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In music classroom without instruments, an ensemble of apps play bandleader |

At Kaenoisuksa school, in Chiang Mai, Thailand, we face the unique challenge of bringing music education to roughly 600 students who don’t have the benefit of real instruments to practice with. Adding to the complexity, our student body is a diverse mix Shan, Yunnan and Lahu students who all bring a different set of cultural values and learning techniques to the classroom every day. Our curriculum has to be nimble if it’s going to serve all of their unique needs.

As the school’s music and dramatic arts teacher, it’s my job to find educational solutions that will strike a chord with my students. In the common smartphone, I found a tool perfectly fit for the job—so long as it was equipped with the right apps.

Learning music isn’t just a matter of knowing how to play this song on that instrument. Using Microsoft apps like Office, Sway, OneNote, PowerPoint, Windows Movie Maker and others, I weaved together a 21st-century lesson plan that covered a range of musical topics, from theory to technique to history and cultural context. I call it Mobile Music Learning, and through it, my students have learned both the fundaments of music education as well as the value of technology in exploring their own questions in their own ways.

Things That Worked in My Classroom

  • Mobile VR Thrills: My students loved exploring international music and concert videos with apps like WITHIN and YouTube VR, which help turn your mobile screen into a virtual-reality headset. Access to music videos—from Operas in London to Indonesian dance routines in Bali—seeded them with questions about instruments, dance and other cultural elements that led to lively discussion as a class.
  • Strum Your Screens: Countless apps will turn your phone into a real-live instrument, replete with keys, strings, skins or some other music-making analog of your choosing. This let students get their hands a little dirty with playing where they otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. Even better, they got to do so from home long after class was over—and on just about any instrument they could think of.
  • Tech Does Double Duty: I want my students to learn music education, of course, but through it, I also want them to learn tech fluency. They are emerging into a world where success will depend on their ability to confidently navigate tech tools. Employing integrated apps like Microsoft Sway, Word, PowerPoint and Windows MovieMaker to explore, share and present the material helps them build that confidence along the way.

Practicing an instrument on a smartphone may seem like a novel concept, but for my students, a familiarity with mobile devices meant they brought more confidence to the initial lessons than they might’ve in a class with traditional instruments. The portability of our devices also empowered them to continue exploring the lessons for themselves once class had finished.

By applying the tech tools they’re already familiar with, I encouraged my students to explore, and ultimately synthesize, the subject matter in ways that felt natural to them as digital natives. The result was not only a newfound appreciation for music education but also the fostering of a rich and informed dialogue about other related subjects.

The Mobile Music Learning curriculum I created is little more than a collection of everyday Microsoft software applications. On their own, any one of the apps provides an important, specific tool. When combined in symphony, though, they strike a harmony that is greater than the sum of their unique parts. For my students, that approach helped fuel a modern, imaginative curiosity that made the curriculum more engaging and the group discussion more meaningful.

Ready to unlock limitless learning for your students? Check out our tools for educators. Already experiencing the difference in your classroom? Share your changemaker story with us!

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Microsoft disputes Outlook data breach report

Microsoft warned users of its web email services that accounts may have been compromised, and some sensitive data may have been accessed.

Beginning late Friday, Microsoft sent email messages to users of Outlook, Hotmail and MSN Mail, alerting them that an unauthorized third party gained partial access to Microsoft-managed accounts between Jan. 1 and March 28 of this year. According to Microsoft, the Outlook data breach was limited in scope. Microsoft initially said attackers potentially had access to email addresses of affected users and those they communicated with, folder names and subject lines of messages.

However, after TechCrunch first reported the story, Motherboard claimed to have seen screenshots from the threat actors involved in the Outlook data breach. The attackers claimed the issue persisted for as long as six months, and they were able to access email content from “a large number” of users.

A Microsoft spokesperson refuted the claim that the Outlook data breach spanned six months, calling it “inaccurate” and reaffirming the January-to-March timeline. Microsoft did admit attackers accessed more information for some users.

“Our notification to the majority of those impacted noted that bad actors would not have had unauthorized access to the content of emails or attachments. A small group ([approximately] 6% of the original, already-limited subset of consumers) was notified that the bad actors could have had unauthorized access to the content of their email accounts, and was provided with additional guidance and support. Out of an abundance of caution, we also increased detection and monitoring for the affected accounts,” a Microsoft spokesperson wrote via email. “We addressed this scheme, which affected a limited subset of consumer accounts, by disabling the compromised credentials and blocking the perpetrators’ access.”

