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Everything new from Microsoft Edge at Build 2020 – Microsoft Edge Blog

Microsoft Build 2020 can be defined by a set of ‘firsts’—it’s the first Build of the new decade, the first Build that’s all-digital for 24 hours a day, and the first Build since the new Microsoft Edge launched! We’re learning a lot as we deliver Build and Microsoft Edge in new ways.
Last year at Build, we unveiled what was coming with the new Microsoft Edge. Since then we haven’t stopped innovating to build a browser that’s right for you, with world-class performance and more security, more productivity, and more value as you browse.
We’ve introduced tools to give you more control over your privacy with Tracking prevention. We’ve added new ways to be more productive with Collections. And with Give Mode, we’ve turned searching with Bing into an easy way to do something good.
As mentioned in January, we plan to upgrade all Windows 10 devices (excluding enterprise and education) to the new Microsoft Edge. Users will be able to experience all the features above when it’s delivered via a measured roll-out that you’ll see ramping up over the course of the next few weeks. If you can’t wait and want to try it now, you can download the new Microsoft Edge here.
We believe in a web that just works for everyone. As we work to deliver a great browsing experience, we remain committed to listening to developers and sharing improvements back to the open source community that makes Microsoft Edge possible. To date, we’ve made over 3,000 commits back to the Chromium open source project that make the web more enjoyable, capable, and accessible for everyone.
This year at Build, we’re sharing ongoing innovation with improved tooling and reach for web developers, new consumer integrations, and new customization options for businesses.

What’s new for web developers
A healthy web community is made possible by a vibrant developer community. Over the last few months, we’ve worked to support that community with improvements like DevTools localization in 10 new languages, which has been adopted by many of you as you develop for Microsoft Edge. Now, we’re excited to highlight new tools that empower you, the developers who make the web possible, while expanding your canvas so you can reach your customers in more ways than ever before.
WebView2 preview expands to include .NET and UWP (WinUI) development

Last year, we pushed WebView2 forward with a preview for Win32 development. WebView2 lowers the barrier for developers to maximize code reuse across platforms with a consistent web platform to host web content in their apps. We’d like to thank everyone that has engaged with us so far throughout the preview—the contributions and feedback we’ve received drive our feature roadmap and quality.
Today, we’re expanding the preview with new options for .NET and UWP (WinUI 3.0) development, enabling you to embed a Chromium-based Edge WebView in WinForms, WPF, and UWP (WinUI 3.0) applications. Check out our documentation and Getting Started guide, or simply open Visual Studio and download the WebView2 package to get started.
Improvements to the Microsoft Edge Add-ons site make searching and finding extensions easier
For many users, extensions are a key component to the web experience. We’re committed to not only making it easy for developers to bring their Chromium-based extensions into our store, but also to make it simple for users to find them. We will be making a significant update to the Microsoft Edge Add-ons site to make it more visually appealing—new categories, new search capabilities, and a new layout will get those extensions in front of customers. Expect to see this roll out starting this month!
Making PWAs feel more at home on Windows 10
Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) continue to gain momentum as a great way to deliver content in an app-like experience across platforms, powered by web standards. With the most recent versions of Microsoft Edge and Windows 10, we’re making PWAs feel even more natural and familiar alongside other Windows apps.
Today, when you install PWAs on Windows 10, they look and feel more at home on your desktop OS in important ways, launching in a standalone window and appearing in places like Start and the Taskbar for easier access. We’re working on updates to make this integration even smoother—you’ll be able to manage them from settings, use them to share (and receive shared content), and more. Check out an early preview of this Windows integration by using Windows Insider preview builds and enabling the Web Apps Identity Proxy flag in the Microsoft Edge Canary preview build.
Try out experimental web platform features with Origin Trials
We always aim to move the web forward to meet the needs of web developers. Our Origin Trials program enables developers to test drive experimental features on their websites for a set length of time. Prototypes that we haven’t enabled for the general web yet will work on your site for a selection of your visitors in Microsoft Edge, enabling you to gather and provide early feedback which can influence the final API.
Learn more and register for an Origin Trial at the new Origin Trial Developer Console today!
New features for every user
This week, we’re also introducing a few exciting new features to help you be more productive, and a new integration to help find and organize the content you want.
Collections in Microsoft Edge is getting smarter with a new Pinterest integration
Collections helps you organize, save, and share your online life by allowing you to create groups of content from around the web. Links, images, text, and notes can be saved together across multiple sites, pages, and browser sessions to help you stay organized and inspired.
Now, Collections in Microsoft Edge is collaborating with Pinterest to help you discover relevant content for your research or project. People use Collections to capture their favorite design ideas, recipes, home improvement links, and even to research their next big purchase across multiple sites. This new integration with Pinterest will help you find ideas to spark inspiration, save time, and be more productive by suggesting content related to what you have already collected. When you enable the feature, you will see Pinterest suggestions at the bottom of your collection. Clicking on a suggestion will open a board of similar, trending Pins so you can quickly find and add ideas relevant to you.
This collaboration also allows you to export your collection to Pinterest. Any saved webpages or images will then show up in a new board in your Pinterest account.

