Category Archives: Chromium

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Getting your sites ready for the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

This morning, we released Microsoft Edge Beta version 79, which is the final Beta before the new Microsoft Edge is generally available, also known as the “Release Candidate.” On January 15th, we expect to release the “Stable” channel, at which point Microsoft Edge will be generally available to download on Windows and macOS.The new Microsoft Edge is built on the Chromium engine, providing best in class compatibility with extensions and web sites, with great support for the latest rendering capabilities, modern web applications, and powerful developer tools across all supported platforms.
For Enterprise customers, the new Microsoft Edge also includes Internet Explorer mode, providing a seamless experience across internal sites and LOB apps with legacy dependencies. And for end users, it includes new privacy-enhancing features like tracking prevention that’s on by default and a new InPrivate mode across your entire web experience, so your online searches and browsing are not attributed to you.
You can learn more about how the new Microsoft Edge and Bing work together to be the browser and search engine for business over on the Windows blog. In this post, we’ll share more about how you can add the new Microsoft Edge to your automated browser testing, so your customers have a great experience as they begin to upgrade. We’ll also share resources you can use to file bugs, get support, and see what’s next for the new Microsoft Edge.

Microsoft Edge has multiple channels that you can get started testing today: Canary, Developer, and Beta. Each of these channels has differing levels of support for experimental features, and therefore each has its own level of risk regarding stability.In general, we recommend testing on the Developer channel as a good balance between Canary (which is essentially untested bits that are built every night) and Beta, which contains six weeks’ worth of changes. The Developer channel may be less stable than Beta but allows developers to experiment and prototype against early bits.
For customers looking for a snapshot of what is coming in the next major version, the Beta channel represents an early preview of the next Stable release. For example, today’s Beta 79 is our “Release Candidate” build for our Stable release on January 15th. To install the browser, simply browse here and select the appropriate channel.

Because the new Microsoft Edge is built on Chromium, it is fully compatible with popular automated testing frameworks like Selenium WebDriver and Puppeteer. With general availability coming in January, we recommend incorporating the new Microsoft Edge into your existing automated tests now – testing the Beta channel will give you six weeks advance notice of any potential issues that may impact your site.
Selenium WebDriver
The most common framework for browser automation is Selenium WebDriver. To configure WebDriver with Microsoft Edge, you’ll need to download the corresponding version of our WebDriver, MSEdgeDriver. So, for example, if you downloaded the Developer channel for Microsoft Edge, you would want to click on the Settings and More link in the browser and then click on “Settings”. From there, you can click on “About Microsoft Edge” and see your Version. It will say something like “79.0.308.0”. Once you know that, you can download the matching version of MSEdgeDriver that is appropriate for your Operating System.
If you prefer to automate that process, you can check the following registry key for the version of Microsoft Edge that is installed:
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftEdge{ CHANNEL}BLBeacon (e.g., ComputerHKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftEdge DevBLBeacon)
And then you can download the driver by building a URL to the server that looks like this:
https://msedgedriver.azureedge.net/{VERSION}/edgedriver_{ARC}.zip (e.g., https://msedgedriver.azureedge.net/79.0.308.1/edgedriver_win32.zip)
Microsoft Edge should be fully compatible with existing tests written to run in Chrome or other Chromium-based browsers – simply modify the “binary_location” to point to Microsoft Edge, and modify the “executable_path” to point to msedgedriver.exe. MSEdgeDriver.exe currently supports Chrome options, but we do plan on updating the Selenium language bindings in Selenium 4 to account for our new browser. For the time being, the language bindings will default to creating the legacy Microsoft Edge connections, so you will pass in a parameter indicating that these tests should run against the new Microsoft Edge browser:
Here is an example for how you would do that in C#:

