Showcasing new business opportunities with the Microsoft Automotive Accelerator – Dynamics 365 Blog

Starting next week at IAA – New Mobility World, Microsoft will join 1000+ exhibitors and 250,000 visitors from approximately 39 countries to exhibit and explore immersive technologies, visionary concepts like electromobility, and many industry disruptors in Frankfurt. This year at IAA – New Mobility World asks the questions: “How are society, business, indeed our whole way of life changing and how does this affect our mobility? What can new technologies offer us?”

Shaping the transformation of the automotive industry

Today, Microsoft partners with automotive companies to revolutionize mobility with digital technology—building differentiated experiences, accelerating automotive innovation, monetizing data and services, and redefining transportation for a cleaner, safer world. Learn more about Microsoft’s perspective on navigating the future of autonomous vehicles.

With Microsoft Business Applications, our automotive partners, suppliers, and retailers can develop new customer insights and create omnichannel customer experiences with the Microsoft Automotive Accelerator.

Creating omnichannel customer experiences

Microsoft Industry Accelerators are a packaged and prepopulated common data model (CDM) using industry standards, built on Microsoft 365, Azure, and Dynamics 365. Industry accelerators enable customers and ISVs to build industry solutions on Microsoft technology by enabling specific industry business processes or scenarios for partners to develop industry solutions.

The Microsoft Automotive Accelerator allows users to schedule appointments and automotive services, facilitated through proactive communications. Microsoft partners gain access to a wide range of industry-standard entities and data relationships, allowing for rapid development of new automotive solutions. Working with our partners and industry leaders, the accelerator was developed to help auto makers, dealerships, and service providers quickly add more value for their customers.

For auto makers, the accelerator offers a vehicle and equipment management focus which allows device details and specifications within our data model to allow for the management and tracking of vehicles and devices. For dealerships and service providers, the accelerator includes a service and post-sales focus helping create connected customer experiences with a holistic view of customers, from service appointments to contracts and warranties.

Building new solutions with partners

This year at IAA – New Mobility World, Annata will showcase how their Annata 365 solutions, built on Microsoft technology with the Automotive Accelerator, help automotive and equipment businesses meet business challenges while taking advantages of new opportunities in the market.

The new Annata 365 for Sales solution adds industry-specific functionality to Microsoft Dynamics 365 for Sales, and is targeted specifically at driving a customer-centric approach to marketing and sales processes within the ever-evolving automotive industry. Annata 365 and the Microsoft Power Platform provide built-in analytics and intelligence, task-based apps, and omnichannel capabilities to drive digital transformation and innovation in any automotive organization.

We will also highlight our partnership with Adobe at IAA. Adobe and Microsoft’s strategic partnership and integrations allow an end-to-end customer experience management solution for experience creation, marketing, advertising, analytics, and commerce. This allows companies to deliver consistent and compelling experiences at each touch point with a customer, accelerating business growth throughout the customer journey.

Get the full story at IAA

These are just a few of the ways we’re partnering with organizations like Annata and Adobe to transform the automotive industry with Dynamics 365 and the Power Platform. If you are attending IAA, visit our booth at the Frankfurt Exhibition Hall 5, Stand C21, to experience our full suite of technologies and chat with customers and partners.

For more information about our location and sessions at this event, please see our event site.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Microsoft’s connected vehicle platform presence at IAA, the Frankfurt Auto Show

This post was co-authored by the extended Microsoft Connected Vehicle Platform (MCVP) team. 

A connected vehicle solution must enable a fleet of potentially millions of vehicles, distributed around the world, to deliver intuitive experiences including infotainment, entertainment, productivity, driver safety, driver assistance. In addition to these services in the vehicle, a connected vehicle solution is critical for fleet solutions like ride and car sharing as well as phone apps that incorporate the context of the user and the journey.

Imagine you are driving to your vacation destination and you start your conference call from home while you are packing. When you transition to the shared vehicle, the route planning takes into account the best route for connectivity and easy driving and adjusts the microphone sensitivity during the call in the back seat. These experiences today are constrained to either the center-stack screen, known as the in-vehicle infotainment device (IVI), or other specific hardware and software that is determined when the car is being built. Instead, these experiences should evolve over the lifetime of ridership. The opportunity is for new, modern experiences in vehicles that span the entire interior and systems of a vehicle, plus experiences outside the vehicle, to create deeper and longer-lasting relationships between car makers and their customers throughout the transportation journey.

To realize this opportunity, car manufacturers and mobility-as-a-service (MaaS) providers need a connected vehicle platform to complete the digital feedback loop by incorporating the seamless deployment of new functionality that is composed from multiple independently updatable services that reflect new understanding, at scale, and with dependable and consistent management of data and these services from Azure to and from three different edges: the vehicle, the phone, and the many enterprise applications that support the journey.

The Microsoft Connected Vehicle Platform (MCVP) is the digital chassis upon which automotive original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) can deliver value-add services to their customers. These services areas include:

  • In-vehicle experiences
  • Autonomous driving
  • Advanced navigation
  • Customer engagement and insights
  • Telematics and prediction services
  • Connectivity and over the air updates (OTA)

MCVP is a platform composed from about 40 different Azure services and tailored for automotive scenarios. To ensure continuous over-the-air (OTA) updates of new functionality, MCVP also includes different Azure edge technologies such as Automotive IoT Edge that runs in the vehicle, and Azure Maps for intelligent location services.

With MCVP, and an ecosystem of partners across the industry, Microsoft offers a consistent platform across all digital services. This includes vehicle provisioning, two-way network connectivity, continuous over-the-air updates of containerized functionality, support for command-and-control, hot, warm, or cold path for telematics, and extension hooks for customer or third-party differentiation. Being built on Azure, MCVP includes the hyperscale, global availability, and regulatory compliance that comes as part of the Azure cloud. OEMs and fleet operators leverage MCVP as a way to “move up the stack” and focus on their customers rather than spend resources on non-differentiating infrastructure.

Automotive OEMs already taking advantage of MCVP, along with many of our ecosystem partners, including the Volkswagen Group, the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, and Iconiq.

In this blog post, we are delighted to recap many of the MCVP ecosystem partners that accelerate our common customers’ ability to develop and deploy completed connected vehicle solutions.

An image showing the aspects of the Microsoft Connected Vehicle Platform.

