Category Archives: Announcements

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Debug z-index stacking content with 3D View in the Microsoft Edge DevTools – Microsoft Edge Blog

We are thrilled to announce the next iteration of 3D View in the Microsoft Edge DevTools, with a new feature to help debug z-index stacking context. The general 3D View shows a representation of the DOM (Document Object Model) depth using color and stacking, and the z-Index view helps you isolate the different stacking contexts of your page.
3D view is enabled by default in the Canary branch – to enable it in other branches, open the DevTools “Experiments” settings (Ctrl-Shift-P -> “Experiments“) and turn on “Enable 3D View.” If you don’t see that item, navigate to edge://flags and make sure you have enabled “Developer Tools experiments.” Once 3D view is enabled, you can find it under the “More tools” menu (or via search: Ctrl-Shift-P -> “3D View“).

With our first 3D View experiment, we were able to get incredible feedback from Twitter and from the feedback button. This encouraged us to conduct further usability studies to improve the tool. Along the way, we received plenty of requests for CSS z-index debugging as a feature, and felt that the 3D View would be a great vehicle to try it out.
In the z-index tab you can further simplify the view by only showing elements with a stacking context or hiding elements with the same paint order as their parent. These two settings will make for a flatter and more readable experience. Check out our explainer for more details!

What’s next
Coming soon, we’ll have a better highlighting experience between the Elements panel and 3D View, UI improvements, and new camera controls. We’d love to hear what else you’d like to see from this experience! What other features would help you with your day to day debugging? Feel free to reach out to us on Twitter, or just click “Send feedback” in the Microsoft Edge “Help and Feedback” menu at any time.
– Erica Draud, Program Manager, Edge DevTools

Upgrading to the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

The new Microsoft Edge is now out of preview and available for download, with today’s release of our first Stable channel build (Microsoft Edge 79 stable). You can download the new Microsoft Edge today at microsoft.com/edge. In this post, we’ll walk through what you can expect now that the new Edge channel is open – including how the update will roll out, how you can get started testing and what to expect from the preview channels going forward. 
The work of upgrading devices to the new Microsoft Edge across hundreds of millions of Windows PCs around the world won’t happen overnight. Our goal is to make this process as simple and non-intrusive as possible to deliver a great experience, while minimizing risk to users and organizations.  

You can get the new Microsoft Edge for Windows and macOS today by downloading it directly from microsoft.com/edge. When you install Microsoft Edge on an up-to-date Windows 10 device, it will replace the previous (legacy) version on your device. In some cases, you may be prompted to install additional updates. Your favorites, passwords, and basic settings will carry over to the new Microsoft Edge automatically. Web apps (including those built on EdgeHTML), and Microsoft Edge preview channels (such as Dev or Canary) will continue to work without interruption.  
If you’re using Microsoft Edge on iOS or Android, you don’t need to take any action – your device will update automatically. 

If you’d prefer not to install Microsoft Edge manually, you can wait for it to be installed in a future update to Windows 10, following our measured roll-out approach over the next several months. We will start to migrate Windows 10 customers to the new Microsoft Edge in the coming weeks, starting with a subset of Windows Insiders in the Release Preview ring.  
Enterprise and education users will not be automatically upgraded at this time. Contact your administrator for more information on updating to the new Microsoft Edge in your organization. Administrators should refer to the “Enterprise updates and options” section below.  
The new Microsoft Edge will gradually be made available on Windows Update and offered to additional devices as data and feedback indicate that users are having a good experience. If you don’t want to wait, you can get the new Microsoft Edge at microsoft.com/edge. 
Whether you download today or wait for us to upgrade it on your device, your favorites, passwords, and basic settings will carry over to the new Microsoft Edge automatically. The automatic rollout will maintain your default browser setting – if your default is currently set to a browser other than Microsoft Edge, your setting will carry over once the new Microsoft Edge is installed.  
Once you’ve installed Microsoft Edge, it will update independently on a roughly six-week cadence. You can always preview the next major update via the Beta channel—for example, Microsoft Edge 80 will enter the Beta channel soon, and is expected to release to Stable in February. You can learn more about Microsoft Edge preview channels in our previous blog post, What to expect in the new Microsoft Edge Insider channels. 

Organizations are in full control of when the new Microsoft Edge will be deployed to their managed devices. Managed devices will not be automatically updated to the new Microsoft Edge. In addition to managed devices, Enterprise, Education, and Workstation Pro Edition devices will not be automatically updated at this time.  Organizations that would like to block the automatic delivery of the new Microsoft Edge to devices on Home and Pro Editions with Windows Update enabled can do so either via policies or by downloading and deploying the Blocker Toolkit.  Note that Internet Explorer is not impacted by our automatic rollout. 
When you are ready to deploy the new Microsoft Edge, you can learn more about rolling out and managing Microsoft Edge across your organization from our enterprise documentation, and you can download our offline deployment packages and administrative policy templates for configuring Microsoft Edge on Windows and macOS at our enterprise page. Eligible Microsoft 365 customers can also take advantage of Fast Track and App Assure support, launching in Q1 of 2020.    
Once you have deployed the new Microsoft Edge to your organization, you can configure or restrict updates using the Microsoft Edge Update policies. In the future, we plan to include Microsoft Edge built-in to Windows, to be delivered through a future Windows 10 Feature Update for all customers. 
For more guidance on deployment, check out this Microsoft Mechanics interview from Ignite, where host Jeremy Chapman interviews Chuck Friedman, CVP of Microsoft Edge engineering, and walks through deployment demos including Configuration Manager and a new security baseline for Microsoft Edge.  