Motherboard reported that the Outlook data breach was caused by attackers stealing credentials for a customer support account. Microsoft did not respond to questions asking to confirm this, nor did Microsoft say whether users with multifactor authentication (MFA) were safe from the attack.

Robert Vamosi, senior product marketing manager at ForgeRock, an identity and access management company in San Francisco, said MFA likely wouldn’t have helped victims of the Outlook data breach, because “the malicious third party did not gain access to login credentials.”

“However, people can sometimes include sensitive information in their emails, such as login credentials, PII [personally identifiable information] or even payment [and] bank account information,” Vamosi said. “In that case, MFA should be enabled on those compromised services, along with changing the current password, to prevent any future attempts at account hijacking.”

George Cerbone, principal solutions architect at One Identity, based in Aliso Viejo, Calif., noted that if the attack was caused by stolen support credentials, Microsoft makes products that could have protected that account from being compromised.

“Microsoft could have followed their own advice and instituted what they suggest to other customers, called a Privileged Access Workstation. This would put in a series of controls that the employee would have to follow when they need to access sensitive information,” Cerbone said. “Another option, which is something that Microsoft also offers, is a PIM [privileged identity management] tool. This tool would allow employees to request access to do certain privileged functions for a period of time. Once that time has expired, it would pull back those privileges until needed again.”

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For Sale – Mini Water Cooled i7 4770K 256SSD GTX970

Coolermaster Case I thinks it’s the Elite 110 so 210mm x 260 x 280 H x W x D

Water Cooled I7 4770K

Asus Z971 Plus MB WiFi

Coolermaster 800W Silent Pro Gold

Zotac GTX 970 GPU

Team Group Xtreem DDR3 1333 8GB

Samsung 256GB M2
WD Black 500GB Sata

W10 Pro

PC is pretty quiet unless gaming – never had a problem with it. Plays games at 1080p on high settings. Will throw in a Dell S2309WB 1080p monitor and KB/Mouse with all cables.

Price and currency: £350
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT cash on collection
Location: Leicester LE7
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Latest Microsoft SDDC updates improve security, performance

Editor’s note

With each ensuing version of Windows Server, Microsoft adds more functionality to the virtualization technologies that combine to form the software-defined data center. Administrators might not realize their investment in this server OS consolidates hardware resources — servers, networking devices and storage — to form a scalable virtualized infrastructure.

The IT operations team benefits from the added control through new tools, such as the Windows Admin Center that Microsoft tailored for managing and deploying hyper-converged clusters. This guide helps administrators get up to speed with the virtualized components in Windows Server 2019 that combine to form the Microsoft SDDC.

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In music classroom without instruments, an ensemble of apps play bandleader |

At Kaenoisuksa school, in Chiang Mai, Thailand, we face the unique challenge of bringing music education to roughly 600 students who don’t have the benefit of real instruments to practice with. Adding to the complexity, our student body is a diverse mix Shan, Yunnan and Lahu students who all bring a different set of cultural values and learning techniques to the classroom every day. Our curriculum has to be nimble if it’s going to serve all of their unique needs.

As the school’s music and dramatic arts teacher, it’s my job to find educational solutions that will strike a chord with my students. In the common smartphone, I found a tool perfectly fit for the job—so long as it was equipped with the right apps.

Learning music isn’t just a matter of knowing how to play this song on that instrument. Using Microsoft apps like Office, Sway, OneNote, PowerPoint, Windows Movie Maker and others, I weaved together a 21st-century lesson plan that covered a range of musical topics, from theory to technique to history and cultural context. I call it Mobile Music Learning, and through it, my students have learned both the fundaments of music education as well as the value of technology in exploring their own questions in their own ways.

Things That Worked in My Classroom

  • Mobile VR Thrills: My students loved exploring international music and concert videos with apps like WITHIN and YouTube VR, which help turn your mobile screen into a virtual-reality headset. Access to music videos—from Operas in London to Indonesian dance routines in Bali—seeded them with questions about instruments, dance and other cultural elements that led to lively discussion as a class.
  • Strum Your Screens: Countless apps will turn your phone into a real-live instrument, replete with keys, strings, skins or some other music-making analog of your choosing. This let students get their hands a little dirty with playing where they otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. Even better, they got to do so from home long after class was over—and on just about any instrument they could think of.
  • Tech Does Double Duty: I want my students to learn music education, of course, but through it, I also want them to learn tech fluency. They are emerging into a world where success will depend on their ability to confidently navigate tech tools. Employing integrated apps like Microsoft Sway, Word, PowerPoint and Windows MovieMaker to explore, share and present the material helps them build that confidence along the way.