Collections will also be rolling out the ability to send to OneNote, in addition to the options to send to Excel and Word which are available today. Collections integration with Pinterest, and Send to OneNote, will appear in Insider channels within the next month. Join our Edge insider program to be one of the first people to try it.
Sidebar search provides a faster, more contextual way to look things up

Today you have the option to look up words or phrases by searching in a new tab. This can make you lose your train of thought instead of helping you get more out of what you’re reading. Sidebar search aims to improve this experience by giving you the option to see results in a pane on the side of the page. Simply highlight a word or phrase, right click, and select “search in sidebar” from the context menu. And if you’re at work and signed in with your Azure Active Directory account, you’ll even see company results! Reading a corporate strategy paper with unlinked references? Use sidebar search to help find the answer. When you’re done, you can close out of the pane or keep searching in it to look up additional information.
Expect to see this show up in Insider preview channels in the coming weeks. Become an Edge Insider to be one of the first to try it.
New features for information workers and IT Pros
Microsoft Edge is the browser for business, and today we’re announcing new features and updates to make the lives of IT managers and information workers a little bit easier. Want to try these out in your organization? Download offline installers here.
New syncing and customization options for IT professionals

If you use multiple devices while working from home, you know how important sync is. Installed extensions now sync in Microsoft Edge and a new policy even allows IT professionals to precisely manage which types of data sync for their users. The flexibility to sync individual data types means IT professionals can fit syncing to their workplace needs. For some workplaces, syncing passwords might not be allowed—now IT can manage this.
Coming soon, sync will also extend to customers whose environments are still on-premises. The transition to the cloud takes time, and your company should be able to get the most out of Microsoft Edge during that transition.
Data security gets a boost with Windows Information Protection
As many people work from home, data protection is top of mind, especially for IT professionals. Microsoft Edge now supports Windows Information Protection for Windows 10 customers which clearly separates personal and corporate data, adds extra protection for line-of-business apps, and provides audit reporting for compliance. This has been a top ask by many customers, and we’re excited to bring it to the new Microsoft Edge.
Easily move between work and personal profiles

