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New DirectX 12 features in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

We’ve come a long way since we launched DirectX 12 with Windows 10 on July 29, 2015. Since then, we’ve heard every bit of feedback and improved the API to enhance stability and offer more versatility. Today, developers using DirectX 12 can build games that have better graphics, run faster and that are more stable than ever before. Many games now run on the latest version of our groundbreaking API and we’re confident that even more anticipated, high-end AAA titles will take advantage of DirectX 12.
DirectX 12 is ideal for powering the games that run on PC and Xbox, which is the most powerful console on the market. Simply put, our consoles work best with our software: DirectX 12 is perfectly suited for native 4K games on the Xbox One X.
In the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, we’ve added features that make it easier for developers to debug their code. In this article, we’ll explore how these features work and offer a recap of what we added in Windows 10 Creators Update.
But first, let’s cover how debugging a game or a program utilizing the GPU is different from debugging other programs.
As covered previously, DirectX 12 offers developers unprecedented low-level access to the GPU (check out Matt Sandy’s detailed post for more info). But even though this enables developers to write code that’s substantially faster and more efficient, this comes at a cost: the API is more complicated, which means that there are more opportunities for mistakes.
Many of these mistakes happen GPU-side, which means they are a lot more difficult to fix. When the GPU crashes, it can be difficult to determine exactly what went wrong. After a crash, we’re often left with little information besides a cryptic error message. The reason why these error messages can be vague is because of the inherent differences between CPUs and GPUs. Readers familiar with how GPUs work should feel free to skip the next section.
The CPU-GPU Divide
Most of the processing that happens in your machine happens in the CPU, as it’s a component that’s designed to resolve almost any computation it it’s given. It does many things, and for some operations, foregoes efficiency for versatility. This is the entire reason that GPUs exist: to perform better than the CPU at the kinds of calculations that power the graphically intensive applications of today. Basically, rendering calculations (i.e. the math behind generating images from 2D or 3D objects) are small and many: performing them in parallel makes a lot more sense than doing them consecutively. The GPU excels at these kinds of calculations. This is why game logic, which often involves long, varied and complicated computations, happens on the CPU, while the rendering happens GPU-side.
Even though applications run on the CPU, many modern-day applications require a lot of GPU support. These applications send instructions to the GPU, and then receive processed work back. For example, an application that uses 3D graphics will tell the GPU the positions of every object that needs to be drawn. The GPU will then move each object to its correct position in the 3D world, taking into account things like lighting conditions and the position of the camera, and then does the math to work out what all of this should look like from the perspective of the user. The GPU then sends back the image that should be displayed on system’s monitor.

To the left, we see a camera, three objects and a light source in Unity, a game development engine. To the right, we see how the GPU renders these 3-dimensional objects onto a 2-dimensional screen, given the camera position and light source. 
For high-end games with thousands of objects in every scene, this process of turning complicated 3-dimensional scenes into 2-dimensional images happens at least 60 times a second and would be impossible to do using the CPU alone!
Because of hardware differences, the CPU can’t talk to the GPU directly: when GPU work needs to be done, CPU-side orders need to be translated into native machine instructions that our system’s GPU can understand. This work is done by hardwire drivers, but because each GPU model is different, this means that the instructions delivered by each driver is different! Don’t worry though, here at Microsoft, we devote a substantial amount of time to make sure that GPU manufacturers (AMD, Nvidia and Intel) provide drivers that DirectX can communicate with across devices. This is one of the things that our API does; we can see DirectX as the software layer between the CPU and GPU hardware drivers.
Device Removed Errors
When games run error-free, DirectX simply sends orders (commands) from the CPU via hardware drivers to the GPU. The GPU then sends processed images back. After commands are translated and sent to the GPU, the CPU cannot track them anymore, which means that when the GPU crashes, it’s really difficult to find out what happened. Finding out which command caused it to crash used to be almost impossible, but we’re in the process of changing this, with two awesome new features that will help developers figure out what exactly happened when things go wrong in their programs.
One kind of error happens when the GPU becomes temporarily unavailable to the application, known as device removed or device lost errors. Most of these errors happen when a driver update occurs in the middle of a game. But sometimes, these errors happen because of mistakes in the programming of the game itself. Once the device has been logically removed, communication between the GPU and the application is terminated and access to GPU data is lost.
Improved Debugging: Data
During the rendering process, the GPU writes to and reads from data structures called resources. Because it takes time to do translation work between the CPU and GPU, if we already know that the GPU is going to use the same data repeatedly, we might as well just put that data straight into the GPU. In a racing game, a developer will likely want to do this for all the cars, and the track that they’re going to be racing on. All this data will then be put into resources. To draw just a single frame, the GPU will write to and read from many thousands of resources.
Before the Fall Creators Update, applications had no direct control over the underlying resource memory. However, there are rare but important cases where applications may need to access resource memory contents, such as right after device removed errors.
We’ve implemented a tool that does exactly this. Developers with access to the contents of resource memory now have substantially more useful information to help them determine exactly where an error occurred. Developers can now optimize time spent trying to determine the causes of errors, offering them more time to fix them across systems.
For technical details, see the OpenExistingHeapFromAddress documentation.
Improved Debugging: Commands
We’ve implemented another tool to be used alongside the previous one. Essentially, it can be used to create markers that record which commands sent from the CPU have already been executed and which ones are in the process of executing. Right after a crash, even a device removed crash, this information remains behind, which means we can quickly figure out which commands might have caused it—information that can significantly reduce the time needed for game development and bug fixing.
For technical details, see the WriteBufferImmediate documentation.
What does this mean for gamers? Having these tools offers direct ways to detect and inform around the root causes of what’s going on inside your machine. It’s like the difference between trying to figure out what’s wrong with your pickup truck based on hot smoke coming from the front versus having your Tesla’s internal computer system telling you exactly which part failed and needs to be replaced.
Developers using these tools will have more time to build high-performance, reliable games instead of continuously searching for the root causes of a particular bug.
Recap of Windows 10 Creators Update
In the Creators Update, we introduced two new features: Depth Bounds Testing and Programmable MSAA. Where the features we rolled out for the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update were mainly for making it easier for developers to fix crashes, Depth Bounds Testing and Programmable MSAA are focused on making it easier to program games that run faster with better visuals. These features can be seen as additional tools that have been added to a DirectX developer’s already extensive tool belt.
Depth Bounds Testing
Assigning depth values to pixels is a technique with a variety of applications: once we know how far away pixels are from a camera, we can throw away the ones too close or too far away. The same can be done to figure out which pixels fall inside and outside a light’s influence (in a 3D environment), which means that we can darken and lighten parts of the scene accordingly. We can also assign depth values to pixels to help us figure out where shadows are. These are only some of the applications of assigning depth values to pixels; it’s a versatile technique!
We now enable developers to specify a pixel’s minimum and maximum depth value; pixels outside of this range get discarded. Because doing this is now an integral part of the API and because the API is closer to the hardware than any software written on top of it, discarding pixels that don’t meet depth requirements is now something that can happen faster and more efficiently than before.
Simply put, developers will now be able to make better use of depth values in their code and can free GPU resources to perform other tasks on pixels or parts of the image that aren’t going to be thrown away.
Now that developers have another tool at their disposal, for gamers, this means that games will be able to do more for every scene.
For technical details, see the OMSetDepthBounds documentation.
Programmable MSAA
Before we explore this feature, let’s first discuss anti-aliasing.
Aliasing refers to the unwanted distortions that happen during the rendering of a scene in a game. There are two kinds of aliasing that happen in games: spatial and temporal.
Spatial aliasing refers to the visual distortions that happen when an image is represented digitally. Because pixels in a monitor/television screen are not infinitely small, there isn’t a way of representing lines that aren’t perfectly vertical or horizontal on a monitor. This means that most lines, instead of being straight lines on our screen, are not straight but rather approximations of straight lines. Sometimes the illusion of straight lines is broken: this may appear as stair-like rough edges, or ‘jaggies’, and spatial anti-aliasing refers to the techniques that programmers use to make these kinds edges smoother and less noticeable. The solution to these distortions is baked into the API, with hardware-accelerated MSAA (Multi-Sample Anti-Aliasing), an efficient anti-aliasing technique that combines quality with speed. Before the Creators Update, developers already had the tools to enable MSAA and specify its granularity (the amount of anti-aliasing done per scene) with DirectX.

