For Sale – Seagate 1TB 3.5″ HDD

Europe’s busiest forums, with independent news and expert reviews, for TVs, Home Cinema, Hi-Fi, Movies, Gaming, Tech and more.

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company number 03997482, registered in England and Wales.

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For Sale – Dell E7450 14″ Ultrabook Laptop (Intel i5-5300 8GB 512GB SSD)

Europe’s busiest forums, with independent news and expert reviews, for TVs, Home Cinema, Hi-Fi, Movies, Gaming, Tech and more.

AVForums.com is owned and operated by M2N Limited,
company number 03997482, registered in England and Wales.

Powered by Xenforo, Hosted by Nimbus Hosting, Original design Critical Media Ltd.
This website uses the TMDb API but is not endorsed or certified by TMDb.

Copyright © 2000-2020 E. & O.E.

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For Sale – ROG Rapture GT-AX11000 router

Selling this gaming router due to change of circumstances.. Was brought in July 2019 from Very.. Opened up over the weekend to set it up forgotten I had it to be honest was due to have my front room Extended why the delay is setting it up.. but loft is now getting done first so item has not even been turned on yet took pics and put back in box. Had a little. Accident with one the anttanas must of been lose wire has come out and little clip will need gluing. Price adjusted for the antanna

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For Sale – Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000mhz 16GB

Europe’s busiest forums, with independent news and expert reviews, for TVs, Home Cinema, Hi-Fi, Movies, Gaming, Tech and more.

AVForums.com is owned and operated by M2N Limited,
company number 03997482, registered in England and Wales.

Powered by Xenforo, Hosted by Nimbus Hosting, Original design Critical Media Ltd.
This website uses the TMDb API but is not endorsed or certified by TMDb.

Copyright © 2000-2020 E. & O.E.

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Community and Connection to Drive Change

Reflections on International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month

In recent weeks, I have had several individuals share with me their admiration for the amount of time I spend listening to, advocating for and simply being there for women. Of course I was humbled by what felt like a compliment, but hearing this gave me pause. Why did these individuals see my actions as deserving of admiration as opposed to a core way of how we show up for each other in the workplace, the industry and our lives in general? What path led me to this way of being, how might I expand my impact and how might I encourage others to take a more active role?

This way of being has been part of who I am for my entire working life. When I joined Microsoft full time in 1998, my first manager was a role model for me. Laurie Litwack spent time getting to know me personally as well as to understand my passion and hopes and what unique perspective I brought. She thoughtfully created my first assignment to both leverage my skills and challenge me. Laurie showed me not only what it meant to bring your authentic self to work but also how it felt to be supported. Under her leadership I not only grew in the technical aspects of my role, she also nurtured my appreciation for people. Looking back, this experience was unique, especially for that era in engineering where there were fewer women and even fewer women managers. It shaped my values as a leader and my view on how you best engage people and support their development. It showed me the importance of being present.

Early into my career the VP of our engineering organization, Bill Vegthe, brought a group of women employees together to better understand our experiences in the organization. He genuinely wanted to learn from us what the organization could be doing better to support our growth and satisfaction. At the time, the number of women in the organization was low and this forum was the first opportunity many of us had to meet and spend time with each other. The most valuable thing we learned from the experience was the personal support and enjoyment that came from simply making time for each other. The isolation we each felt melted away when we got to spend time with others like us: creating connections, sharing experiences, learning from each other. We grew more collectively than we ever would have individually, and I personally benefited from both the friendship and wisdom of many of the women in this community: Terrell Cox, Jimin Li, Anna Hester, Farzana Rahman, Deb MacFadden, Molly Brown, Linda Apsley, Betsy Speare. This was true many years ago when this community was created and holds true today even as this community has scaled from a handful of women to thousands of women across our Cloud + AI Division who make up this Women’s Leadership Community (WLC) under sponsorship from leaders such as Bob Muglia, Bill Laing, Brad Anderson and currently Scott Guthrie.