Puppeteer
Another popular automation framework is Puppeteer, a Node library which provides a high-level API to control Chromium-based Browsers over the DevTools Protocol. By default, Puppeteer will launch a version of Chromium (the core upon which Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Brave, Vivaldi, and others are built). However, you can also pass in the path to the browser exe you would like to run instead.
You would write something like this (in JavaScript):

Automating Internet Explorer mode
In addition to running tests written for Chrome on Microsoft Edge, we’ve also made it easy to migrate tests written for Internet Explorer 11. The new Microsoft Edge includes “Internet Explorer mode,” which allows a tab to render content using IE11 in certain Enterprise contexts (e.g., for Intranet sites or sites  specified by your Enterprise Mode Site List).
The new Microsoft Edge allows you to run IE11 validation for legacy sites in addition to your modern experiences. To run your IE11 tests in Microsoft Edge, download the IEDriverServer from Selenium. Then you must pass in a capability to put Microsoft Edge into IE Mode and then run your tests.
Because this capability puts the whole browser into IE11 Mode, you cannot simultaneously test content that should render in the modern Chromium engine, but you should be able to run all of your IE11 tests and validate the rendering in Microsoft Edge. Note that this code requires an update to IEDriverServer which should be included in the next release of Selenium.
After you download the new IEDriverServer from SeleniumHQ and follow the directions for the “Required Configuration” as documented here, you can run the following code to launch the new Microsoft Edge in IE11 mode and run some tests:

As you test your sites in Microsoft Edge, you may encounter issues that appear to be caused by a bug in the browser. For any issue, the quickest way to give feedback is simply to click the “Send feedback” button in the “Help and Feedback” menu (or Alt-Shift-I on Windows). You can describe your issue and share additional details such as screenshots, diagnostic details, or contact information here.
This is also the best place to provide general end-user feedback such as feature suggestions. To date, we’ve received over 230,000 pieces of feedback from users and developers – thank you, and we truly embrace your input!

Alongside today’s announcements, we’ve updated our Platform Status feature roadmap to reflect the new Microsoft Edge capabilities and an early look at what’s in development for future versions. If you have questions about whether we plan to implement an upcoming HTML/CSS/JS feature, you can search for the corresponding entry here. If you don’t see the feature you’re looking for, simply open an issue on GitHub to get it added.
We’re also continuing to innovate through new standards proposals and by implementing experimental features in Chromium. You can track our focus areas on GitHub in the MSEdgeExplainers repository, where we publish public explainers and “intent to implement” notices as our first step towards shipping new features. We are committed to contributing as a member of the open source community, and have published over 30 explainers to date – and more importantly, we hope to make the web better for everyone.
Get started today by downloading the Microsoft Edge Release Candidate build and adding it to your test matrix, and be sure to share any feedback or issues you might have. We’ll see you in January!
– Kyle Pflug, Senior PM Lead, Microsoft Edge– John Jansen, Principal Software Engineering Manager, Microsoft Edge

Improving form controls in Microsoft Edge and Chromium – Microsoft Edge Blog

Since we began work on the next version of Microsoft Edge based on Chromium, we’ve been investigating ways to modernize form controls to provide a modern appearance as well as the touch friendliness and accessibility that our users expect from Microsoft Edge today.Over the past few months, we’ve been collaborating closely with the Google Chrome team on this project, and are excited to share the refreshed controls that will be coming to Microsoft Edge Insider builds, or other Chromium browsers near you.

This change brings an improved polish to the form controls and helps bring continuity of design and user experience with the rest of the browser. We have been collaborating closely with the Google Chrome design team to strike a balance between our design languages with a modern look and feel that feels at home in a variety of Chromium browsers. Below is a comparison of the default controls in Chromium today, compared to the updated controls we’re rolling out:

Windows devices come in a rich array of form factors and input modalities, including traditional desktop and laptop PCs, 2-in-1 devices, and other tablets and pen devices. We heard your feedback looking for a better touch input experience in our early Chromium preview builds, and set out to take an inventory of the controls to identify opportunities to improve the touch experience.