Practicing an instrument on a smartphone may seem like a novel concept, but for my students, a familiarity with mobile devices meant they brought more confidence to the initial lessons than they might’ve in a class with traditional instruments. The portability of our devices also empowered them to continue exploring the lessons for themselves once class had finished.

By applying the tech tools they’re already familiar with, I encouraged my students to explore, and ultimately synthesize, the subject matter in ways that felt natural to them as digital natives. The result was not only a newfound appreciation for music education but also the fostering of a rich and informed dialogue about other related subjects.

The Mobile Music Learning curriculum I created is little more than a collection of everyday Microsoft software applications. On their own, any one of the apps provides an important, specific tool. When combined in symphony, though, they strike a harmony that is greater than the sum of their unique parts. For my students, that approach helped fuel a modern, imaginative curiosity that made the curriculum more engaging and the group discussion more meaningful.

Ready to unlock limitless learning for your students? Check out our tools for educators. Already experiencing the difference in your classroom? Share your changemaker story with us!

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Google Cloud, HPE team up for new hybrid cloud platforms

Hewlett Packard Enterprise and Google Cloud have teamed up to create hybrid cloud platforms that combine Google Cloud’s Anthos with HPE’s SimpliVity, Nimble Storage and ProLiant servers in hopes of creating consistent experiences across public clouds and on-premises environments.

HPE will also offer on-premises infrastructure as a service through HPE GreenLake. Customers who use this can run applications in Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) on premises and have the same container-based design across the hybrid infrastructure.

The combination of HPE SimpliVity and Anthos will bring converged software to GKE. SimpliVity’s remote management capabilities and replication between sites allow for central administration. The infrastructure and advanced data services enable a transition to a container environment by allowing containers and virtual machines to share the same hardware and storage.

Anthos and HPE’s Nimble Storage and ProLiant provide architecture for storage-centric workloads that require independent scaling of compute and storage. The companies claimed this platform provides reliability and speed to container environments, as well as uniform management across on premises and public clouds.

With HPE GreenLake and Anthos, organizations can deploy containers on demand and not have to manage the underlying on-premises infrastructure.

The companies also hope the collaboration will accelerate container deployment. Gartner estimated that, by 2022, more than 75% of organizations will be running containerized applications. Anthos uses virtual machines to run containers on premises, and working with HPE could potentially make it easier for customers to use containers and have a consistent cloud application. Developers can build applications once, which run anywhere, across clouds and on premises.

The companies claimed this will make it ideal for a range of uses, including implementing DevOps through a continuous integration and continuous deployment pipeline, developing applications in Google Cloud and running them in production on premises, and deploying low-cost distributed edge containerized applications.

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For Sale – Mini Water Cooled i7 4770K 256SSD GTX970

Coolermaster Case I thinks it’s the Elite 110 so 210mm x 260 x 280 H x W x D

Water Cooled I7 4770K

Asus Z971 Plus MB WiFi

Coolermaster 800W Silent Pro Gold

Zotac GTX 970 GPU

Team Group Xtreem DDR3 1333 8GB

Samsung 256GB M2
WD Black 500GB Sata

W10 Pro

PC is pretty quiet unless gaming – never had a problem with it. Plays games at 1080p on high settings. Will throw in a Dell S2309WB 1080p monitor and KB/Mouse with all cables.

Price and currency: £350
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT cash on collection
Location: Leicester LE7
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Author:

Blue Hexagon bets on deep learning AI in cybersecurity

With corporate networks becoming a prime target for threat actors, software vendors are beginning to use deep learning and other types of AI in cybersecurity. While deep learning does show promise, industry experts are skeptical.

The threat landscape is evolving, and existing network security measures like signature-based detection techniques, firewalls and sandboxing fail to keep up, said John Petersen, CIO at Heffernan Insurance Brokers, based in Walnut Creek, Calif. He sought out a deep learning application with the intelligence built in to monitor network traffic that detects threats as they come in real-time.

“Endpoint security is not secure enough anymore,” Petersen said. “You can’t secure every device on the network; you need something watching the network. So, we started as a company looking at what options we had out there that could be monitoring the network that could learn and identify zero-day attacks as they come in.”

That led him to cybersecurity startup Blue Hexagon’s deep-learning-powered network security platform, which was able to detect an Emotet infection as soon as it hit one of Heffernan Insurance Brokers’ servers.  

