Category Archives: Microsoft Store

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How to watch the Age of Empires: Definitive Edition Mixer Livestream on Feb. 19

How to watch the Age of Empires: Definitive Edition Mixer Livestream on Feb. 19
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The Definitive Edition of the original Age of Empires with the Rise of Rome expansion pack is launching on Feb. 20, local time for Windows 10 PCs! To mark the occasion, the flagship Microsoft Store in New York is hosting a special livestream from the Mixer NYC Studio on Feb. 19, so fans around the world can experience the action. Join hosts Kate Yeager, Adam Isgreen from Microsoft Studios, Bert Beeckman from Forgotten Empires and more special guests as they discuss the remastering of the classic real-time strategy game, stream gameplay and share their best tips and tricks.
You’ll be able to get the game from the Microsoft Store on Windows 10 beginning at midnight on Feb. 20!

Updated Microsoft Store App Developer Agreement and Microsoft Store Policies

The Microsoft Store team has updated the Microsoft Store App Developer Agreement and Microsoft Store Policies as of February 14th.  
The new version (8.2) of the Microsoft Store App Developer Agreement is available here. This update is particularly relevant to developers based in New Zealand or Australia who sell apps and/or in-app products. For more info, view the change history. The next time you log in to the Dev Center dashboard, you may be prompted to accept the new agreement, depending on your account location. 
We’ve also updated the Microsoft Store Policies, which you can view here. The updated policies clarify the requirements for storing or transmitting personal information, and add a new requirement stating that apps using app-specific authentication can only be published from company accounts. For more info, view the change history.   
If you have feedback on the policies, please let us know by commenting in the Microsoft Store forum. 

This Week on Windows: Amazon Music app, fifth anniversary of Surface Pro and more

We hope you enjoyed this week’s episode of This Week on Windows! Visit this post to read about the Amazon Music app for Windows 10, now available from Microsoft Store, check out our Windows 10 Tip on 7 pro tips for getting started with Microsoft Edge as your PDF viewer or head over here for the system requirements for Sea of Thieves on Windows 10!
In case you missed it:

 

Have a great weekend!

Amazon Music for Windows 10 available now from Microsoft Store

We’re excited to announce that Amazon Music for Windows 10 is now available to download in the Microsoft Store* in the US, UK, Germany, Austria, France, Italy, Spain and Japan.
With Amazon Music on Windows 10, you can enjoy, discover, and share millions of songs from today’s chart-topping artists wherever and whenever you want. Amazon Music includes two streaming service options, Amazon Music Unlimited and Prime Music. With Amazon Music Unlimited, subscribers can explore a full catalog of tens of millions of songs, thousands of hand-curated playlists and stations at their fingertips, on all their devices, with new releases from today’s most popular artists. Included in your Prime membership at no additional cost, Prime Music offers ad-free access to more than two million songs with over one thousand playlists and stations.

We’re proud to collaborate with Amazon Music to make it easy for customers to enjoy music anytime, anywhere with ad-free listening and on-demand and offline playback on Amazon Music. You can also learn more about today’s exciting news over on the Amazon Music Blog.

*Available on Windows 10 PCs and tablets. To download this app, your PC or tablet must be running the Windows 10 Anniversary Update or greater. If you’re not sure which version of Windows your PC is running visit this link. To learn how to get the Windows 10 Anniversary Update click here.

Super Bowl LII brings the culmination of “Create Change”

Congratulations to the Super Bowl Champion Philadelphia Eagles!

Each year, the Super Bowl offers a unique opportunity for Microsoft to highlight the season-long work that comes from our partnership with the NFL. We were proud to see the players, coaches, and officials using Microsoft Surface at pivotal moments during Sunday’s game. Super Bowl LII was an amazing game, but it is something that happened earlier in the week at our Microsoft Store at the Mall of America in Minneapolis that we’re most proud of.
Earlier this season, we launched the Create Change campaign with five NFL stars with the goal of supporting the philanthropic work they do off the field.