Whether you’re just trying out the new Microsoft Edge for the first time, or have been with us on this journey over the last year, thank you for getting involved and helping make Microsoft Edge great. We’ve seen exciting momentum in the Chromium project over the last year, landing more than 1900 contributions across areas like accessibility, modern input including touch, speech, digital inking, and many more, and we couldn’t be more excited for what’s next. 
Enterprise administrators and IT professionals can learn more about deploying, managing, and configuring the new Microsoft Edge in your organization at our new enterprise page.  
Web developers can find guidance on incorporating Microsoft Edge into your test matrix in our recent blog post, “Getting your sites ready for the new Microsoft Edge,” as well as more information on new platform capabilities, developer tools, web apps, and more in our web developer documentation. 
Happy browsing! 
– Kyle Pflug, Senior PM Lead, Microsoft Edge 

Announcing the draft Security Baseline for Microsoft Edge version 79 – Microsoft Edge Blog

We are pleased to announce the draft security baseline for the initial stable release of the new Microsoft Edge! Please review the security baseline (DRAFT) for Microsoft Edge version 79, and send us your feedback through the Baselines Discussion site.Every organization faces security threats. However, the types of security threats that are of most concern to one organization can be completely different from another organization. For example, an e-commerce company may focus on protecting its Internet-facing web apps, while a hospital may focus on protecting confidential patient information. The one thing that all organizations have in common is a need to keep their apps and devices secure.
A security baseline is a group of Microsoft-recommended configuration settings that explains their security impact. These settings are based on feedback from Microsoft security engineering teams, product groups, partners, and customers.

Security baselines are an essential benefit to your organization because they bring together expert knowledge from Microsoft, partners, and customers.
For example, there are 200+ Microsoft Edge Group Policy settings for Windows. Of these settings, only some are security-related.  Although Microsoft provides extensive guidance on these policies, exploring each one can take a long time. You would have to determine the security impact of each setting on your own. Then, you would still need to determine the appropriate value for each setting.
In modern organizations, the security threat landscape is constantly evolving, and IT administrators and policy-makers must keep up with security threats and make required changes to Microsoft Edge security settings to help mitigate these threats. To enable faster deployments and make managing Microsoft Edge easier, Microsoft provides customers with security baselines that are available in consumable formats, such as Group Policy Objects backups.

As with our current Windows and Office security baselines, our recommendations for Microsoft Edge configuration follow a streamlined and efficient approach to baseline definition when compared with the baselines we published before Windows 10. The foundation of that approach is essentially this:
The baselines are designed for well-managed, security-conscious organizations in which standard end users do not have administrative rights.
A baseline enforces a setting only if it mitigates a contemporary security threat and does not cause operational issues that are worse than the risks they mitigate.
A baseline enforces a default only if it is otherwise likely to be set to an insecure state by an authorized user:
If a non-administrator can set an insecure state, enforce the default.
If setting an insecure state requires administrative rights, enforce the default only if it is likely that a misinformed administrator will otherwise choose poorly.

(For further explanation, see the “Why aren’t we enforcing more defaults?” section in this blog post.)

You can use security baselines to:
Ensure that user and device configuration settings are compliant with the baseline.
Set configuration settings. For example, you can use Group Policy, System Center Configuration Manager, or Microsoft Intune to configure a device with the setting values specified in the baseline.

For version 78, see Security baseline (DRAFT) for Chromium-based Microsoft Edge, version 78.
For version 79, see Security baseline (DRAFT) for Chromium-based Microsoft Edge, version 79.
Future draft security baselines versions will be posted to the Microsoft Security Baselines Blog, and final security baselines will be available in the Security Compliance Toolkit (SCT).

Check out our Microsoft Edge enterprise documentation to learn more about deploying and managing the next version of Microsoft Edge.
– Forbes Higman, Program Manager, Microsoft Edge enterprise security– Brian Altman, Program Manager, Microsoft Edge manageability

Get started building extensions for the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

