

Bluetooth beacons, such as those being used by the company Foresight Augmented Reality, act like highly precise, personalized guides for people who are blind or partially sighted. While basic GPS technology can take users to a location, beacons mounted in a store, restaurant or public building can guide them to the entrance of the building in question. And when the user is inside, other beacons can direct them to the bathroom or other important facilities.

Electric vehicles

The European Union is taking no chances with people’s safety. New legislation means electric vehicles have to be audible  at low speeds and while reversing. Some manufacturers are already incorporating artificial noise into their electric vehicles.

Smart Glasses

Researchers at Ajman University in the United Arab Emirates are working on the development of a set of smart glasses that can use AI to read, provide navigation information and potentially identify faces. Glasses are connected to a smartphone through a processing unit, allowing the system to function without an internet connection.

These smart glasses are still in the early stages of development but are said to work with a reading accuracy rate of 95%.

AI for Accessibility

Microsoft’s AI for Accessibility program was launched last year, with a $25 million commitment to put Microsoft technology in the hands of start-ups, developers, researchers and non-profits in order to drive innovation and amplify human capability for people with disabilities. The program is continuously looking at new projects to support.

For more on these innovations and accessibility initiatives at Microsoft, visit microsoft.com/en-us/accessibility and follow @MSFTIssues on Twitter.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Protect against BlueKeep

Worms are the cause of many cyber headaches. They can easily replicate themselves to spread malicious malware to other computers in your network. As the field responders providing Microsoft enterprise customers with onsite assistance to serious cybersecurity threats, our Detection and Response Team (DART) has seen quite a few worms. If you’ve met the DART Team, then you know your worms are our concern and that’s why we keep an eye out for BlueKeep.

Protect against BlueKeep

This summer, the DART team has been preparing for CVE-2019-0708, colloquially known as BlueKeep, and has some advice on how you can protect your network. The BlueKeep vulnerability is “wormable,” meaning it creates the risk of a large-scale outbreak due to its ability to replicate and propagate, similar to Conficker and WannaCry. Conficker has been widely estimated to have impacted 10- to 12-million computer systems worldwide. WannaCry was responsible for approximately $300 million in damages at just one global enterprise.

To protect against BlueKeep, we strongly recommend you apply the Windows Update, which includes a patch for the vulnerability. If you use Remote Desktop in your environment, it’s very important to apply all the updates. If you have Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) listening on the internet, we also strongly encourage you to move the RDP listener behind some type of second factor authentication, such as VPN, SSL Tunnel, or RDP gateway.

You also want to enable Network Level Authentication (NLA), which is a mitigation to prevent un-authenticated access to the RDP tunnel. NLA forces users to authenticate before connecting to remote systems, which dramatically decreases the chance of success for RDP-based worms. The DART team highly recommends you enable NLA regardless of this patch, as it mitigates a whole slew of other attacks against RDP.

If you’re already aware of the BlueKeep remediation methods, but are thinking about testing it before going live, we recommend that you deploy the patch. It’s important to note that the exploit code is now publicly and widely available to everyone, including malicious actors. By exploiting a vulnerable RDP system, attackers will also have access to all user credentials used on the RDP system.

Why the urgency?

Via open source telemetry, we see more than 400,000 endpoints lacking any form of network level authentication, which puts each of these systems potentially at risk from a worm-based weaponization of the BlueKeep vulnerability.

The timeline between patch release and the appearance of a worm outbreak is difficult to predict and varies from case to case. As always, the DART team is ready for the worst-case scenario. We also want to help our customers be prepared, so we’re sharing a few previous worms and the timeline from patch to attack. Hopefully, this will encourage everyone to patch immediately.

Chart showing vulnerability, patch release, and outbreak. Vulnerability: MS08-067; Patch release: October 23, 2008; Outbreak: late December 2008. Vulnerability: MS17-010; Patch release: March 14, 2017; Outbreak: May 12, 2017. Vulnerability: CVE-2019-0708; Patch release: May 13, 2019; Outbreak column shows three question marks.