By partnering with these players and their foundations in providing both resources and awareness, we hope to make an impact on the lives of those in need and to use technology to create change in communities that need it most. Through a series of digital videos, social campaigns, and via integration with Microsoft Rewards, we told the stories of these special players and their work with Microsoft in strengthening their causes. In addition, fans were encouraged to share how they are creating change in their local communities on social media. Each player then selected his favorite Create Change story and presented that fan with a trip to Super Bowl LII in Minneapolis. And as part of a special Super Bowl LII edition of the campaign last week, we added Minneapolis native Larry Fitzgerald, highlighting the work he’s done in the local school district in helping close the digital divide. Whether on the field, in the classroom, or at the hospital, these players have demonstrated how Microsoft Surface can play an invaluable resource for changing lives and we are proud to have partnered with them on their missions.
Thank you, Larry Fitzgerald, Von Miller, Russell Wilson, Richard Sherman, Greg Olsen, and Martellus Bennett for the amazing and inspiring work you do off the field.
NFL players Larry Fitzgerald, Greg Olsen, Von Miller, and Russell Wilson pose with their custom designed helmets as part of Microsoft’s Create Change program at the Microsoft Store at Mall of America on Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018 in Minneapolis. (Doug Benc/AP Images for Microsoft)
This past week saw the culmination of the Create Change campaign at the world’s biggest sporting event, the Super Bowl. Four of the Create Change players (Larry Fitzgerald, Greg Olsen, Von Miller, and Russell Wilson) were joined by NFL legend Tony Gonzalez at a panel event at the Microsoft Store in the Mall of America.
In front of hundreds of fans, media, foundations, school children, and local civic leaders, the players talked about the positive role Microsoft technology has on the charity work they do off the field and gave inspiring words about how to best use the platforms available to you to empower others and create change. On display were the custom helmets for each player’s charity. As part of the event, Microsoft donated to Larry’s charity, the First Down Fund, which will go towards providing a Surface computer lab to the Hiawatha school in Minneapolis, five minutes from Larry’s childhood home.
To learn more about the Create Change campaign, please visit surface.com/nfl.

Super Bowl LII brings the culmination of “Create Change”
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Welcoming Progressive Web Apps to Microsoft Edge and Windows 10

A little over a year ago, we outlined our vision to bring Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) to the more than half a billion devices running Windows 10. We believe PWAs are key to the web’s future, and couldn’t be more excited about their potential to enable more immersive web app experiences across all device form factors.
Today, we’re excited to take a major step from vision to reality, starting with some updates on previewing PWAs in Windows and our roadmap to bring PWAs to the Microsoft Store.
Beginning with EdgeHTML 17.17063, we have enabled Service Workers and push notifications by default in preview builds of Microsoft Edge—you can learn more about those features in Ali’s post, “Service Worker: Going beyond the page.” This completes the suite of technologies (including Fetch networking and the Push and Cache APIs) that lays the technical foundation for PWAs on Windows 10.
Over the coming weeks, we’re also kicking off some experiments with crawling and indexing quality PWAs from the Web to list them in the Microsoft Store, where users can find them just like any other app on Windows 10.
In this post, we’ll give a quick introduction to Progressive Web Apps – what they are, the problems they solve, and how we’ll be enabling them across Windows 10. We’ll explore how our indexing experiments will ramp to an end-to-end PWA discovery experience later this year, and how we’ll empower developers to differentiate their PWAs on Windows – including allowing developers to claim and monetize their PWAs in the Store, interact with customers via reviews and telemetry, and enhance the app with WinRT capabilities.
Let’s dive in!
What’s a Progressive Web App, anyway?
The excitement about PWAs in the developer community is almost palpable – but amongst all that excitement, it can be hard to pin down a single, concise, authoritative definition of a “Progressive Web App.” For the purposes of this discussion, here’s how we define a PWA:
Progressive Web Apps are just great web sites that can behave like native apps—or, perhaps, Progressive Web Apps are just great apps, powered by Web technologies and delivered with Web infrastructure.
Technologically speaking, PWAs are web apps, progressively enhanced with modern web technologies (Service Worker, Fetch networking, Cache API, Push notifications, Web App Manifest) to provide a more app-like experience.
Unlike a “packaged” web app experience, PWAs are hosted on your servers and can be updated without issuing new updates to an app store. Additionally, new web standards (such as Service Worker) enable interoperable ways to implement push notifications, support for offline scenarios, background refreshing, and more, without platform-specific code.
It’s beyond the scope of this post to give a full crash course in the component technologies of a PWA (for that, we highly encourage you to check out Progressive Web Apps on MDN for a starter). But at a high level, these features are built to enable native-like capabilities – offline, background wake/refresh, instant loading, push notifications, and installability.
Progressive Web Apps in Microsoft Edge and Windows 10
So what about PWAs in Microsoft Edge and Windows 10?
We’ve announced before in several venues that we’re all-in on PWAs. In fact, as hinted above, we want to take PWAs on Windows to the next level, by making them first-class app citizens in Windows. This follows from our general philosophy that the web platform, powered by EdgeHTML, is a core part of the Universal Windows Platform on Windows 10. Because of this any device running EdgeHTML 17 gets full access to the technologies and characteristics of Progressive Web Apps.
On other platforms, PWAs primarily originate from inside the browser, and can escape the browser in response to various prompts or menu options. We’re taking things one step further on Windows! Because a PWA can be a first-class citizen in the Windows Store, a user will be able to engage fully with an installed PWA—from discovery, to installation, to execution—without ever opening the browser.