Starting today, the Microsoft Edge Addons store is now open for submissions for all developers. This is where users will find your extensions for the new Microsoft Edge. You can submit your extensions today by visiting the Partner Center Developer Dashboard.In most cases, existing extensions built for Chromium will work without any modifications in the new Microsoft Edge. Check out our developer documentation to learn more about Microsoft Edge-specific APIs, tips on submitting your extension, and other helpful information. The extension submission program is in its preview phase and we are excited to hear and incorporate your feedback.
Transitioning your existing extensions to Chromium
As we move towards the general availability of the new Microsoft Edge on January 15th, 2020, we will no longer accept new submissions for Microsoft Edge Legacy (EdgeHTML-based) extensions after December 17th, 2019. We will continue to accept updates for your existing extensions.
We recommend you prioritize building new extensions for the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge, and continue to support your existing EdgeHTML-based extensions to ensure a quality experience for active users.
Developers who have given consent for Microsoft to migrate their EdgeHTML extension listings to the new Microsoft Edge should begin to see their extensions available in the new Addons store experience in Microsoft Edge. If you publish an EdgeHTML extension and have not received any communication regarding its migration or are unsure of its status, please contact us at [email protected]
If you have already received a confirmation from us regarding migration, we encourage you to log on to the Partner Center Developer Dashboard to validate your access to the extension, and verify whether you can update it. Once the migration is complete, ownership and management will be completely transferred to you, and Microsoft will not be responsible for updating or maintaining your extension.
Migrating extension users to the new Microsoft Edge
We will migrate users’ extensions from the current version of Microsoft Edge when they update to the new Microsoft Edge (starting January 15th). Extensions will only be migrated for users if they are already available on the Microsoft Edge Addons store at the time of switching to the new browser.
We recommend that developers update your existing EdgeHTML extensions for Chromium and publish them via the new portal as soon as possible, so your existing customers will not face any interruptions when they update to the new Microsoft Edge.
Getting started
You can check out our initial developer documentation today, and expect to see more coming soon. If you have any additional questions about the extension submission process, please contact Microsoft Edge Addons Developer Support.
It’s a great time to build for the web, and we look forward to collaborating with you on our new browser!
– Killian McCoy, Program Manager 2– Pratyusha Avadhanula, Senior Program Manager

Try out WebView2 with the new interactive API sample – Microsoft Edge Blog

Over the past few years, we have seen increased demand for the development of applications that leverage both web and native technologies to modernize native applications, iterate faster with web technologies, and more easily develop cross-platform.At this year’s Build conference in May, we introduced the Win32 preview of the WebView2 control, powered by the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser. A WebView is a modal that is embedded within a native application, and which renders web content (HTML/CSS/JavaScript) powered by the browser. Since launching our Win32 WebView2 preview, we have been engaging with the community and partners to collect a great deal of feedback, and delivering SDK updates every six weeks.
To learn more about WebViews, how they work, and more about options like Evergreen (WebView content is rendered by the Microsoft Edge browser instance on the user’s computer) vs. Bring Your Own (WebView content is rendered by a separate instance of the Microsoft Edge browser downloaded with the application) check out our developer documentation.
WebView2 API Sample
Recently, we built and launched a sample application (we call it WebView2 API Sample) using the WebView2 APIs to create an interactive application that demonstrates WebView2’s functionalities. The WebView2 API Sample is intended to be the most comprehensive guide available and will be updated regularly as we add more features to our SDK.
Notable features in our WebView2 API Sample are Navigation, Web Messaging (communication between the Win32 Host and the WebView), and Native Object Injection (accessing Win32 Objects directly from JavaScript).

You can build and play around with the WebView2 API Sample by downloading or cloning it from our WebView2 Samples repository. To learn more about the sample’s source code and functionality, read our WebView2 API Sample guide. As you develop your own applications, we recommend referencing the source code for suggested API patterns for WebView2 workflows.
Build your own WebView2 application
You can learn more about WebView2 through our documentation, get started using our getting-started guide, and checkout more examples in our samples repository.
Tell us what you plan to build with WebView2 and please reach out with any thoughts or feedback through our feedback repo.
– Palak Goel, Program Manager, WebView

Get started with Collections in Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

We’re excited to announce that Collections is now enabled by default for all Microsoft Edge Insiders in the Canary and Dev channels (build 80.0.338.0 or later). Following our initial preview behind a feature flag two months ago, we have been adding in new features and functionality. For those who enabled the feature flag – thank you! We have been listening to your feedback and are excited to share the improvements we’ve made.We designed Collections based on what you do on the web. If you’re a shopper, it will help you collect and compare items. If you’re an event or trip organizer, Collections will help pull together all your trip or event information as well as ideas to make your event or trip a success. If you’re a teacher or student, it will help you organize your web research and create your lesson plans or reports. Whatever you are doing on the web, Collections can help.
Recent improvements to Collections
We’ve been working hard to add more functionality and refine the feature over the last couple months – some of which were directly informed by your feedback.
Here are some of the improvements we made, based on your input:
Access your collections across your devices: We’ve added sync to Collections. We know some of you have seen issues around sync, your feedback has been helping us improve. We know this is an important scenario and are ready for you to try it. When you are signed into Microsoft Edge preview builds with the same profile on different computers, Collections will sync between them.
Open all links in a collection into a new window: We’ve heard you’d like an easy way to open all sites saved in a collection. Try out “Open all” from the “Sharing and more” menu to open tabs in a new window, or from the context menu on a collection to open them as tabs in the current window so you can easily pick up where you left off. We’ve also heard that you want an easy way to save a group of tabs to a collection. This is something that we are actively working on and are excited to share when it is ready.
Edit card titles: You’ve been asking for the ability to rename the titles of items in collections, so they are easier for you to understand. Now you can. To edit a title, right click and choose “Edit” from the context menu. A dialog will appear giving you the ability to rename the title.
Dark theme in Collections: We know you love dark theme, and we want to make sure we provide a great experience in Collections. We’ve heard some feedback on notes which we’ve addressed. Try it out and let us know what you think.
 “Try Collections” flyout: We understand that if you’re an active user of Collections that we were showing you the “Try Collections” flyout even though you previously used the feature. We’ve now tuned the flyout to be quieter.
Sharing a collection: You’ve told us that once you’ve collected content you want to share it with others. We have lots of work planned to better support sharing scenarios. One way you can share today is through the “Copy all” option added to the “Sharing and more” menu, or by selecting individual items and copying them via the “Copy” button in the toolbar.