Focus areas and supporting partnerships

Microsoft’s ecosystem of partners include independent software vendors (ISVs), automotive suppliers, and systems integrators (SIs) to complete the overall value proposition of MCVP. We have pursued partnerships in these areas:

In-vehicle experiences

Cheaply available screens, increasingly autonomous vehicles, the emergence of pervasive voice assistants, and users’ increased expectation of the connectedness of their things have all combined to create an opportunity for OEMs to differentiate through the digital experiences they offer to the occupants, both the driver and the passengers, of their vehicles.

LG Electronics’ webOS Autoplatform offers an in-vehicle, container-capable OS that brings the third party application ecosystem created for premium TVs to In-vehicle experiences. webOSAuto supports the container-based runtime environment of MCVP and can be an important part of modern experiences in the vehicle.

Faurecia leverages MCVP to create disruptive, connected, and personalized services inside the Cockpit of the Future to reinvent the on-board experience for all occupants.

Autonomous driving

The continuous development of autonomous driving systems requires input from both test fleets and production vehicles that are integrated by a common connected vehicle platform. This is because the underlying machine learning (ML) models that either drive the car or provide assistance to the driver will be updated over time as they are improved based on feedback across those fleets, and those updates will be deployed over the air in incremental rings of deployment by way of their connection to the cloud.

Teraki creates and deploys containerized functionality to vehicles to efficiently extract and manage selected sensor data such as telemetry, video, and 3D information. Teraki’s product continuously trains and updates the sensor data to extract relevant, condensed information that enables customers’ models to achieve highest accuracy rates, both in the vehicle (edge) as well in Azure (cloud.)

TomTom is integrating their navigation intelligence services such as HD Maps and Traffic as containerized services for use in MCVP so that other services in the vehicles, including autonomous driving, can take advantage of the additional location context.

Advanced navigation

TomTom’s navigation application has been integrated with the MCVP in-vehicle compute architecture to enable navigation usage and diagnostics data to be sent from vehicles to the Azure cloud where the data can be used by automakers to generate data-driven insights to deliver tailored services, and to make better informed design and engineering decisions. The benefit of this integration includes the immediate insights created from comparing the intended route with the actual route with road metadata. If you are attending IAA, be sure to check out the demo at the Microsoft booth.

Telenav is a leading provider of connected car and location-based services and is working with Microsoft to integrate its intelligent connected-car solution suite, including infotainment, in-car commerce, and navigation, with MCVP.

Customer engagement and insights

Otonomo securely ingests automotive data from OEMs, fleet operators, etc., then reshapes and enriches the data so application and service providers can use it to develop a host of new and innovative offerings that deliver value to drivers. The data services platform has built it privacy by design solutions for both personal and aggregate use cases. Through the collaboration with Microsoft, car manufacturers adopting the Microsoft Connected Vehicle Platform can easily plug their connected car data into Otonomo’s existing ecosystem to quickly roll out new connected car services to drivers.

Telematics and prediction services

DSA is a leading software and solutions provider for quality assurance, diagnostics, and maintenance of the entire vehicle electrics and electronics in the automotive industry. Together, DSA and Microsoft target to close the digital feedback loops between automotive production facilities and field cars by providing an advanced Vehicle Lifecycle Management, based on the Microsoft Connected Vehicle Platform.

WirelessCar is a leading managed service provider within the connected vehicle eco-system and empowers car makers to provide mobility services with Microsoft Azure and the Microsoft Connected Vehicle Platform that supports and accelerates their customers’ high market ambitions in a world of rapid changing business models.

Connectivity and OTA

Cubic Telecom is a leading connectivity management software provider to the automotive and IoT industries globally. They are one of the first partners to bring seamless connectivity as a core service offering to MCVP for a global market. The deep integration with MCVP allows for a single data lake and an integrated services monitoring path. In addition, Cubic Telecom provides connected car capabilities that let drivers use infotainment apps in real-time, connect their devices to the Wi-Fi hotspot, and top-up on data plans to access high-speed LTE connectivity, optionally on a separate APN.

Excelfore is an innovator in automotive over-the-air (OTA) updating and data aggregation technologies. They provide a full implementation of the eSync bi-directional data pipeline, which has been ported to the Microsoft Azure cloud platform and integrated as the first solution for MCVP OTA updating.

Tata Communications is a leading global digital infrastructure provider. We are working with them to help speed the development of new innovative connected car applications. By combining the IoT connectivity capabilities of Tata Communications MOVE™ with MCVP, the two companies will enable automotive manufacturers to offer consumers worldwide more seamless and secure driving experiences.

Microsoft is incredibly excited to be a part of the connected vehicle space. With the Microsoft Connected Vehicle Platform, our ecosystem partners, and our partnerships with leading automotive players – both vehicle OEMs and automotive technology suppliers – we believe we have a uniquely capable offering enabling at global scale the next wave of innovation in the automotive industry as well as related verticals such as smart cities, smart infrastructure, insurance, transportation, and beyond.

Explore the Microsoft Connected Vehicle Platform today and visit us at IAA.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Tara Prakriya | Microsoft Story Labs

Mark Mobleywritten by

Mark Mobley

Microsoft’s connected car platform delivers a mobile datacenter to your driveway

The connected car revolution isn’t coming — it’s here. Going to a meeting, and have a conference call on the way? Your ride’s digital assistant will help you plan a route blessedly free of tunnels and drops in connectivity that could interfere. And while you drive, the car will help you stay in your lane.

Dr. Herbert Diess, Volkswagen AG chairman, Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, Tara Prakriya, and Christian Senger, Volkswagen board member & head of digital car & services, at the Volkswagen AG Digital Lab in Berlin.

Leading this effort on the engineering front at Microsoft is Tara Prakriya, General Manager for Azure IoT Mobility and Connected Vehicles. This team of dozens is working with the two largest industry players, Volkswagen Group and Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, to create cars featuring unprecedented levels of interactivity.

“What our connected vehicle platform gives our clients is truly a digital chassis to achieve scale and efficiency in developing and delivering value to their customers,” Prakriya said. “Our customers are navigating a digital transformation of the industry and this digital chassis helps them absorb and fully take advantage of the new opportunities available in the market in a global way, including China.”

“What our customers look for in the partnership from Microsoft is not just a technology vendor, but a strategic partnership to help the full digital transformation, cultural transformation and market transformation that need to work in lock step. It’s a tall order, which is why we work with our customers to figure out what this is going to look like.”