For information workers, we’ve made improvements to help keep them in their flow throughout the workday—this is especially true for those working at home, where work and personal boundaries can easily blend. Microsoft Edge now allows users to set a default profile for any link they open, creating a consistent experience even if they’re switching between profiles throughout the day.
Microsoft Edge helps you manage your profiles even more with a feature called Automatic Profile Switching. Previously, if you’ve been using your personal account and then try to access a work link, you’d be forced to sign-in again because your personal account doesn’t have your work credentials. With the new Automatic Profile Switching feature, Microsoft Edge will detect that the link you’re trying to open needs work credentials, and then switch you to your work profile to open it. Profile switching has never been smoother.
Microsoft Search in Bing puts your work results all in one place
Bing is bringing the life-changing capability of search to the workplace, and we have an exciting update as part of this year’s Build. A comprehensive Work page will now be part of Bing’s search results pages for all Microsoft 365 customers. When signed-in to Bing with your work credentials, this page will appear right next to other familiar pages such as Images, Shopping, and News. This new results page gives you the option to view work-specific results such as files, people, internal websites, and more. If your organization uses Microsoft 365 Apps for enterprise, just sign into Bing with your work credentials and try it today. Learn more on our new website!
We hope you enjoy this new 48-hour, all-digital format as we meet you where you are around the world—we truly can’t thank you enough for joining us online for Microsoft Build 2020.
Keep innovating, keep building, and keep expecting more from the web.

Upgrading to the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

The new Microsoft Edge is now out of preview and available for download, with today’s release of our first Stable channel build (Microsoft Edge 79 stable). You can download the new Microsoft Edge today at microsoft.com/edge. In this post, we’ll walk through what you can expect now that the new Edge channel is open – including how the update will roll out, how you can get started testing and what to expect from the preview channels going forward. 
The work of upgrading devices to the new Microsoft Edge across hundreds of millions of Windows PCs around the world won’t happen overnight. Our goal is to make this process as simple and non-intrusive as possible to deliver a great experience, while minimizing risk to users and organizations.  

You can get the new Microsoft Edge for Windows and macOS today by downloading it directly from microsoft.com/edge. When you install Microsoft Edge on an up-to-date Windows 10 device, it will replace the previous (legacy) version on your device. In some cases, you may be prompted to install additional updates. Your favorites, passwords, and basic settings will carry over to the new Microsoft Edge automatically. Web apps (including those built on EdgeHTML), and Microsoft Edge preview channels (such as Dev or Canary) will continue to work without interruption.  
If you’re using Microsoft Edge on iOS or Android, you don’t need to take any action – your device will update automatically. 

If you’d prefer not to install Microsoft Edge manually, you can wait for it to be installed in a future update to Windows 10, following our measured roll-out approach over the next several months. We will start to migrate Windows 10 customers to the new Microsoft Edge in the coming weeks, starting with a subset of Windows Insiders in the Release Preview ring.  
Enterprise and education users will not be automatically upgraded at this time. Contact your administrator for more information on updating to the new Microsoft Edge in your organization. Administrators should refer to the “Enterprise updates and options” section below.  
The new Microsoft Edge will gradually be made available on Windows Update and offered to additional devices as data and feedback indicate that users are having a good experience. If you don’t want to wait, you can get the new Microsoft Edge at microsoft.com/edge. 
Whether you download today or wait for us to upgrade it on your device, your favorites, passwords, and basic settings will carry over to the new Microsoft Edge automatically. The automatic rollout will maintain your default browser setting – if your default is currently set to a browser other than Microsoft Edge, your setting will carry over once the new Microsoft Edge is installed.  
Once you’ve installed Microsoft Edge, it will update independently on a roughly six-week cadence. You can always preview the next major update via the Beta channel—for example, Microsoft Edge 80 will enter the Beta channel soon, and is expected to release to Stable in February. You can learn more about Microsoft Edge preview channels in our previous blog post, What to expect in the new Microsoft Edge Insider channels. 