Just for kicks, here is @davatron5000’s @godaytrip as a #PWA on a preview build of Windows 10! ????(inspired by: https://t.co/Flm63mmu6K) pic.twitter.com/t2Kr5MlTOX
— Kirupa ???? (@kirupa) February 1, 2018

On the other hand, in the browser context, all the benefits of being a PWA should still accrue to the web site, empowering the user to choose how and where they want to engage with the experience.
Progressive Web Apps in the Microsoft Store
The first and most obvious distinction here is that we believe PWAs should be discoverable everywhere apps are discoverable – this means they should appear in the Microsoft Store alongside native apps.
In the next release of Windows 10, we intend to begin listing PWAs in the Microsoft Store. Progressive Web Apps installed via the Microsoft Store will be packaged as an appx in Windows 10 – running in their own sandboxed container, without the visual or resource overhead of the browser.
This has a number of benefits to users: PWAs installed via the store will appear in “app” contexts like Start and Cortana search results, and have access to the full suite of WinRT APIs available to UWP apps. They can differentiate their experience on Windows 10 with enhancements like access to local calendar and contacts data (with permission) and more.
It also has exciting benefits to developers! Listing a PWA in the Store gives developers the opportunity to get more insight into their users with channels like reviews and ratings in the Store, analytics on installs, uninstalls, shares, and performance, and more. It also provides more natural and discoverable access to your web experience on devices where the browser is a less natural entry point, such as Xbox, Windows Mixed Reality, and other non-PC form factors.
The road from the Web to the Microsoft Store
PWAs provide a natural signal of intent to be treated as “app-like” in the Web App Manifest, which allows us to leverage Bing’s web crawler in combination with our Store catalog to identify the best candidates for indexing.
The Microsoft Store has a two-pronged approach to publishing Progressive Web Apps:
Developers can proactively submit Progressive Web Apps to the Microsoft Store
The Microsoft Store, powered by the Bing crawler, will automatically index selected quality Progressive Web Apps
Submitting to the Microsoft Store with PWA Builder
Proactively submitting a PWA to the Microsoft Store requires generating an AppX containing your PWA and publishing it to your Dev Center account.
The easiest way to generate an AppX with your PWA is the free PWA Builder tool. PWA Builder can generate a complete AppX for publishing using your existing site and Web App Manifest – both website and CLI options are available.
PWA Builder takes data from your site and uses that to generate cross-platform Progressive Web Apps.
Publishing manually gives you full access to the benefits above—fine-grained control over how your app appears in the Microsoft Store, access and the ability to respond to feedback (reviews and comments), insights into telemetry (installs, crashes, shares, etc.), and the ability to monetize your app. This also gets you access to all the other benefits of the Microsoft Dev Center, including promotion and distribution in the Microsoft Store for Business and the Microsoft Store for Education.
Automatically indexing quality Progressive Web Apps with the Bing Crawler
We’ve been using the Bing Crawler to identify PWAs on the web for nearly a year, and as we’ve reviewed the nearly 1.5 million candidates, we’ve identified a small initial set of Progressive Web App experiences which we’ll be indexing for Windows 10 customers to take for a spin over the coming weeks.
We will crawl and index selected PWAs from the web to be available as apps in the Microsoft Store
Over the coming months, we’ll be ramping up our automatic indexing in the Microsoft Store from a few initial candidates to a broader sample. Throughout this process, we’ll continue to vet our quality measures for PWAs, to make sure we’re providing a valuable, trustworthy, and delightful experience to our mutual customers on Windows devices.
Whether automatically indexed by the Store or manually submitted by the site owner, the Web App Manifest provides the starting set of information for the app’s Store page: name, description, icons, and screenshots. Developers should aim to provide complete and high-quality information in the manifest. Once in the Store, the publisher will have the option of claiming their apps to take complete control of their Store presence.