Side-by-side comparison of the same scene with spatial aliasing (left) and without (right). Notice in particular the jagged outlines of the building and sides of the road in the aliased image. This still was taken from Forza Motorsport 6: Apex.
But what about temporal aliasing? Temporal aliasing refers to the aliasing that happens over time and is caused by the sampling rate (or number of frames drawn a second) being slower than the movement that happens in scene. To the user, things in the scene jump around instead of moving smoothly. This YouTube video does an excellent job showing what temporal aliasing looks like in a game.
In the Creators Update, we offer developers more control of MSAA, by making it a lot more programmable. At each frame, developers can specify how MSAA works on a sub-pixel level. By alternating MSAA on each frame, the effects of temporal aliasing become significantly less noticeable.
Programmable MSAA means that developers have a useful tool in their belt. Our API not only has native spatial anti-aliasing but now also has a feature that makes temporal anti-aliasing a lot easier. With DirectX 12 on Windows 10, PC gamers can expect upcoming games to look better than before.
For technical details, see the SetSamplePositions documentation.
Other Changes
Besides several bugfixes, we’ve also updated our graphics debugging software, PIX, every month to help developers optimize their games. Check out the PIX blog for more details.
Once again, we appreciate the feedback shared on DirectX 12 to date, and look forward to delivering even more tools, enhancements and support in the future.
Happy developing and gaming!

Xbox analytics report update in Dev Center

We are happy to announce that we’ve updated our Xbox analytics report with a new Xbox Live service health tab to provide visibility into Xbox Live’s service responses.
Xbox Live service health
The new Xbox Live service health tab helps you understand the impact of any Xbox Live client errors, including rate limiting. You are now able to drill down by endpoint and status code to more effectively fix issues. This includes exempt rate limited requests to see potential impact in cases of high volume of these services.
The report also provides a view on Xbox Live’s service availability for your title, so you can quickly determine whether an issue is due to your title’s code or a service outage. The report includes sandbox filters, so you can be more proactive and mitigate issues before your game is released.

Xbox analytics overview
The Xbox analytics overview tab shows who your players are and how they’re engaging with Xbox Live features, so you can make key business decisions for your Xbox titles. For many of these statistics, we also show the Xbox average, so you can easily see how your customers interact with Xbox compared to the average Xbox customer. You can view the following data in the overview tab:
Concurrent usage
Gamerscore distribution
Achievement unlocks
Game statistics
Friends and followers
Accessory usage
Connection type

You can learn more about the Xbox analytics report here. We look forward to the positive impact it will have on your players!

Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 17035 now available

Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 17035 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 17035 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.
The Preview SDK can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.
For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum. For new developer feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice.
Things to note:
This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017. You can install this SDK and still also continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 Creators build or earlier to the store.
The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download the Visual Studio 2017 here.
Known Issues:
Installation on an operating system that is not a Windows 10 Insider Preview  build is not supported and may fail.
What’s New:
C++/WinRT Now Available:
The C++/WinRT headers and cppwinrt compiler (cppwinrt.exe) are now included in the Windows SDK. The compiler comes in handy if you need to consume a third-party WinRT component or if you need to author your own WinRT components with C++/WinRT. The easiest way to get working with it after installing the Windows Insider Preview SDK is to start the Visual Studio Developer Command Prompt and run the compiler in that environment. Authoring support is currently experimental and subject to change. Stay tuned as we will publish more detailed instructions on how to use the compiler in the coming week. The ModernCPP blog has a deeper dive into the CppWinRT compiler. Please give us feedback by creating an issue at: https://github.com/microsoft/cppwinrt.
Breaking Changes
New MIDL key words. 
As a part of the “modernizing IDL” effort, several new keywords are added to the midlrt tool. These new keywords will cause build breaks if they are encountered in IDL files.
The new keywords are:
event
set
get
partial
unsealed
overridable
protected
importwinmd
If any of these keywords are used as an identifier, it will generate a build failure indicating a syntax error.
The error will be similar to:
1 >d:ossrconecorecomcombaseunittestastatestserverstestserver6idlremreleasetest.idl(12) : error MIDL2025 : [msg]syntax error [context]: expecting a declarator or * near “)”
To fix this, modify the identifier in error to an “@” prefix in front of the identifier. That will cause MIDL to treat the offending element as an identifier instead of a keyword.
API Updates and Additions
When targeting new APIs, consider writing your app to be adaptive in order to run correctly on the widest number of Windows 10 devices. Please see Dynamically detecting features with API contracts (10 by 10) for more information.
The following APIs have been added to the platform since the release of 16299.