Organizations are in full control of when the new Microsoft Edge will be deployed to their managed devices. Managed devices will not be automatically updated to the new Microsoft Edge. In addition to managed devices, Enterprise, Education, and Workstation Pro Edition devices will not be automatically updated at this time.  Organizations that would like to block the automatic delivery of the new Microsoft Edge to devices on Home and Pro Editions with Windows Update enabled can do so either via policies or by downloading and deploying the Blocker Toolkit.  Note that Internet Explorer is not impacted by our automatic rollout. 
When you are ready to deploy the new Microsoft Edge, you can learn more about rolling out and managing Microsoft Edge across your organization from our enterprise documentation, and you can download our offline deployment packages and administrative policy templates for configuring Microsoft Edge on Windows and macOS at our enterprise page. Eligible Microsoft 365 customers can also take advantage of Fast Track and App Assure support, launching in Q1 of 2020.    
Once you have deployed the new Microsoft Edge to your organization, you can configure or restrict updates using the Microsoft Edge Update policies. In the future, we plan to include Microsoft Edge built-in to Windows, to be delivered through a future Windows 10 Feature Update for all customers. 
For more guidance on deployment, check out this Microsoft Mechanics interview from Ignite, where host Jeremy Chapman interviews Chuck Friedman, CVP of Microsoft Edge engineering, and walks through deployment demos including Configuration Manager and a new security baseline for Microsoft Edge.  

Whether you’re just trying out the new Microsoft Edge for the first time, or have been with us on this journey over the last year, thank you for getting involved and helping make Microsoft Edge great. We’ve seen exciting momentum in the Chromium project over the last year, landing more than 1900 contributions across areas like accessibility, modern input including touch, speech, digital inking, and many more, and we couldn’t be more excited for what’s next. 
Enterprise administrators and IT professionals can learn more about deploying, managing, and configuring the new Microsoft Edge in your organization at our new enterprise page.  
Web developers can find guidance on incorporating Microsoft Edge into your test matrix in our recent blog post, “Getting your sites ready for the new Microsoft Edge,” as well as more information on new platform capabilities, developer tools, web apps, and more in our web developer documentation. 
Happy browsing! 
– Kyle Pflug, Senior PM Lead, Microsoft Edge 

Get started building extensions for the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

Starting today, the Microsoft Edge Addons store is now open for submissions for all developers. This is where users will find your extensions for the new Microsoft Edge. You can submit your extensions today by visiting the Partner Center Developer Dashboard.In most cases, existing extensions built for Chromium will work without any modifications in the new Microsoft Edge. Check out our developer documentation to learn more about Microsoft Edge-specific APIs, tips on submitting your extension, and other helpful information. The extension submission program is in its preview phase and we are excited to hear and incorporate your feedback.
Transitioning your existing extensions to Chromium
As we move towards the general availability of the new Microsoft Edge on January 15th, 2020, we will no longer accept new submissions for Microsoft Edge Legacy (EdgeHTML-based) extensions after December 17th, 2019. We will continue to accept updates for your existing extensions.
We recommend you prioritize building new extensions for the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge, and continue to support your existing EdgeHTML-based extensions to ensure a quality experience for active users.
Developers who have given consent for Microsoft to migrate their EdgeHTML extension listings to the new Microsoft Edge should begin to see their extensions available in the new Addons store experience in Microsoft Edge. If you publish an EdgeHTML extension and have not received any communication regarding its migration or are unsure of its status, please contact us at [email protected]
If you have already received a confirmation from us regarding migration, we encourage you to log on to the Partner Center Developer Dashboard to validate your access to the extension, and verify whether you can update it. Once the migration is complete, ownership and management will be completely transferred to you, and Microsoft will not be responsible for updating or maintaining your extension.
Migrating extension users to the new Microsoft Edge
We will migrate users’ extensions from the current version of Microsoft Edge when they update to the new Microsoft Edge (starting January 15th). Extensions will only be migrated for users if they are already available on the Microsoft Edge Addons store at the time of switching to the new browser.
We recommend that developers update your existing EdgeHTML extensions for Chromium and publish them via the new portal as soon as possible, so your existing customers will not face any interruptions when they update to the new Microsoft Edge.
Getting started
You can check out our initial developer documentation today, and expect to see more coming soon. If you have any additional questions about the extension submission process, please contact Microsoft Edge Addons Developer Support.
It’s a great time to build for the web, and we look forward to collaborating with you on our new browser!
– Killian McCoy, Program Manager 2– Pratyusha Avadhanula, Senior Program Manager