A good example of the touch improvements is the time input; currently, Chromium provides a text input, a clear button and a spinner. Our research found that with the large surface area of the fingertip, small controls that are too close together can be difficult to target precisely, recommending a control size of 23×23 pixels (13×13 DLUs) is a good minimum interactive control size for any input device. By contrast, the spin controls at 15×11 pixels are much too small to be used effectively with touch. The new time input we’re introducing includes a flyout with expected touch affordances, like inertia when scrolling and larger touch targets. Other inputs such as date, color, range received subtle size increases to  important touch targets as well.

Another area we examined is the focus rectangle that wraps a control when a user focuses the control. This is an important accessibility feature, as it allows the user to track where they’re actively focused, especially while navigating via keyboard.
Our team identified three different potential focus indicators that aligned with Microsoft’s design language, guaranteed high contrast on any background content, and provided a clean and aesthetically pleasing appearance.
We then ran interactive user studies to identify the best option, compared against Chromium’s current default focus rectangle as a baseline. We found that, while preferences were split for aesthetics, one option was the clear leader for accessibility. We’ve chosen that option as the new focus rectangle in Microsoft Edge, which you can see below:

Additionally, all these controls now support Windows High Contrast, which allows the user to define specific colors to improve the visual experience. All sites that utilize the built-in controls will benefit from these updated controls whenever the user is in High Contrast mode, without web developers doing any extra work. However, webdevelopers can adjust these styles if they want by utilizing the new CSS forced-color-adjust property and the prefers-contrastmedia query that are actively being standardized.

We’ve also updated our implementation to ensure great keyboard support across each control. For example, in the new color input, you can either navigate a single value using the arrow keys with the color well selected; if you hold the Ctrl key on Windows (Cmd key on Mac), it will move by 10 values allowing for quick traversal of the color well.
Finally, we updated the mappings for the controls to map to the HTML Accessibility API Mappings specification, to ensure a great experience for users who use assistive technologies (such as screen readers).

These updated controls are now available in Canary and Dev channel builds of Microsoft Edge, and will be coming upstream to other Chromium browsers in the near future. We’re excited as this work begins to ship out to users, and as the controls continue to evolve, we greatly appreciate any feedback that you may have in how we can improve the experience. Just click the smiley face in the top-right to Send Feedback, and let us know what you think!
— Greg Whitworth, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge

Update on removing Flash from Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer – Microsoft Edge Blog

In 2017, we published a roadmap to remove Adobe Flash from Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer by 2020. Since that post, we announced our intent to build Microsoft Edge on the Chromium open source project. In this post, we will provide an update on what to expect for the Flash retirement in Microsoft browsers.Here’s what you can expect for each Microsoft browser:
In the next version of Microsoft Edge (built on Chromium), we will continue to retire Flash in the same timeframe as other Chromium based browsers. You can learn more of that timeline in this blog post. Flash will initially be disabled, and the user will need to re-enable Flash on a site-by-site basis; Flash will be completely removed from the browser towards the end of 2020. Group policies are available for enterprise admins and IT pros to change the Flash behavior prior to that date.
For both the in-market version of Microsoft Edge (built on EdgeHTML) and Internet Explorer 11, the current experience will continue as-is through 2019. Specifically, we no longer intend to update either Microsoft Edge (built on EdgeHTML) or Internet Explorer 11 to disable Flash by default. We still plan to fully remove Flash from these browsers by December 2020, as originally communicated.
– Colleen Williams, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge
[Updated to clarify the in-market EdgeHTML/IE experience – Ed.]