As I grew in my career, the importance of intentionally building connections with other women only became more clear. In the early 2010s as I joined the technical executive community, I looked around and felt a similar experience to my early career days. There were very few technical executives who were women, and we were spread across the organization, meaning we rarely had the opportunity to interact and in some cases had never met! It was out of desire to bring the WLC experience to this group that our Life Without Lines Community of technical women executives across Microsoft grew, based on the founding work of Michele Freed, Lili Cheng, Roz Ho, Rebecca Norlander. This group represents cross-company leadership and as the connections deepened, so did the impact on each other in terms of peer mentoring, career sponsorship and engineering and product collaboration.

Together we are more powerful than we are individually, amplifying each other’s voices.       

Although the concept of community might seem simple and obvious in the ongoing conversations about inclusion, the key in my experience is how the connections in these communities were built. This isn’t just about networking for the sake of networking; we come together with a focus on being generous with our time and our experiences, challenging each other and our organization to address issues in a new way, and with the space to be authentic within our own community by not feeling like we needed to be a monolith in our perspectives or priorities. We advocate for one another, we leverage our networks, we create space and we amplify voices of others. This community names the challenges these women face, names the hopes they have for themselves and future women in our industry, and names what is most important to our enjoyment of our work. My job, and the job of others leaders, is to then listen to these voices leveraging the insights to advocate for what is needed in the organization, and drive systemic changes that will create the best-lived experience for all women at Microsoft and in the industry. 

I have found that members of the community want to be heard, if you are willing to be present, willing to bring your authentic self and willing to take action on what you learn. I’m reflecting on this, in particular, as I think about International Women’s Day (IWD). From its beginnings in the early 1900s through to present day, IWD strives to recognize the need for active participation, equality and development of women and acknowledge the contribution of women globally.

This year I am reflecting on the need to ensure that our communities of women accurately represent the diverse range of perspectives and experiences of employees and customers. Making sure that even in a community about including others, we are not unintentionally excluding certain groups of women who may not have the same experiences or priorities, or privileges as others. It is a chance to reflect on how I can expand my impact. I challenge all of us to take this time to recognize those who are role models for us and those voices who may not be heard and determine what role each of us can play in achieving this goal for everyone.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

For Sale – delidded 9900k and Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Master

I’m considering having a go at team red so thinking about getting rid of my delidded 9900k and Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Master mb, my chip is good for 5.1ghz @ 1.315v and is in the board with frame so direct die, i will include the EK-Supremacy EVO with the bundle, I’m not looking to split so please don’t ask.
I’m looking for £600 inc delivery

Location
Newcastle
Price and currency
£600
Delivery cost included
Delivery Is Included
Prefer goods collected?
I have no preference
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Bank transfer

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For Sale – AM4 Motherboard, RAM, Modular PSU

1:
Item: 16GB (2×8) DDR3 SO-DIMM ram.
Brand: Samsung
Type: 8gb 2Rx8 PC3L-12800S-11-13-F3
Model: M471B1G73EB0-YK0
Purchased: Around 3 years ago
Reason for sale: No longer required
Price: £25 per stick inc shipping

2:
Item: Asus ROG Strix B450-F gaming ATX
Purchased: 21/04/2019
Reason for sale: Downsize of build
Price: 80 inc shipping

3:
Item: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 (Black)
Purchased: 21/04/2019
Reason for sale: Downsize of build
Price: 70 inc shipping

4:
Item: EVGA B3 650W 80+ bronze fully modular
Purchased: 15/04/2019
Reason for sale: Downsize of build
Price: 45 inc shipping

Cheers.

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For Sale – EVGA Geforce GTX 1080Ti + More

HyperX Alloy Elite Full Size Cherry MX Red £70 Inc please

Boxed and in excellent conditon, replaced with a K95

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Creative Soundblaster E5 (Bare Unit Only) £55 Inc please.

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Western Digital PCSN520 NVME 256GB £35 inc please.

Pulled from new system, very little use.