Getting your sites ready for the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

This morning, we released Microsoft Edge Beta version 79, which is the final Beta before the new Microsoft Edge is generally available, also known as the “Release Candidate.” On January 15th, we expect to release the “Stable” channel, at which point Microsoft Edge will be generally available to download on Windows and macOS.The new Microsoft Edge is built on the Chromium engine, providing best in class compatibility with extensions and web sites, with great support for the latest rendering capabilities, modern web applications, and powerful developer tools across all supported platforms.
For Enterprise customers, the new Microsoft Edge also includes Internet Explorer mode, providing a seamless experience across internal sites and LOB apps with legacy dependencies. And for end users, it includes new privacy-enhancing features like tracking prevention that’s on by default and a new InPrivate mode across your entire web experience, so your online searches and browsing are not attributed to you.
You can learn more about how the new Microsoft Edge and Bing work together to be the browser and search engine for business over on the Windows blog. In this post, we’ll share more about how you can add the new Microsoft Edge to your automated browser testing, so your customers have a great experience as they begin to upgrade. We’ll also share resources you can use to file bugs, get support, and see what’s next for the new Microsoft Edge.

Microsoft Edge has multiple channels that you can get started testing today: Canary, Developer, and Beta. Each of these channels has differing levels of support for experimental features, and therefore each has its own level of risk regarding stability.In general, we recommend testing on the Developer channel as a good balance between Canary (which is essentially untested bits that are built every night) and Beta, which contains six weeks’ worth of changes. The Developer channel may be less stable than Beta but allows developers to experiment and prototype against early bits.
For customers looking for a snapshot of what is coming in the next major version, the Beta channel represents an early preview of the next Stable release. For example, today’s Beta 79 is our “Release Candidate” build for our Stable release on January 15th. To install the browser, simply browse here and select the appropriate channel.

Because the new Microsoft Edge is built on Chromium, it is fully compatible with popular automated testing frameworks like Selenium WebDriver and Puppeteer. With general availability coming in January, we recommend incorporating the new Microsoft Edge into your existing automated tests now – testing the Beta channel will give you six weeks advance notice of any potential issues that may impact your site.
Selenium WebDriver
The most common framework for browser automation is Selenium WebDriver. To configure WebDriver with Microsoft Edge, you’ll need to download the corresponding version of our WebDriver, MSEdgeDriver. So, for example, if you downloaded the Developer channel for Microsoft Edge, you would want to click on the Settings and More link in the browser and then click on “Settings”. From there, you can click on “About Microsoft Edge” and see your Version. It will say something like “79.0.308.0”. Once you know that, you can download the matching version of MSEdgeDriver that is appropriate for your Operating System.
If you prefer to automate that process, you can check the following registry key for the version of Microsoft Edge that is installed:
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftEdge{ CHANNEL}BLBeacon (e.g., ComputerHKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftEdge DevBLBeacon)
And then you can download the driver by building a URL to the server that looks like this:
https://msedgedriver.azureedge.net/{VERSION}/edgedriver_{ARC}.zip (e.g., https://msedgedriver.azureedge.net/79.0.308.1/edgedriver_win32.zip)
Microsoft Edge should be fully compatible with existing tests written to run in Chrome or other Chromium-based browsers – simply modify the “binary_location” to point to Microsoft Edge, and modify the “executable_path” to point to msedgedriver.exe. MSEdgeDriver.exe currently supports Chrome options, but we do plan on updating the Selenium language bindings in Selenium 4 to account for our new browser. For the time being, the language bindings will default to creating the legacy Microsoft Edge connections, so you will pass in a parameter indicating that these tests should run against the new Microsoft Edge browser:
Here is an example for how you would do that in C#:

Puppeteer
Another popular automation framework is Puppeteer, a Node library which provides a high-level API to control Chromium-based Browsers over the DevTools Protocol. By default, Puppeteer will launch a version of Chromium (the core upon which Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Brave, Vivaldi, and others are built). However, you can also pass in the path to the browser exe you would like to run instead.
You would write something like this (in JavaScript):

Automating Internet Explorer mode
In addition to running tests written for Chrome on Microsoft Edge, we’ve also made it easy to migrate tests written for Internet Explorer 11. The new Microsoft Edge includes “Internet Explorer mode,” which allows a tab to render content using IE11 in certain Enterprise contexts (e.g., for Intranet sites or sites  specified by your Enterprise Mode Site List).
The new Microsoft Edge allows you to run IE11 validation for legacy sites in addition to your modern experiences. To run your IE11 tests in Microsoft Edge, download the IEDriverServer from Selenium. Then you must pass in a capability to put Microsoft Edge into IE Mode and then run your tests.
Because this capability puts the whole browser into IE11 Mode, you cannot simultaneously test content that should render in the modern Chromium engine, but you should be able to run all of your IE11 tests and validate the rendering in Microsoft Edge. Note that this code requires an update to IEDriverServer which should be included in the next release of Selenium.
After you download the new IEDriverServer from SeleniumHQ and follow the directions for the “Required Configuration” as documented here, you can run the following code to launch the new Microsoft Edge in IE11 mode and run some tests:

As you test your sites in Microsoft Edge, you may encounter issues that appear to be caused by a bug in the browser. For any issue, the quickest way to give feedback is simply to click the “Send feedback” button in the “Help and Feedback” menu (or Alt-Shift-I on Windows). You can describe your issue and share additional details such as screenshots, diagnostic details, or contact information here.
This is also the best place to provide general end-user feedback such as feature suggestions. To date, we’ve received over 230,000 pieces of feedback from users and developers – thank you, and we truly embrace your input!

Alongside today’s announcements, we’ve updated our Platform Status feature roadmap to reflect the new Microsoft Edge capabilities and an early look at what’s in development for future versions. If you have questions about whether we plan to implement an upcoming HTML/CSS/JS feature, you can search for the corresponding entry here. If you don’t see the feature you’re looking for, simply open an issue on GitHub to get it added.
We’re also continuing to innovate through new standards proposals and by implementing experimental features in Chromium. You can track our focus areas on GitHub in the MSEdgeExplainers repository, where we publish public explainers and “intent to implement” notices as our first step towards shipping new features. We are committed to contributing as a member of the open source community, and have published over 30 explainers to date – and more importantly, we hope to make the web better for everyone.
Get started today by downloading the Microsoft Edge Release Candidate build and adding it to your test matrix, and be sure to share any feedback or issues you might have. We’ll see you in January!
– Kyle Pflug, Senior PM Lead, Microsoft Edge– John Jansen, Principal Software Engineering Manager, Microsoft Edge

Improving form controls in Microsoft Edge and Chromium – Microsoft Edge Blog

Since we began work on the next version of Microsoft Edge based on Chromium, we’ve been investigating ways to modernize form controls to provide a modern appearance as well as the touch friendliness and accessibility that our users expect from Microsoft Edge today.Over the past few months, we’ve been collaborating closely with the Google Chrome team on this project, and are excited to share the refreshed controls that will be coming to Microsoft Edge Insider builds, or other Chromium browsers near you.

This change brings an improved polish to the form controls and helps bring continuity of design and user experience with the rest of the browser. We have been collaborating closely with the Google Chrome design team to strike a balance between our design languages with a modern look and feel that feels at home in a variety of Chromium browsers. Below is a comparison of the default controls in Chromium today, compared to the updated controls we’re rolling out:

Windows devices come in a rich array of form factors and input modalities, including traditional desktop and laptop PCs, 2-in-1 devices, and other tablets and pen devices. We heard your feedback looking for a better touch input experience in our early Chromium preview builds, and set out to take an inventory of the controls to identify opportunities to improve the touch experience.