Introducing Microsoft Edge Beta: Be one of the first to try it now | Windows Experience Blog

Today I’m thrilled to announce that a Beta release for the next version of Microsoft Edge is now available for all supported versions of Windows and macOS. Our goal with Microsoft Edge is to create better web compatibility with better performance for our customers while ensuring less fragmentation of the web for all web developers. Our community has been with us on this journey from the beginning and your feedback is making it possible to rapidly improve. To date, there have been more than one million downloads of our preview builds, across all supported versions of Windows and Mac, from which we have received more than 140,000 individual pieces of feedback. Thank you!  
Now that the Beta channel for the next version of Microsoft Edge is available, I’d like to call on all of you to jump in today and be some of the first to download and try it! 
Microsoft Edge Beta Channel: The next chapter 

Beta is the third and final preview channel which will come online before launch. As we release Beta, we remain committed to delivering a high-quality product and nailing the fundamentals of a great browsing experience. Beta represents the most stable preview channel, as features are added to Beta only after they have cleared quality testing in first the Canary channel and then the Dev channel. Major version updates can be expected roughly every six weeks, alongside periodic minor updates for bug fixes and security.  
While still in the preview stage, with this announcement the next version of Microsoft Edge is ready for everyday use. In the Beta today, you will see new ways to personalize your experience, along with support for 14 languages. With new tab page customization, you have the ability to choose what you want to see when you open a new web page by selecting either a Focused, Inspirational or Informational layout. You can also set a dark theme or visit the Microsoft Edge Insider Addons store or other Chromium-based web stores, such as the Chrome Web Store, to add your favorite extensions. 
You can personalize your experience further by enabling tracking prevention, a feature designed to protect you from being tracked by websites that you don’t visit. Today, this feature is behind a flag but you can enable it in the Beta builds. When enabled, a customer will be able to choose from three levels of privacy – Basic, Balanced and Strict. Additional features that we showed at the Build 2019 Conference will come to the Beta channel in the coming months. Collections is already available for testing in the Canary channel today. 
Microsoft Edge is getting even better for business 
Beta also includes many of the commercial features we announced at our Build conference, such as: 
Microsoft Search built-in to Bing, which will reduce the time spent looking for things at work by intelligently connecting an organization’s people, documents, sites, locations and conversations. 
Internet Explorer mode, which streamlines today’s not-so-great experience of viewing the web through two different browsers by bringing Internet Explorer 11 compatibility directly into Microsoft Edge, creating one simple experience. This is an important feature for the more than 60% of worldwide organizations that use both IE as well as another browser. 
Windows Defender Application Guard helps to isolate enterprise-defined untrusted sites, protecting the company while employees browse the Internet.
Additional features, like the enterprise-focused new tab, will be coming soon to the Canary and Dev channels as well.  
Security Bounty Program for Edge Beta 
With this Beta release, we are also announcing that we have extended the Microsoft Edge browser security bounty program to cover the Beta and Dev channels. We welcome researchers to seek out and disclose any high-impact vulnerabilities they may find in these channels and offer rewards up to US$30,000 for eligible vulnerabilities. See the MSRC blog for more details. 
Chromium contributions 
We are also continuing our commitment to be an active contributor to the Chromium community. To date, we’ve contributed more than 1,000 commits to the Chromium project, and we look forward to continuing our active engagement with the community in the shared pursuit of making the web better for everyone. 
Time to try! Download Microsoft Edge Beta today 
If you are an enterprise customer, the next version of Microsoft Edge is ready to pilot with either Beta or Dev builds. We invite you to check out the enterprise tab of the Microsoft Edge Insider site, download a build and begin trialing it in your organization. 
If you are a consumer who is comfortable testing a beta, visit the Microsoft Edge Insider site to learn more and download the builds. Your feedback is critical in helping us build the future of Microsoft Edge and we’re excited to hear what you think. 

As with the Canary and Dev builds, if you’re not comfortable using early release software there is nothing for you to do today. Keep using the Microsoft Edge you know and love, and we’ll let you know when it’s time to make the move to the next version of the browser. 
Thanks again to everyone who has continued engaging with us on this journey. Stay tuned for more as we get closer to launch!