John Petersen, CIO at Heffernan Insurance BrokersJohn Petersen

“Blue Hexagon was able to find it right away and alert us, so we were able to take that server offline,” he said. “Now, we have a lot more [network] visibility than we ever did.”

Nayeem Islam, chief executive and co-founder of Blue Hexagon and the former head of Qualcomm research and development, said he believes automated threat defense is the future of security. Deep learning and neural network technology are some of the most advanced techniques that can be used to help defend an enterprise from the velocity and volume of modern-day threats, Islam said.

“What we were recognizing was that deep learning was having a significant impact on image and speech recognition. And, at the same time, we were also recognizing that these techniques were not being used in computer security,” Islam said.

The Sunnyvale, Calif., network security provider emerged from stealth mode earlier this year.

Other companies use deep learning and related forms of AI in cybersecurity software, including IBM Watson for Cybersecurity, Deep Instinct and Darktrace.

Nayeem Islam, CEO and co-founder at Blue HexagonNayeem Islam

Deep learning is unique because it determines what’s good and bad by looking at network flows, Islam said.

“The automation that deep learning provides reduces the amount of human intervention needed to detect threats,” he said. “People have networking infrastructure, and we sit behind the traditional defenses and provide an additional layer of defense; that’s how you would deploy us.”

The company’s deep learning platform focuses on threats that pass through the network, Islam explained. It looks at a packet as they flow through the network and applies deep learning. The Blue Hexagon deep learning models inspect the complete network flow — payloads, headers, malicious URLs and C2 communications — and are able to deliver threat inference in less than a second, according to the company. Threat prevention can then be enabled on firewalls, endpoint devices and network proxies.

“We train our deep learning models with a very diverse set of threat data,” he said. “We actually do this in the cloud — on the AWS infrastructure — and have been working with them since inception to ensure the infrastructure is optimized for security.”

Blue Hexagon; deep learning in cybersecurity
The Blue Hexagon dashboard’s threat view

Experts provide caution on AI in cybersecurity

Deep learning is indeed an interesting machine learning technique and can be used for many security use cases, said Gartner analyst Augusto Barros. But more important than understanding what it can do is to understand what deep learning in cybersecurity cannot do, Barros added.

New threat types … won’t be magically identified by machine learning.
Augusto BarrosAnalyst, Gartner

“Many machine learning implementations, including those using deep learning, can find threats, such as new malware, for example, that has common characteristics with what we already know as malware,” Barros said in an email interview. “They can be very effective in identifying parameters that can be used to identify malware, but first we need to feed them with what we know as malware and also with what we know as not malware so they can learn. New threat types … won’t be magically identified by machine learning.”

Until a couple of years ago, malware detection technology was being developed — or trained in the case of machine learning — with file samples, Barros said. Deep Learning can be very useful in identifying which characteristics of the files are most likely to determine if something is malware or not, he added.

“But when what we call fileless attacks started to appear, all those machine-learning-based tools analyzing files were not able to detect those attacks,” Barros said. “They were just looking at the wrong place. And who does tell them where they should be looking? Humans.”

Barros said he doubts any machine-learning-based system would be faster than simple signature matching. When it comes to prevention, he said, it is important to be sure of what is detected before deciding to intervene.

“Although signatures will miss unknown threats, they are very certain about what we know; antiviruses do that quite well,” Barros said. “With machine learning, you’ll only get a percentage of certainty — the algorithms tell you the changes of something being bad is xx% — so using that for intervention can be really problematic and with chances of disrupting systems.”

With enterprise network complexity increasing over time, teaching the algorithm to tell good from bad is actually much harder than the classic deep learning success stories like face recognition, said Gartner analyst Anton Chuvakin.

“The variety of what is normal, what is legitimate, what is actually acceptable to business is so wide that the training of the algorithm is going to be really difficult,” Chuvakin said.

When it comes to domains of security like malware detection, deep learning is working because there is a pretty large pool of data about legitimate software and malware that can be used to train the algorithm, he said.

“But, to me, for [network] traffic, it has a much lower chance of working,” Chuvakin said.

To really succeed with deep learning in cybersecurity, there must be a very large volume of labeled data, he said.

“It took some of the malware analysis vendors years to accumulate [data on] malware,” he said. “But, where is that data for traffic? Nobody has been collecting malicious traffic at wide scale over many years, so there is no way to point at a repository and say, ‘OK, I’m going to train my algorithm on this traffic,’ because that doesn’t really exist. Moreover, in many cases, they don’t know whether the traffic is malicious or not.”

