Category Archives: PC

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Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19592 | Windows Experience Blog

Hello Windows Insiders, today we’re releasing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19592.1001 to Windows Insiders in the Fast ring.
You can check out our Windows Insider Program documentation here, including a list of all the new features and updates released in builds so far. Not seeing any of the features in this build? Check your Windows Insider Settings to make sure you’re on the Fast ring. Submit feedback here to let us know if things weren’t working the way you expected.
If you want a complete look at what build is in which Insider ring, head over to Flight Hub. Please note, there will be a slight delay between when a build is flighted and when Flight Hub is updated.

In case you missed the news earlier this week, Panos Panay announced Amanda Langowski is the new lead for the Windows Insider Program. Be sure to check out Panos’ blog post.

Tablet posture improvements for 2-in-1 convertible PCs
We are beginning to roll out (again*) the new tablet experience for 2-in-1 convertible PCs as a preview to some Windows Insiders in the Fast ring. This experience is separate from the Tablet Mode experience that you will still be able to use. This new experience allows users entering tablet posture to stay in the familiar desktop experience without interruption with a few key touch improvements:
Taskbar icons are spaced out
Search box on taskbar is collapsed into icon-only mode
Touch keyboard auto invokes when you tap a text field
File explorer elements will have a little more padding, to make them comfortable to interact with using touch
You’ll also notice we’ve updated some of the related Tablet settings under Settings > System, so as to give you control over the experience.
In order to help ensure quality, the feature will be rolling out slowly, starting with a portion of the Insiders that have never detached their keyboard before, or have their tablet mode settings set to Don’t ask me and don’t switch.
We’d love to hear your feedback about the experience:
Use your convertible PC with apps as you normally would.
When you’re ready to pick it up and go or simply lean back on the couch, you can fold back the keyboard or remove it altogether.
Use your device as a tablet with touch, without going into Tablet Mode.

*Note: This feature was previously rolled out as an experiment to Windows Insiders in 20H1 Build 18970 and ended in Build 19013. After some refinement, we’re reintroducing it to Windows Insiders in this build and plan to deliver this experience to customers in a future Windows 10 update.

The Windows Search Platform (Indexer) has been updated with improved logic to help find better times to perform indexing of your files and avoiding heavily indexing while you are using your machine. An improvement was also made to significantly limit the amount of times the service indexes your files for content that doesn’t have an impact on search experiences, and gives you a better experience on Windows.

We’ve fixed the issue causing ARM devices to receive a bugcheck and have removed the block with this build.
We fixed an issue that could result in the Optional Features page in Settings appearing blank.
We’ve fixed an issue where, when running corruption repair (DISM), the process stopped at 84.9%.
We fixed an issue where, after successfully completing installation of an update and rebooting the device, the Start menu Shutdown button still showed Update and Shutdown and Update and Restart.
We fixed an issue that could result in Windows updates failing with error 0x80070003.
We fixed an issue that could sometimes result in Settings crashing when pausing updates or the Windows Update settings page not loading.
We fixed an issue from the previous flight that was resulting in extra lines appearing in the taskbar jumplist.
We fixed in an issue resulting in a black window, with only a mouse being visible to others, when sharing a single app over Microsoft Teams.

BattlEye and Microsoft have found incompatibility issues due to changes in the operating system between some Insider Preview builds and certain versions of BattlEye anti-cheat software. To safeguard Insiders who might have these versions installed on their PC, we have applied a compatibility hold on these devices from being offered affected builds of Windows Insider Preview. See this article for details.
We are aware Narrator and NVDA users that seek the latest release of Microsoft Edge based on Chromium may experience some difficulty when navigating and reading certain web content. Narrator, NVDA and the Edge teams are aware of these issues. Users of legacy Microsoft Edge will not be affected. NVAccess has released a NVDA 2019.3 that resolves the known issue with Edge.
We’re looking into reports of the update process hanging for extended periods of time when attempting to install a new build.
Some devices may experience a bugcheck (GSOD) during the reboot to install this update. If this happens, log in, schedule a time for the update to install, and then log off all user profiles before the scheduled install time. The install will then proceed as expected.
The Documents section under Privacy has a broken icon (just a rectangle).
When trying to use Win + PrtScn to capture a screenshot, the image is not saved to the Screenshots directory. For now, you’ll need to use one of the other options for taking screenshots, such as WIN + Shift + S.
Sticky Notes windows can’t be moved. As a workaround, when you set focus to Sticky Notes, press Alt + Space. This will bring up a menu that contains a Move option. Select it, then use either the arrow keys or the mouse to move the window.
We’re looking into reports of some Insiders receiving driver compatibility warnings when attempting to update to a newer build in certain virtual environments.
Thanks,BLB

Venture into the digital worlds of Minecraft Marketplace’s free educational content | Windows Experience Blog

To help keep young minds sharp and stimulated while kids are now out of school, Minecraft Marketplace has launched favorite lessons from Minecraft: Education Edition in a brand new Education category.
These educational worlds can be played on your own, with your kids, parents or friends. From the comfort of your home, you can tour the International Space Station, discover the wonders of ancient Greece, or explore the inside of a human eye.
Also included: 10 worlds from the Marketplace creator community that explore renewable energy, marine biology, Greek history and more. They include lesson plans like creative writing activities, build challenges and tricky puzzles.
All of these worlds are launching now and are free to download through June 30. Find out more at Minecraft.

Announcing the new lead for the Windows Insider Program | Windows Experience Blog

Five years ago, we invited our most passionate and opinionated customers to help us shape the future of Windows. Since then the Windows Insider Program has grown to a community of 18 million people whose enthusiasm for Windows has a profound impact on the products and features we build.
In my first 30 days as the Windows leader, as I’ve been spending time listening, learning, and working with the team to build a vision for the next era of Windows, I’ve been in awe of the Insiders group and the level of dedication and depth of knowledge they have. We often say that products are a reflection of the people who make them. I truly believe this and believe that you can see the passion and drive of the Windows Insiders reflected in more than a billion Windows users around the world. To keep this momentum going and continue to grow and innovate in Windows, it’s clear we need the right person to lead this powerful community into the next era, which is why I’m excited to announce Amanda Langowski as the new lead for the Windows Insider Program.

Amanda’s passion for Windows is evident in her 20-year career at Microsoft, which began with coordinating beta programs for Windows. Since then, she’s been an extraordinary and dedicated product maker for the company. In meeting Amanda, one thing that is immediately apparent is her passion for customer feedback and the positive impact it can have on our products. This can be seen in her work leading the Flighting Platform Team not only coordinating the release of each new build that goes to Insiders, but also in managing our Insider settings capabilities, ultimately enabling one of the most powerful streams of customer feedback we have.
More inspiring than the work she has done though is her vision for the future and her desire to help connect our engineers with customers, providing clarity on how their feedback transforms the way we build experiences for all our Windows 10 customers. All while driving the Windows Insider Program forward by enhancing our communication with legacy Insiders and growing the diversity of our community to ensure more customers are reflected in the products we’re building together.
Not only do I truly believe in the power of this program, but I’m also looking forward to working hand in hand with Amanda to realize this vision for the future of the Windows Insider Program.
Panos

Hosted App Model – Windows Developer Blog

In Windows 10 version 2004, we are introducing the concept of Hosted Apps to the Windows App Model. Hosted apps are registered as independent apps on Windows, but require a host process in order to run. An example would be a script file which requires its host (eg: Powershell or Python) to be installed. By itself, it is just a file and does not have any way to appear as an app to Windows. With the Hosted App Model, an app can declare itself as a host, and then packages can declare a dependency upon that host and are known as hosted apps. When the hosted app is launched, the host executable is then launched with the identity of the hosted app package instead of its own identity. This allows the host to be able to access the contents of the hosted app package and when calling APIs it does so with the hosted app identity.

Modern apps are defined to Windows via signed MSIX packages. A package provides identity, so it is known to the system and contains all the files, assets, and registration information for the app it contains. Many apps have scenarios where they want to host content and binaries, such as extensibility points, from other apps. There are also scenarios where the host app is more of a runtime engine that loads script content. On top of it all, there is a desire to have these hosted apps to look and behave like a separate app on the system – where it has its own start tile, identity, and deep integration with Windows features such as BackgroundTasks, Notifications, and Share. Using the Hosted App Model, a retail kiosk app can easily be rebranded, or a Python or Powershell script can now be treated as a separate app.
Developers attempt to accomplish this today in either of two ways. First, they simply use a shortcut on the desktop to launch the host. But this experience does not have any deep integration with Windows and the shell, as the ‘app’ is the host executable not the script. To get a more deeply integrated experience, the alternative is for developers to create a packaged app that includes the host binaries within the package. While the package would now be a separate app and have the ability for deep Windows integration, this approach is inefficient as each app would need to redistribute the host and can have potential servicing and licensing issues.
The Hosted App Model solves the needs of these hosted apps. The Hosted App Model is dependent upon two pieces, a “Host” which is made available to other apps, and a “Hosted App” that declares a dependency upon the host. When a hosted app is launched, the result is that the host is then running under the identity of the hosted app package, so it can load visual assets, content from the Hosted App package location, and when it calls APIs it does so with the identity declared in the Hosted App. The Hosted App gets the intersection of capabilities declared between the Host and Hosted App – this means that if a Hosted App cannot ask for more capabilities than what the Host provides. In this initial release of the Hosted App Model packaged desktop apps are supported, and we will be expanding support to UWP hosts in future releases.

More specifically, a Host is the executable in a package declared by the HostRuntime extension which points to the main executable or runtime process for the hosted app. The HostRuntime extension has an Id attribute, and this identifier is referenced as a dependency by the Hosted App in its package manifest. A host can determine the package identity it is currently running under by referring to the Windows.ApplicationModel.Package.Current api.
A Hosted App is an app that declares a package dependency on a Host, and leverages the HostRuntime Id for activation instead of specifying an Entrypoint executable in its own package. It typically contains content, visual assets, scripts, or binaries that may be accessed by the host. Hosted App packages can be Signed or Unsigned:
Signed packages may contain executable files. This is useful in scenarios that have an extension mechanism, allowing the host to load a dll or registered component in the hosted app package.
Unsigned packages can only contain non-executable files. This is useful in scenarios where the hostruntime only needs to load images, assets and content such as script files. Unsigned packages must include a special Unsigned Publisher OID in their Identity or they won’t be allowed to register. This prevents unsigned packages from spoofing a signed package identity.
Declaring a Host
Declaring a Host is quite simple. All you need to do is to declare the HostRuntime package extension in your AppxManifest.xml. The HostRuntime extension is package-wide and so is declared as a child of the package element. Below is an excerpt from an example AppxManifest.xml showing the HostRuntime entry that declares an app as a Host with Id “PythonHost.”

hostRuntime – a package-wide extension defining runtime information used when activating a Hosted App.
Executable – The executable binary that will be the host process
RuntimeBehavior and TrustLevel – A hosted app will run with the definitions expressed in the extension. For example, a hosted app using the Host declared above will run the executable PyScriptEngine.exe, at mediumIL trust level.
HostRuntime Id – A unique identifier used to specify a Host in a package. A package can have multiple Host Apps, and each must have a unique HostRuntime Id. This identifier is referenced by the Hosted App.

A hosted app must declare a package dependency upon the host, and specify the HostId to use. If the package is unsigned, it must include the Unsigned Publisher OID to ensure the package identity does not conflict with a signed package. Also the TargetDeviceFamily should match the host so it does not attempt to deploy on devices that are not supported by the host. The following is an example of a manifest for a Hosted App that takes a dependency upon the Python host.

Unsigned Publisher OID – 2.25.311729368913984317654407730594956997722=1 This identifier is required when a Hosted App will be unsigned. The identifier ensures any unsigned package cannot spoof the identity of a signed package.
HostRuntimeDependency – A Hosted App package must declare a HostRuntimeDependency on the Host app. This consists of the Name and Publisher of the Host package, and the min version it depends on. These can be found under the <Identity> element in the Host package. When deployed, if the HostRuntimeDependency cannot be found, the registration fails.
HostId – Instead of declaring the usual Executable and EntryPoint for an app or extension, the HostId attribute expresses a dependency on a Host app. As a result, the Hosted App inherits the Executable, EntryPoint and runtime attributes of the Host with the specified HostId. When registered, if the HostId is not found, the deployment fails.
Parameters (optional)– parameters that are passed on the command line to the host app. The host needs to know what to do with these parameters, and so there is an implied contract between the host and hosted app.

One of the advantages of the new HostRuntime is that it enables a host to dynamically register a hosted app package at runtime. This dynamically registered package does not need to be signed. This allows a host to dynamically generate the content and manifest for the hosted app package and then register it. We are working with the new Microsoft Edge browser to take advantage of the Hosted App Model for Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) – converting the web app manifest into an app manifest, package the additional web content into an MSIX package and register it. In this model, a PWA is its own independent app registered to the system even though it is being hosted by Edge.
The new APIs for registering a package are:
Management.Deployment.PackageManager.AddPackageByUriAsync() is used for registering an MSIX package
Management.Deployment.PackageManager.RegisterPackageByUriAsync() is used for registering a loose file AppxManifest.xml file.
In the case where the hosted app is unsigned, its manifest must meet the following requirements:
The unsigned package cannot contain any Executable attributes in its Application or Extension elements (e.g.: no <Application Executable=…> or <Extension Executable=…>), and it can’t specify any other activation data (Executable, TrustLevel, etc). The Application node only supports the HostId and Parameters elements.
An unsigned package must be a Main package type – it cannot be a Bundle, Framework, Resource or Optional package.
In turn, the host process registering an unsigned hosted app package must meet the following requirements:
The process must have package identity
The process must have the package management capability <rescap:Capability Name=”packageManagement”/>

Let’s have a look at two examples. The first, WinFormsToastHost, is a Host with a signed Hosted App that shows how to include an extension that is dynamically loaded into the host. The second, NumberGuesser, an example of using python as a host and a script file as a hosted app package. You can find the sample code for both at https://aka.ms/hostedappsample.
WinFormsToastHost
Host
The host in this example is a simple Windows Forms app that displays its package identity, location, and calls the ToastNotification APIs. It also has the capability to load a binary extension from a hosted app package. When run under its own identity, it does not display the extension information. The app is packaged with the Windows App Packaging Project which includes the manifest declarations for being a host.
WinformsToastHost-Extension
The hosted app is a .NET dll that implements an extension mechanism for the host to load. It also includes a packaging project that declares its identity and dependency upon the hostruntime. You will see this identity reflected in the values displayed when the app is run. When registered, the hostruntime has access to the hostedapp’s package location and thus can load the extension.
Running the sample
You can load the source code in Visual Studio as follows:
Open WinformsToastHost.sln in VS2019
Build and deploy WinformsToastHost.Package
Build and deploy HostedAppExtension
Goto Start menu and launch ‘WinformsToastHost’
Goto Start menu and launch ‘Hosted WinformsToastHost Extension‘
Here is a screenshot of the host running. Notice its package identity and path, and the UX for loading an assembly is not available because it is not running as a hosted app.

Now launch the hosted app. Notice the identity and path have changed, and that the UX for dynamically loading an extension assembly is enabled.

When the “Run hosted” button is pressed, you will get a dialog from the binary extension:

Here is the Task Manager details view showing both apps running at the same time. Notice that the host binary is the executable for both:

And when clicking on the Show Toast button for each app, the system recognizes the two different identities in the action center:

The Host
In this example, the host is comprised of 2 projects – first is PyScriptEngine which is wrapper written in C# and makes use of the Python nuget package to run python scripts. This wrapper parses the command line and has the capability to dynamically register a manifest as well as launch the python executable with a path to a script file. The second project is PyScriptEnginePackage which is a Windows App Packaging Project that installs PyScriptEngine and registers the manifest that includes the HostRuntime extension.
The Hosted App
The Hosted App is made up of a python script, NumberGuesser.py, and visual assets. It doesn’t contain any PE files. It has an app manifest where the declarations for HostRuntimeDependency and HostId are declared that identifies PyScriptEngine as its Host. The manifest also contains the Unsigned Publisher OID entry that is required for an unsigned package.
Running the sample
To run this sample you first need to build and deploy the host, then you can use the host from the commandline to dynamically register the hosted app.
Open PyScriptEngine.sln solution in Visual Studio
Set PyScriptEnginePackage as the Startup project
Build PyScriptEnginePackage
Deploy PyScriptEnginePackage
Because the host app declares an appexecutionalias, you will be able to go to a command prompt and run “pyscriptengine” to get the usage notice:

6. Use the python host to register the NumberGuesser game from the commandline:

7. Now, click on “Number Guesser (Manifest)” in your start menu, and run the game! See how many tries it takes you to guess the number:

Let’s confirm what is running. Notice how PyScriptEngine is executing under the package identity of NumberGuesser!

In summary, we are pleased to bring you more power and features to the windows platform, and we are excited to see what creative ideas you have for the Hosted App Model. In addition to Microsoft Edge, we are working with teams across the company and expect to see more apps leveraging the Hosted App Model in the future.

Extending the Reach of Windows ML and DirectML – Windows Developer Blog

Since the initial release, Windows ML has powered numerous Machine Learning (ML) experiences on Windows. Delivering reliable, high-performance results across the breadth of Windows hardware, Windows ML is designed to make ML deployment easier, allowing developers to focus on creating innovative applications.
Windows ML is built upon ONNX Runtime to provide a simple, model-based, WinRT API optimized for Windows developers. This API enables you to take your ONNX model and seamlessly integrate it into your application to power ML experiences. Layered below the ONNX Runtime is the DirectML API for cross-vendor hardware acceleration. DirectML is part of the DirectX family and provides full control for real-time, performance-critical scenarios.
This end-to-end stack provides developers with the ability to run inferences on any Windows device, regardless of the machine’s hardware configuration, all from a single and compatible codebase.

Figure 1 – The Windows AI Platform stack
Windows ML is used in a variety of real-world application scenarios. The Windows Photos app uses it to help organize your photo collection for an easier and richer browsing experience. The Windows Ink stack uses Windows ML to analyze your handwriting, converting ink strokes into text, shapes, lists and more. Adobe Premier Pro offers a feature that will take your video and crop it to the aspect ratio of your choice, all while preserving the important action in each frame.
With the next release of Windows 10, we are continuing to build on this momentum and are further expanding to support more exciting and unique experiences. The interest and engagement from the community provided valuable feedback that allowed us to focus on what our customers need most. Today, we are pleased to share with you some of that important feedback and how we are continually working to build from it.

Today, Windows ML is fully supported as a built-in Windows component on Windows 10 version 1809 (October 2018 Update) and newer. Developers can use the corresponding Windows Software Development Kit (SDK) and immediately begin leveraging Windows ML in their application. For developers that want to continue using this built-in version, we will continue to update and innovate Windows ML and provide you with the feature set and performance you need with each new Windows release.
A common piece of feedback we’ve heard is that developers today want the ability to ship products and applications that have feature parity to all of their customers. In other words, developers want to leverage Windows ML on applications targeting older versions of Windows and not just the most recent. To support this, we are going to make Windows ML available as a stand-alone package that can be shipped with your application. This redistributable path enables Windows ML support for CPU inference on Windows versions 8.1 and newer, and GPU hardware-acceleration on Windows 10 1709 and newer.
Going forward, with each new update of Windows ML, there will be a corresponding redist package, with matching new features and optimizations, available on GitHub. Developers will find that with either option they choose, they will receive an official Windows offering that is extensively tested, guaranteeing reliability and high performance.

In addition to bringing Windows ML support to more versions of Windows, we are also unifying our approach with Windows ML, ONNX Runtime, and DirectML. At the core of this stack, ONNX Runtime is designed to be a cross-platform inference engine. With Windows ML and DirectML, we build around this runtime to offer a rich set of features and hardware scaling, designed for Windows and the diverse hardware ecosystem.
We understand the complexities developers face in building applications that offer a great customer experience, while also reaching their wide customer base. In order to provide developers with the right flexibility, we are bringing the Windows ML API and a DirectML execution provider to the ONNX Runtime GitHub project. Developers can now choose the API set that works best for their application scenarios and still benefit from DirectML’s high-performance and consistent hardware acceleration across the breadth of devices supported in the Windows ecosystem.
In GitHub today, the Windows ML and DirectML preview is available as source, with instructions and samples on how to build it, as well as a prebuilt NuGet package for CPU deployments.

Are you a Windows app developer that needs a friendly WinRT API that will integrate easily with your other application code and is optimized for Windows devices? Windows ML is a perfect choice for that. Do you need to build an application with a single code-path that can work across other non-Windows devices? The ONNX Runtime cross-platform C API can provide that.

Figure 2 – newly layered Windows AI and ONNX Runtime
Developers already using the ONNX Runtime C-API and who want to check out the DirectML EP (Preview) can follow these steps.

We are already making great progress on these new features.
You can get access to the preview of Windows ML and DirectML for the ONNX Runtime here. We invite you to join us on GitHub and provide feedback at [email protected]
The official Windows ML redistributable package will be available on NuGet in May 2020.
As always, we greatly appreciate all the support from the developer community. We’ll continue to share updates as we make more progress with these upcoming features.

Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19587 | Windows Experience Blog

Hello Windows Insiders, today we’re releasing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19587 to Windows Insiders in the Fast ring.
You can check out our Windows Insider Program documentation here, including a list of all the new features and updates released in builds so far. Not seeing any of the features in this build? Check your Windows Insider Settings to make sure you’re on the Fast ring. Submit feedback here to let us know if things weren’t working the way you expected.
If you want a complete look at what build is in which Insider ring, head over to Flight Hub. Please note, there will be a slight delay between when a build is flighted and when Flight Hub is updated.

Based on feedback, when you have muted your volume, the volume will now not unmute when using the hardware keyboard volume keys until you raise the volume (or manually unmute).
We made a couple of improvements to Narrator and how it works with some of the controls in Windows:
Narrator now uses a more friendly string to describe the audio output in the Select playback device dropdown menu in the volume flyout.
Narrator now announces more information in the Add Bluetooth or other devices dialog in the Settings application when first opened.

We fixed an issue where the new icon next to Scan with Microsoft Defender in File Explorer’s context menu didn’t have a transparent background.
We fixed an issue that could result in Default Apps page in Settings crashing when you tried to change defaults.
We fixed an issue that could result in the search box being missing from certain apps.
We fixed an issue where some files couldn’t be opened in win32 apps from File Explorer when the path length to the file was very long and parts of the path included East Asian characters.
We fixed an issue where thumbnails weren’t being generated for pictures inside a Work Folder.
We fixed an issue where adding the Session column to the Users tab in Task Manager would result in not being able to expand the details for a particular user.

We’re blocking this build from ARM devices because of an issue causing them to receive a bugcheck.
BattlEye and Microsoft have found incompatibility issues due to changes in the operating system between some Insider Preview builds and certain versions of BattlEye anti-cheat software. To safeguard Insiders who might have these versions installed on their PC, we have applied a compatibility hold on these devices from being offered affected builds of Windows Insider Preview. See this article for details.
We are aware Narrator and NVDA users that seek the latest release of Microsoft Edge based on Chromium may experience some difficulty when navigating and reading certain web content. Narrator, NVDA and the Edge teams are aware of these issues. Users of legacy Microsoft Edge will not be affected. NVAccess has released a NVDA 2019.3 that resolves the known issue with Edge.
We’re looking into reports of the update process hanging for extended periods of time when attempting to install a new build.
Some devices may experience a bugcheck (GSOD) during the reboot to install this update. If this happens, log in, schedule a time for the update to install, and then log off all user profiles before the scheduled install time.  The install will then proceed as expected.
The Documents section under Privacy has a broken icon (just a rectangle).
When trying to use Win + PrtScn to capture a screenshot, the image is not saved to the Screenshots directory. For now, you’ll need to use one of the other options for taking screenshots, such as WIN + Shift + S.
We’re looking into reports where, when running corruption repair (DISM), the process will stop at 84.9%.
We’re investigating reports that Sticky Notes windows cannot be moved on the desktop. As a workaround, when you set focus to Sticky Notes, press Alt+Space. This will bring up a menu that contains a Move option. Select it, then you should be able to use either the arrow keys or the mouse to move the window.

Earth Day is next month, and Bing wants to celebrate with you! Check out our Earth day feature, where we have a countdown and news about the big day. We also have quizzes allowing you and your friends to learn more about the great outdoors and endangered animals.
If you want to be among the first to learn about these Bing features, join our Bing Insiders Program.
Thanks,BLB

Update on Stable channel releases for Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

In light of current global circumstances, the Microsoft Edge team is pausing updates to the Stable channel for Microsoft Edge. This means that Microsoft Edge 81 will not be promoted to Stable until we resume these updates.
We are making this change to be consistent with the Chromium project, which recently announced a similar pause due to adjusted schedules, and out of a desire to minimize additional impact to web developers and organizations that are similarly impacted.
We will continue to deliver security and stability updates to Microsoft Edge 80. Preview channels (Canary, Dev, and Beta) will continue to update on their usual schedule.
As the situation evolves, we will post updates here and on our Twitter channel.

Releasing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19041.153 to the Slow ring | Windows Experience Blog

Hello Windows Insiders, today we’re releasing 20H1 Build 19041.153 (KB4541738) to Windows Insiders in the Slow ring. This Cumulative Update includes quality improvements. Key changes include:
We fixed an issue that might prevent ActiveX content from loading.
We fixed an issue that might cause Microsoft browsers to bypass proxy servers.
We fixed an issue with rendering PeerDist-encoded content in Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge.
We changed how the Linux kernel in WSL2 is installed and serviced on your machine, for more details please read this Windows Command Line blog post.
Security updates to Windows Server, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Silicon Platform, Microsoft Edge, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, and Windows Update Stack.
For more information about the resolved security vulnerabilities, please refer to the Security Update Guide.

We are aware Narrator and NVDA users that seek the latest release of Microsoft Edge based on Chromium may experience some difficulty when navigating and reading certain web content. Narrator, NVDA and the Edge teams are aware of these issues. Users of legacy Microsoft Edge will not be affected. NVAccess has released a NVDA 2019.3that resolves the known issue with Edge.
Thanks,BLB

Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19582 | Windows Experience Blog

Hello Windows Insiders, today we’re releasing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19582.1001 to Windows Insiders in the Fast ring.
You can check out our Windows Insider Program documentation here, including a list of all the new features and updates released in builds so far. Not seeing any of the features in this build? Check your Windows Insider Settings to make sure you’re on the Fast ring. Submit feedback here to let us know if things weren’t working the way you expected.
If you want a complete look at what build is in which Insider ring, head over to Flight Hub. Please note, there will be a slight delay between when a build is flighted and when Flight Hub is updated.

Eye Control Improvements
Eye Control enables users to interact with Windows using only their eyes. Based on feedback, with this build, we’re updating the Eye Control settings to now span multiple pages, in order to give the options a bit more room to breathe.

To get started with Eye Control, connect a supported eye tracking device, then follow the steps here.

Your Phone app–Samsung Galaxy S20 and Galaxy Z Flip introduces multiple new features
Continuing our strong partnership with Samsung from last August, we’re excited to introduce exciting new features, which are now available on the latest Samsung Galaxy S20/S20+/S20 Ultra and Samsung Galaxy Z Flip devices in select markets. You can enjoy copying and pasting text and images between your devices, black screen while in phone screen, Rich Communication Service messaging, and more!
Copy and paste between devices and vice versa
You can now copy and paste text and images between your phone and Windows 10 PC seamlessly. Simply turn on this feature in the Your Phone app settings and enjoy copying and pasting content with the familiar ctrl + C and ctrl + v commands on the PC or the tapping and holding gesture on your Android phone. It’s that simple.

Copy and paste requirements:
Samsung Galaxy S20/S20+/S20 Ultra and Samsung Galaxy Z Flip devices in select markets
PC running Windows 10 April 2018 Update or higher
Black screen while using phone screen
The phone screen feature is getting a boost. Users now have the option to turn off their smartphone screen to optimize battery consumption and protect the privacy of their phone’s personal content. Black screen will show during a phone screen session on all supported devices (any device that supports Link to Windows). The black screen kicks in when the session is initiated and dismisses itself when it ends. The user can dismiss the black screen anytime by:
Pressing the power button
Swiping the device screen
Activating Bixby
Disabling the black screen at any time from the Settings page
Feature Requirements:
Latest version of Link to Windows
Phone screen supported devices
Check out the list of supported phone screen compatible devices.
Rich Communication Service (RCS)
Your Phone app now supports RCS (send/receive) for a richer messaging experience on select Samsung devices, provided your mobile operator supports RCS. For users who have RCS messaging enabled on their device and use Samsung Messages app as the default app on their phone, they will now be able to send and receive these messages from the Your Phone app. Additionally, users will be able to see their messages get marked as read. If a user views messages on their PC, they will also be marked as read on the phone, removing the need to clear notifications on the phone.
RCS requirements:
Samsung Galaxy S20 series running version 10.0 or higher
PC running Windows 10 April 2018 Update or higher
Mobile operator supporting RCS messaging
These features are available to Windows Insiders on Windows 10 Build 19H2+ and to the general public. Please make sure you have the latest versions of the Your Phone Companion – Link to Windows, and the Your Phone app. We plan on supporting additional Samsung devices in the future and will keep you posted.
We value your feedback, so give these features a try and let us know what you think. You can report any issues under Your Phone > Settings > Send feedback or directly through Feedback Hub.

[UPDATE] This change isn’t quite ready to roll out, but we’ll let you know once it is.In an effort to consolidate information, we’re removing the Windows Security status details from the About Settings. This information is still available under Settings > Update & Security > Windows Security.
We’re working on giving you control over whether apps can disable the screen capture border. The page isn’t finished being wired up yet, but you’ll see it listed under Privacy Settings.
We’ve updated the “set time zone automatically” toggle in Time & Date settings to now be greyed out if location has been disabled.
Based on feedback, we’re updating the Scottish Gaelic keyboard in these ways:
Pressing AltGR + 7 will now input ⁊ (U+204A TIRONIAN SIGN ET).
Pressing ‘ will now directly insert that character (right single quote).
Pressing AltGr +’ will now act as a dead key to combine an acute accent with a subsequent letter.

We fixed an issue for Chinese Insiders where Windows setup (for example, if you reset your PC) would get stuck after inputting your Microsoft Account details.
We fixed an issue where, when you upgraded with certain languages like Japanese, the Installing Windows X% page wasn’t rendering the text correctly (only boxes were displayed).
We fixed an issue resulting in notifications sometimes having the wrong actions associated with them (for example, an unexpected reply box).
We fixed an issue causing some attempts to update to a newer build to result in error 0x8007042b.
We resolved the issue preventing the cloud recovery option for Reset this PC from working.
We fixed an issue that could result in a green screen with Win32kbase.sys crash at session shutdown.
We fixed an issue resulting in not being about to navigate between the Xbox Game Bar options using an Xbox Controller.
We fixed an issue where the “set time zone automatically” toggle in Time & Date settings wouldn’t stay enabled.
We fixed an issue that could result in the Open With dialog not accepting the selection when opening PDFs.
We fixed an issue resulting in Task Manager showing “Unavailable” DPI Awareness for all processes.

BattlEye and Microsoft have found incompatibility issues due to changes in the operating system between some Insider Preview builds and certain versions of BattlEye anti-cheat software. To safeguard Insiders who might have these versions installed on their PC, we have applied a compatibility hold on these devices from being offered affected builds of Windows Insider Preview. See this article for details.
We are aware Narrator and NVDA users that seek the latest release of Microsoft Edge based on Chromium may experience some difficulty when navigating and reading certain web content. Narrator, NVDA and the Edge teams are aware of these issues. Users of legacy Microsoft Edge will not be affected. NVAccess has released a NVDA 2019.3 that resolves the known issue with Edge.
We’re looking into reports of the update process hanging for extended periods of time when attempting to install a new build.
Some devices may experience a bugcheck (GSOD) during the reboot to install this update. If this happens, log in, schedule a time for the update to install, and then log off all user profiles before the scheduled install time. The install will then proceed as expected.
The Documents section under Privacy has a broken icon (just a rectangle).
When trying to use Win + PrtScn to capture a screenshot, the image is not saved to the Screenshots directory. For now, you’ll need to use one of the other options for taking screenshots, such as WIN + Shift + S.
We’re looking into reports where, when running corruption repair (DISM), the process will stop at 84.9%.

They shoot, they score! Are you a true NCAA basketball fan? Put it to the test with our college basketball quiz. Learn about Magic Johnson, Lorri Bauman, record breaking moments and more. Challenge your friends and become a NCAA basketball expert here!
If you want to be among the first to learn about these Bing features, join our Bing Insiders Program.
Thanks,BLB

Goodr and Jasmine Crowe use technology to reduce other companies’ carbon footprint | Windows Experience Blog

Jasmine Crowe, founder & CEO for Goodr

Before she founded a profit-for-good corporation that helps other companies strive for zero waste – which has so far diverted more than 2 million pounds of surplus food from landfills (about 1.8 million meals) – Jasmine Crowe used to feed people experiencing homelessness directly from the kitchen of her small one-bedroom apartment in Atlanta, something she called Sunday Soul.
For three and a half years, she cut coupons, price matched and shopped at three to four grocery stores and farmer’s markets, then spent 15-20 hours to make the bi-weekly meal (4-6 entrees, 10-ish side dishes, desserts and bread) for 250-500 people. She would then load up her car and drive the food to senior homes, shelters, parks, under bridges and alleyways.
“A video of one of my pop up restaurants went viral on Facebook and I woke up one day to millions of views, friend requests and I was reading through the comments, and one of the recurring questions people kept asking me was, ‘Who donates the food?’ And the reality was nobody,” she says. “And I started thinking, why aren’t restaurants donating the food? So, I started researching food waste.”
She found that nearly 75 billion pounds of perfectly good food is wasted every year in America – which amounts to about $218 billion a year spent in the U.S. on food that people never eat.
“The idea that hunger is an issue of scarcity and we need to produce more food is false,” says Crowe, who founded Goodr in 2017 as a sustainable food waste management company that leverages technology to solve hunger and food waste. “What I look at hunger being is an issue of logistics, and so Goodr is solving what I call the surplus food supply chain problem.”
Read the rest on Microsoft Stories.