Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19582 | Windows Experience Blog

Hello Windows Insiders, today we’re releasing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19582.1001 to Windows Insiders in the Fast ring.
You can check out our Windows Insider Program documentation here, including a list of all the new features and updates released in builds so far. Not seeing any of the features in this build? Check your Windows Insider Settings to make sure you’re on the Fast ring. Submit feedback here to let us know if things weren’t working the way you expected.
If you want a complete look at what build is in which Insider ring, head over to Flight Hub. Please note, there will be a slight delay between when a build is flighted and when Flight Hub is updated.

Eye Control Improvements
Eye Control enables users to interact with Windows using only their eyes. Based on feedback, with this build, we’re updating the Eye Control settings to now span multiple pages, in order to give the options a bit more room to breathe.

To get started with Eye Control, connect a supported eye tracking device, then follow the steps here.

Your Phone app–Samsung Galaxy S20 and Galaxy Z Flip introduces multiple new features
Continuing our strong partnership with Samsung from last August, we’re excited to introduce exciting new features, which are now available on the latest Samsung Galaxy S20/S20+/S20 Ultra and Samsung Galaxy Z Flip devices in select markets. You can enjoy copying and pasting text and images between your devices, black screen while in phone screen, Rich Communication Service messaging, and more!
Copy and paste between devices and vice versa
You can now copy and paste text and images between your phone and Windows 10 PC seamlessly. Simply turn on this feature in the Your Phone app settings and enjoy copying and pasting content with the familiar ctrl + C and ctrl + v commands on the PC or the tapping and holding gesture on your Android phone. It’s that simple.

Copy and paste requirements:
Samsung Galaxy S20/S20+/S20 Ultra and Samsung Galaxy Z Flip devices in select markets
PC running Windows 10 April 2018 Update or higher
Black screen while using phone screen
The phone screen feature is getting a boost. Users now have the option to turn off their smartphone screen to optimize battery consumption and protect the privacy of their phone’s personal content. Black screen will show during a phone screen session on all supported devices (any device that supports Link to Windows). The black screen kicks in when the session is initiated and dismisses itself when it ends. The user can dismiss the black screen anytime by:
Pressing the power button
Swiping the device screen
Activating Bixby
Disabling the black screen at any time from the Settings page
Feature Requirements:
Latest version of Link to Windows
Phone screen supported devices
Check out the list of supported phone screen compatible devices.
Rich Communication Service (RCS)
Your Phone app now supports RCS (send/receive) for a richer messaging experience on select Samsung devices, provided your mobile operator supports RCS. For users who have RCS messaging enabled on their device and use Samsung Messages app as the default app on their phone, they will now be able to send and receive these messages from the Your Phone app. Additionally, users will be able to see their messages get marked as read. If a user views messages on their PC, they will also be marked as read on the phone, removing the need to clear notifications on the phone.
RCS requirements:
Samsung Galaxy S20 series running version 10.0 or higher
PC running Windows 10 April 2018 Update or higher
Mobile operator supporting RCS messaging
These features are available to Windows Insiders on Windows 10 Build 19H2+ and to the general public. Please make sure you have the latest versions of the Your Phone Companion – Link to Windows, and the Your Phone app. We plan on supporting additional Samsung devices in the future and will keep you posted.
We value your feedback, so give these features a try and let us know what you think. You can report any issues under Your Phone > Settings > Send feedback or directly through Feedback Hub.

[UPDATE] This change isn’t quite ready to roll out, but we’ll let you know once it is.In an effort to consolidate information, we’re removing the Windows Security status details from the About Settings. This information is still available under Settings > Update & Security > Windows Security.
We’re working on giving you control over whether apps can disable the screen capture border. The page isn’t finished being wired up yet, but you’ll see it listed under Privacy Settings.
We’ve updated the “set time zone automatically” toggle in Time & Date settings to now be greyed out if location has been disabled.
Based on feedback, we’re updating the Scottish Gaelic keyboard in these ways:
Pressing AltGR + 7 will now input ⁊ (U+204A TIRONIAN SIGN ET).
Pressing ‘ will now directly insert that character (right single quote).
Pressing AltGr +’ will now act as a dead key to combine an acute accent with a subsequent letter.