Once you’ve copied items from your Collection, you can then paste them into your favorite apps, like OneNote or Email. If you are pasting into an app that supports HTML you will get a rich copy of the content.

Try out Collections
You can get started by opening the Collections pane from the button next to the address bar.
When you open the Collections pane, select Start new collection and give it a name. As you browse, you can start to add content related to your collection.

Send Feedback
Now that we’re on by default, we hope that more of you will give us a try. Thank you again to all of you that have been using the feature and sending us feedback. If you think something’s not working right, or if there’s some capability you’d like to see added, please send us feedback using the smiley face icon in the top right corner of the browser.

Thanks for continuing to be a part of this preview!

Improving Tracking Prevention in Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

Today, we’re excited to announce some improvements to our tracking prevention feature that have started rolling out with Microsoft Edge 79. In our last blog post about tracking prevention in Microsoft Edge, we mentioned that we are experimenting with ways that our Balanced mode can be further improved to provide even greater privacy protections by default without breaking sites. We are looking to strike a balance between two goals:Blocking more types of trackers – Microsoft Edge’s tracking prevention feature is powered by Disconnect’s tracking protection lists. We wanted to build off our initial implementation of tracking prevention in Microsoft Edge 78 and maximize the protections we offered by default by exploring blocking other categories of trackers (such as those in the Content category) in Balanced mode. These changes resulted in Microsoft Edge 79 blocking ~25% more trackers than Microsoft Edge 78.
Maintaining compatibility on the web – We knew that blocking more categories of trackers (especially those in the Content category) had the potential to break certain web workflows such as federated login or embedded social media content.
We learned through experimentation that it is possible to manage these tradeoffs by relaxing tracking prevention for organizations with which a user has established a relationship. To determine this list, we built on-device logic that combines users’ personal site engagement scores with the observation that some organizations own multiple domains that they use to deploy functionality across the web. It’s worth mentioning that this compatibility mitigation only applies to Balanced mode; Strict mode will continue to block the largest set of trackers without any mitigations.

The Chromium project’s site engagement score is a measure of how engaged a specific user is with a specific site. Site engagement scores can range from 0 (meaning a user has no relationship with a site) to 100 (meaning that a user is extremely engaged with a site). Activities such as browsing to a site repeatedly/over several days, spending time interacting with a site, and playing media on a site all cause site engagement scores to increase, whereas not visiting a site causes site engagement scores to decay exponentially over time. You can view your own site engagement scores by navigating to edge://site-engagement.
It’s also worth noting that site engagement scores are computed on your device and never leave it. This means that they are not synced across your devices or sent to Microsoft at any time.
Through local experimentation, we found that a site engagement score of 4.1 was a suitable threshold to define a site that a user has an active relationship with. While this value is subject to change based on user feedback and future experiments, it was selected as an initial value for two reasons:
It is low enough to ensure successful interactions with a site that a user has not previously had a history of engagement with.
It is high enough to ensure that sites a user visits infrequently will drop off the list relatively quickly.
While site engagement helps signal which sites are important to individual users, allowing third party storage access/resource loads from only these sites would not consider the fact that organizations can serve content that users care about from multiple domains, which can still result in site breakages.
Combining site engagement with organizations
In our last blog post about tracking prevention, we introduced the concept of an organization, that is, a single company that can own multiple domains related to their business (such as Org1 owning “org1.test” and “org1-cdn.test”). We also shared that in order to keep sites working smoothly, our tracking prevention implementation groups such domains together and exempts storage/resource blocks when a domain in one organization requests resources from another domain in that same organization.
In order to keep sites that users engage with working as expected while also increasing the types of trackers that we block by default, we combined the concept of an organization together with site engagement to create a new mitigation. This mitigation takes effect whenever a user has established an ongoing relationship with a given site (currently defined by a site engagement score of 4.1 or greater). For example, consider the following organization which owns two domains:
Social Org
social.example
social-videos.example
A user will be considered to have a relationship with Social Org if they have established a site engagement score of at least 4.1 with any one of its domains.
If another site, content-embedder.example, includes third-party content (say an embedded video from social-videos.example) from any of Social Org’s domains that would normally be restricted by tracking prevention, it will be temporarily allowed as long as the user’s site engagement score with Social Org’s domains is maintained above the threshold.
If a site does not belong to an organization, a user will need to establish a site engagement score of at least 4.1 with it directly before any storage access/resource load blocks imposed by tracking prevention will be lifted.
What does this mean?
By exempting sites and organizations that you have an ongoing and established relationship with from tracking prevention, we can ensure that the web services and applications you care about continue to work as you expect across the web. Leveraging site engagement also allows us to only unblock content that is likely to be important to you and reflects your current needs. This ensures that actions such as briefly visiting a site or seeing a popup aren’t enough to unblock content by themselves. If content does get unblocked due to you interacting with a site, it is always unblocked in a temporary manner that is proportional to how highly engaged you are with that site/its parent organization. By combining these exemptions with more strict blocking of trackers by default, we can provide higher levels of protection while still maintaining compatibility on the ever-evolving set of sites that you engage with.
It’s worth noting that tracking prevention, when enabled, will always block storage access and resource loads for sites that fall into the Fingerprinting or Cryptomining categories on Disconnect’s tracking protection lists. We will also not apply the site engagement-based mitigation outlined above for our most privacy-minded users who opt into tracking prevention’s Strict mode.