A good example of the touch improvements is the time input; currently, Chromium provides a text input, a clear button and a spinner. Our research found that with the large surface area of the fingertip, small controls that are too close together can be difficult to target precisely, recommending a control size of 23×23 pixels (13×13 DLUs) is a good minimum interactive control size for any input device. By contrast, the spin controls at 15×11 pixels are much too small to be used effectively with touch. The new time input we’re introducing includes a flyout with expected touch affordances, like inertia when scrolling and larger touch targets. Other inputs such as date, color, range received subtle size increases to  important touch targets as well.

Another area we examined is the focus rectangle that wraps a control when a user focuses the control. This is an important accessibility feature, as it allows the user to track where they’re actively focused, especially while navigating via keyboard.
Our team identified three different potential focus indicators that aligned with Microsoft’s design language, guaranteed high contrast on any background content, and provided a clean and aesthetically pleasing appearance.
We then ran interactive user studies to identify the best option, compared against Chromium’s current default focus rectangle as a baseline. We found that, while preferences were split for aesthetics, one option was the clear leader for accessibility. We’ve chosen that option as the new focus rectangle in Microsoft Edge, which you can see below:

Additionally, all these controls now support Windows High Contrast, which allows the user to define specific colors to improve the visual experience. All sites that utilize the built-in controls will benefit from these updated controls whenever the user is in High Contrast mode, without web developers doing any extra work. However, webdevelopers can adjust these styles if they want by utilizing the new CSS forced-color-adjust property and the prefers-contrastmedia query that are actively being standardized.

We’ve also updated our implementation to ensure great keyboard support across each control. For example, in the new color input, you can either navigate a single value using the arrow keys with the color well selected; if you hold the Ctrl key on Windows (Cmd key on Mac), it will move by 10 values allowing for quick traversal of the color well.
Finally, we updated the mappings for the controls to map to the HTML Accessibility API Mappings specification, to ensure a great experience for users who use assistive technologies (such as screen readers).

These updated controls are now available in Canary and Dev channel builds of Microsoft Edge, and will be coming upstream to other Chromium browsers in the near future. We’re excited as this work begins to ship out to users, and as the controls continue to evolve, we greatly appreciate any feedback that you may have in how we can improve the experience. Just click the smiley face in the top-right to Send Feedback, and let us know what you think!
— Greg Whitworth, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge

Update on removing Flash from Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer – Microsoft Edge Blog

In 2017, we published a roadmap to remove Adobe Flash from Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer by 2020. Since that post, we announced our intent to build Microsoft Edge on the Chromium open source project. In this post, we will provide an update on what to expect for the Flash retirement in Microsoft browsers.Here’s what you can expect for each Microsoft browser:
In the next version of Microsoft Edge (built on Chromium), we will continue to retire Flash in the same timeframe as other Chromium based browsers. You can learn more of that timeline in this blog post. Flash will initially be disabled, and the user will need to re-enable Flash on a site-by-site basis; Flash will be completely removed from the browser towards the end of 2020. Group policies are available for enterprise admins and IT pros to change the Flash behavior prior to that date.
For both the in-market version of Microsoft Edge (built on EdgeHTML) and Internet Explorer 11, the current experience will continue as-is through 2019. Specifically, we no longer intend to update either Microsoft Edge (built on EdgeHTML) or Internet Explorer 11 to disable Flash by default. We still plan to fully remove Flash from these browsers by December 2020, as originally communicated.
– Colleen Williams, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge
[Updated to clarify the in-market EdgeHTML/IE experience – Ed.]