We fixed an issue for Chinese Insiders where Windows setup (for example, if you reset your PC) would get stuck after inputting your Microsoft Account details.
We fixed an issue where, when you upgraded with certain languages like Japanese, the Installing Windows X% page wasn’t rendering the text correctly (only boxes were displayed).
We fixed an issue resulting in notifications sometimes having the wrong actions associated with them (for example, an unexpected reply box).
We fixed an issue causing some attempts to update to a newer build to result in error 0x8007042b.
We resolved the issue preventing the cloud recovery option for Reset this PC from working.
We fixed an issue that could result in a green screen with Win32kbase.sys crash at session shutdown.
We fixed an issue resulting in not being about to navigate between the Xbox Game Bar options using an Xbox Controller.
We fixed an issue where the “set time zone automatically” toggle in Time & Date settings wouldn’t stay enabled.
We fixed an issue that could result in the Open With dialog not accepting the selection when opening PDFs.
We fixed an issue resulting in Task Manager showing “Unavailable” DPI Awareness for all processes.

BattlEye and Microsoft have found incompatibility issues due to changes in the operating system between some Insider Preview builds and certain versions of BattlEye anti-cheat software. To safeguard Insiders who might have these versions installed on their PC, we have applied a compatibility hold on these devices from being offered affected builds of Windows Insider Preview. See this article for details.
We are aware Narrator and NVDA users that seek the latest release of Microsoft Edge based on Chromium may experience some difficulty when navigating and reading certain web content. Narrator, NVDA and the Edge teams are aware of these issues. Users of legacy Microsoft Edge will not be affected. NVAccess has released a NVDA 2019.3 that resolves the known issue with Edge.
We’re looking into reports of the update process hanging for extended periods of time when attempting to install a new build.
Some devices may experience a bugcheck (GSOD) during the reboot to install this update. If this happens, log in, schedule a time for the update to install, and then log off all user profiles before the scheduled install time. The install will then proceed as expected.
The Documents section under Privacy has a broken icon (just a rectangle).
When trying to use Win + PrtScn to capture a screenshot, the image is not saved to the Screenshots directory. For now, you’ll need to use one of the other options for taking screenshots, such as WIN + Shift + S.
We’re looking into reports where, when running corruption repair (DISM), the process will stop at 84.9%.

They shoot, they score! Are you a true NCAA basketball fan? Put it to the test with our college basketball quiz. Learn about Magic Johnson, Lorri Bauman, record breaking moments and more. Challenge your friends and become a NCAA basketball expert here!
If you want to be among the first to learn about these Bing features, join our Bing Insiders Program.
Thanks,BLB

Goodr and Jasmine Crowe use technology to reduce other companies’ carbon footprint | Windows Experience Blog

Jasmine Crowe, founder & CEO for Goodr

Before she founded a profit-for-good corporation that helps other companies strive for zero waste – which has so far diverted more than 2 million pounds of surplus food from landfills (about 1.8 million meals) – Jasmine Crowe used to feed people experiencing homelessness directly from the kitchen of her small one-bedroom apartment in Atlanta, something she called Sunday Soul.
For three and a half years, she cut coupons, price matched and shopped at three to four grocery stores and farmer’s markets, then spent 15-20 hours to make the bi-weekly meal (4-6 entrees, 10-ish side dishes, desserts and bread) for 250-500 people. She would then load up her car and drive the food to senior homes, shelters, parks, under bridges and alleyways.
“A video of one of my pop up restaurants went viral on Facebook and I woke up one day to millions of views, friend requests and I was reading through the comments, and one of the recurring questions people kept asking me was, ‘Who donates the food?’ And the reality was nobody,” she says. “And I started thinking, why aren’t restaurants donating the food? So, I started researching food waste.”
She found that nearly 75 billion pounds of perfectly good food is wasted every year in America – which amounts to about $218 billion a year spent in the U.S. on food that people never eat.
“The idea that hunger is an issue of scarcity and we need to produce more food is false,” says Crowe, who founded Goodr in 2017 as a sustainable food waste management company that leverages technology to solve hunger and food waste. “What I look at hunger being is an issue of logistics, and so Goodr is solving what I call the surplus food supply chain problem.”
Read the rest on Microsoft Stories.