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MSI X370 Gaming Plus £65 Inc please.

Boxed with accessories , and in full working order

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EVGA 1080Ti £450 Inc

As below, any questions please ask.

Boxed and complete, still in warranty for 512 Days.

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Sold

Microserver Gen 8 (Xeon E3 1220 3.0Ghz Quad Core, 16GB Ram, 4*1TB HDD , Ilo Advanced, Samsung 850 250GB SSD ) £330 inc please —-Sold

As in the spec above , a beefed up Microserver, owned since new, a great lab device, in full working order with the above spec, any questions please ask.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————Uni-fi AP AC Lite £50 Inc please — Sold

Boxed and complete, and in full working order

Any questions please ask.

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Women as allies for women: Understanding intersectionality – The Official Microsoft Blog

One of my earliest learnings was that my experiences as a woman were not identical to other women’s experiences, although they were similar. As with any dimension of identity, the way women experience the world depends on much larger context. As a white girl growing up in Victoria, British Columbia, there were multiple layers to my experiences. Although my brothers and I had what was necessary, we did not have much socioeconomic privilege. What I learned as I watched the world around me is that as a benefit of my race, it was easier for me to cover my socioeconomic status than it was for my friends who were not white.

The United Nations marked March 8 as International Women’s Day by declaring that “fundamental freedoms require the active participation, equality and development of women everywhere.” This declaration is inclusive of all women with intersectionality in mind.

Understanding intersectionality in the workplace

It starts with something as simple as the way we think about all the dimensions of our identity, including things like race, ethnicity, disability, religion, age and sexual orientation. Even class, education, geography and personal history can alter how we experience womanhood. When Kimberlé Crenshaw coined the term intersectionality 30 years ago, she explained it as how these overlapping identities and conditions impact the way we experience life’s challenges and opportunities, the privileges we have, the biases we face.

So simply focusing on a single dimension of identity, without that context, is not always helpful. When we consider women as a single category, as a monolith, it can be misleading at best, dangerous at worst. Doing so overlooks the variations of circumstances and perspectives within the group and obscures real lived experiences as outliers or exceptions. “Women’s workplace issues” is a vague term without enough specificity to drive action. Women of color, women with disabilities, transgender women, women who are the first of their family to work corporate or professional jobs, women who are caregivers — all women deal with additional social, cultural, regional or community demands that may not exist for others. Although all women navigate varying degrees of conscious and unconscious gender biases, intersections of identity can place compounded pressure on a woman to downplay other aspects of her life to conform — a behavior called covering, as explored by Kenji Yoshino — leading to even greater workplace stress.

To increase hiring, retention, representation and the development of women in the workplace, companies must be intentional and accountable for being aware of the diversity within the diversity. Conventional strategies to increase the representation of women in a workplace have mostly benefited those who do not also experience intersectional challenges. By getting curious and exploring the lived experiences of women through the lens of intersectionality, we become more precise about the root cause and about finding ways to generate systemic solutions for all.

Setting the stage for allyship

 Understanding all this can be a powerful catalyst for change, not just for organizations as a whole but also for individuals. At Microsoft we are refining how we think about allyship. Part of that exploration is the recognition that as Microsoft employees each of us has some dimension of privilege. This isn’t meant to minimize or negate the very real ways that communities experience significant, systematic historical bias or oppression. But rather it is meant to shine a light on our opportunity to show up for each other. For example, as a community of women we have an opportunity to be more thoughtful about the experiences of our peers who face greater challenges due to their intersectional identity. So although traditionally we might look to men in the workplace to carry the full weight of allyship, women in the workplace also have an opportunity to be thoughtful allies for others in their community.

Such an awareness opens the door for true allyship — an intentional commitment to use your voice, credibility, knowledge, place or power to support others in the way they want to be supported. I am very aware of my opportunity, due to my personal privilege, to show up for other women in a meaningful way. I embrace my obligation to create space for other voices to be heard, not just on International Women’s Day, but all year round.

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Author: Microsoft News Center