The best way to learn what’s changed with tracking prevention in Microsoft Edge 79 is to take a look at the table below:
Along the top are the categories of trackers as defined by Disconnect’s tracking protection list categories.
Along the left side are comparisons of the improvements made to our tracking prevention feature broken down into Basic, Balanced, and Strict.
The letter “S” in a cell denotes that storage access is blocked.
The letter “B” in a cell denotes that both storage access and resource loads (i.e. network requests) are blocked.
A “-“ in a cell denotes that no block will be applied to either storage access or resource loads.
The “Same-Org Mitigation” refers to the first mitigation that we introduced in our previous blog post and recapped above.
The “Org Engagement Mitigation” refers to the second mitigation based on site engagement that we introduced earlier in this post.

Advertising
Analytics
Content
Cryptomining
Fingerprinting
Social
Other
Same Org Mitigation
Org Engagement Mitigation
Basic

Microsoft Edge 78



B
B


Enabled
Not impl.
Microsoft Edge 79



B
B


Enabled
N/A
Balanced

Microsoft Edge 78
S


B
B
S

Enabled
Not impl.
Microsoft Edge 79
S

S
B
B
S
S
Enabled
Enabled1
Strict 2

Microsoft Edge 78
B
B

B
B
B
B
Enabled
Not impl.
Microsoft Edge 79
B
B
S
B
B
B
B
Enabled
Disabled
Does not apply to Cryptomining or Fingerprinting categories.
Strict mode blocks more resource loads than Balanced. This can result in Strict mode appearing to block less tracking requests than Balanced since the trackers making the requests are never even loaded to begin with.
With our recent updates in Microsoft Edge 79, we have seen, on average, 25% more trackers blocked in Balanced mode. Close monitoring of user feedback and engagement time also showed no signs of negative compatibility impact, suggesting that the org engagement mitigation is effective at minimizing breakage on sites that users actively engage with. While this does mean that top sites have the org engagement mitigation applied more often, we believe this is an acceptable tradeoff versus compatibility, especially as more top sites are starting to give users mechanisms to transparently view, control, and delete their data.
As with all our features, we’ll continue to monitor telemetry and user feedback channels to learn more and continually improve tracking prevention in future releases. We are also exploring additional compatibility mitigations such as the Storage Access API, which we intend to experiment with in a future version of Microsoft Edge.
InPrivate Changes
In our previous blog post, we mentioned that users browsing in InPrivate will automatically get Strict mode protections. By listening to the feedback our users provided, we found that this led to unexpected behavior (such as causing sites that worked in a normal browsing window to fail to load InPrivate) and broke some important use cases. That’s why in Microsoft Edge 79, your current tracking prevention settings will be carried over to InPrivate sessions.
We are currently experimenting in our Canary and Dev channels with a switch at the bottom of our settings panel (which you can reach by navigating to edge://settings/privacy) that will allow you to re-enable Strict mode protections InPrivate by default:

We’ve also made it easier for you to view the trackers that Microsoft Edge has blocked for you. Navigate to edge://settings/privacy/blockedTrackers to test out this new experience today!

We’d love to hear your thoughts on our next iteration of tracking prevention. If something looks broken, or if you have feedback to share on these changes, we’d love to hear from you. Please send us feedback using the “smiley face” in the top right corner of the browser.
Send feedback at any time with the Send a Smile button in Microsoft Edge

As always, thanks for being a part of this journey towards a more private web!
–  Scott Low, Senior Program Manager–  Brandon Maslen, Senior Software Engineer

Find your flow with the Enterprise New Tab Page – Microsoft Edge Blog

How much time do you think you spend looking for things at work? Because our files and information are stored in so many places it’s probably quite a bit. In fact, according to McKinsey, we spend 20% of our work week just searching for internal information, tracking down colleagues, and trying to pick up where we left off.  That’s one whole day a week.That’s why we’re excited for you to try a new way to manage your work with the new Microsoft Edge, now available in Microsoft Edge Insider preview builds. When signed in with an Azure Active Directory work account, opening a new tab in Microsoft Edge delivers a dynamic and personalized set of your most relevant Office documents, internal web sites, company resources, and other Microsoft 365 content.
Each new tab layout is populated by features that leverage the intelligence of the Office 365 graph to find what you need, right when you need it.
Microsoft Search in Bing: Search bar for the web and the intranet; find people, documents, and internal sites, just by searching.
Dynamic Site Tiles: Below the search bar you’ll find a set of tiles populated with your most commonly used websites or important internal sites configured by a company admin.
Recommended Content: Easy access to recently shared or often accessed files that are most important to you and your team.
Recent files & sites: Immediately below Recommended documents are lists of recent Office files (on the left) and frequently used SharePoint sites (on the right).
Content and Layout Selection: An easy toggle allows navigation between content feeds (‘Office 365’ and ‘Microsoft News’)
Please check out the additional details on the capabilities below, then try it yourself by downloading a Microsoft Edge Insider build. Tell us what you like, what doesn’t work for you, and anything else you think could help you find your flow on the Enterprise new tab experience.