Our connected vehicle platform gives our clients a digital chassis to achieve scale and efficiency in developing and delivering value to their customers.

“Pretty much everybody that’s on the team is really excited about this space,” said Larry Sullivan, co-head of the team with Prakriya and a veteran Microsoft engineer. “I think Tara brings a lot of that energy and the team gives that energy back as well. We’re not a huge team, but we’re really motivated, and we’re really fired up about helping our customers do business in a really positive way.”

Microsoft’s automotive initiatives engage such corporate partners as TomTom, Cubic Telecom, Moovit, DSA and Faurecia. They also leverage Microsoft’s work on the Internet of Things (IoT) and the company’s Azure cloud computing service. Prakriya believes it’s helpful to think of IoT as the information of things.

Tara Prakriya and Larry Sullivan consider themselves “two in a box” as collaborators on Microsoft’s connected car platform.

Tara Prakriya and Larry Sullivan consider themselves “two in a box” as collaborators on Microsoft’s connected car platform.

“The digital feedback loop is the term that we use at Microsoft,” Prakriya said. “IoT in many ways represents the digital feedback loop of physical things, physical spaces, physical environment and what products actually do in the marketplace. There are lots of decisions that our business customers need to make that IoT information can make a significant contribution to.

“And, once those decisions are made, there is new information, and that needs to be communicated as a feedback loop back to those physical environments, physical products, physical consumers and physical employees. The opportunity in connected vehicles, and mobility as a whole, is to be on the edge of getting the data so that we can do amazing things and then deliver it back to the edge again. What then connects the stationary things, like smart buildings, with smart transportation and mobility is Azure Maps.”

A car, Prakriya said, has plenty in common with other consumer electronics products: “You want experiences to become easy. You want the cars and the system to anticipate what your needs are. There is a lot of ease of use and delight that can be had for the consumers — both the drivers and the passengers. The cool challenge with delivering a connected vehicle platform is simplifying the complexities of what is really a mobile datacenter on wheels so that these experiences are easier to create, deploy and refine. Having a single connected vehicle and maps platform that underpins consumer experiences in the vehicle and on their phones, providing driving assistance and mobility as a service, goes a long way towards this goal.”

Connected car illustration.

Microsoft’s work in the automotive space is about helping each customer create a differentiated set of integrated services while taking advantage of a consistent, robust, flexible, global and secure digital chassis for scale. “They have different brand promises to their consumers,” Prakriya said, “and so as a result, the features that they are really thinking about and the digital value that they are trying to deliver to their customers are different. We are taking care of the boring stuff so that they can really think about what their brand promise is and deliver it.”

She points out that automakers are making these promises and creating these systems in the face of not one, not two, but four simultaneous upheavals in the industry. The first is basic digital connectivity, followed closely by the use of artificial intelligence — for example, in fighting driver distraction, among other applications. Then there are shared-vehicle services, and the gradual electrification of cars and trucks as manufacturers move away from fossil fuels, which will have impacts across the supply chain and all through the vehicle life cycle.

“It is an enormous amount of change that we know our customers are thinking about constantly,” Prakriya said, “so this is a lot of the reason why we created the set of platforms for IoT Mobility. We are very engaged with our customers because it’s so exciting to watch them navigate this. And if we can play any part in that navigation, it’s pretty wonderful.”

The challenge with delivering a connected vehicle platform is simplifying the complexities of what is really a mobile datacenter on wheels so that these experiences are easier to create, deploy and refine.

To further complicate matters, all of the team’s major customers are also working on driverless vehicles. “Azure’s storage and compute teams, along with the AI teams, and the devops teams, together have an excellent story for building your own autonomous driving models,” she said. “Azure has a pretty great end-to-end template and methodology that helps customers, from getting their big data onto Azure all the way through to working with ecosystem partners to be on Azure for things like simulation as well as collecting data from production vehicles to assist in validation.

“We work with a number of large customers on building their own autonomous driving models on Azure. Fully autonomous vehicles are, of course, more than just a technical problem. There are legal and regulatory considerations. In the meantime, assisted driving models are rapidly improving, and we are excited to work with our customers to deploy these models to vehicles using our connected vehicle platform and create a digital feedback loop.”

Larry Sullivan is an engineering manager who works on Microsoft’s connected car platform.

Larry Sullivan is an engineering manager who works on Microsoft’s connected car platform.

“Today, this data informs cutting-edge driver-assisted features like automatic braking, advanced cruise control and lane assist. Tomorrow, the information will be the backbone of autonomy. The leader in that space, bar none, is Microsoft,” wrote analyst Jon Markman in a recent Forbes article.

There is also an increasing focus on Azure Maps to keep up with the demands of multi-modal routing, HD Maps and fresh updates that connect ride share partners with map making partners. In addition, Azure Maps is an important pillar in geo-spatial analytics to help create new value for customers.

Prakriya “really understands the tech and the business and how those things come together,” co-head of the team, Sullivan said. “She is fantastic as a counterpart.”

Both Prakriya and Sullivan say they consider themselves “two in a box” as managers — even though he’s Texan and she’s not, he’s kind of a car guy and she drives a non-connected minivan that’s the same age as her 14-year-old son. They’re both fast talkers who laugh easily.

“We have a great time,” Sullivan said. “We have a lot of fun. This is an exciting industry. It’s really going through a bunch of changes and we feel well positioned to help, but like anything, it’s got a degree of insanity, and we have a lot of fun with just, ‘All right, what’s the craziness of the day?'”

Yet Prakriya’s scientific approach — she holds nine patents — persists even after she leaves the office. It extends to life with her son and husband, who works in the Microsoft Business and Applications Group.

“I am a crock pot maven,” she said. “There is almost nothing I cannot cook in a crock pot. It is the only way our family survives. A lot of Indian cooking works really well in the crock pot, baking as well — it is amazingly easy to bake in a crock pot.

Microsoft’s work in the automotive space is about helping each corporate customer create a differentiated set of services.

Prakriya and Sullivan walk along a woodsy trail on Microsoft’s Redmond campus.Prakriya and Sullivan walk along a woodsy trail on Microsoft’s Redmond, Washington campus.