Learn more

To learn more about DART, our engagements, and how they are delivered by experienced cybersecurity professionals who devote 100 percent of their time to providing cybersecurity solutions to customers worldwide, please contact your account executive. Bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage on security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity.

This document is for informational purposes only and Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, in this blog.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

3 Fundamental Capabilities of VM Groups You Can’t Ignore

In a previous post, I introduced you to VM groups in Hyper-V and demonstrated how to work with them using PowerShell. I’m still working with them to see how I will incorporate them into my everyday Hyper-V work, but I already know that I wish the cmdlets for managing groups worked a little differently. But that’s not a problem. I can create my own tooling around these commands and build a solution that works for me. Let me share what I’ve come up with so far.

1. Finding Groups

As I explained last time, you can have a VM group that contains a collection of virtual machines, or nested management groups. By default, Get-VMGroup will return all groups. Yes, you can filter by name but you can’t filter by group type. If I want to see only Management groups, I need to use a PowerShell expression like this:

This is not a complicated expression but it becomes tedious when I am repeatedly typing or modifying this command. This isn’t an issue in a script, but for everyday interactive work, it can be a bit much. My solution was to write a new command, Find-VMGroup, that works identically to Get-VMGroup except this version allows you to specify a group type.

Finding specific VM Group types with PowerShell

Your output might vary from the screenshot but I think you get the idea. The default is to return all groups, but then you might as well use Get-VMGroup. And because the group type is coded into the function, you can use tab complete to select a value.

Interested in getting the Find-VMGroup command? I have a section on how to install the module a little further down the page.

2. Expanding Groups

Perhaps the biggest issue (and even that might be a bit strong) I had with the VM Group command is that ultimately, what I really want are the members of the group. I want to be able to use groups to do something with all of the members of that group. And by members, I mean virtual machines. It doesn’t matter to me if the group is a VM Collection or Management Collection. Show me the virtual machines!

Again, this isn’t technically difficult.

 Getting VM Group members

If you haven’t figured out by now I prefer simple. Getting virtual machines from a management group requires even more steps. Once again, I wrote my own command called Expand-VMGroup.

Expanding a single VM group with a custom PowerShell command

The output has been customized a bit to provide a default, formatted view. There are in fact other properties you could work with.

Viewing all properties of an expanded VM group

Depending on the command, you might be able to pipe these results to another Hyper-V command. But I know that many of the Hyper-V cmdlets will take pipeline input by value. This allows you to pass a list of virtual machine names to a command. I added a parameter to Expand-VMGroup that will write just the virtual machine names to the pipeline as a list. Now I can run commands like this:

Piping Expand-VMGroup to another Hyper-V command

Again, the module containing this command can be found near the end of the article and can be installed using Install-Module

3. Starting and Stopping Groups

The main reason I want to use VM groups is to start and stop groups of virtual machines all at once. I could use Expand-VMGroup and pipe results to Start-VM or Stop-VM but I decided to make specific commands for starting and stopping all virtual machine members of a group. If a member of the group is already in the targeted state, it is skipped.

Starting members of a VM group

The third member of this group was already running so it was skipped. Now I’ll shut down the group.

Stopping members of a VM group

It may not seem like much but every little thing I can do to get more done with less typing and effort is worth my time. I’m using full parameter names and typing out more than I actually need to for the sake of clarity.

How Do I Get These Commands

Normally, I would show you code samples that you could use. But in this case, I think these commands are ready to use as-is. You can get the commands from my PSHyperVTools module which is free to install from the PowerShell Gallery.

If you haven’t installed anything before you might get a prompt to update the version of nuget. Go ahead and say yes.  You’ll also be prompted if you want to install from a non-trusted repository. You aren’t installing this on a mission-critical server so you should be OK. Once installed, you can use the commands that I’ve demonstrated. They should all have help and examples.

Getting help for Expand-VMGroup

The module is open source so if you’d like to review the code first or the README, jump over to https://github.com/jdhitsolutions/PSHyperV. There are a few other commands and features of the module that I hope to write about in a future article or two. But for now, I hope you’ll give these commands a spin and let me know what you think in the comments section below!