Microsoft Search in Bing
If you’re looking for something you haven’t used in a while, just perform a search. Artificial intelligence technology from Bing and personalized insights from the Microsoft Graph connect you to the best of the web and work in a single experience. Whether you’re working in SharePoint, OneDrive, Office, or Bing, and communicating with Microsoft Teams or Yammer, you can search all of your files and conversations in one place, giving you the information you need, right when you need it most. Try searching for a document, conversation, colleague, or even yourself. Click here to explore Microsoft Search in Bing. You can also click here to read documentation on how to get set up and running with Microsoft Search in Bing in your organization.
Dynamic Site Tiles
Eight tiles provide visual links back to the sites you use most; the algorithm to compute these is run locally on your device, based on your browsing history, also stored locally. No data needs to leave your machine for these to work. We’re also introducing a new policy enabling IT Administrators to program up to 3 of these tiles. These can be enabled via enforced policy, which pins the tile permanently or recommended policy, which allows more frequently used sites to replace that tile. Administrators will also specify the URL, title. Click here to learn more about this policy. To learn about all Microsoft Edge policies, click here.
Recommended Content
In the face of ever-expanding file, email, and discussion traffic, the Recommended Documents feature is the ‘magic’ that surfaces what you need most. It is the intelligence that monitors all file activity and uses machine learning to produce a short list of files, saving you time and allowing you to pick up right where you left off.
The Office Graph provides brains behind the Recommended content module. The Office Graph continuously collects and analyses signals that you and your colleagues send when you work in Office 365. For example, when you and a colleague modify or view the same document, it’s a signal that you’re likely to be working together. Other signals include who you communicate with through e-mail, and who you’ve shared documents with, who your manager is, and who has the same manager as you.
With Recommended content, you’ll be served a series of cards that provide information about the content and collaboration status of a few documents that we believe you should pay attention to. For example, a Microsoft Word file that has had 3 different edits in the last day, an Excel file where you’ve been @mentioned with a couple of questions, and an important presentation your team is working on with 5 unread comments.
Each card contains easily scannable information so you can quickly prioritize what to work on next without breaking your flow.
The center of the card: features a thumbnail so you can quickly recognize the file.
The top: features an icon to indicate what type of activity is most significant and who it was associated with and when the activity occurred.
At the bottom: of the card, you’ll find the file name as well as the location of the file for reference.
Please note that for documents to appear in the Recommended section, they must be stored on OneDrive for Business or SharePoint. Click here to learn more about the Office Graph.
Recent Files & Sites
Another way to stay focused and in your workflow is to organize the work you’ve been doing most recently. That’s why, immediately below Recommended documents, you’ll see lists of recent files (on the left) and frequent SharePoint sites (on the right).  Organized into 4 helpful views:
Recent: Your recently accessed files. Hovering over an item allows additional actions like pinning, sharing, and opening in browser or desktop.
Pinned: Filters your recent documents down to only those you’ve pinned.
Shared with me: A list of files that have been shared with you, whether you’ve recently opened them or not.
Discover: In discover, you’ll see a mix of both your own documents, and documents your colleagues are working on so you have additional awareness about team projects. These are documents that are stored in OneDrive for Business or SharePoint in Office 365, or that have been shared with you as attachments in emails. These documents aren’t organized according to a timeline, for example last modified, or in alphabetical order. Instead, these documents are organized according to what’s likely to be most relevant to you right now.
Settings Flyout
In the upper right is a quick way for you to switch back to the Microsoft News content & layout choices, and coming soon, the ability to choose various layouts that best suit your flow.

We’re also introducing a policy enabling IT Administrators to set page content. This can be enabled via enforced policy, which prevents switching or recommended policy, which allows switching between Microsoft News and Office 365 page content. Click here to learn more about this policy.  To learn about all Microsoft Edge policies, click here.
Microsoft 365 Compliance
The Enterprise new tab experience integrates compliant M365 services and is architected so that your data stays within your organization’s boundaries.
Microsoft Search in Bing: Address bar and in-page search is supported by Microsoft Search in Bing. Explore the links in the “Microsoft Search in Bing” section to learn more about how your data is protected.
Dynamic Site Tiles: computed locally using local device data. For these, nothing leaves your device.
Office content: This content is powered by existing compliant M365 services like the Recommended Content service, recent file service, and recent SharePoint sites service.
If your organization needs to comply with legal or regulatory standards, start here to learn about compliance in Microsoft 365.
More to Come for Enterprise New Tab Experience
We are looking forward for you to download the new Microsoft Edge and experience these new workflows to collect your feedback. Providing feedback is easy. Just click the smiley face in the top-right corner of the browser to let us know what you like or want to see improved:

In the meantime, we’re working on adding support for new and compliant ways for enterprise end users to and IT admins to personalize, configure, and use the Enterprise New Tab Page for productivity in their day-to-day workflows.
Thank you for trying out the new Microsoft Edge. We welcome your comments below!
– Chad Rothschiller, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge– Matt Betz, Product Marketing Manager, Microsoft Edge

Getting your sites ready for the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

This morning, we released Microsoft Edge Beta version 79, which is the final Beta before the new Microsoft Edge is generally available, also known as the “Release Candidate.” On January 15th, we expect to release the “Stable” channel, at which point Microsoft Edge will be generally available to download on Windows and macOS.The new Microsoft Edge is built on the Chromium engine, providing best in class compatibility with extensions and web sites, with great support for the latest rendering capabilities, modern web applications, and powerful developer tools across all supported platforms.
For Enterprise customers, the new Microsoft Edge also includes Internet Explorer mode, providing a seamless experience across internal sites and LOB apps with legacy dependencies. And for end users, it includes new privacy-enhancing features like tracking prevention that’s on by default and a new InPrivate mode across your entire web experience, so your online searches and browsing are not attributed to you.
You can learn more about how the new Microsoft Edge and Bing work together to be the browser and search engine for business over on the Windows blog. In this post, we’ll share more about how you can add the new Microsoft Edge to your automated browser testing, so your customers have a great experience as they begin to upgrade. We’ll also share resources you can use to file bugs, get support, and see what’s next for the new Microsoft Edge.

Microsoft Edge has multiple channels that you can get started testing today: Canary, Developer, and Beta. Each of these channels has differing levels of support for experimental features, and therefore each has its own level of risk regarding stability.In general, we recommend testing on the Developer channel as a good balance between Canary (which is essentially untested bits that are built every night) and Beta, which contains six weeks’ worth of changes. The Developer channel may be less stable than Beta but allows developers to experiment and prototype against early bits.
For customers looking for a snapshot of what is coming in the next major version, the Beta channel represents an early preview of the next Stable release. For example, today’s Beta 79 is our “Release Candidate” build for our Stable release on January 15th. To install the browser, simply browse here and select the appropriate channel.

Because the new Microsoft Edge is built on Chromium, it is fully compatible with popular automated testing frameworks like Selenium WebDriver and Puppeteer. With general availability coming in January, we recommend incorporating the new Microsoft Edge into your existing automated tests now – testing the Beta channel will give you six weeks advance notice of any potential issues that may impact your site.
Selenium WebDriver
The most common framework for browser automation is Selenium WebDriver. To configure WebDriver with Microsoft Edge, you’ll need to download the corresponding version of our WebDriver, MSEdgeDriver. So, for example, if you downloaded the Developer channel for Microsoft Edge, you would want to click on the Settings and More link in the browser and then click on “Settings”. From there, you can click on “About Microsoft Edge” and see your Version. It will say something like “79.0.308.0”. Once you know that, you can download the matching version of MSEdgeDriver that is appropriate for your Operating System.
If you prefer to automate that process, you can check the following registry key for the version of Microsoft Edge that is installed:
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftEdge{ CHANNEL}BLBeacon (e.g., ComputerHKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftEdge DevBLBeacon)
And then you can download the driver by building a URL to the server that looks like this:
https://msedgedriver.azureedge.net/{VERSION}/edgedriver_{ARC}.zip (e.g., https://msedgedriver.azureedge.net/79.0.308.1/edgedriver_win32.zip)
Microsoft Edge should be fully compatible with existing tests written to run in Chrome or other Chromium-based browsers – simply modify the “binary_location” to point to Microsoft Edge, and modify the “executable_path” to point to msedgedriver.exe. MSEdgeDriver.exe currently supports Chrome options, but we do plan on updating the Selenium language bindings in Selenium 4 to account for our new browser. For the time being, the language bindings will default to creating the legacy Microsoft Edge connections, so you will pass in a parameter indicating that these tests should run against the new Microsoft Edge browser:
Here is an example for how you would do that in C#:

Puppeteer
Another popular automation framework is Puppeteer, a Node library which provides a high-level API to control Chromium-based Browsers over the DevTools Protocol. By default, Puppeteer will launch a version of Chromium (the core upon which Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Brave, Vivaldi, and others are built). However, you can also pass in the path to the browser exe you would like to run instead.
You would write something like this (in JavaScript):

Automating Internet Explorer mode
In addition to running tests written for Chrome on Microsoft Edge, we’ve also made it easy to migrate tests written for Internet Explorer 11. The new Microsoft Edge includes “Internet Explorer mode,” which allows a tab to render content using IE11 in certain Enterprise contexts (e.g., for Intranet sites or sites  specified by your Enterprise Mode Site List).
The new Microsoft Edge allows you to run IE11 validation for legacy sites in addition to your modern experiences. To run your IE11 tests in Microsoft Edge, download the IEDriverServer from Selenium. Then you must pass in a capability to put Microsoft Edge into IE Mode and then run your tests.
Because this capability puts the whole browser into IE11 Mode, you cannot simultaneously test content that should render in the modern Chromium engine, but you should be able to run all of your IE11 tests and validate the rendering in Microsoft Edge. Note that this code requires an update to IEDriverServer which should be included in the next release of Selenium.
After you download the new IEDriverServer from SeleniumHQ and follow the directions for the “Required Configuration” as documented here, you can run the following code to launch the new Microsoft Edge in IE11 mode and run some tests:

As you test your sites in Microsoft Edge, you may encounter issues that appear to be caused by a bug in the browser. For any issue, the quickest way to give feedback is simply to click the “Send feedback” button in the “Help and Feedback” menu (or Alt-Shift-I on Windows). You can describe your issue and share additional details such as screenshots, diagnostic details, or contact information here.
This is also the best place to provide general end-user feedback such as feature suggestions. To date, we’ve received over 230,000 pieces of feedback from users and developers – thank you, and we truly embrace your input!

