For Sale – Gigabyte Geforce RTX 2060 Gaming OC 6G Edition

Purchased on the 15th January from Scan. Only reason for selling is I’ve been treated to an upgrade for Christmas

Like new, in full original packaging.

Features Powered by GeForce RTX™ 2060 Integrated with 6GB GDDR6 192-bit memory interface WINDFORCE 3X Cooling System with alternate spinning fans RGB Fusion…

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McAfee launches security tool Mvision Cloud for Containers

Cybersecurity company McAfee on Tuesday announced McAfee Mvision Cloud for Containers, a product intended to help organizations ensure security and compliance of their cloud container workloads.

Mvision Cloud for Containers integrates container security with McAfee’s cloud access security broker (CASB) and cloud security posture management (CSPM) tools, according to the company.

“Data could … move between SaaS offerings, IaaS custom apps in various CPSs, containers and hybrid clouds. We want security to be consistent and predictable across the places data live and workloads are processed. Integrating CASB and CSPM allows McAfee to provide consistent configuration policies and DLP/malware scanning that does not restrict the flexibility of the cloud,” said John Dodds, a director of product management at McAfee.

According to Andras Cser, vice president and principal analyst for security and risk management at Forrester, when it comes to evaluating a product like Mvision, it’s worth looking at factors such as “price, cost of integration, level of integration between acquired components and coverage of the client’s applications.”

Mvision Cloud uses the zero-trust model application visibility and control capabilities by container security startup NanoSec for container-based deployments in the cloud. McAfee acquired NanoSec in September in a move to expand its container cloud security offerings.

Mvision Cloud for Containers builds on the existing McAfee Mvision Cloud platform, integrating cloud security posture management and vulnerability scanning for container workloads so that security policies can be implemented across different forms of cloud IaaS workloads, according to the company.

Other features of McAfee Mvision Cloud for Containers include:

  • Cloud security posture management: Ensures the container platforms run in accordance with Center for Internet Security and other compliance standards by integrating configuration audit checks to container workloads.
  • Container images vulnerability scanning: Identifies weak or exploitable elements in container images to reduce the application’s risk profile.
  • DevOps integration: Ensures compliance and secures container workloads; executes security audits and vulnerability scanning to identify risk and send security incidents and feedback to developers within the build process; and monitors and prevents configuration drift on production deployments of the container workloads.

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For Sale – Huawei Matebook X Pro – i7, 512GB, MX150

I am selling my Huawei Matebook X Pro, i7, 8GB RAM, 512GB Storage, GPU MX150.
It is in excellent condition and I can’t find any scratches or dings on it anywhere.

I bought it from the Microsoft Store so I have been the only owner, and I purchased it on 21st November 2018.
It comes in the original box, with the original charger and the HDMI accessory that came with it.

The only reason for sale is that I was travelling a lot with work at the time and since that has died down, I’ve built a desktop.

This is an excellent laptop with a great display and battery life has never let me down.

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For Sale – Western Digital 4TB 2.5″ External Passport Hard Drive

Western Digital 4TB 2.5″ External Passport Hard Drive
Black in colour, used for only backup movies.

Location
Warwick
Price and currency
62.50
Delivery cost included
Delivery Is Included
Prefer goods collected?
I have no preference
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Bank transfer or paypal

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AI trends 2020 outlook: More automation, explainability

The AI trends 2020 landscape will be dominated by increasing automation, more explainable AI and natural language capabilities, better AI chips for AI on the edge, and more pairing of human workers with bots and other AI tools.

AI trends 2020 — increased automation

In 2020, more organizations across many vertical industries will start automating their back-end processes with robotic process automation (RPA), or, if they are already using automation, increase the number of processes to automate.

RPA is “one of the areas where we are seeing the greatest amount of growth,” said Mark Broome, chief data officer at Project Management Institute (PMI), a global nonprofit professional membership association for the project management profession.

Citing a PMI report from summer 2019 that compiled survey data from 551 project managers, Broome said that now, some 21% of surveyed organizations have been affected by RPA. About 62% of those organizations expect RPA will have a moderate or high impact over the next few years.