“I joke that my aim is to bend the space-time continuum of figuring out how we eat as a family, and with the slow cooker, we have the option of stretching out the interval between when I cook and when the meal needs to be ready. I also like the whole end-to-end supply chain of food. It’s also about optimizing the shopping list, strategic use of the freezer, and considering the whole process all the way down to the dishes. It’s kind of fun.”

Both at home and at work, she pursues a hobby: knitting. She’s a contributor to Knit-A-Square, a South African charity that collects knitted squares and assembles them into blankets for vulnerable and orphaned children, many of whom are affected by HIV/AIDS. She said that knitting is the perfect accompaniment to a conference call.

“We do a lot of them because our customers are in Europe,” she said, “and they are kind of all in different places, right? Knitting keeps me away from the keyboard because it’s easy to get distracted. It is a way to keep my fingers active so I can focus.”

And for Prakriya, Sullivan and the team, focus is key — because there’s always another question to answer from another angle.

“Just connecting things does not solve the big challenges,” Prakriya said. “There is definitely a lot of work to do. We are trying to provide the platforms to make that work easier. We have great support from our management chain. We are aligned all the way up and down with our wickedly smart compatriots in business development — shout out to [Executive Vice President of Business Development] Peggy Johnson’s team — as well as marketing, teams in the field, as well as PR. And our close relationship with our partners and customers makes the work exciting and fun.

“What Larry and I and the extended IoT Mobility team are doing is a shining example of everything about the fantastic Microsoft culture at work. It’s about solving the right problems the right way, in an aligned manner, so that the best people who understand the problem from different dimensions can come together and achieve something really great, and help our customers achieve something that is frankly even greater.”

Originally published on 9/12/2019 / Photos by Brian Smale / © Microsoft

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Announcing Microsoft for Startups Autonomous Driving | Blog

Today, at the Frankfurt Motorshow (IAA) we announced Microsoft for Startups: Autonomous Driving (MfS – AD), an exclusive program which aims to accelerate the growth of startups working on autonomous driving (AD).

Increasingly startups have been playing a crucial role in bringing autonomous driving technology to the world. From building full-stack autonomy solutions for OEMs to opening up new business opportunities in areas like delivery, ride-sharing and long haul transit, startups have been at the forefront of technological advancement in this space. Startups also play a critical role in delivering important AD enablement technologies and solutions like simulation, data management, labeling and more.

image

Cultivating a state-of-the-art, global partner ecosystem has been a focal point of our autonomous driving strategy and our startup partners have played an important part in helping our customers deliver the promise of autonomous driving at scale. For instance, Cognata is using their simulation technology to help customers like Audi AG speed up their AV development. We announced partnerships with Ascent Robotics, a Tokyo-based startup making innovative use of reinforcement learning and neuroscience to deliver complex L4 driving scenarios and Linker Networks, a startup based in Taiwan taking annotation efficiency and reliability to a whole new level through their AI-based auto-labeling technology helping the industry build smarter, safer vehicles. We are also closely working with startups like Udelv, who are paving the path for autonomous driving to meet the growing demands of the retail delivery space. This week at IAA, Applied Intuition announced the release of their Applied Development Platform optimized on Microsoft Azure. 

The MfS-AD program is another example of our continuing commitment to the AD startup community. We want to empower pioneering startups who are defining what is next in autonomous driving by helping them scale up and scale out through business and technical enablement. As part of the program, all selected startups will receive the premium offer from our Microsoft for Startups program including access to up to $120,000 USD of free Azure cloud.

For technical enablement, startups will receive benefits like:

  • Access to our top engineers and program managers working on autonomous driving infrastructure technology and solutions.
  • 1:1 architectural sessions with Microsoft Cloud Engineers.
  • Early access to autonomous driving capabilities on Azure.
  • Potential co-development opportunities.

For business enablement, startups will receive benefits like:

  • Opportunities to expand your network by becoming a part of Microsoft’s autonomous driving ecosystem. Many of our partners have found their next big customer or partner at one of our automotive networking receptions and other events.
  • Joint customer opportunities.
  • Marketing and amplification support.
  • Preferred showcase opportunities at industry events and conferences.
  • Visibility to M12 (formerly Microsoft Ventures) for potential investment opportunities.

For details on how to apply, nomination requirements, selection criteria and more, visit https://aka.ms/ADstartup

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Kaseya ramps up managed compliance services focus

MSP software vendor Kaseya revealed it has invested $10 million into a newly formed business unit dedicated to managed compliance services.

The division focuses on Kaseya Compliance Manager, a platform the vendor developed after acquiring RapidFire Tools in 2018. Kaseya Compliance Manager lets MSPs assess and monitor customers’ compliance posture within a number of regulatory frameworks, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Payment Card Industry Security Standard, and General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The platform can also help MSPs and their customers demonstrate compliance with cyberinsurance policies. Kaseya recently appointed Max Pruger, formerly chief revenue officer at CloudJumper, to lead the unit as senior vice president and general manager of compliance.

“We as a company believe that compliance is the next big managed service. It is a close cousin to security … [and] a fantastic opportunity for MSPs to expand their business and monetize a very low-touch type of offering,” said Fred Voccola, CEO of Kaseya.

What Kaseya Compliance Manager does

Fred Voccola, CEO of KaseyaFred Voccola

According to Voccola, Kaseya’s compliance management platform scans a customer’s networks and infrastructure to gather about 70% to 90% of the data required by regulators. The remaining 10% to 30% of information can’t be obtained through automated processes, so the software generates a checklist to guide that information’s collection.

“What our product does is it automates everything that can be automated and then it lists the 50 to 100 items that have to be ‘manually’ proven,” Voccola said.

HIPAA, for example, states that a medical provider must physically store patient files in a room with secure locks on the doors. In this case, Kaseya Compliance Manager would direct the MSP and its customer to take photos of the door locks and load the photos into the software, he said.

Once the information is collected, MSPs can then generate documentation and reports to show the customer has met compliance requirements.

In addition, Voccola said the software lets MSPs continually monitor customers’ compliance status. MSPs can receive alerts if changes in a customer’s network or infrastructure cause a compliance issue.

Enabling managed compliance services

A portion of Kaseya’s $10 million investment will go into developing resources to help MSPs establish managed compliance practices. Resources include a content library to learn about how to price, sell and deliver the services. “MSPs don’t have to be an expert in the compliance framework with this offering. That’s the biggest part of it,” Voccola said.