Alongside today’s announcements, we’ve updated our Platform Status feature roadmap to reflect the new Microsoft Edge capabilities and an early look at what’s in development for future versions. If you have questions about whether we plan to implement an upcoming HTML/CSS/JS feature, you can search for the corresponding entry here. If you don’t see the feature you’re looking for, simply open an issue on GitHub to get it added.
We’re also continuing to innovate through new standards proposals and by implementing experimental features in Chromium. You can track our focus areas on GitHub in the MSEdgeExplainers repository, where we publish public explainers and “intent to implement” notices as our first step towards shipping new features. We are committed to contributing as a member of the open source community, and have published over 30 explainers to date – and more importantly, we hope to make the web better for everyone.
Get started today by downloading the Microsoft Edge Release Candidate build and adding it to your test matrix, and be sure to share any feedback or issues you might have. We’ll see you in January!
– Kyle Pflug, Senior PM Lead, Microsoft Edge– John Jansen, Principal Software Engineering Manager, Microsoft Edge

Improving form controls in Microsoft Edge and Chromium – Microsoft Edge Blog

Since we began work on the next version of Microsoft Edge based on Chromium, we’ve been investigating ways to modernize form controls to provide a modern appearance as well as the touch friendliness and accessibility that our users expect from Microsoft Edge today.Over the past few months, we’ve been collaborating closely with the Google Chrome team on this project, and are excited to share the refreshed controls that will be coming to Microsoft Edge Insider builds, or other Chromium browsers near you.

This change brings an improved polish to the form controls and helps bring continuity of design and user experience with the rest of the browser. We have been collaborating closely with the Google Chrome design team to strike a balance between our design languages with a modern look and feel that feels at home in a variety of Chromium browsers. Below is a comparison of the default controls in Chromium today, compared to the updated controls we’re rolling out:

Windows devices come in a rich array of form factors and input modalities, including traditional desktop and laptop PCs, 2-in-1 devices, and other tablets and pen devices. We heard your feedback looking for a better touch input experience in our early Chromium preview builds, and set out to take an inventory of the controls to identify opportunities to improve the touch experience.

A good example of the touch improvements is the time input; currently, Chromium provides a text input, a clear button and a spinner. Our research found that with the large surface area of the fingertip, small controls that are too close together can be difficult to target precisely, recommending a control size of 23×23 pixels (13×13 DLUs) is a good minimum interactive control size for any input device. By contrast, the spin controls at 15×11 pixels are much too small to be used effectively with touch. The new time input we’re introducing includes a flyout with expected touch affordances, like inertia when scrolling and larger touch targets. Other inputs such as date, color, range received subtle size increases to  important touch targets as well.

Another area we examined is the focus rectangle that wraps a control when a user focuses the control. This is an important accessibility feature, as it allows the user to track where they’re actively focused, especially while navigating via keyboard.
Our team identified three different potential focus indicators that aligned with Microsoft’s design language, guaranteed high contrast on any background content, and provided a clean and aesthetically pleasing appearance.
We then ran interactive user studies to identify the best option, compared against Chromium’s current default focus rectangle as a baseline. We found that, while preferences were split for aesthetics, one option was the clear leader for accessibility. We’ve chosen that option as the new focus rectangle in Microsoft Edge, which you can see below:

Additionally, all these controls now support Windows High Contrast, which allows the user to define specific colors to improve the visual experience. All sites that utilize the built-in controls will benefit from these updated controls whenever the user is in High Contrast mode, without web developers doing any extra work. However, webdevelopers can adjust these styles if they want by utilizing the new CSS forced-color-adjust property and the prefers-contrastmedia query that are actively being standardized.

We’ve also updated our implementation to ensure great keyboard support across each control. For example, in the new color input, you can either navigate a single value using the arrow keys with the color well selected; if you hold the Ctrl key on Windows (Cmd key on Mac), it will move by 10 values allowing for quick traversal of the color well.
Finally, we updated the mappings for the controls to map to the HTML Accessibility API Mappings specification, to ensure a great experience for users who use assistive technologies (such as screen readers).

These updated controls are now available in Canary and Dev channel builds of Microsoft Edge, and will be coming upstream to other Chromium browsers in the near future. We’re excited as this work begins to ship out to users, and as the controls continue to evolve, we greatly appreciate any feedback that you may have in how we can improve the experience. Just click the smiley face in the top-right to Send Feedback, and let us know what you think!
— Greg Whitworth, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge