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Microsoft and salesforce.com announce strategic partnership

Microsoft and salesforce.com announced a strategic partnership Thursday to connect salesforce.com’s customer relationship management apps and platform to Microsoft Office and Windows.

“We are excited to partner with salesforce.com and help customers thrive in a mobile and cloud-first world,” said Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella in a press release. “Working together we’ll deliver new solutions that connect the customer insights of Salesforce to the cloud productivity of Office 365, the cloud platform of Azure and the mobility of Windows, so our customers can do more.”

Among the solutions the two companies will deliver is Salesforce1 for Windows and Windows Phone 8.1, which will let customers access Salesforce and run their businesses from their Windows devices. A preview is planned in fall 2014, with general availability in 2015.

To learn more, read the press release.

You might also be interested in:

· New water utilities app for Windows 8 lets workers quickly respond to customer complaints, critical events
· Big businesses are already choosing Surface Pro 3
· Updated Microsoft HelpBridge app for smartphones can be a lifeline during disasters

Suzanne Choney
Microsoft News Center Staff

James Whittaker on the art of making truly killer presentations

Editor’s note: The following is a post from Jennifer Warnick, a writer for microsoft.com/stories.


It’s a Friday afternoon, and James Whittaker is sitting at Hi-Fi Brewing in Redmond. Laptop open, pint to the side, he’s working on his latest brainchild, a manuscript called “The Art of Stage Presence.”

After spending his career leading various deeply technical charges, Whittaker has spent the last year tucking his metaphorical soap box into countless overhead compartments as he travels the globe speaking about Microsoft. Stage presence, he said, is his super power.

“I’m convincing the world that Microsoft is a force to be reckoned with, that we do interesting work, that we’re thinking about the future, that we have great ideas,” Whittaker said. “I’ve spoken at all of the major developer conferences on every continent. Except Antarctica.”

Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” begins playing overhead. “And I will totally teach penguins to code if you give me an opportunity,” he continues in his Kentuckian drawl. “Anyone who has ever sat through a technology conference can confirm that brilliance is not always bestowed in equal measures with stage presence and public speaking skills,” Whittaker said. “See, there are four parts to every talk …”

Read the full profile at microsoft.com/stories.

Spell e-d-u-c-a-t-i-o-n: Each spelling bee participant receives new Surface, Office 365 and Skype gift card

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Yan Zhong, Skype program manager at Microsoft, far left, when she competed in the national spelling bee during her middle school years.

Each of the 281 participants in the 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee got an extra boost from Microsoft Tuesday night to help them with their education, and to make sure the bonds they create with other competitors around the world can continue.

The spellers, who range in age from 8 to 15, each received a brand new Surface device and Office 365. They also got a Skype gift card that can be used with the Skype app on their new Surface devices. “That way, everyone will be able to maintain the new friendships they’ve formed, no matter where their friends are located around the globe,” writes Yan Zhong, Skype program manager at Microsoft. Zhong was a spelling bee competitor in the late 1990s, when she was in middle school.

Microsoft is sponsoring the event as the first-ever technology champion. To read more, head over to the Microsoft in Education blog.

You might also be interested in:

· Winners, finalists of 2014 Microsoft Partner of the Year Awards announced
· Workshop discusses big data’s role in responding to catastrophic events
· Visual Studio’s new Productivity Power Tools 2013 feature lets you make better use of your vertical real estate

Suzanne Choney
Microsoft News Center Staff

Microsoft demos breakthrough in real-time translated conversations

The following post is from Gurdeep Pall, Corporate Vice President of Skype and Lync at Microsoft.


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It’s been an interesting evening here in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif. at the inaugural Code Conference (#CodeCon) where @karaswisher and @waltmossberg are engaging Microsoft CEO @satyanadella in a more than hour-long onstage conversation.  

During his conversation with Walt and Kara, Satya discussed his views on how we’re evolving to a more personal, more human era of computing, and I had the good fortune to join Satya on stage to demo – for the the first time publicly – an exciting new capability we’re developing for Skype.

On Tuesday at the inaugural Code Conference in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella sat down to talk with Re/code’s Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg. Photo credit: Asa Mathat – Re/code.

Imagine in the very near future technology allowing humans to bridge geographic and language boundaries to connect mind to mind and heart to heart in ways never before possible.

For more than a decade, Skype has brought people together to make progress on what matters to them. Today, we have more than 300 million connected users each month, and more than 2 billion minutes of conversation a day as Skype breaks down communications barriers by delivering voice and video across a number of devices, from PCs and tablets, to smartphones and TVs. But language barriers have been a blocker to productivity and human connection; Skype Translator helps us overcome this barrier.

On Tuesday at the inaugural Code Conference in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., Gurdeep Pall, Microsoft corporate vice president of Skype and Lync, demoed the new Skype Translator app while Re/code’s Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher looked on. Video of the demo will be available on The Official Microsoft Blog shortly. Photo credit: Asa Mathat – Re/code.