Introducing Microsoft Edge Beta: Be one of the first to try it now | Windows Experience Blog

Today I’m thrilled to announce that a Beta release for the next version of Microsoft Edge is now available for all supported versions of Windows and macOS. Our goal with Microsoft Edge is to create better web compatibility with better performance for our customers while ensuring less fragmentation of the web for all web developers. Our community has been with us on this journey from the beginning and your feedback is making it possible to rapidly improve. To date, there have been more than one million downloads of our preview builds, across all supported versions of Windows and Mac, from which we have received more than 140,000 individual pieces of feedback. Thank you!  
Now that the Beta channel for the next version of Microsoft Edge is available, I’d like to call on all of you to jump in today and be some of the first to download and try it! 
Microsoft Edge Beta Channel: The next chapter 

Beta is the third and final preview channel which will come online before launch. As we release Beta, we remain committed to delivering a high-quality product and nailing the fundamentals of a great browsing experience. Beta represents the most stable preview channel, as features are added to Beta only after they have cleared quality testing in first the Canary channel and then the Dev channel. Major version updates can be expected roughly every six weeks, alongside periodic minor updates for bug fixes and security.  
While still in the preview stage, with this announcement the next version of Microsoft Edge is ready for everyday use. In the Beta today, you will see new ways to personalize your experience, along with support for 14 languages. With new tab page customization, you have the ability to choose what you want to see when you open a new web page by selecting either a Focused, Inspirational or Informational layout. You can also set a dark theme or visit the Microsoft Edge Insider Addons store or other Chromium-based web stores, such as the Chrome Web Store, to add your favorite extensions. 
You can personalize your experience further by enabling tracking prevention, a feature designed to protect you from being tracked by websites that you don’t visit. Today, this feature is behind a flag but you can enable it in the Beta builds. When enabled, a customer will be able to choose from three levels of privacy – Basic, Balanced and Strict. Additional features that we showed at the Build 2019 Conference will come to the Beta channel in the coming months. Collections is already available for testing in the Canary channel today. 
Microsoft Edge is getting even better for business 
Beta also includes many of the commercial features we announced at our Build conference, such as: 
Microsoft Search built-in to Bing, which will reduce the time spent looking for things at work by intelligently connecting an organization’s people, documents, sites, locations and conversations. 
Internet Explorer mode, which streamlines today’s not-so-great experience of viewing the web through two different browsers by bringing Internet Explorer 11 compatibility directly into Microsoft Edge, creating one simple experience. This is an important feature for the more than 60% of worldwide organizations that use both IE as well as another browser. 
Windows Defender Application Guard helps to isolate enterprise-defined untrusted sites, protecting the company while employees browse the Internet.
Additional features, like the enterprise-focused new tab, will be coming soon to the Canary and Dev channels as well.  
Security Bounty Program for Edge Beta 
With this Beta release, we are also announcing that we have extended the Microsoft Edge browser security bounty program to cover the Beta and Dev channels. We welcome researchers to seek out and disclose any high-impact vulnerabilities they may find in these channels and offer rewards up to US$30,000 for eligible vulnerabilities. See the MSRC blog for more details. 
Chromium contributions 
We are also continuing our commitment to be an active contributor to the Chromium community. To date, we’ve contributed more than 1,000 commits to the Chromium project, and we look forward to continuing our active engagement with the community in the shared pursuit of making the web better for everyone. 
Time to try! Download Microsoft Edge Beta today 
If you are an enterprise customer, the next version of Microsoft Edge is ready to pilot with either Beta or Dev builds. We invite you to check out the enterprise tab of the Microsoft Edge Insider site, download a build and begin trialing it in your organization. 
If you are a consumer who is comfortable testing a beta, visit the Microsoft Edge Insider site to learn more and download the builds. Your feedback is critical in helping us build the future of Microsoft Edge and we’re excited to hear what you think. 

As with the Canary and Dev builds, if you’re not comfortable using early release software there is nothing for you to do today. Keep using the Microsoft Edge you know and love, and we’ll let you know when it’s time to make the move to the next version of the browser. 
Thanks again to everyone who has continued engaging with us on this journey. Stay tuned for more as we get closer to launch!