RPA is an older technology — organizations have used RPA for decades. It’s starting to take off now, Broome said, partially because many enterprises are becoming aware of the technology.

“It takes a long time for technologies to take hold, and it takes a while for people to even get trained on the technology,” he said.

Moreover, RPA is becoming more sophisticated, Broome said. Intelligent RPA or simply intelligent process automation (IPA) — RPA infused with machine learning — is becoming popular, with major vendors such as Automation Anywhere and UiPath often touting their intelligent RPA products. With APIs and built-in capabilities, IPA enables users to more quickly and easily scale up their automation use cases or carry out more sophisticated tasks, such as automatically detecting objects on a screen, using technologies like optical character recognition (OCR) and natural language processing (NLP).

Sheldon Fernandez, CEO of DarwinAI, an AI vendor focused on explainable AI, agreed that RPA platforms are becoming more sophisticated. More enterprises will start using RPA and IPA over the next few years, he said, but it will happen slowly.

RPA, AI trends 2020
In 2020, enterprises will use more RPA and chatbots, and will get more explainable AI.

AI trends 2020 — push toward explainable AI

Even as AI and RPA become more sophisticated, there will be a bigger move toward more explainable AI.

“You will see quite a bit of attention and technical work being done in the area of explainability across a number of verticals,” Fernandez said.

You will see quite a bit of attention and technical work being done in the area of explainability.
Sheldon FernandezCEO, DarwinAI

Users can expect two sets of effort behind explainable AI. First, vendors will make AI models more explainable for data scientists and technical users. Eventually, they will make models explainable to business users.

Likely, technology vendors will move more to address problems of data bias as well, and to maintain more ethical AI practices.

“As we head into 2020, we’re seeing a debate emerge around the ethics and morality of AI that will grow into a highly contested topic in the coming year, as organizations seek new ways to remove bias in AI and establish ethical protocols in AI-driven decision-making,” predicted Phani Nagarjuna, chief analytics officer at Sutherland, a process transformation vendor.

AI trends 2020 — natural language

Furthermore, BI, analytics and AI platforms will likely get more natural language querying capabilities in 2020.

NLP technology also will continue to evolve, predicted Sid Reddy, chief scientist and senior vice president at virtual assistant vendor Conversica.

“Human language is complex, with hundreds of thousands of words, as well as constantly changing syntax, semantics and pragmatics and significant ambiguity that make understanding a challenge,” Reddy said.

“As part of the evolution of AI, NLP and deep learning will become very effective partners in processing and understanding language, as well as more clearly understanding its nuance and intent,” he continued.

Among the tech giants involved in AI, AWS, for example, in November 2019 revealed Amazon Kendra, an AI-driven search tool that will enable enterprise users to automatically index and search their business data. In 2020, enterprises can expect similar tools to be built into applications or sold as stand-alone products.

More enterprises will deploy chatbots and conversational agents in 2020 as well, as the technology becomes cheaper, easier to deploy and more advanced. Organizations won’t fully replace contact center employees with bots, however. Instead, they will pair human employees more effectively with bot workers, using bots to answer easy questions, while routing more difficult ones to their human counterparts.

“There will be an increased emphasis in 2020 on human-machine collaboration,” Fernandez said.

AI trends 2020 — better AI chips and AI at the edge

To power all the enhanced machine learning and deep learning applications, better hardware is required. In 2020, enterprises can expect hardware that’s specific to AI workloads, according to Fernandez.

In the last few years, a number of vendors, including Intel and Google, released AI-specific chips and tensor processing units (TPUs). That will continue in 2020, as startups begin to enter the hardware space. Founded in 2016, the startup Cerebras, for example, unveiled a giant AI chip that made national news. The chip, the largest ever made, Cerebras claimed, is the size of a dinner plate and designed to power massive AI workloads. The vendor shipped some last year, with more expected to ship this year.

While Cerebras may have created the largest chip in the world, 2020 will likely introduce smaller pieces of hardware as well, as more companies move to do AI at the edge.

Max Versace, CEO and co-founder of neural network vendor Neurala, which specializes in AI technology for manufacturers, predicted that in 2020, many manufacturers will move toward the edge, and away from the cloud.