namespace Windows.ApplicationModel {
public enum StartupTaskState {
EnabledByPolicy = 4,
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Background {
public sealed class MobileBroadbandPcoDataChangeTrigger : IBackgroundTrigger
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls {
public enum PhoneCallMedia {
AudioAndRealTimeText = 2,
}
public sealed class VoipCallCoordinator {
VoipPhoneCall RequestNewAppInitiatedCall(string context, string contactName, string contactNumber, string serviceName, VoipPhoneCallMedia media);
VoipPhoneCall RequestNewIncomingCall(string context, string contactName, string contactNumber, Uri contactImage, string serviceName, Uri brandingImage, string callDetails, Uri ringtone, VoipPhoneCallMedia media, TimeSpan ringTimeout, string contactRemoteId);
}
public sealed class VoipPhoneCall {
void NotifyCallAccepted(VoipPhoneCallMedia media);
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Chat {
public sealed class RcsManagerChangedEventArgs
public enum RcsManagerChangeType
public sealed class RcsNotificationManager
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.UserActivities {
public sealed class UserActivity {
public UserActivity();
}
public sealed class UserActivityChannel {
public static void DisableAutoSessionCreation();
}
public sealed class UserActivityVisualElements {
string AttributionDisplayText { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Devices.PointOfService {
public sealed class BarcodeScannerReport {
public BarcodeScannerReport(uint scanDataType, IBuffer scanData, IBuffer scanDataLabel);
}
public sealed class ClaimedBarcodeScanner : IClosable {
void HideVideoPreview();
IAsyncOperation<bool> ShowVideoPreviewAsync();
}
public sealed class UnifiedPosErrorData {
public UnifiedPosErrorData(string message, UnifiedPosErrorSeverity severity, UnifiedPosErrorReason reason, uint extendedReason);
}
}
namespace Windows.Globalization {
public static class ApplicationLanguages {
public static IVectorView<string> GetLanguagesForUser(User user);
}
public sealed class Language {
LanguageLayoutDirection LayoutDirection { get; }
}
public enum LanguageLayoutDirection
}
namespace Windows.Graphics.Imaging {
public enum BitmapPixelFormat {
P010 = 104,
}
}
namespace Windows.Management.Deployment {
public sealed class PackageManager {
IAsyncOperationWithProgress<DeploymentResult, DeploymentProgress> RequestAddPackageAsync(Uri packageUri, IIterable<Uri> dependencyPackageUris, DeploymentOptions deploymentOptions, PackageVolume targetVolume, IIterable<string> optionalPackageFamilyNames, IIterable<Uri> relatedPackageUris, IIterable<Uri> packageUrisToInstall);
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Audio {
public sealed class AudioGraph : IClosable {
IAsyncOperation<CreateMediaSourceAudioInputNodeResult> CreateMediaSourceAudioInputNodeAsync(MediaSource mediaSource);
IAsyncOperation<CreateMediaSourceAudioInputNodeResult> CreateMediaSourceAudioInputNodeAsync(MediaSource mediaSource, AudioNodeEmitter emitter);
}
public sealed class AudioGraphSettings {
double MaxPlaybackSpeedFactor { get; set; }
}
public sealed class CreateMediaSourceAudioInputNodeResult
public sealed class MediaSourceAudioInputNode : IAudioInputNode, IAudioInputNode2, IAudioNode, IClosable
public enum MediaSourceAudioInputNodeCreationStatus
}
namespace Windows.Media.Capture {
public sealed class CapturedFrame : IClosable, IContentTypeProvider, IInputStream, IOutputStream, IRandomAccessStream, IRandomAccessStreamWithContentType {
BitmapPropertySet BitmapProperties { get; }
CapturedFrameControlValues ControlValues { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Capture.Frames {
public sealed class AudioMediaFrame
public sealed class MediaFrameFormat {
AudioEncodingProperties AudioEncodingProperties { get; }
}
public sealed class MediaFrameReference : IClosable {
AudioMediaFrame AudioMediaFrame { get; }
}
public sealed class MediaFrameSourceController {
AudioDeviceController AudioDeviceController { get; }
}
public enum MediaFrameSourceKind {
Audio = 4,
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Core {
public sealed class MediaBindingEventArgs {
void SetDownloadOperation(DownloadOperation downloadOperation);
}
public sealed class MediaSource : IClosable, IMediaPlaybackSource {
DownloadOperation DownloadOperation { get; }
public static MediaSource CreateFromDownloadOperation(DownloadOperation downloadOperation);
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Devices {
public sealed class VideoDeviceController : IMediaDeviceController {
VideoTemporalDenoisingControl VideoTemporalDenoisingControl { get; }
}
public sealed class VideoTemporalDenoisingControl
public enum VideoTemporalDenoisingMode
}
namespace Windows.Media.DialProtocol {
public sealed class DialReceiverApp {
IAsyncOperation<string> GetUniqueDeviceNameAsync();
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.MediaProperties {
public static class MediaEncodingSubtypes {
public static string P010 { get; }
}
public enum MediaPixelFormat {
P010 = 2,
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Playback {
public sealed class MediaPlaybackSession {
MediaRotation PlaybackRotation { get; set; }
MediaPlaybackSessionOutputDegradationPolicyState GetOutputDegradationPolicyState();
}
public sealed class MediaPlaybackSessionOutputDegradationPolicyState
public enum MediaPlaybackSessionVideoConstrictionReason
}
namespace Windows.Media.Streaming.Adaptive {
public sealed class AdaptiveMediaSourceDiagnosticAvailableEventArgs {
string ResourceContentType { get; }
IReference<TimeSpan> ResourceDuration { get; }
}
public sealed class AdaptiveMediaSourceDownloadCompletedEventArgs {
string ResourceContentType { get; }
IReference<TimeSpan> ResourceDuration { get; }
}
public sealed class AdaptiveMediaSourceDownloadFailedEventArgs {
string ResourceContentType { get; }
IReference<TimeSpan> ResourceDuration { get; }
}
public sealed class AdaptiveMediaSourceDownloadRequestedEventArgs {
string ResourceContentType { get; }
IReference<TimeSpan> ResourceDuration { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Networking.BackgroundTransfer {
public sealed class DownloadOperation : IBackgroundTransferOperation, IBackgroundTransferOperationPriority {
void MakeCurrentInTransferGroup();
}
public sealed class UploadOperation : IBackgroundTransferOperation, IBackgroundTransferOperationPriority {
void MakeCurrentInTransferGroup();
}
}
namespace Windows.Networking.Connectivity {
public sealed class CellularApnContext {
string ProfileName { get; set; }
}
public sealed class ConnectionProfileFilter {
IReference<Guid> PurposeGuid { get; set; }
}
public sealed class WwanConnectionProfileDetails {
WwanNetworkIPKind IPKind { get; }
IVectorView<Guid> PurposeGuids { get; }
}
public enum WwanNetworkIPKind
}
namespace Windows.Networking.NetworkOperators {
public sealed class MobileBroadbandAntennaSar {
public MobileBroadbandAntennaSar(int antennaIndex, int sarBackoffIndex);
}
public sealed class MobileBroadbandModem {
IAsyncOperation<MobileBroadbandPco> TryGetPcoAsync();
}
public sealed class MobileBroadbandModemIsolation
public sealed class MobileBroadbandPco
public sealed class MobileBroadbandPcoDataChangeTriggerDetails
}
namespace Windows.Networking.Sockets {
public sealed class ServerMessageWebSocket : IClosable
public sealed class ServerMessageWebSocketControl
public sealed class ServerMessageWebSocketInformation
public sealed class ServerStreamWebSocket : IClosable
public sealed class ServerStreamWebSocketInformation
}
namespace Windows.Networking.Vpn {
public sealed class VpnNativeProfile : IVpnProfile {
string IDi { get; set; }
VpnPayloadIdType IdiType { get; set; }
string IDr { get; set; }
VpnPayloadIdType IdrType { get; set; }
bool IsImsConfig { get; set; }
string PCscf { get; }
}
public enum VpnPayloadIdType
}
namespace Windows.Security.Authentication.Identity.Provider {
public enum SecondaryAuthenticationFactorAuthenticationMessage {
CanceledByUser = 22,
CenterHand = 23,
ConnectionRequired = 20,
DeviceUnavaliable = 28,
MoveHandCloser = 24,
MoveHandFarther = 25,
PlaceHandAbove = 26,
RecognitionFailed = 27,
TimeLimitExceeded = 21,
}
}
namespace Windows.Services.Maps {
public sealed class MapRouteDrivingOptions {
IReference<DateTime> DepartureTime { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.System {
public sealed class AppActivationResult
public sealed class AppDiagnosticInfo {
IAsyncOperation<AppActivationResult> ActivateAsync();
}
public sealed class AppResourceGroupInfo {
IAsyncOperation<bool> TryResumeAsync();
IAsyncOperation<bool> TrySuspendAsync();
IAsyncOperation<bool> TryTerminateAsync();
}
}
namespace Windows.System.Diagnostics.DevicePortal {
public sealed class DevicePortalConnection {
ServerMessageWebSocket GetServerMessageWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request);
ServerMessageWebSocket GetServerMessageWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request, SocketMessageType messageType, string protocol);
ServerMessageWebSocket GetServerMessageWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request, SocketMessageType messageType, string protocol, uint outboundBufferSizeInBytes, uint maxMessageSize, MessageWebSocketReceiveMode receiveMode);
ServerStreamWebSocket GetServerStreamWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request);
ServerStreamWebSocket GetServerStreamWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request, string protocol, uint outboundBufferSizeInBytes, bool noDelay);
}
public sealed class DevicePortalConnectionRequestReceivedEventArgs {
bool IsWebSocketUpgradeRequest { get; }
IVectorView<string> WebSocketProtocolsRequested { get; }
Deferral GetDeferral();
}
}
namespace Windows.System.RemoteSystems {
public static class KnownRemoteSystemCapabilities {
public static string NearShare { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.System.UserProfile {
public static class GlobalizationPreferences {
public static GlobalizationPreferencesForUser GetForUser(User user);
}
public sealed class GlobalizationPreferencesForUser
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition {
public class CompositionLight : CompositionObject {
bool IsEnabled { get; set; }
}
public sealed class Compositor : IClosable {
string Comment { get; set; }
}
public sealed class PointLight : CompositionLight {
Vector2 AttenuationCutoff { get; set; }
}
public sealed class SpotLight : CompositionLight {
Vector2 AttenuationCutoff { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition.Core {
public sealed class CompositorController : IClosable
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml {
public sealed class BringIntoViewOptions {
IReference<double> HorizontalAlignmentRatio { get; set; }
Point Offset { get; set; }
IReference<double> VerticalAlignmentRatio { get; set; }
}
public sealed class BringIntoViewRequestedEventArgs : RoutedEventArgs
public sealed class EffectiveViewportChangedEventArgs
public class FrameworkElement : UIElement {
event TypedEventHandler<FrameworkElement, EffectiveViewportChangedEventArgs> EffectiveViewportChanged;
void InvalidateViewport();
virtual bool IsViewport();
}
public class UIElement : DependencyObject {
public static RoutedEvent BringIntoViewRequestedEvent { get; }
KeyboardAcceleratorPlacementMode KeyboardAcceleratorPlacementMode { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorPlacementModeProperty { get; }
DependencyObject KeyboardAcceleratorToolTipTarget { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorToolTipTargetProperty { get; }
DependencyObject KeyTipTarget { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyTipTargetProperty { get; }
event TypedEventHandler<UIElement, BringIntoViewRequestedEventArgs> BringIntoViewRequested;
virtual void OnBringIntoViewRequested(BringIntoViewRequestedEventArgs e);
virtual void OnKeyboardAcceleratorInvoked(KeyboardAcceleratorInvokedEventArgs args);
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Automation.Peers {
public sealed class AutoSuggestBoxAutomationPeer : FrameworkElementAutomationPeer, IInvokeProvider {
void Invoke();
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls {
public class AppBarButton : Button, ICommandBarElement, ICommandBarElement2 {
string KeyboardAcceleratorText { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorTextProperty { get; }
AppBarButtonTemplateSettings TemplateSettings { get; }
}
public class AppBarToggleButton : ToggleButton, ICommandBarElement, ICommandBarElement2 {
string KeyboardAcceleratorText { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorTextProperty { get; }
AppBarToggleButtonTemplateSettings TemplateSettings { get; }
}
public class MenuFlyoutItem : MenuFlyoutItemBase {
string KeyboardAcceleratorText { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorTextProperty { get; }
MenuFlyoutItemTemplateSettings TemplateSettings { get; }
}
public class NavigationView : ContentControl {
string PaneTitle { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty PaneTitleProperty { get; }
event TypedEventHandler<NavigationView, object> PaneClosed;
event TypedEventHandler<NavigationView, NavigationViewPaneClosingEventArgs> PaneClosing;
event TypedEventHandler<NavigationView, object> PaneOpened;
event TypedEventHandler<NavigationView, object> PaneOpening;
}
public sealed class NavigationViewPaneClosingEventArgs
public enum WebViewPermissionType {
Screen = 5,
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.Maps {
public sealed class MapControl : Control {
string Region { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty RegionProperty { get; }
}
public class MapElement : DependencyObject {
bool IsEnabled { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty IsEnabledProperty { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.Primitives {
public sealed class AppBarButtonTemplateSettings : DependencyObject
public sealed class AppBarToggleButtonTemplateSettings : DependencyObject
public sealed class MenuFlyoutItemTemplateSettings : DependencyObject
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Input {
public sealed class KeyboardAcceleratorInvokedEventArgs {
KeyboardAccelerator KeyboardAccelerator { get; }
}
public enum KeyboardAcceleratorPlacementMode
}