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Wanted – Cheap 1150 cpu and DDR3 laptop menory

Discussion in ‘Desktop Computer Classifieds‘ started by geordieboy25, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. geordieboy25

    geordieboy25

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    Hi guys.

    Just bought a 2nd user laptop and a Lenovo M93P sff.

    None of which came with memory and I’d like a few 4gb ddr3 sticks

    Also the M93P was a barebones kit so would like a cheap cpu. Just wanted to get it up and running, nothing fancy please.

    Thanks

    Location: Newcastle

    ______________________________________________________
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    By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
    Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

    • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
    • Name and address including postcode
    • Valid e-mail address

    DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

  2. maddy

    maddy

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    CEX are cheap for 4GB DDR3 – £8, or £9.50 posted. They’re the cheapest I’ve found.

    Is your Lenovo one of the tiny range? If it is, make sure you buy an Intel from their “T” series as they tiny ones aren’t designed for the thermal load of a non-T CPU.

    Great little machines.

  3. Krooner

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    I have 2 stick of 4gb DDR3 at home, do you need low voltage ram in the SFF?

  4. geordieboy25

    geordieboy25

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    Not too sure, is it SODIMMS that you have?

  5. Krooner

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    Yes, I know the ultra small form factor units require PC3L is all, not sure about the SFF It was something I ran into on the m92p.

    I have Low voltage sticks, but if it will take standard PC3 then CEX will be 50p per stick cheaper than me.

  6. GIBSrUS

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    Hiya. I have a pentium g3258 if that’s of interest?

  7. geordieboy25

    geordieboy25

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    Thanks but I think I need a “t” series cpu.

  8. Ozzyh

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    @geordieboy25 Are you still after DDR3 laptop RAM? I have 2x 4GB matching sticks if that helps.

  9. geordieboy25

    geordieboy25

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    How much please?

  10. Ozzyh

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    £18 delivered ok? I can send via 1st class recorded Monday morning and you should get Tuesday or Wednesday at the latest as I’m at work till 6pm today.

    Would like to avoid sending normal 1st class as just in case they get lost in the post.

  11. Ozzyh

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    Sorry just to add that the modules are a matching pair of the below. They were inside a HP laptop which my 6yr old daughter was using for playing games to help her read. Moved her onto a PC now.

    Hynix 4GB PC3L – 12800S (part number: HMT351S6EFR8A)

    These are going for about £13 for 4GB on eBay so £18 inc delivery for 8GB is a steal

    Thanks.

  12. Ozzyh

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    Not heard back so i’ll create a For Sale advert as it looks like you’re not interested.

    Thanks.

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How to Set up Azure Cloud Storage

Cloud-based storage has been around for decades, first becoming commercially available in the 1990s with the launch of web-based email. We interact with data we store in the cloud on a daily basis through popular applications like OneDrive, Google Drive, Dropbox and iCloud, and this familiarity has helped accelerate the adoption of cloud-based storage in the enterprise. Organizations are realizing that by storing their files, data and databases in the cloud, there are usually significant cost-savings, simplified management, higher-availability, greater security, increased accessibility, and unlimited scalability. Storage management in traditional on-premises datacenters is expensive and time-consuming, as it requires procuring expensive storage hardware, setting up racks, electricity, and cooling, and costly on-site technical support whenever an issue occurs. The main scenarios where it still makes sense to retain legacy storage is when on-site servers need real-time data access, or if you are operating within an industry that requires it for compliance, privacy or security. For the rest of us, using cloud storage should be the default option and this blog will introduce you to the different types of cloud storage provided by Microsoft Azure.

Azure File Storage

This is the most basic and common type of storage, which is similar to using a file server in the cloud. It is easy to operate, inexpensive, and allows you to migrate files from your existing datacenter to Azure with little effort. Behind the scenes, a highly-available network file share is created which is accessed using SMB, a RESTful interface, or storage client libraries. Hyper-V virtual machines (VMs) can also store their virtual hard disks here, with the VMs running anywhere in Azure. Since this storage interface has been designed to mimic traditional file servers, it has a high level of compatibility with legacy applications, so IT departments will often make it the default storage for log files, analytics data, or crash dumps. The downside is that currently Active Directory-based authentication and ACLs are only supported in ‘public preview’, so anyone with access to the file share may be able to open every file.