Max Pruger, senior vice president and general manager of compliance, KaseyaMax Pruger

Kaseya is also encouraging MSPs to use the platform internally. Under certain regulatory frameworks, such as HIPAA, MSPs must demonstrate internal compliance before they can touch customer data. Voccola said Kaseya gives MSPs the license for their own internal usage for free when they purchase Kaseya Compliance Manager.

Pruger added that MSPs can also benefit from using the software internally for showing continual compliance with cyberinsurance policies. “Every MSP out there should have cyberinsurance,” Pruger noted.

Voccola said that regulatory compliance will soon become a common part of doing business for all MSPs in the U.S., especially as states roll out localized privacy legislation. He cited the California Consumer Privacy Act introduced in 2018, as an example.

Pruger agreed. “I will say that in the next 24 months, every single MSP will have to have a compliance practice, because every single state in the United States is going to have specific compliance rules that they are going to have to follow,” Pruger said.

In the next quarter, Pruger said he aims to bring Kaseya Compliance Manager to market across GDPR, cyberinsurance, HIPAA and NIST frameworks. “As far as cyberinsurance, HIPAA and NIST go within the U.S., every single MSP has to be [compliant with] at least one of those,” he said. He noted that he will look to add more compliance standards on the platform.

Only about 400 MSPs are currently using Kaseya Compliance Manager, Voccola noted — a number the company hopes to greatly increase in the coming months.

SADA offers flat-rate GCP services

SADA, a business and technology consultancy based in Los Angeles, launched four flat-rate packaged offers for Google Cloud Platform adopters.

The packaged services include Anthos First Step, Anthos Flat-Rate, Database Migration Flat-Rate and VM Migration Flat-Rate. SADA delivers the services for a flat price and according to a fixed time. Miles Ward, CTO at SADA, said the GCP services address customers’ uncertainty and risk when moving to the cloud. An organization may balk at a cloud migration service if the service provider can’t cite a definitive delivery schedule or set a fixed price.

“The ability to have a flat-rate offer lets the conversation start,” Ward said. He noted customers are more likely to greenlight a project if the service is prescriptive, time-bound and available at a specific price point.

The Anthos First Step package provides the first phase of setting up and using Google Anthos. The offering includes x86 portable or rack-mounted infrastructure and Google Anthos, VMware vCenter 6.5 and F5 Big-IP Virtual Addition. SADA provides on-site hardware and software installation, a hands-on lab and a help desk trained on Anthos/Kubernetes.

Anthos Flat-Rate covers the second phase of an Anthos implementation. The package includes everything in the first-step package as well as additional items including a review of the initial implementation, identification of production goals and stakeholders for readiness reviews, and any additional equipment delivery and validation, according to SADA.

The Database Migration Flat-Rate package includes migration of a customer’s database to GCP, while VM Migration Flat-Rate migrates a customer’s virtual machines to GCP.

Hostway, Hosting rebrand as Ntirety

Emil Sayegh, president and CEO at NtiretyEmil Sayegh

Hostway Services Inc. and Hosting, which merged in January, have rebranded as Ntirety.

The managed cloud services company is based in Austin, Texas, and has vendor certifications with companies such as AWS, Microsoft and Oracle. Emil Sayegh, president and CEO at Ntirety, cited “strong synergy” between the companies’ offerings and no overlap between their customer bases. On the IT side, the companies had both been using ScienceLogic to run their businesses. The consolidation of those instances has generated cost savings, Sayegh noted.

No additional acquisitions are in the offing this year, but Sayegh noted the potential for merger and acquisition activity in 2020.

Other news

Christian Alvarez as vice president, Americas Channel, at NutanixChristian Alvarez
  • Nutanix has appointed Christian Alvarez as vice president, Americas Channel. Alvarez was previously worldwide head of channels and distribution at Juniper Networks. He has also held positions at Cyan, a Ciena company; Avaya; eLandia Group; Connexion Technologies and Terremark Worldwide, a Verizon company. Nutanix said its partners include value-added resellers, distributors, system integrators, OEM partners and technology alliances.
  • Hewlett Packard Enterprise launched HPE ML Ops, a container-based software product to support the machine-learning model lifecycle, according the company. An HPE spokesperson said the vendor believes the product presents an opportunity for partners. “Channel partners need to build a practice in this area and develop expertise in data science, AI [and machine learning], and advanced analytics. It’s an opportunity for them to … provide a strategic advisory role for their customers as they look to deliver game-changing business innovation with AI,” the spokesperson said.
  • NYI, a hybrid IT solutions provider based in New York, has acquired a data center in Chicago. The former Navisite facility is geared toward edge and IoT requirements, according to the company.
  • In distribution news, Ingram Micro inked a deal with CoreKinect to provide its IoT sensors to U.S. channel partners. Meanwhile, Tech Data signed an agreement with OPAQ to provide its network-security-as-a-service cloud platform to U.S. service providers.
  • Mission, an MSP based in Los Angeles, said it obtained AWS APN Premier Consulting Partner status.
  • Axcient, a business availability and cloud migration company, unveiled a lead generation program that it said is free for all Axcient partners.
  • Opengear, which specializes in enterprise automation, network resilience and security, will host its first channel partner conference Sept. 16-17 in Dallas.

Market Share is a news roundup published every Friday.

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Azure Media Services’ new AI-powered innovation

Animated character recognition, multilingual speech transcription and more now available

At Microsoft, our mission is to empower every person and organization on the planet to achieve more. The media industry exemplifies this mission. We live in an age where more content is being created and consumed in more ways and on more devices than ever. At IBC 2019, we’re delighted to share the latest innovations we’ve been working on and how they can help transform your media workflows. Read on to learn more, or join our product teams and partners at Hall 1 Booth C27 at the RAI in Amsterdam from September 13th to 17th.

Video Indexer adds support for animation and multilingual content

We made our award winning Azure Media Services Video Indexer generally available at IBC last year, and this year it’s getting even better. Video Indexer automatically extracts insights and metadata such as spoken words, faces, emotions, topics and brands from media files, without you needing to be a machine learning expert. Our latest announcements include previews for two highly requested and differentiated capabilities for animated character recognition and multilingual speech transcription, as well as several additions to existing models available today in Video Indexer.