Windows 10 at Microsoft Connect(); 2017

Today, at Microsoft Connect(); we spoke about the work we have been doing to align the concepts and tags that can be shared between Microsoft’s XAML UI systems.  With Windows 10 XAML and Xamarin.Forms, we expose the full and unique capabilities of each platform. Xamarin.Forms focuses on native mobile experiences and exposing the common subset of controls and capabilities needed most by mobile developers. Windows 10 XAML and WPF are optimized for native Windows experiences, including the most rich and demanding experiences optimized for use with mouse, keyboard and touch. We are releasing a preview of Xamarin.Forms which includes additional APIs that advance XAML Standard, including new types names and properties for common elements you will recognize from Windows 10 XAML. I encourage you to check out the APIs at: aka.ms/xamlstandard and provide us with your feedback. We look forward to working with you.
Connect(); Sessions
Tomorrow, on November 16th, you can view two Connect(); 2017 live sessions online to learn more about how to create beautiful and engaging applications. In “Engaging with your customers on any platform using the Microsoft Graph, Activity Feed, and Adaptive Cards” you’ll learn how customers’ lives are made more seamless through Microsoft Graph and Project Rome. Allowing customers to use Windows, Android and iOS together ensures continuity in busy lifestyles. Next, you’ll learn about the benefits Bots and Adaptive Cards bring to that same customer, as well as the businesses they are interacting with. And finally, we’ll show you how unique Windows experiences like Notifications and Timeline run smoothly and are quick and easy to integrate with Adaptive Cards. Be sure to tune in at 11 a.m. PST to learn about all of these rich features.
In our next session, also on November 16 at 12pm PST, we show you how to make your applications more beautiful. “Building amazing applications with the Fluent Design System” helps you transform your applications to be engaging, modern and visually rich. It includes the UX building blocks, guidelines, tools and end-to-end support developers need. You will learn how easy it is to use familiar technologies like XAML and C# to create applications that bring the Fluent Design System to life on Windows 10 across a range of devices and inputs. We will cover the different elements of the design system and how to use the latest controls, animations, effects and other platform capabilities to captivate your customers and maximize their productivity. To learn more about the features, visit: http://developer.microsoft.com/design.
Wrapping up
Last month, we shipped the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update SDK – we created tools and APIs to help developers build applications that will make customers want to engage and re-engage with your application – driving future growth and retention. We are constantly taking in your feedback and making Windows 10 a better place for all developers.