“With AI and data becoming centralized, manufacturers are forced to pay massive fees to top cloud providers to access data that is keeping systems up and running,” he said. “As a result, new routes to training AI that can be deployed and refined at the edge will become more prevalent.”

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Pentagon CMMC program to vet contractor cybersecurity

The U.S. Department of Defense is aiming to secure its supply chain with the cybersecurity maturity model certification, or CMMC program, which will vet potential third-party contractors.

Ellen Lord, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment, said at a news conference at the Pentagon that the CMCC program “will measure technical capabilities and process maturity” for organizations in the running for new defense contracts.

Although the full details of the CMMC program won’t be made public until January, Lord described it as a five-tier framework in which each level of certification is specifically designed based on how critical the work of the contractor would be. The CMMC program is scheduled to be fully implemented by June 2020.

Dan Fallon, senior director of public sector systems engineers at Nutanix, said programs like CMMC “create or enhance standard practices and responsibilities around cybersecurity are essential to improving security posture.”

“It is great to see the DOD engaged in a strategic, comprehensive, and measured approach to ensuring the security of the products and vendors with whom they work,” Fallon told SearchSecurity. “Furthermore, the Department’s concerted effort in sourcing input from the private sector in developing these standards is a strong indication of its understanding that even with additional cybersecurity policy, overall security will always remain a shared responsibility between vendors and government agencies. After all, there is no one silver bullet to make an agency invulnerable to attack.”

Theresa Payton, president and CEO of Fortalice Solutions and former White House CIO, said the CMMC program “is a good next step to improve supply chain security for the DOD through its contractors and sub-contractors.” 

“In the wake of data breaches where the weakest link was a contractor, these are important next steps,” Payton told SearchSecurity via email. She added that if she “were to prioritize security elements for every contractor and subcontractor to meet it would be: 1. ensure that all data in rest and in transit and at points of consumption are encrypted; 2. have a regular review process of user access controls and authorizations to include third party applications and system to system interactions that are tested; 3. create kill switches that can be flipped if there is a suspected intrusion; 4. ongoing training and awareness.”

The full details of the CMMC program requirements won’t be known until next month, but Lord did promise the expectations, measurements and metrics used will be “crystal clear,” and audits of potential contractors will be done by a third party that should be chosen by next month as well.

Additionally, Lord said at the Ronald Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, Calif. earlier this week that the DOD expects the weakest links in the supply chain to be the lower tier, smaller companies who may not be able to afford to meet the requirements. As such, the DoD is planning ways to ensure smaller contactors can meet a basic level of cybersecurity via “broader certifications” that will be detailed more in the next three months.

Payton said she was “encouraged to see that the DOD specifically noted that it will help smaller contractors to meet requirements.”

“This will encourage many to embark on this endeavor,” Payton said. “A rising tide lifts all boats so if the DOD would extend free software, tools, and tips and techniques to their supply chain they will naturally lift the security of the DOD ecosystem.”

Government contractor risks

The history of cybersecurity risks and third-party contractors can be traced back years. The most famous example was whistleblower Edward Snowden, a contractor for Booz Allen, who stole and leaked information about NSA phone metadata tracking practices in 2013.

In 2015, a breach of the Office of Personnel Management affected millions and the ensuing investigation found that the threat actors gained access to systems in part by using credentials stolen from government contractors.

The DOD had two issues in 2017 linked to contractors. In August, an AWS S3 bucket containing unclassified data from the DOD was discovered to be publicly accessible due to misconfiguration by Booz Allen Hamilton. In November, another S3 bucket containing DOD data, this one built by contractor VendorX, was discovered to be exposed.

Payton said there’s a simple reason why these past issues didn’t lead to faster action by the government.

“There is a fundamental disconnect between the rate at which technology evolves and the rate at which bureaucracy reacts. What we’re dealing with here is a failure of systems,” Payton said. “It’s never too late to learn from past mistakes, but ultimately, we need real-time solutions not just to today’s obstacles and threats but to tomorrow’s as well.” 

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