Quality signals for Progressive Web Apps
We’re passionate about making the Microsoft Store a home to trustworthy, quality app experiences. With that in mind, we’ve identified a set of quality measures for developers to keep in mind as you build PWAs.
We won’t ingest every app that meets these criteria, but will be including them in our considerations for candidates as we gradually expand our program.
Web App Manifests should suggest quality: In our initial crawl of sites looking for PWAs, we discovered over 1.5 million manifests across 800k domains. Looking at a selection of these sites, we discovered that not all are good candidates for ingestion. Some aren’t PWAs at all, and others have a boilerplate manifest generated by tools like favicon generators. We will be looking for non-boilerplate manifests that include a name, description, and at least one icon that is larger than 512px square.
Sites should be secure: Access to the Service Worker family of APIs requires an HTTPS connection on Windows and other platforms.
Service Workers should be an enhancement: We’ll look for a Service Worker as a signal for ingesting PWAs, but we also expect experiences to degrade gracefully if Service Worker is unsupported, as it may be on older browsers or other platforms. You can get started building a basic Service Worker with PWA Builder; Mozilla also has great recipes if you are looking for somewhere to start.
Sites should consider automated testing for quality: There are a number of tools out there for this, including our sonarwhal, Lighthouse, aXe, and more.
PWAs must be compliant with Microsoft Store policies: PWAs will need to meet the standards of the Microsoft Store, just like any other app. We will not ingest PWAs that violate laws or Store policies.
Once we have shipped these technologies to mainstream Windows customers with EdgeHTML 17, we will gradually expand our indexing of high-quality Progressive Web Apps into the Microsoft Store based on quality measures and the value they add to the Windows ecosystem.
PWA or UWP?
Given the overlap in terms of capabilities, we often get asked about the recommended approach: PWA or UWP. We see this as a false dichotomy! In fact, on Windows 10, the Universal Windows Platform fully embraces Progressive Web Apps, because EdgeHTML is a foundational component of UWP.
For developers who are building a fully-tailored UWP experience, building from the ground up with native technologies may make the most sense. For developers who want to tailor an existing web codebase to Windows 10, or provide a first-class cross-platform experience with native capabilities and enhancements, PWA provides an on-ramp to the Universal Windows Platform that doesn’t require demoting or forking existing web resources.
When evaluating native app development in relation to Progressive Web Apps, here are some of the questions we recommend asking:
Are there native features the Web can’t offer that are critical to the success of this product?
What is the total cost (time and money) of building and maintaining each platform-specific native app?
What are the strengths of my dev team? or How easy will it be to assemble a new team with the necessary skills to build each native app as opposed to a PWA?
How critical will immediate app updates (e.g., adding new security features) be?
In other words, the choice between PWA and native should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. For example:
If you are looking to craft an experience that takes full advantage of each platform you release it on and you want to agonize over every UX detail in order to differentiate your product… native might be the best choice for you.
If you are maintaining a product on multiple native platforms in addition to the Web and they are all largely the same in terms of look & feel and capabilities, it may make more sense to focus all of your efforts on the Web version and go PWA.
If you are planning a brand-new product and the Web provides all of the features you need (especially when you also consider the additional APIs provided via the host OS), building a PWA is probably going to be a faster, more cost-effective option.
For a more in-depth discussion, check out our video from Microsoft Edge Web Summit 2017: PWA, HWA, Electron, oh my! Making sense of the evolving web app landscape.