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Author: Jeffery Hicks

Closing the rural broadband gap is an urgent national crisis – Microsoft on the Issues

It’s been clear to us for some time that the digital divide in this country is an urgent national crisis that must be solved. Since 2017, we’ve been working with internet service providers to do just that, through our Airband Initiative, and we’re on track to cover 3 million Americans in unserved rural areas by 2022.

It’s encouraging to see this issue rise in national prominence, through funding from the administration, congressional legislation and most recently new proposals introduced by several candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination. While there’s been some progress already, solving the broadband gap will require active engagement as well as effective policy proposals from all parts of the public sector.

It’s time to recognize that inequal access to broadband translates into inequality of opportunity. People in rural areas that lack broadband face higher unemployment rates, see fewer job and economic opportunities and place children from these communities behind their suburban and peers in school. Of course, this is not just a rural issue – broadband deserts exist within very urban areas as well, where costs can be unaffordable and availability non-existent.

To be sure, there are efforts underway to provide the funding and assistance needed to expand broadband coverage for rural areas, by the administration, Congress, governors and the private sector, including Microsoft and our Airband partners. But much more needs to be done to translate proposals into action.

That’s why we’re at the Iowa State Fair this week as well. Microsoft is hosting a booth, where we’ll learn from Iowans about their digital realities, discuss what we can do through the Airband Initiative to help and what other opportunities can be unlocked with reliable, affordable broadband access. We hope to discuss the issue with political leaders attending the fair as well.

Solving the broadband gap should be a national issue because we are leaving millions of Americans behind. We look forward to working with both sides of the aisle to make meaningful progress on this important national issue.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Crazy about chocolate, serious about people: meet the Dutch chocolate company that dared to be different – Microsoft News Centre Europe

Now, staff can build annual reports with Teams, easily sharing multiple source documents while knowing that team members are always working with the most current versions. As with every other aspect of work life for Tony’s employees, that strategy is carefully aligned with company values. “We use the chat feature in Teams to build the personal relationships we want to encourage,” says Ursem. “Email is more formal, more time-consuming. Chat lends itself to the shared humor and quick check-ins that naturally fit our culture and make us more efficient.”

With Teams, Tony’s team members have an informal, easy way to collaborate on projects with each other and with suppliers by using Teams Rooms. For IT Manager Rick van Doorn, otherwise known as Chocomatic Fanatic, nurturing spirit drives key decisions made by company leadership. “We say that our team comes first,” he explains. “Without the team, there is no company. And keeping that team collaborating optimally is vitally important to everything we do.”

Since implementing Teams, the company has averaged a 10 to 15 percent decrease in its total email volume. Ursem and van Doorn point out that this is happening despite steady company growth. “We’re pushing communication to the channels where it can happen most effectively,” says van Doorn.

A new world of work
The company focuses intently on messaging, both internally and externally. Even the design of its chocolate bars has a message – each bar is divided into unequal pieces, to mirror the inequalities in traditional profit sharing.

Internally, employees mix up workspaces every six months, sharing space with colleagues from different departments to build stronger team relations. That dedication to cultivating teamwork led the company to experiment with various apps purported to propel teamwork forward.

One of the biggest successes to come out of this experimentation was consolidating telephony with Office 365 in April 2019. As a result, employees can now access the company landline through Teams with the Vodafone Calling in Office 365 solution. For customer contact, Teams is extended with the Anywhere365 Contact Center. Because the solution interoperates with Salesforce, incoming calls can be logged in the company’s customer relationship management system for inclusion in the customer database.

“Using Teams with Vodafone Calling in Microsoft Office 365 amplifies the personal and transparent approach we’re known for,” says van Doorn. “We can talk to our chocofans with full knowledge of their prior backgrounds, orders, and feedback.” Incoming calls automatically route to the best person to handle the call, no matter where that person is, and contact information is included for the convenience of the person receiving the call.