Animated character recognition

Animated content or cartoons are one of the most popular content types, but standard AI vision models built for human faces do not work well with them, especially if the content has characters without human features. In this new preview solution, Video Indexer joins forces with Microsoft’s Azure Custom Vision service to provide a new set of models that automatically detect and group animated characters and allow customers to then tag and recognize them easily via integrated custom vision models. These models are integrated into a single pipeline, which allows anyone to use the service without any previous machine learning skills. The results are available through the no-code Video Indexer portal or the REST API for easy integration into your own applications.

Image of the AMS Video Indexer recognizing animated characters.

We built these animated character models in collaboration with select customers who contributed real animated content for training and testing. The value of the new functionality is well articulated by Andy Gutteridge, Senior Director, Studio & Post-Production Technology at Viacom International Media Networks, which was one of the data contributors: “The addition of reliable AI-based animated detection will enable us to discover and catalogue character metadata from our content library quickly and efficiently. Most importantly, it will give our creative teams the power to find the content they want instantly, minimize time spent on media management and allow them to focus on the creative.”

To get started with animated character recognition, please visit our documentation page.

Multilingual identification and transcription

Some media assets like news, current affairs, and interviews contain audio with speakers using different languages. Most existing speech-to-text capabilities require the audio recognition language to be specified in advance, which is an obstacle to transcribing multilingual videos. Our new automatic spoken language identification for multiple content feature leverages machine learning technology to identify the different languages used in a media asset. Once detected, each language segment undergoes an automatic transcription process in the language identified, and all segments are integrated back together into one transcription file consisting of multiple languages.

An image of the Video Indexer screen, showing multilingual transcription.
The resulting transcription is available both as part of Video Indexer JSON output and as closed-caption files. The output transcript is also integrated with Azure Search, allowing you to immediately search across videos for the different language segments. Furthermore, the multi-language transcription is available as part of the Video Indexer portal experience so you can view the transcript and identified language by time, or jump to the specific places in the video for each language and see the multi-language transcription as captions as a video is played. You can also translate the output back-and-forth into 54 different languages via the portal and API.

Read more about the new multilingual option and how to use it in Video Indexer in our documentation.

Additional updated and improved models

We are also adding new and improving existing models within Video Indexer, including:

Extraction of people and locations entities

We’ve extended our current brand detection capabilities to also incorporate well-known names and locations, such as the Eiffel Tower in Paris or Big Ben in London. When these appear in the generated transcript or on-screen via optical character recognition (OCR), a specific insight is created. With this new capability, you can review and search by all people, locations and brands that appeared in the video, along with their timeframes, description, and a link to our Bing search engine for more information.

 Azure Video Indexer entity extraction in the insight pane.

Editorial shot detection model

This new feature adds a set of “tags” in the metadata attached to an individual shot in the insights JSON to represent its editorial type (such as wide shot, medium shot, close up, extreme close up, two shot, multiple people, outdoor and indoor, etc.). These shot-type characteristics come in handy when editing videos into clips and trailers as well as when searching for a specific style of shots for artistic purposes.

Azure Video Indexer editorial shot type example.
Explore and read more about editorial shot type detection in Video Indexer.

Expanded granularity of IPTC mapping

Our topic inferencing model determines the topic of videos based on transcription, optical character recognition (OCR), and detected celebrities even if the topic is not explicitly stated. We map these inferred topics to four different taxonomies: Wikipedia, Bing, IPTC, and IAB. With this enhancement, we now include level-2 IPTC taxonomy.

Tanking advantage of these enhancements is as easy as re-indexing your current Video Indexer library.

New live streaming functionality

We are also introducing two new live-streaming capabilities in preview to Azure Media Services.

Live transcription supercharges your live events with AI

Using Azure Media Services to stream a live event, you can now get an output stream that includes an automatically generated text track in addition to the video and audio content. This text track is created using AI-based live transcription of the audio of the contribution feed. Custom methods are applied before and after speech-to-text conversion in order to improve the end-user experience. The text track is packaged into IMSC1, TTML, or WebVTT, depending on whether you are delivering in DASH, HLS CMAF, or HLS TS.

Live linear encoding for 24/7 over-the-top (OTT) channels

Using our v3 APIs, you can create, manage, and stream live channels for OTT services and take advantage of all the other features of Azure Media Services like live to video on demand (VOD), packaging, and digital rights management (DRM).

To try these preview features, please visit the Azure Media Services Community page.

An image showing live transcription signal flow.

New packaging features

Support for audio description tracks

Broadcast content frequently has an audio track that contains verbal explanations of on-screen action in addition to the normal program audio. This makes programming more accessible for vision-impaired viewers, especially if the content is highly visual. The new audio description feature enables a customer to annotate one of the audio tracks to be the audio description (AD) track, which in turn can be used by players to make the AD track discoverable by viewers.

ID3 metadata insertion

In order to signal the insertion of advertisements or custom metadata events on a client player, broadcasters often make use of timed metadata embedded within the video. In addition to SCTE-35 signaling modes, we now also support ID3v2 or other custom schemas defined by an application developer for use by the client application.

Microsoft Azure partners demonstrate end-to-end solutions

Bitmovin is debuting its Bitmovin Video Encoding and Bitmovin Video Player on Microsoft Azure. Customers can now use these encoding and player solutions on Azure and leverage advanced functionality such as 3-pass encoding, AV1/VVC codec support, multi-language closed captions, and pre-integrated video analytics for QoS, ad, and video tracking.

Evergent is showing its User Lifecycle Management Platform on Azure. As a leading provider of revenue and customer lifecycle management solutions, Evergent leverages Azure AI to enable premium entertainment service providers to improve customer acquisition and retention by generating targeted packages and offers at critical points in the customer lifecycle.

Haivision will showcase its intelligent media routing cloud service, SRT Hub, that helps customers transform end-to-end workflows starting with ingest using Azure Data Box Edge and media workflow transformation using Hublets from Avid, Telestream, Wowza and Cinegy, and Make.tv.

SES has developed a suite of broadcast-grade media services on Azure for its satellite connectivity and managed media services customers. SES will show solutions for fully managed playout services, including master playout, localized playout and ad detection and replacement, and 24×7 high-quality multichannel live encoding on Azure.

SyncWords is making its caption automation technology and user-friendly cloud-based tools available on Azure. These offerings will make it easier for media organizations to add automated closed captioning and foreign language subtitling capabilities to their real-time and offline video processing workflows on Azure.
 