Testing your Progressive Web Apps in Microsoft Edge and Windows 10
Service Worker, Push, and other technologies are enabled by default in current Insider builds in Microsoft Edge, and we intend to enable them by default when EdgeHTML 17 ships to stable builds of Windows 10 next year.
You can get started testing your PWA in Microsoft Edge today by downloading a recent build of Windows 10 via the Windows Insider Program, or using a free VM. We’ll be sharing more about Service Worker debugging features in the Microsoft Edge DevTools in a future post—stay tuned!
Service Worker features will be enabled for the UWP platform (including installed PWAs) with the upcoming release of Windows 10, but are currently not available to published apps in the Store, including on Windows Insider Preview builds. In the meantime, you can test them in Insider builds by sideloading your AppX using the install script provided by PWA Builder tools, or by running your PWA inside Microsoft Edge.
What’s next for Progressive Web Apps on Windows?
Over the coming months, we’re laser focused on polishing our initial implementation of the core technologies behind PWAs in EdgeHTML and the Universal Windows Platform—Service Worker, Push, Web App Manifest, and especially Fetch are foundational technologies which have a potentially dramatic impact to compatibility and reliability of existing sites and apps, so real-world testing with our Insider population is paramount.
In our initial implementation, we’ll be focused on those two components—the Service Worker family of technologies in Microsoft Edge, and PWAs in the Microsoft Store. Looking forward, we’re excited about the potential of PWA principles to bring the best of the web to native apps, and the best of native apps to the web through tighter integrations between the browser and the desktop. We look forward to hearing your feedback on our initial implementation and experimenting further in future releases.
In the meantime, we encourage you to try out your favorite PWAs in Microsoft Edge today, and get started testing your installable PWA on Windows, both via PWA Builder and in Microsoft Edge! We look forward to hearing your feedback and to digging in to any bugs you may encounter.
Here’s to what’s next!
– Kyle, Kirupa, Aaron, and Iqbal

Target Surface Hub and Windows 10 S on a Snapdragon processor with your UWP apps

When submitting your UWP app or game to Microsoft Store through Dev Center, you have the flexibility to choose the device families on which customers can acquire your app. By default, we make your app or game available to all device families which can run it (except for Xbox, which you can opt into as appropriate if your packages support it). This lets your apps and games reach the most potential customers.
Recently, we’ve added new options that let you offer your submission to customers on Surface Hub. You can now also offer ARM packages to Windows 10 S on a Snapdragon processor (Always Connected PCs).

To target Surface Hub when submitting your UWP app to the Microsoft Store, simply ensure that the box for the Windows 10 Team device family is checked. This is generally the case if you upload packages targeting the Universal or Team device family.
If you include an ARM package in your submission that targets the Universal or Desktop device family, this package will be made available to Windows 10 S on a Snapdragon processor (Always Connected PCs) devices as long as the Windows 10 Desktop device family box is checked.
The example above shows three packages that target the Universal device family, x64, ARM and x86. The boxes for Windows 10 Desktop, Windows 10 Mobile, Windows 10 Xbox, Windows 10 Team, and Windows 10 Holographic are selected. This means that customers on any of those device types can download this submission.
For more about device family selection, check out our documentation.

App packaging and testing
App packages are configured to run on a specific processor architecture. We highly recommended that you build your app packages to target all architectures whenever possible, so your app will run smoothly on all Windows 10 devices. To learn more, visit our app package architecture documentation.
We highly recommend that you test your app on all device families that you plan to support to ensure the best experience on all devices. To learn more about steps to take before packaging and submitting your UWP app, read our documentation.

This Week on Windows: Mixed Reality Viewer app, Sea of Thieves, ebooks and more

We hope you enjoyed this week’s episode of This Week on Windows! Head over here to learn more about Surface Book 2 coming to all Surface markets, catch up on the news about the Sea of Thieves Closed Beta, or, check out our Windows 10 Tips on staying in touch with My People and getting started with the Mixed Reality Viewer app.
In case you missed it:

Age of Empires: Definitive Edition is launching worldwide on Feb. 20 for Windows 10 PC with a multiplayer beta set for Jan. 29. https://t.co/H2TLH9MTT8
— Xbox Wire (@XboxWire) January 18, 2018

Here’s what’s new in Microsoft Store this week:
Need a good book? Check out Walter Isaacson’s reading list in the Microsoft Store
 