Ad Monetization Tips: Maximizing your App Ad revenues for the holidays using the Microsoft Ad Monetization platform

Did you know that app developers make the most money from Advertising during the holiday season than at any other time of the year? Advertisers spend huge sums promoting their brands through Digital Ad campaigns during this period.  Are you ready to take advantage of this and maximize Ad revenues for your Windows apps this holiday season?
If you haven’t already,  join the tens of thousands of Windows app developers using the Microsoft Advertising SDK and the Microsoft Ad Monetization platform as their Ad monetization solution. Integrating the SDK into your app is straightforward and you should be able to get up and running in just about a day. The Microsoft Ad Monetization platform provides higher fill rates and better eCPMs on a variety of Ad formats including Banner, Native and Interstitial Video Ads. The platform uses Machine Learning to maximize App Ad revenues by selecting the potentially highest yield Ad response on every Ad request. Also, with a single integration to the platform through the SDK, you get access to the growing portfolio of our Ad network partners such as SpotX, Smartclip etc. without making additional code changes when new networks get added.
If you are already using the Microsoft Advertising SDK for Ad monetization, here are the top five tips to maximize Ad revenues for your apps for the holidays.
1. Check the placement of your Ad in your app (link).
Placing the Ad in the right place on the app increases user visibility and click performance of the ad unit, which directly improves monetization. Advertisers are likely to bid higher if the Ad viewability scores are higher for your app. Optimize for viewability and clicks and see your revenue increase.
2. Switch from ‘Manual’ to ‘Automatic’ in Mediation settings for your Ad units.
By choosing the ‘Automatic’ option, you let the Microsoft Ad Monetization platform choose the best mediation settings to maximize the yield for your app. This is done using Machine learning algorithms that take into account several app, user and environment features to pick the optimal order of Ad networks to maximize Ad yield.
3. Use interstitial banner as fallback for video (link).
Video ads are a great way to monetize but when a video ad request is not converted into an impression, a great option is to use Interstitial banner as a fallback and make the most of the opportunity to monetize that ad space.
4. Check your app’s COPPA settings (link).
If your app does not target children under 13, then Targeted Ads are a great way to maximize your Ad monetization potential. Incorrect classification of your app as ‘directed at children under the age of 13’ while in reality it is not, can cause Ad revenues to drop as the Ads returned in this situation are not targeted/relevant. Also, Ad requests for such apps are not sent to Ad networks that are not COPPA compliant, thereby causing Ad fill rates on your app to drop.
5. Consider using high yield Ad formats in your app.
Have you considered adding in support for Ad formats such as Interstitial Video (link) and Native Ads (link) in your app? These richer Ad formats have higher yield than standard banner Ads and can make a considerable difference in your App Ad revenues especially during the holiday season.
Implementing these very simple steps is a great way to ensure you are maximizing the Ad monetization potential for your apps and setting yourself up for higher Ad revenues during this holiday season!

Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 17025

Today, we released a new Windows 10 Preview Build of the SDK to be used in conjunction with Windows 10 Insider Preview (Build 17025 or greater). The Preview SDK Build 17025 contains bug fixes and under development changes to the API surface area.
The Preview SDK can be downloaded from developer section on Windows Insider.
For feedback and updates to the known issues, please see the developer forum.  For new developer feature requests, head over to our Windows Platform UserVoice.
Things to note:
This build works in conjunction with previously released SDKs and Visual Studio 2017. You can install this SDK and still also continue to submit your apps that target Windows 10 Creators build or earlier to the store.
The Windows SDK will now formally only be supported by Visual Studio 2017 and greater. You can download the Visual Studio 2017 here.
Known Issues
Installation on an operating system that is not a Windows 10 Insider Preview build is not supported and may fail.
 Breaking Changes
New MIDL key words.As a part of the “modernizing IDL” effort, several new keywords are added to the midlrt tool. These new keywords will cause build breaks if they are encountered in IDL files.
The new keywords are:
event
set
get
partial
unsealed
overridable
protected
importwinmd
If any of these keywords are used as an identifier, it will generate a build failure indicating a syntax error.
The error will be similar to:
1
>d:ossrconecorecomcombaseunittestastatestserverstestserver6idlremreleasetest.idl
(12) : error MIDL2025 : [msg]syntax error [context]: expecting a declarator or * near “)”
To fix this, modify the identifier in error to an “@” prefix in front of the identifier. That will cause MIDL to treat the offending element as an identifier instead of a keyword.
API Updates and Additions
When targeting new APIs, consider writing your app to be adaptive in order to run correctly on the widest number of Windows 10 devices. Please see Dynamically detecting features with API contracts (10 by 10) for more information.
The following APIs have been added to the platform since the release of 16299.