Global design and technology services company Tata Elxsi has integrated TEPlay, its OTT platform SaaS, with Azure Media Services to deliver OTT content from the cloud. Tata Elxsi has also brought FalconEye, its quality of experience (QoE) monitoring solution that focuses on actionable metrics and analytics, to Microsoft Azure.

Verizon Media is making its streaming platform available in beta on Azure. Verizon Media Platform is an enterprise-grade managed OTT solution including DRM, ad insertion, one-to-one personalized sessions, dynamic content replacement, and video delivery. The integration brings simplified workflows, global support and scale, and access to a range of unique capabilities available on Azure.

Many of our partners will also be presenting in the theater at our booth, so make sure you stop by to catch them!

Short distance, big impact

We are proud to support the 4K 4Charity Fun Run as a gold sponsor. This is a running and walking event held at various media industry events since 2014, and it raises awareness and financial support for non-profits focused on increased diversity and inclusion. Register and come join us on Saturday, September 14th, at 7:30am at the Amstelpark in Amsterdam.

Don’t miss out

There’s a lot more going on at the Microsoft booth this IBC. To learn more, read about how the community of our customers and partners are innovating on Azure in media and entertainment, or better yet come and join us in Hall 1 Booth C27. If you won’t be there, we’re sorry we’ll miss you, but you can try Video Indexer and Azure Media Services for yourself by following the links.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Today in Technology: Lessons through time | Microsoft On The Issues

Technology never exists in isolation. Every advance is shaped by what has gone before.

As part of the Today in Technology series, Microsoft President Brad Smith and Carol Ann Browne, Senior Director of External Relations and Executive Communications, have listened to different perspectives and explored lessons from history.

Here’s a glimpse into some of their videos:

Lessons on protecting privacy

The explosion of data in recent years means that agreeing on how best to protect our privacy is more relevant than ever. A visit to a former prison in Berlin served as a powerful reminder of the importance of getting that right.

[Subscribe to Microsoft on the Issues for more on the topics that matter most.]

YouTube Video

During the Cold War, the East German secret police, the Stasi, spied on millions of people, keeping files on their activities. Hohenschoenhausen was where those that were suspected of holding outlawed beliefs and opinions were imprisoned.

How the spirit of Louis Braille lives on in today’s AI innovators

YouTube Video

In the 19th century, a young French boy named Louis Braille developed a system of reading through touch. His work transformed the way millions of people who are blind or have low vision perceive the world. The same passion that inspired him lives on in the work undertaken today by engineers, programmers and technicians to create accessible technology that can help unleash everyone’s potential.

The Human Cost of Cyberattacks

YouTube Video

Interconnected digital infrastructure is vulnerable to an entirely new form of attack – cyberwarfare. To fight this, we need to update the international rules of allowable behavior – and work toward a Digital Geneva Convention.

There is no playbook for addressing challenges such as privacy, cybersecurity, the moral conundrums of AI or the relationship between technology and inequality, but Smith and Browne examine these challenges, and more, in their new book, Tools and Weapons: the Promise and the Peril of the Digital Age.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Google Cloud tackles Spark on Kubernetes

An early version of a Google Cloud service that runs Apache Spark on Kubernetes is now available, but more work will be required to flesh out the container orchestration platform’s integrations with data analytics tools.

Kubernetes and containers haven’t been renowned for their use in data-intensive, stateful applications, including data analytics. But there are benefits to using Kubernetes as a resource orchestration layer under applications such as Apache Spark rather than the Hadoop YARN resource manager and job scheduling tool with which it’s typically associated. Developers and IT ops stand to gain advantages that containers bring to any application, such as portability across systems and consistency in configuration, along with automated provisioning and scaling for workloads that’s handled in the Kubernetes layer or by Helm charts, as well as container resource efficiency compared with virtual or bare metal machines.

“Analytical workloads, in particular, benefit from the ability to add rapidly scalable cloud capacity for spiky peak workloads, whereas companies might want to run routine, predictable workloads in a virtual private cloud,” said Doug Henschen, an analyst at Constellation Research in Cupertino, Calif. 

Google, which offers managed versions of Apache Spark and Apache Hadoop that run on YARN through its Cloud Dataproc service, would prefer to use its own Kubernetes platform to orchestrate resources — and to that end, released an alpha preview integration for Spark on Kubernetes within Cloud Dataproc this week. Other companies, such as Databricks (run by the creators of Apache Spark) and D2iQ (formerly Mesosphere), support Spark on Kubernetes, but Google Cloud Dataproc stands to become the first of the major cloud providers to include it in a managed service.

Customers don’t care about managing Hive or Pig, and want to use Kubernetes in hybrid clouds.
James MaloneProduct manager, Google Cloud Dataproc

Apache Spark has had a native Kubernetes scheduler since version 2.3, and Hadoop added native container support in Hadoop 3.0.3, both released in May 2018. However, Hadoop’s container support is still tied to HDFS and is too complex, in Google’s view.

“People have gotten Docker containers running on Hadoop clusters using YARN, but Hadoop 3’s container support is probably about four years too late,” said James Malone, product manager for Cloud Dataproc at Google. “It also doesn’t really solve the problems customers are trying to solve, from our perspective — customers don’t care about managing [Apache data warehouse and analytics apps] Hive or Pig, and want to use Kubernetes in hybrid clouds.”

Spark on Kubernetes only scratches the surface of big data integration

Cloud Dataproc’s Spark on Kubernetes implementation remains in a very early stage, and will require updates upstream to Spark as well as Kubernetes before it’s production-ready. Google also has its sights set on support for more Apache data analytics apps, including the Flink data stream processing framework, Druid low-latency data query system and Presto distributed SQL query engine.

“It’s still in alpha, and that’s by virtue of the fact that the work that we’ve done here has been split into multiple streams,” Malone said. One of those workstreams is to update Cloud Dataproc to run Kubernetes clusters. Another is to contribute to the upstream Spark Kubernetes operator, which remains in the experimental stage within Spark Core. Finally, Cloud Dataproc must brush up performance enhancement add-ons such as external shuffle service support, which aids in the dynamic allocation of resources.