Walter Isaacson is one of today’s most influential writers, authoring bestselling biographies about luminaries past (Leonardo da Vinci, Benjamin Franklin) and present (Steve Jobs). What’s on Isaacson’s reading list? Some very interesting volumes, indeed, which is why we’ve made his reading list our latest eBooks collection in the Microsoft Store.*
The Walter Isaacson Collection features titles including Heroes of the Frontier, where Dave Eggers tells the story of a 30-something woman turning her back on convention and heading to Alaska to start life over. In Fantasyland, Kurt Andersen 
traces America’s relationship with false facts and delusion over the past 500 years. The fascinating, brilliant man behind just about everything important in the Information Age is profiled in
A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age, by Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman, and in Madison Park, Eric Motley tells how his upbringing in a small Alabama town founded by freed slaves gave him his deep belief in the American Dream.
Check out the complete Walter Isaacson Collection here, and don’t miss Walter’s personal reviews on each title’s page in the Microsoft Store.
Have a great weekend!
*Market availability: Please check availability in your local Store.

Now Available: Offer Add-on Subscriptions with Automated Recurring Billing in Your UWP Apps

Today we are extremely excited to announce that subscription add-ons are available to all UWP developers. You can use subscriptions to sell digital products in your app with automated recurring billing while giving your customers a seamless purchase experience. One thing to keep in mind is that the Store fee for recurring billed subscriptions differs from other business models in Microsoft Store. For any add-on subscriptions in apps (but not games), you receive 85% of the subscription price, minus applicable taxes. For game add-on subscriptions, you receive 70% of the subscription price, minus applicable taxes. Please read the Microsoft Store App Developer Agreement for further details on Store Fees and other terms relating to subscriptions.
Creating a subscription add-on
To enable the purchase of subscription add-ons in your app, your project must target Windows 10 Anniversary Edition (10.0; Build 14393) or a later release in Visual Studio (this corresponds to Windows 10, version 1607), and it must use the APIs in the Windows.Services.Store namespace to implement the in-app purchase experience instead of the Windows.ApplicationModel.Store namespace. For more information about the differences between these namespaces, see In-app purchases and trials.
1) Create an add-on submission for your subscription in the Dev Center dashboard and publish the submission.
For Product type, ensure that you select Subscription.

When offering subscription add-ons to your customers, you can choose to offer a subscription period of 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year or 2 years. You can also add a free trial period of 1 week or 1 month so your customers can try out the add-on before they commit to purchasing.
2) In your app, use APIs in the Services.Store namespace to determine whether the current user has already acquired your subscription add-on and then offer it for sale as an in-app purchase.
3) Test the in-app purchase implementation of your subscription in your app. You’ll need to download your app once from the Store to your development device to use its license for testing.
4) Create and publish an app submission that includes your updated app package, including your tested code.
For a complete overview of add-on subscriptions and how to implement them into your UWP app, please visit our documentation.
Customer management
Customers can manage their purchased subscriptions from the services & subscriptions page for their Microsoft account. Here they’ll find all the subscriptions they have acquired, with options to cancel a subscription or change the form of payment associated with a subscription.
Offering add-on subscriptions can be a great monetization strategy for your apps and games. As you go through the implementation process, please provide us with any feedback via the Feedback link in the upper right corner of the Dev Center dashboard.

This Week on Windows: The Countdown to 2018 sale at Microsoft Store, Windows 10 tips and more

We hope you enjoyed this week’s episode of This Week on Windows! You can visit this blog post to learn more about how you can find the perfect last-minute gift or treat yourself during the Countdown to 2018 sale at Microsoft Store, check out our Windows 10 Tips on how to get started with Windows Hello on your PC, choosing your performance and battery balance, or saving disk space with OneDrive Files OnDemand  – or, keep reading for more of this week’s news!
In case you missed it:

Here’s what’s new at Microsoft Store:
Countdown to 2018

It’s too late to ship gifts to arrive in time for Christmas, but digital content and great deals are always ready to go in an instant in the Countdown sale. Check out this amazing collection of favorite games, movies, TV, ebooks and more, all in the Microsoft Store and on sale through Jan 4, 2018. Read more about all the deals in our blog post! 
Netflix – Bright

A Los Angeles rife with interspecies tension is the setting for Bright, debuting today exclusively on Netflix (Free app, subscription service). As an LA cop, Will Smith and his orc partner stumble upon a powerful object and are soon embroiled in a prophesied turf war. Watch the action unfold today – and get the soundtrack on Spotify (Free app, subscription service).
Have a great weekend!