namespace Windows.ApplicationModel {
public enum StartupTaskState {
EnabledByPolicy = 4,
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Background {
public sealed class MobileBroadbandPcoDataChangeTrigger : IBackgroundTrigger
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.Calls {
public enum PhoneCallMedia {
AudioAndRealTimeText = 2,
}
public sealed class VoipCallCoordinator {
VoipPhoneCall RequestNewAppInitiatedCall(string context, string contactName, string contactNumber, string serviceName, VoipPhoneCallMedia media);
VoipPhoneCall RequestNewIncomingCall(string context, string contactName, string contactNumber, Uri contactImage, string serviceName, Uri brandingImage, string callDetails, Uri ringtone, VoipPhoneCallMedia media, TimeSpan ringTimeout, string contactRemoteId);
}
public sealed class VoipPhoneCall {
void NotifyCallAccepted(VoipPhoneCallMedia media);
}
}
namespace Windows.ApplicationModel.UserActivities {
public sealed class UserActivity {
public UserActivity();
}
public sealed class UserActivityChannel {
public static void DisableAutoSessionCreation();
}
public sealed class UserActivityVisualElements {
string AttributionDisplayText { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Devices.PointOfService {
public sealed class BarcodeScannerReport {
public BarcodeScannerReport(uint scanDataType, IBuffer scanData, IBuffer scanDataLabel);
}
public sealed class ClaimedBarcodeScanner : IClosable {
void HideVideoPreview();
IAsyncOperation<bool> ShowVideoPreviewAsync();
}
public sealed class UnifiedPosErrorData {
public UnifiedPosErrorData(string message, UnifiedPosErrorSeverity severity, UnifiedPosErrorReason reason, uint extendedReason);
}
}
namespace Windows.Globalization {
public static class ApplicationLanguages {
public static IVectorView<string> GetLanguagesForUser(User user);
}
public sealed class Language {
LanguageLayoutDirection LayoutDirection { get; }
}
public enum LanguageLayoutDirection
}
namespace Windows.Graphics.Imaging {
public enum BitmapPixelFormat {
P010 = 104,
}
}
namespace Windows.Management.Deployment {
public sealed class PackageManager {
IAsyncOperationWithProgress<DeploymentResult, DeploymentProgress> RequestAddPackageAsync(Uri packageUri, IIterable<Uri> dependencyPackageUris, DeploymentOptions deploymentOptions, PackageVolume targetVolume, IIterable<string> optionalPackageFamilyNames, IIterable<Uri> relatedPackageUris, IIterable<Uri> packageUrisToInstall);
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Capture {
public sealed class CapturedFrame : IClosable, IContentTypeProvider, IInputStream, IOutputStream, IRandomAccessStream, IRandomAccessStreamWithContentType {
BitmapPropertySet BitmapProperties { get; }
CapturedFrameControlValues ControlValues { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Core {
public sealed class MediaBindingEventArgs {
void SetDownloadOperation(DownloadOperation downloadOperation);
}
public sealed class MediaSource : IClosable, IMediaPlaybackSource {
DownloadOperation DownloadOperation { get; }
public static MediaSource CreateFromDownloadOperation(DownloadOperation downloadOperation);
}
}
namespace Windows.Media.Devices {
public sealed class VideoDeviceController : IMediaDeviceController {
VideoTemporalDenoisingControl VideoTemporalDenoisingControl { get; }
}
public sealed class VideoTemporalDenoisingControl
public enum VideoTemporalDenoisingMode
}
namespace Windows.Media.MediaProperties {
public static class MediaEncodingSubtypes {
public static string P010 { get; }
}
public enum MediaPixelFormat {
P010 = 2,
}
}
namespace Windows.Networking.BackgroundTransfer {
public sealed class DownloadOperation : IBackgroundTransferOperation, IBackgroundTransferOperationPriority {
void MakeCurrentInTransferGroup();
}
public sealed class UploadOperation : IBackgroundTransferOperation, IBackgroundTransferOperationPriority {
void MakeCurrentInTransferGroup();
}
}
namespace Windows.Networking.Connectivity {
public sealed class CellularApnContext {
string ProfileName { get; set; }
}
public sealed class ConnectionProfileFilter {
IReference<Guid> PurposeGuid { get; set; }
}
public sealed class WwanConnectionProfileDetails {
WwanNetworkIPKind IPKind { get; }
IVectorView<Guid> PurposeGuids { get; }
}
public enum WwanNetworkIPKind
}
namespace Windows.Networking.NetworkOperators {
public sealed class MobileBroadbandAntennaSar {
public MobileBroadbandAntennaSar(int antennaIndex, int sarBackoffIndex);
}
public sealed class MobileBroadbandModem {
IAsyncOperation<MobileBroadbandPco> TryGetPcoAsync();
}
public sealed class MobileBroadbandModemIsolation
public sealed class MobileBroadbandPco
public sealed class MobileBroadbandPcoDataChangeTriggerDetails
}
namespace Windows.Networking.Sockets {
public sealed class ServerMessageWebSocket : IClosable
public sealed class ServerMessageWebSocketControl
public sealed class ServerMessageWebSocketInformation
public sealed class ServerStreamWebSocket : IClosable
public sealed class ServerStreamWebSocketInformation
}
namespace Windows.Security.Authentication.Identity.Provider {
public enum SecondaryAuthenticationFactorAuthenticationMessage {
CanceledByUser = 22,
CenterHand = 23,
ConnectionRequired = 20,
DeviceUnavaliable = 28,
MoveHandCloser = 24,
MoveHandFarther = 25,
PlaceHandAbove = 26,
RecognitionFailed = 27,
TimeLimitExceeded = 21,
}
}
namespace Windows.Services.Maps {
public sealed class MapRouteDrivingOptions {
IReference<DateTime> DepartureTime { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.System {
public sealed class AppActivationResult
public sealed class AppDiagnosticInfo {
IAsyncOperation<AppActivationResult> ActivateAsync();
}
public sealed class AppResourceGroupInfo {
IAsyncOperation<bool> TryResumeAsync();
IAsyncOperation<bool> TrySuspendAsync();
IAsyncOperation<bool> TryTerminateAsync();
}
}
namespace Windows.System.Diagnostics.DevicePortal {
public sealed class DevicePortalConnection {
ServerMessageWebSocket GetServerMessageWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request);
ServerMessageWebSocket GetServerMessageWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request, SocketMessageType messageType, string protocol);
ServerMessageWebSocket GetServerMessageWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request, SocketMessageType messageType, string protocol, uint outboundBufferSizeInBytes, uint maxMessageSize, MessageWebSocketReceiveMode receiveMode);
ServerStreamWebSocket GetServerStreamWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request);
ServerStreamWebSocket GetServerStreamWebSocketForRequest(HttpRequestMessage request, string protocol, uint outboundBufferSizeInBytes, bool noDelay);
}
public sealed class DevicePortalConnectionRequestReceivedEventArgs {
bool IsWebSocketUpgradeRequest { get; }
IVectorView<string> WebSocketProtocolsRequested { get; }
Deferral GetDeferral();
}
}
namespace Windows.System.RemoteSystems {
public static class KnownRemoteSystemCapabilities {
public static string NearShare { get; }
}
}
namespace Windows.System.UserProfile {
public static class GlobalizationPreferences {
public static GlobalizationPreferencesForUser GetForUser(User user);
}
public sealed class GlobalizationPreferencesForUser
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition {
public class CompositionLight : CompositionObject {
bool IsEnabled { get; set; }
}
public sealed class Compositor : IClosable {
string Comment { get; set; }
}
public sealed class PointLight : CompositionLight {
Vector2 AttenuationCutoff { get; set; }
}
public sealed class SpotLight : CompositionLight {
Vector2 AttenuationCutoff { get; set; }
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Composition.Core {
public sealed class CompositorController : IClosable
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml {
public sealed class BringIntoViewOptions {
IReference<double> HorizontalAlignmentRatio { get; set; }
Point Offset { get; set; }
IReference<double> VerticalAlignmentRatio { get; set; }
}
public sealed class BringIntoViewRequestedEventArgs : RoutedEventArgs
public sealed class EffectiveViewportChangedEventArgs
public class FrameworkElement : UIElement {
event TypedEventHandler<FrameworkElement, EffectiveViewportChangedEventArgs> EffectiveViewportChanged;
void InvalidateViewport();
virtual bool IsViewport();
}
public class UIElement : DependencyObject {
public static RoutedEvent BringIntoViewRequestedEvent { get; }
KeyboardAcceleratorPlacementMode KeyboardAcceleratorPlacementMode { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorPlacementModeProperty { get; }
DependencyObject KeyboardAcceleratorToolTipTarget { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorToolTipTargetProperty { get; }
DependencyObject KeyTipTarget { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyTipTargetProperty { get; }
event TypedEventHandler<UIElement, BringIntoViewRequestedEventArgs> BringIntoViewRequested;
virtual void OnBringIntoViewRequested(BringIntoViewRequestedEventArgs e);
virtual void OnKeyboardAcceleratorInvoked(KeyboardAcceleratorInvokedEventArgs args);
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Automation.Peers {
public sealed class AutoSuggestBoxAutomationPeer : FrameworkElementAutomationPeer, IInvokeProvider {
void Invoke();
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls {
public class AppBarButton : Button, ICommandBarElement, ICommandBarElement2 {
string KeyboardAcceleratorText { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorTextProperty { get; }
AppBarButtonTemplateSettings TemplateSettings { get; }
}
public class AppBarToggleButton : ToggleButton, ICommandBarElement, ICommandBarElement2 {
string KeyboardAcceleratorText { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorTextProperty { get; }
AppBarToggleButtonTemplateSettings TemplateSettings { get; }
}
public class MenuFlyoutItem : MenuFlyoutItemBase {
string KeyboardAcceleratorText { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty KeyboardAcceleratorTextProperty { get; }
MenuFlyoutItemTemplateSettings TemplateSettings { get; }
}
public class NavigationView : ContentControl {
string PaneTitle { get; set; }
public static DependencyProperty PaneTitleProperty { get; }
event TypedEventHandler<NavigationView, object> PaneClosed;
event TypedEventHandler<NavigationView, NavigationViewPaneClosingEventArgs> PaneClosing;
event TypedEventHandler<NavigationView, object> PaneOpened;
event TypedEventHandler<NavigationView, object> PaneOpening;
}
public sealed class NavigationViewPaneClosingEventArgs
public enum WebViewPermissionType {
Screen = 5,
}
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.Primitives {
public sealed class AppBarButtonTemplateSettings : DependencyObject
public sealed class AppBarToggleButtonTemplateSettings : DependencyObject
public sealed class MenuFlyoutItemTemplateSettings : DependencyObject
}
namespace Windows.UI.Xaml.Input {
public sealed class KeyboardAcceleratorInvokedEventArgs {
KeyboardAccelerator KeyboardAccelerator { get; }
}
public enum KeyboardAcceleratorPlacementMode