A future in the cloud
Ten years ago, the company migrated to the cloud. “We were growing rapidly and needed to be scalable,” recalls van Doorn. “And we also looked at the growing number of relationships we were managing—both customers and suppliers, plus our rapidly expanding staff. We felt that committing to a complicated IT landscape in terms of connections, interfaces, and equipment would have been a risk.”

Cross-functional collaboration also underpins daily and strategic operations at Tony’s Chocolonely. Teamwork fans out from internal teams to a swath of partners that support different aspects of operations, including web developers, product wrapper suppliers, retail stores, and many more.

The company is so committed in fact, that its suppliers also now collaborate in Teams. “We’ve implemented the entire Microsoft 365 suite,” van Doorn. “All of our data is on SharePoint. With this modern working platform, we can easily collaborate with our partners, suppliers, and with each other.” The company also hopes to reduce business travel expenses by 10 percent now that so much collaboration takes place in the cloud.

For the people behind the Tony’s Chocolonely brand, it comes down to relationships. “By growing long-term relationships and paying a higher price—above the market price plus the Fairtrade Premium—to West African farmers, we’re trying to create an equal partnership,” says Ursem. “And if we’re performing well, other companies will be inspired to shoulder this responsibility, too.”

For more information, please visit the Microsoft Customer Stories blog.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Introducing Altaro Physical Server Backup

Hello again everyone! I’m delighted to bring you news about a hugely requested and great new addition to the Altaro Backup family, Altaro Physical Server Backup!

Altaro Physical Server Backup

If you’ve been a user of Altaro products in the past you will know that we focused our attention over the years towards creating the best virtual machine backup application on the market. However, one piece of feedback that we’ve encountered by many users is the request for a physical server backup solution. Most organizations have that one server that for whatever reason cannot be virtualized. This usually comes down to a supportability issue with a very old operating system or a 3rd party vendor concern. Additionally, from the managed services provider perspective, it is advantageous to be able to onboard a new customer knowing you’ll be able to protect physical servers should you run into one. Altaro Physical Server Backup is designed to address this gap and means you can now use Altaro to secure both your virtual and physical environments!

The initial release of Altaro Physical Server Backup will be offered as freeware, with a community support forum available for assistance. This initial release allows users to back up physical servers and recover them to a virtual machine or a VHD(X) if recovery is needed. Not only does this provide backup services, but it also provides the means to convert a physical machine into a virtual machine running on Hyper-V. Support for vSphere will follow at a later date.

Altaro Physical Server Backup

Altaro Physical Server Backup Roadmap

Future releases will include commercial features that will provide additional functionality and official support from the lightning-fast Altaro support team!

Future features expected currently are:

  • Integration with Altaro VM Backup for MSPs
  • Central Management with the Altaro Cloud Management Console

How to Download Altaro Physical Server Backup

Those wishing to download this solution for free can do so by completing the download form. After completing the form you’ll be sent a freeware license key for the product via email.

System requirements can be found here. Also, a getting started guide can be found here for more information on how to configure your first backup.

Wrap-Up

We hope you’ll enjoy using Altaro Physical Server Backup as much as we’ve enjoyed making it. We’re looking forward to your feedback and also looking forward to developing new features and products to make your lives as system administrators easier!

Let us know what you think of this offering in the comments!

Thanks for reading!

Andy Syrewicze

I currently have the distinct pleasure of acting as a Technical Evangelist for Altaro Software, makers of Altaro VM Backup. I’m heavily involved in IT community, on Altaro’s behalf, in a number of different ways, including, podcasts, webinars, blogging and public speaking. Prior to that, I spent the last 12+ years providing technology solutions across several industry verticals working for MSPs and Internal IT Departments. My areas of focus include, Virtualization, Cloud Services, VMware and the Microsoft Server Stack, with an emphasis on Hyper-V and Clustering. Outside of my day job, I spend a great deal of time working with the IT community, I’m a published author, and I’ve had the great honor of being named a Cloud and Datacenter Management MVP by Microsoft. I have a passion for technology and always enjoy talking about tech with peers, customers and IT pros over a cup of coffee or a cold beer.

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Author: Andy Syrewicze