Say hello to Heart of Fire: Free update adds Tall Tale and new weaponry to Sea of Thieves | Windows Experience Blog

The latest monthly content update for Sea of Thieves, titled Heart of Fire, is now available with Xbox Game Pass and on Xbox One and Windows 10 PC.
“This free update brings story-driven action with a new Tall Tale continuing the sagas of Pendragon and Captain Flameheart, alongside new weaponry to fight your foes and a special challenge for Pirate Legends,” says Joe Neate, executive producer at Rare, in a blog post on Xbox Wire.
For details and imagery from the update – plus some guidance if you’re new to Sea of Thieves – head over to Xbox Wire.

How to Run a Windows Failover Cluster Validation Test

Guest clustering describes an increasingly popular deployment configuration for Windows Server Failover Clusters where the entire infrastructure is virtualized. With a traditional cluster, the hosts are physical servers and run virtual machines (VMs) as their highly available workloads. With a guest cluster, the hosts are also VMs which form a virtual cluster, and they run additional virtual machines nested within them as their highly available workloads. Microsoft now recommends dedicating clusters for each class of enterprise workload, such as your Exchange Server, SQL Server, File Server, etc., because each application has different cluster settings and configuration requirements. Setting up additional clusters became expensive for organizations when they had to purchase and maintain more physical hardware. Other businesses wanted guest clustering as a cheaper test, demo or training infrastructure. To address this challenge, Microsoft Hyper-V supports “nested virtualization” which allows you to create virtualized hosts and run VMs from them, creating fully-virtualized clusters. While this solves the hardware problem, it has created new obstacles for backup providers as each type of guest cluster has special considerations.

Hyper-V Guest Cluster Configuration and Storage

Let’s first review the basic configuration and storage requirements for a guest cluster. Fundamentally a guest cluster has the same requirements as a physical cluster, including two or more hosts (nodes), a highly available workload or VM, redundant networks, and shared storage. The entire solution must also pass the built-in cluster validation tests. You should also force every virtualized cluster node to run on different physicals hosts so that if a single server fails, it will not bring down your entire guest cluster. This can be easily configured using Failover Clustering’s AntiAffinityClassNames or Azure Availability Sets, so in the event that you lose that physical server, the entire cluster will not fail. Some of the guest cluster requirements will also vary on the nested virtualized application which you are running, so always check for workload-specific requirements during your planning.

Shared storage used to be a requirement for all clusters because it allows the workload or VM to access the same data regardless of which node is running that workload. When the workload fails over to a different node, its services get restarted, then it accesses the same shared data which it was previously using. Windows Server 2012 R2 and later supports guest clusters with shared storage using a shared VHDX disk, iSCSI or virtual fibre channel. Microsoft added support for local DAS replication using storage spaces direct (S2D) within Windows Server 2016 and continued to improve S2D with the latest 2019 release.

For a guest cluster deployment guide, you can refer to the documentation provided by Microsoft to create a guest cluster using Hyper-V. If you want to do this in Microsoft Azure, then you can also follow enabling nested virtualization within Microsoft Azure.

Backup and Restore the Entire Hyper-V Guest Cluster

The easiest backup solution for guest clustering is to save the entire environment by protecting all the VMs in that set. This has almost-universal support by third party backup vendors such as Altaro, as it is essentially just protecting traditional virtual machines which have a relationship to each other. If you are using another VM as part of the set as an isolated domain controller, iSCSI target or file share witness, make sure it is backup up too.

A (guest) cluster-wide backup is also the easiest solution for scenarios where you wish to clone or redeploy an entire cluster for test, demo or training purposes by restoring it from a backup. If you are restoring a domain controller, make sure you bring this back online first. Note that if you are deploying copies of a VM, especially if one contains a domain controller, that any images have been Sysprepped to avoid conflicts by giving them new global identifiers. Also, use DHCP to get new IP addresses for all network interfaces. In this scenario, it is usually much easier to just deploy this cloned infrastructure in a full isolated environment so that the cloned domain controllers do not cause conflicts.

The downside to cluster-wide backup and restore is that you will lack the granularity to protect and recover a single workload (or item) running within the VM, which is why most admins will select another backup solution for guest clusters. Before you pick one of the alternative options, make sure that both your storage and backup vendor support this guest clustering configuration.