For now, IT pros who want to run Spark on Kubernetes must assemble their own integrations among the upstream Spark Kubernetes scheduler, supported Spark from Databricks, and Kubernetes cloud services. Customers that seek hybrid cloud portability for Spark workloads must also implement a distributed storage system from vendors such as Robin Systems or Portworx. All of it can work, but without many of the niceties about fully integrated cloud platform services that would make life easier.

For example, the Spark Kubernetes executor uses Python, rather than the Scala programming language, which is a bit trickier to use.

“The Python experience of Spark in Kubernetes has always lagged the Scala experience, mostly because deploying a compiled artifact in Scala is just easier logistically than pulling in dependencies for Python jobs,” said Michael Bishop, co-founder and board member at Alpha Vertex, a New York-based fintech startup that uses machine learning deployed in a multi-cloud Kubernetes infrastructure to track market trends for financial services customers. “This is getting better and better, though.”

There also remain fundamental differences between Spark’s job scheduler and Kubernetes that must be smoothed out, Bishop said.

“There is definitely an impedance [between the two schedulers,” he said. “Spark is intimately aware of ‘where’ is for [nodes], while Kubernetes doesn’t really care beyond knowing a pod needs a particular volume mounted.”

Google will work on sanding down these rough edges, Malone pledged.

“For example, we have an external shuffle service, and we’re working hard to make it work with both YARN and Kubernetes Spark,” he said.

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Are students prepared for real-world cyber curveballs?

With a projected “skills gap” numbering in the millions for open cyber headcount, educating a diverse workforce is critical to corporate and national cyber defense moving forward. However, are today’s students getting the preparation they need to do the cybersecurity work of tomorrow?

To help educators prepare meaningful curricula, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) Cybersecurity Workforce Framework. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is also doing its part to help educate our future cybersecurity workforce through initiatives like the CyberForce Competition,™ designed to support hands-on cyber education for college students and professionals. The CyberForce Competition™ emulates real-world, critical infrastructure scenarios, including “cyber-physical infrastructure and lifelike anomalies and constraints.”

As anyone who’s worked in cybersecurity knows, a big part of operational reality are the unexpected curveballs ranging from an attacker’s pivot while escalating privileges through a corporate domain to a request from the CEO to provide talking points for an upcoming news interview regarding a recent breach. In many “capture the flag” and “cyber-range exercises,” these unexpected anomalies are referred to as “injects,” the curveballs of the training world.

For the CyberForce Competition™ anomalies are mapped across the seven NICE Framework Workforce Categories illustrated below:

Image showing seven categories of cybersecurity: Operate and Maintain, Oversee and Govern, Collect and Operate, Securely Provision, Analayze, Protect and Defend, and Investigate.

NICE Framework Workforce categories, NIST SP 800-181.

Students were assessed based on how many and what types of anomalies they responded to and how effective/successful their responses were.

Tasks where students excelled

  • Threat tactic identification—Students excelled in identifying threat tactics and corresponding methodologies. This was shown through an anomaly that required students to parse through and analyze a log file to identify aspects of various identifiers of insider threat; for example, too many sign-ins at one time, odd sign-in times, or sign-ins from non-standard locations.
  • Log file analysis and review—One task requires students to identify non-standard browsing behavior of agents behind a firewall. To accomplish this task, students had to write code to parse and analyze the log files of a fictitious company’s intranet web servers. Statistical evidence from the event indicates that students are comfortable writing code to parse log file data and performing data analysis.
  • Insider threat investigations—Students seemed to gravitate towards the anomalies and tasks connected to insider threat identification that maps to the Security Provision pillar. Using log analysis techniques described above, students were able to determine at a high rate of success individuals with higher than average sign-in failure rates and those with anomalous successful logins, such as from many different devices or locations.
  • Network forensics—The data indicated that overall the students had success with the network packet capture (PCAP) forensics via analysis of network traffic full packet capture streams. They also had a firm grasp on related tasks, including file system forensic analysis and data carving techniques.
  • Trivia—Students were not only comfortable with writing code and parsing data, but also showed they have solid comprehension and intelligence related to cybersecurity history and trivia. Success in this category ranked in the higher percentile of the overall competition.

Pillar areas for improvement

  • Collect and Operate—This pillar “provides specialized denial and deception operations and collection of cybersecurity information that may be used to develop intelligence.” Statistical analysis gathered during the competition indicated that students had hesitancies towards the activities in this pillar, including for some tasks that they were successful with in other exercises. For example, some fairly simple tasks, such as analyzing logs for specific numbers of entries and records on a certain date, had a zero percent completion rate. Reasons for non-completion could be technical inability on the part of the students but could also have been due to a poorly written anomaly/task or even an issue with sign-ins to certain lab equipment.
  • Investigate—Based on the data, the Investigate pillar posed some challenges for the students. Students had a zero percent success rate on image analysis and an almost zero percent success rate on malware analysis. In addition, students had a zero percent success rate in this pillar for finding and identifying a bad file in the system.

Key takeaways

Frameworks like NIST NICE and competitions like the DOE CyberForce Competition are helping to train up the next generation of cybersecurity defenders. Analysis from the most recent CyberForce Competition indicates that students are comfortable with tasks in the “Protect and Defend” pillar and are proficient in many critical tasks, including network forensics and log analysis. The data points to areas for improvement especially in the “Collect and Operate” and “Investigate” pillars, and for additional focus on forensic skills and policy knowledge.

Bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage on security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity.

The CyberForce work was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

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Author: Steve Clarke

For Sale – Synology Surveillance Station CCTV Camera Licences x2 (One Left)

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Discussion in ‘Computer Classifieds‘ started by DJ Dunk, Sep 5, 2019.

  1. I have two (2) Synology Surveillance Station camera licences which are now surplus to requirements and removed from my NAS.

    Each licence allows the user to add 1 extra IP camera to their Synology NAS.

    Scan of the code can be emailed to the buyer. Original licence card also available for £1 extra.

    £30 per licence – one available (one sold)

    Price and currency: 30
    Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
    Payment method: PayPal Friends & Family
    Location: Canterbury
    Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
    Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

    ______________________________________________________
    This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019 at 11:36 PM
  2. Up before eBay . . .

  3. tuttonp

    tuttonp

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    are these single camera licences??

  4. Yes they are, one licence per camera (except some PTZ cameras).

  5. jamrop

    jamrop

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    Hey, would like to have 1 please. Pm?

  6. PM sent, thank you.

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