Skype Translator results from decades of work by the industry, years of work by our researchers, and now is being developed jointly by the Skype and Microsoft Translator teams. The demo showed near real-time audio translation from English to German and vice versa, combining Skype voice and IM technologies with Microsoft Translator, and neural network-based speech recognition. Skype Translator is a great example of why Microsoft invests in basic research. We’ve invested in speech recognition, automatic translation and machine learning technologies for more than a decade, and now they’re emerging as important components in this more personal computing era. You can learn more about the research behind this initiative here.

As you saw from my conversation with Diana, it is early days for this technology, but the Star Trek™ vision for a Universal Translator isn’t a galaxy away, and its potential is every bit as exciting as those Star Trek examples. Skype Translator opens up so many possibilities to make meaningful connections in ways you never could before in education, diplomacy, multilingual families and in business. 

Skype Translator first will be available as a Windows 8 beta app before the end of 2014. Skype itself is available across a number of devices and computing platforms. If you aren’t already using Skype for voice and video calls, I encourage you to download Skype and create your account. 

In our industry, we often talk about pursuing big, bold dreams, and of how we’re limited only by the power of our imaginations. Skype Translator is one of those endeavors, and I look forward to keeping you apprised of our journey to break down another barrier to human productivity and connection.

Weekend Reading: May 23rd Edition – Surface Pro 3 unveiled and 8 million students in Thailand get Office 365 for Education

Weekend warriors, you’ve made it! In addition to the unofficial start to summer, and all of the backyard barbecues and beach picnics you’ve got on tap, this weekend promises an extra day to take in none other than Weekend Reading. Enjoy.

On Tuesday, Microsoft unveiled the Surface Pro 3. Envisioned as the tablet that can replace your laptop, this iteration of the Surface features a 12-inch full HD display, 4th-generation Intel® Core™ processor options and a multi-position kickstand that goes from movie mode to working mode to writing mode — all in a package that’s 30 percent thinner than an 11-inch MacBook Air.

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If a new Surface wasn’t excitement enough, also in the news last week: 8 million students in Thailand and 400,000 teachers are getting access to Microsoft Office 365 for Education. The deal, the largest Microsoft cloud education initiative yet, will allow students and teachers to create, connect and collaborate on a safe and secure platform, wrote Anthony Salcito, on The Official Microsoft Blog.

Speaking of summer, time to dial in those travel plans. From deciding where to go to finding lodging and airfare and documenting your trip, these apps from the Windows Store and Windows Phone Store, have you covered. If Alaska is your airline of choice, e-booking and boarding just got easier with the Alaska Airlines app, now available in the Windows Phone Store. If your kids could use some new summer clothes for the trip, check out Moxie Jean, a hip, digital consignment shop featuring all of the top designer brands.

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The “Microsoft Cookbook” has done it again, winning its third Gourmand World Cookbook award, this year in the Corporate category. Microsoft China collected the award, Tuesday, in Beijing. Volume four of the cookbook, focused on health and wellness, and comprised of recipes from Microsoft employees around the world, is due out this fall.

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Also, in the category of high art, Han-Yi Shaw, design manager for Office for iPad gives a behind-the-scenes look at the creative journey the design team took as they “reimagined Office from the ground up for iPad.” There have been more than 27 million downloads of Office for iPad since its launch almost two months ago.

Also, on the Official Microsoft Blog, Susan Hauser, Corporate Vice President of the Enterprise and Partner Group gave businesses her “top 10” list of benefits a company can realize by adopting a strategy for Internet of Things. (Spoiler alert: they include greater efficiencies and deeper customer connections.)

This week on the Microsoft Facebook page, we profiled Emmett Lalish. 3D printing used to be his hobby, now it’s his job at Microsoft.

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Finally, Microsoft Stories launched Snaps, a digital photo album of must-see Microsoft images from around the world. Weekend Reading is excited to bring you a new Snap each week. We’re kicking it off with this one of Panos Panay, Microsoft’s corporate vice president for Surface Computing, taken by Brian Smale, behind the scenes at a rehearsal for Tuesday’s release event.

Enjoy the longer days and the extra-long weekend. Don’t forget sunscreen. We’ll see you back here next week!

Posted by Aimee Riordan
Microsoft News Center Staff

Gathering Recent Events for a Specific VM

Imagine this scenario: you login to one of your Hyper-V servers and find that something has gone wrong with a virtual machine.  Maybe the guest operating system is not responding, maybe it is running slower than expected, maybe something else has gone wrong.

As you are triaging the problem – you are likely to want to gather all the information you can about what has been happening with the virtual machine in question.  Luckily, this is quite easy to do with PowerShell.

In fact, you just need to run this code snippet:

$vmName = “File Server”
Get-WinEvent -FilterHashTable @{LogName =”Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V*”; StartTime = (Get-Date).AddDays(-2)} | ?{( [xml]$_.toxml()).event.userdata.vmleventlog.vmname -eq $vmName}

And you will get results like this:
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(sorry for the lack of results – I have not had any problems with my virtual machines lately!)

This works because Hyper-V tags each event log entry with the virtual machine name, and the Get-WinEvent Cmdlet allows you to look for this tag in the event log results.

Cheers,
Ben