Azure Disk Storage

If you are looking for a dedicated (virtual) disk for a cloud-based application, the best solution is Azure Disk Storage. This provides both HDD and SSD disks with low latency and high throughput for almost any workload. There are many different sizing and performance options so that you can find the best fit and price point for your application’s needs. It is even easy to upgrade from the standard HHD to premium SSD as your business grows, and using VM Scale Sets lets you dynamically change capacity as needed. These disks also support role-based access control (RBAC) and all the data is encrypted and highly-available.

Azure Blob Storage

Some organizations, particularly those supporting consumer applications, need massive amounts of storage to support unstructured data, like photographs, videos, messages, and documents. Azure Blob Storage provides a cost-effective solution with tiered storage options that basically allows its end users to ‘dump’ files and forget about them. This is designed for businesses whose users are not internal staff, but consumers who may be accessing these files through a web browser from anywhere in the world.

Azure Archive Storage

Sometimes data needs to be retained for compliance reasons for long periods, even if it will unlikely need to be accessed. This is a great scenario for Azure Archive Storage, which could be compared to “tape archive in the cloud”. Any rarely-accessed data can be stored here, where it will be encrypted and can even be automatically moved between hot and cold storage tiers, all at very low costs.

Azure Data Lake Storage

If your business is working with big data, then consider using Azure Data Lake Storage. This service provides endless storage for analytics data, allowing organizations to aggregate logs, metrics, performance information and other structured data into a single location. The data is groomed and optimized for high-performance analytics tools like Apache Spark and Hadoop. Azure Data Lake Storage also supports the latest in enterprise security, with firewalls, encryption, Active Directory integration, and granular ACL support.

Azure Queues

If you are running a large distributed cloud application, then you have likely developed some type of messaging infrastructure to allow for communication between components. Azure Queues provides a store to save and retrieve messages. These messages and tasks can be processed asynchronously, so users or applications can retrieve them independently from where they are stored in the queue. This data can also be made accessible via the public Internet over HTTP(S).

Avere vFXT for Azure

For applications which have high-performance needs, they often need short-term access to storage at incredibly fast speeds. In this case, the storage data can be cached and function like extra CPU memory. If your application needs to process large datasets at high speed, consider using Avere vFXT to quickly scale up to support fast access of data which can be stored either on-premises (using NFS or SMB) or in Azure Blob Storage. This solution can become expensive, so it is recommended for short-term use during intense periods when the storage cannot be a bottleneck and slow down the rest of the application.

Azure Databases

If you are storing a database in the cloud, it is recommended to use a native platform as a service (PaaS) solution, rather than deploying the database inside a virtual machine running in Azure (an IaaS solution). When a database is built directly into the platform, it will get better performance, reliability, and monitoring, and usually at a lower cost. These databases can include Azure SQL Server, SQL Data Warehouse, Cosmos DB, Data Factory, PostgreSQL, MySQL, Azure Cache for Redis, Table Storage, and MariaDB. Reviewing the Azure database options is beyond the scope of this blog, but you can find more information at https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/services/#databases.

Creating an Azure Storage Account

Once you understand what type of storage you plan to use, the next steps you will take is to create an Azure storage account. This section will provide you with the basic steps to prepare for your cloud storage.

  • Create an Azure account and add a subscription.
  • Log into the Azure Portal.
  • From the Azure Portal, select Storage Accounts.
  • From the Storage Accounts view, select Add.
  • Select the subscription which you wish to use.
  • An Azure Resource Group is required for the storage account as a management group. Either select an existing Resource Group or click Create New and provide a new Resource Group with a name as shown in the following screenshot.

Creating a Azure storage account

Figure 1 – Creating an Azure Storage Account

  • Enter a unique name for the storage account.
  • Select a location for the storage account.
  • Select the deployment model. Leaving the default (Resource Manager) is recommended.
  • Choose the performance type. Leaving the default (Standard) is recommended.
  • Choose the account kind. Leaving the default (StorageV2 [general-purpose v2]) is recommended. More information about storage accounts.
  • Choose the replication type. Leaving the default (Locally Redundant Storage [LRS]) is recommended.
  • Choose the access tier. Leaving the default (Hot) is recommended.
  • Select Review + Create to verify the settings.
  • Click Create.

Your new Azure Storage Account is now ready for use, and from here you can deploy different types of Azure storage based on the needs of your application. One of the best things about Azure storage is its compatibility with partners in the Microsoft ecosystem. For example, if you are backing up your on-premises storage to the cloud using Altaro, the backup will be stored in this newly create Azure Storage Account. Now you can take advantage of cloud-based storage for all of your enterprise’s needs.

Further reading: How to set the optimal size for your Azure Virtual Machine

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Author: Symon Perriman