Backup and Restore a Guest Cluster using iSCSI or Virtual Fibre Channel

When guest clusters first became supported for Hyper-V, the most popular storage configurations were to use an iSCSI target or virtual fibre channel. iSCSI was popular because it was entirely Ethernet-based, which means that inexpensive commodity hardware could be used and Microsoft offered a free iSCSI Target server. Virtual fiber channel was also prevalent since it was the first type of SAN-based storage supported by Hyper-V guest clusters through its virtualized HBAs. Either solution works fine and most backup vendors support Hyper-V VMs running on these shared storage arrays. This is a perfectly acceptable solution for reliable backups and recovery if you are deploying a stable guest cluster. The main challenge was that in its earlier versions, Cluster Shared Volumes (CSV) disks and live migration had limited support by vendors. This meant that basic backups would work, but there were a lot of scenarios that would cause backups to fail, such as when a VM was live migrating between hosts. Most scenarios are supported in production, yet still make sure that your storage and backup vendors support and recommend it.

Backup and Restore a Guest Cluster using a Shared Virtual Hard Disk (VHDX) & VHD Set

Windows Server 2012 R2 introduced a new type of shared storage disk which was optimized for guest clustering scenarios, known as the shared virtual hard disk (.vhdx file), or Shared VHDX. This allowed multiple VMs to synchronously access a single data file which represented a shared disk (similar to a drive shared by an iSCSI Target). This disk could be used as a file share witness disk, or more commonly to store shared application data used by the workload running on the guest cluster. This Shared VHDX file could either be stored on a CSV disk or SMB file share (using a Scale-Out File Server).

This first release of a shared virtual hard disk had some limitations and was generally not recommended for production. The main criticisms were that backups were not reliable, and backup vendors were still catching up to support this new format. Windows Server 2016 addressed these issues by adding support for online resizing, Hyper-V Replica, and application-consistent checkpoints. These enhancements were released as a newer Hyper-V VHD Set (.vhds) file format. The VHD Set included additional file metadata which allowed each node to have a consistent view of that shared drive’s metadata, such as the block size and structure. Prior to this, nodes might have an inconsistent view of the Shared VHDX file structure which could cause backups to fail.

While VHD Sets was optimized to support guest clusters, there were inevitably some issues discovered which are documented by Microsoft Support. An important thing when using Shared VHDX / VHD Sets for your guest cluster is that all of your storage, virtualization, and clustering components are patched with any related hotfixes specific to your environment, including any from your storage and backup provider. Also, make sure you explicitly check that your ISVs support this updated file format and follow Microsoft’s best practices. Today this is the recommended deployment configuration for most new guest clusters.

Backup and Restore a Guest Cluster using Storage Spaces Direct (S2D)

Microsoft introduced another storage management technology in Windows Server 2016, which was improved in Windows Server 2019, known as Storage Spaces Direct (S2D). S2D was designed as a low-cost solution to support clusters without any requirement for shared storage. Instead, local DAS drives are synchronously replicated between cluster nodes to maintain a consistent state. This is certainly the easiest guest clustering solution to configure, however, Microsoft has announced some limitations in the current release (this link also includes a helpful video showing how to deploy a S2D cluster in Azure).

First, you are restricted to a 2-node or 3-node cluster only, and in either case you can only sustain the loss or outage of a single node. You also want to ensure that the disks have low latency and high performance, ideally using SSD drives or Azure’s Premium Storage managed disks. One of the major limitations still remains around backups as host-level virtual disk backups are currently not supported. If you deploy the S2D cluster, you are restricted to only taking backups from within the guest OS. Until this has been resolved and your backup vendor supports S2D, the safest option with the most flexibility will be to deploy a guest clustering using Shared VHDX / VHD Sets.

Summary

Microsoft is striving to improve guest clustering with each subsequent release. Unfortunately, this makes it challenging for third-party vendors to keep up with their support of the latest technology. It can be especially frustrating to admins when their preferred backup vendor has not yet added support for the latest version of Windows, and you should share this feedback on what you need with your ISVs. It is always a good best practice to select a vendor with close ties to Microsoft, as they get provided with early access to code and always aim to support the latest and greatest technology. The leading backup companies like Altaro are staffed by Microsoft MVPs and regularly consult with former Microsoft engineers such as myself, to support the newest technologies as quickly as possible. But always make sure that you do your homework before you deploy any of these guest clusters so you can pick the best configuration which is supported by your backup and storage provider.


Go to Original Article
Author: Symon Perriman