}

Introducing new JavaScript optimizations, WebAssembly, SharedArrayBuffer, and Atomics in EdgeHTML 16

JavaScript performance has always been a core area of focus for our team. Every release, we look for opportunities to improve end users’ browsing experience on real workloads with shorter start-up time, faster execution, and leaner memory usage. These efforts are guided by invaluable ongoing customer feedback and telemetry data.
In this blog post, we will share a few new performance enhancements in the Chakra JavaScript engine, as well as updates on the availability of on-by-default WebAssembly, SharedArrayBuffer and Atomics support in Chakra and Microsoft Edge in EdgeHTML 16 with the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update.
More memory savings from deferring/re-deferring functions
In EdgeHTML 15, Chakra introduced the capability to re-defer functions. To briefly recap Chakra’s deferral/re-deferral pipeline, at start-up time Chakra performs a quick pre-parsing pass to check for syntax errors, and then defers the full parsing of eligible functions until they are first executed. At a later point, if heuristics determine that a fully-parsed function will most likely never be executed again, Chakra dumps its metadata generated since full-parsing and returns to a lean state as if the function is just pre-parsed and being deferred (hence the name re-deferral).

The deferral/re-deferral feature helps sites boost start-up time and save memory on redundant functions (imagine pulling a bunch of libraries and only just using 30% of the code, sound familiar?).
In EdgeHTML 16, we’ve addressed the feature’s previous limitation on handling functions in lexical and parameter scopes, and allowed functions in all scopes to be deferred and re-deferred. For example, it is common to have large chunks of scripts wrapped in giant try blocks for error handling, and functions enclosed in a block are now eligible for deferral/re-deferral.

// foo can be deferred/re-deferred after the Fall Creators Update
// example 1 – lexical/block scope
try {
  function foo() {…}
  var bar = foo();
}

// example 2 – parameter scope
function bar(foo = function(){…})) {…}

This change further improves memory savings made possible by deferral/re-deferral. The exact effect varies depending on the coding patterns of the sites. According to our experiment on a small sample of popular sites, this change along with others in the past update typically reduce the memory allocated by Chakra by 4-9%. The impact can also be much larger in some cases―such as a ~35% memory saving on Gmail.
Polymorphic inline cache for property access using square brackets (object[‘property’])
Polymorphic inline cache (PIC) is an optimization technique employed in Chakra (and many other runtimes) since Chakra’s inception. Chakra has an internal type system that maps each value to its type. When the Chakra Just-In-Time compiler (JIT) generates optimized code for hot code paths, Chakra may deploy an inline cache at each call site (location for function/subroutine calls such as property access) to memorize and store fast paths for the types encountered.
Polymorphic inline cache is a kind of inline cache that can remember multiple types at a given call site. In EdgeHTML 16, Chakra added the ability to place polymorphic inline cache for the object[‘property’] syntax, allowing cases where object may be of different types to be optimized.

// example – obj can be of {a: Number} or String type
let arr = [{a: Math.random()}, Math.random().toString()];
arr.forEach(obj =&gt; {
  for (propNames in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(propNames)) {
      // without PIC, multiple types lead to generic slow path
      // with PIC, both types for obj
      console.log(obj[propNames]);
    }
  }
});

This change should benefit typical users browsing sites using bracket notation and shows up as up to 8% speedup on tests utilizing Angular and React frameworks.
Enable optimizations for functions with try/finally
In JavaScript, it is a best practice to use the finally clause to gracefully clean up resources following a try block. Until the latest update, Chakra did not optimize functions that include a try/finally block because it was a non-trivial job to account for exceptions and unwinding in JIT optimizations.
Starting with EdgeHTML 16, when the Chakra JIT analyzes functions and builds the flow graph, it separates the excepting and non-excepting cases and creates two paths for a try/finally block, allowing general optimizations to be applied on the non-excepting path and forcing a bailout in case of an exception.

More optimizations for try/catch/finally are just on the horizon. ChakraCore recently added support for inlining in functions with try/catch/finally and you can expect this change to propagate to Chakra and Microsoft Edge in the next major Windows update.
WebAssembly, SharedArrayBuffer, and Atomics on by default
In the previous update, Chakra and Microsoft Edge debuted WebAssembly Minimum Viable Product (MVP), SharedArrayBuffer and Atomics support behind the “Experimental JavaScript Features” flag. With a bit of tuning in the past few months, these features are now stable and enabled by default in EdgeHTML 16.
Several changes also help improve WebAssembly performance in Chakra by 20-25% on workloads we have been tracking. Try it out for yourself! Point Microsoft Edge at a fun WebAssembly game like Funky Karts to see the improvement with no flags required!

Demo of Funky Karts in WebAssembly in Microsoft Edge (demo by Ross Smith)
Microsoft has been and will continue to work closely with Mozilla, Google, Apple and others in the WebAssembly community to move the technology forward. Impactful post-MVP features such as threads and GC are currently being explored in the WebAssembly Community Group.
Get involved
We are excited to share these new performance optimizations as well as on-by-default WebAssembly, SharedArrayBuffer, and Atomics support in Chakra and Microsoft Edge.
As always, we’re making more enhancements in future releases, and your feedback is one of our key signals for what to do next. So stay tuned and be sure to share your thoughts with us on the ChakraCore repo, or via @MSEdgeDev and @ChakraCore on Twitter!
― Limin Zhu, Program Manager, Chakra

Microsoft Store app and game submission deadlines for the holiday season

Every year the Microsoft Store sees an increase in the number of customers downloading and purchasing content during the holiday season. During the holiday months of 2016, the Microsoft Store saw more than a 30% increase in the number of downloads when compared to the rest of the year.
To take advantage of the holiday momentum, you’ll want to update or submit your app or game no later than November 14th for Thanksgiving (US) and December 14th for the Christmas holiday. You can see the full list of submission deadlines below. Updating or submitting your app early ensures that they will be available during the holiday season!

Holiday

Submission deadline for app publishing for these holidays

Date

Thanksgiving
Thursday, Nov 23
Friday, Nov 24
Tuesday, Nov 14
Christmas
Monday, Dec 25
Tuesday, Dec 26
Thursday, Dec 14
New Year’s
Monday, Jan 1
Monday, Dec 18
 

Windows Application Driver is no longer in Beta!

We’re excited to announce the release of Windows Application Driver (WinAppDriver) version 1.0. This 1.0 release is the first WinAppDriver release without the Beta label. This release is a big milestone for the project which was first introduced during Build 2016 and has been growing in adoption.
What is WinAppDriver
Today, it’s easier than ever to build software for multiple platforms and devices. Microsoft supports any developer working on any platform to build software for any device. We’re showing this support in many tooling investments including .Net, UWP with .Net Standard, Rome, VS Code, Xamarin and WSL. In alignment with this vision we need a test tooling strategy that is equally cross platform and cross device, and that is where WinAppDriver fits in.
WinAppDriver is an open standards based tool for UI Test Automation. You can use WinAppDriver to run Automated UI tests for any application on Windows 10. The support for open standards means if you’ve been running UI Test Automation using Appium or Selenium, you can use your existing tools and preferred languages to write tests for Windows applications.
Version 1.0 Details
This release of WinAppDriver is our first non-Beta for a few reasons:
WinAppDriver now supports the core set of features we initially aspired to back when we launched the project. This doesn’t mean we’re done, but we do feel confident about the supported set of features.
Over the last year we’ve received feedback from the community and been improving WinAppDriver’s performance and quality based on that feedback. Thank you to everyone who participated! A big thank you to the Appium community for including WinAppDriver in the Appium installer.
Removing the Beta label shows we believe strongly in the future of Open Standard based tools and plan to continue to invest in WinAppDriver.
Looking ahead
The WinAppDriver team’s focus is to continue building a feature rich and high performance set of tools for running Automated UI tests on Windows devices. This vision includes enabling support for more Windows devices, test scenarios and tool integrations.
The team is actively working on improvements that include:
Addition to workflows such as Continuous Integration
Multi-touch input support
Pen input support
Bringing WinAppDriver to additional Windows devices
Where can I get it?
You can find the v1.0 installer on the WinAppDriver project’s Github page where we also provide samples, documentation and issue tracking:https://github.com/Microsoft/WinAppDriver/releases.
The next release of Appium (1.7.2) will install WinAppDriver v1.0 for you if you don’t already have it.
How do I provide feedback?
Please provide feedback on our Github issue boardhttps://github.com/Microsoft/WinAppDriver/issues
Stay Informed
To stay up to date with WinAppDriver news follow @mrhassanuz and @yosefdurr.
Summary
The v1.0 release of WinAppDriver is a major milestone which no longer has a Beta label.  Please try upgrading to v1.0 as soon as you can. If you haven’t tried WinAppDriver yet, now is a great time.
Thank you from the WinAppDriver Team!

sonar: Linting the web forward

In addition to building a great browser and dependable web platform for Windows, we’re passionate about empowering developers to build great websites. With that goal in mind, we launched modern.IE in 2013 featuring a static scan tool to detect optimizations for old versions of IE, outdated libraries, missing prefixes, and more. The web has moved on since then, and it’s time to update our tools accordingly!
Introducing sonar
Today, we are excited to announce the next evolution of the static scan tool: sonar, a new linting tool and site scanner for the modern web.

sonar brings many improvements compared to previous scanners: execution of websites code instead of static analysis, a more flexible and modernized set of rules, parallel test execution, integration with other services, a completely open source code base from day one, and more. Additionally, sonar can also be used as a command line tool (CLI) that you can integrate directly into your local web development workflows.
Web development is more than HTML, JavaScript, and CSS: developers are expected to have a grasp of accessibility, performance, security, emerging standards, and more, all while refreshing this knowledge every few months as the web evolves.
Web development can be complex.
Linting the web forward
Simply put, the web is complex, and we want sonar to make it a bit easier for you to write great websites. To make sure that sonar can be helpful not only now, but in the future, we started with a set of guiding principles before we wrote a single line of code.
Put the user at the center
Rather than just telling developers what was wrong, sonar had to also say why. It is important to know the reason for an issue so developers can decide if that really applies to their work. The requirements from website to website can change a lot, for example, an intranet website and an online shopping experience will have vastly different needs. Therefore, sonar should also be easy to use, configure, and expand.
Build for the community’s best interests
The web belongs to everyone, and this project should too. Everything had to be open sourced since the beginning, but that wasn’t enough―we wanted to go even further and make it easier for the web community to get involved, and remove any possible doubt that this project has the community’s best interest in mind. For that reason, we decided to donate the project to the JS Foundation early during the summer.
Collaborate with existing tools and services
sonar should avoid reinventing the wheel, instead leveraging and integrating existing tools and services that help developers build for the web. We are happy to say that sonar now integrates with aXe Core, AMP validator, snyk.io, SSL Labs, and Cloudinary.

You can hear more about sonar’s history and guiding principles in our session at Microsoft Edge Web Summit.
sonar today, and what’s next
We’ve come a long way since we wrote down those principles a few months ago: sonar is now available as an open sourced command line utility, built on node, that you can install via npm. Additionally, it has an open-source online service, deployed on top of Azure, using docker containers, that can scan any publicly available website. sonar’s rules are backed by a collection of best practices for the web, with links to more detailed documentation that keeps growing with each new rule.
But this is just the beginning. We’re hard at work on a backlog of exciting features for future releases, such as:
A plug-in for Visual Studio Code: We want sonar to help you write better websites, and what better moment than when you are in your editor.
Configuration options for the online service: As we fine tune the infrastructure, the rule configuration for our scanner is locked, but we look forward to adding customization options here in the near future.
New rules for a variety of areas like performance, accessibility, security, Progressive Web Apps, and more.
If you are excited about sonar, making a better web, and want to contribute, we have a few issues where you might be able to help. Also, don’t forget to check the rest of the sonarwhal GitHub organization. PRs are always welcome and appreciated!
Take a few moments to try the sonar scanner and the CLI, and let us know what you think at @narwhallnellie on Twitter or in the comments below!
– Antón Molleda, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Edge