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Debug z-index stacking content with 3D View in the Microsoft Edge DevTools – Microsoft Edge Blog

We are thrilled to announce the next iteration of 3D View in the Microsoft Edge DevTools, with a new feature to help debug z-index stacking context. The general 3D View shows a representation of the DOM (Document Object Model) depth using color and stacking, and the z-Index view helps you isolate the different stacking contexts of your page.
3D view is enabled by default in the Canary branch – to enable it in other branches, open the DevTools “Experiments” settings (Ctrl-Shift-P -> “Experiments“) and turn on “Enable 3D View.” If you don’t see that item, navigate to edge://flags and make sure you have enabled “Developer Tools experiments.” Once 3D view is enabled, you can find it under the “More tools” menu (or via search: Ctrl-Shift-P -> “3D View“).

With our first 3D View experiment, we were able to get incredible feedback from Twitter and from the feedback button. This encouraged us to conduct further usability studies to improve the tool. Along the way, we received plenty of requests for CSS z-index debugging as a feature, and felt that the 3D View would be a great vehicle to try it out.
In the z-index tab you can further simplify the view by only showing elements with a stacking context or hiding elements with the same paint order as their parent. These two settings will make for a flatter and more readable experience. Check out our explainer for more details!

What’s next
Coming soon, we’ll have a better highlighting experience between the Elements panel and 3D View, UI improvements, and new camera controls. We’d love to hear what else you’d like to see from this experience! What other features would help you with your day to day debugging? Feel free to reach out to us on Twitter, or just click “Send feedback” in the Microsoft Edge “Help and Feedback” menu at any time.
– Erica Draud, Program Manager, Edge DevTools

Announcing dual-screen preview SDKs and Microsoft 365 Developer Day – Windows Developer Blog

In November, we shared our vision for dual-screen devices and how this new device category will help people get more done on smaller and more mobile form factors. Today, we are excited to give you an update on how you can get started and optimize for dual-screen devices by:Exploring preview SDKs and standards proposals for apps and websites
Embracing dual-screen experiences
Learning more at Microsoft 365 Developer Day

We are happy to announce the availability of the preview SDK for Microsoft Surface Duo, and availability in the coming weeks for the preview SDK for Windows 10. We are also excited to announce new web standards proposals to enable dual-screen experiences for websites and PWAs on both Android and Windows 10X. These new web standards proposals will provide you with the capabilities and tools you need for dual-screen devices.
Download the preview SDK for Microsoft Surface Duo
Today, developers can download the preview SDK for Surface Duo, access documentation and samples for best practices, see UX design patterns, and more. The preview SDK gives developers a first look at how you can take advantage of dual-screen experiences.
This includes:
Native Java APIs to support dual-screen development for the Surface Duo device, including the DisplayMask API, Hinge Angle Sensor, and new device capabilities.
An Android Emulator with a preview Surface Duo image that is integrated into Android Studio so you can test your app without a physical device. The emulator simulates postures, gestures, hinge angle, mimicking the seam between the two screens, and more. We’ll continue to add functionality over time.
Requirements: For the Android Studio and Android Emulator.
We will have more announcements and discussion in the coming months and look forward to hearing your feedback.

Figure 1: The Android Emulator with a preview Surface Duo image
An early look at developing for Windows 10X
In the coming weeks, developers will have access to a pre-release version of the Windows SDK through the standard Insider builds. Our intent is to provide you with the Microsoft® Emulator on February 11th as well as new APIs for dual-screen support, documentation, and code samples.
This includes:
Native Windows APIs for dual-screen development to enable your app to span the two screens, detect the hinge position, and take advantage of Windows 10X.
Microsoft Emulator is a dual-screen Hyper-V emulator so you can deploy your existing Universal Windows Platform (UWP) and Win32 apps and test in both single-and dual-screen scenarios. The emulator simulates the physical device so you can see how your apps interact with Windows 10X.
Requirements: A recent Windows Insiders preview build of 64-bit Windows 10 (Pro, Enterprise, or Education), 64bit CPU with 4 cores, 8GB minimum (16GB of RAM recommended), Hyper-V enabled and dedicated GPU that supports Direct X 11.0 or later.

Figure 2: Microsoft Emulator showing Windows 10X
Build dual-screen experiences on the web
The new Microsoft Edge released last week, provides a powerful and compatible foundation for website and web app experiences across devices, powered by Chromium. We are actively incubating new capabilities that enable web content to provide a great experience on dual-screen devices, whether it’s running in the browser or installed as an app.
New web standards for dual-screen layout: We are proposing CSS primitives for dual-screen layouts and a JavaScript Window Segments Enumeration API to provide web platform primitives for web developers to detect multiple displays and lay out content across them. We expect to provide an experimental implementation of these features in preview builds of the browser soon.
Dual-screen polyfills: As the above features progress through the web standards process, we’ve published polyfills that you can write against as you begin to explore dual-screen development. You can find the polyfills and associated documentation at:

Progressive Web Apps are supported out of the box in the new Microsoft Edge, which can be installed directly from the browser on Windows 10X and Android. PWAs will support the same dual-screen layout features and tools as the browser.
We’ll have more to share about building for dual-screen devices with web technologies over the coming months – watch the Microsoft Edge blog for more details.

Dual-screen devices creates an opportunity for your apps to delight people in a new and innovative way. To help you get started, we are providing you with basic support checklists for touch and pen and drag and drop and initial app pattern ideas to ensure your apps work great on dual-screen devices.

Figure 3: Dual-screen app patterns
Your app by default will occupy a single screen, but users can span the app to cover both screens when the device is in a double-portrait or double-landscape layout. You can programmatically enable full-screen mode for your app at any time, but spanning is limited to user activity for now.

Figure 4: Dual-screen orientation and layout.
For those who are interested in native cross-platform development using React Native or Xamarin.Forms, we are working on improvements to those frameworks and code samples. You can find the all dual-screen checklists, app patterns, and new code samples as they become available on our dual-screen documentation site. Please reach out to us at [email protected] so we can work with you to idealize and innovate great dual-screen experiences together.

Please join us online for the Microsoft 365 Developer Day, focused on dual-screen experiences on Tuesday, February 11th at 8:30 AM PDT. The keynote and sessions will show how to:
Get the most out of these SDKs and emulators
Use cross platform tools and languages
Design apps for dual-screen devices
Build dual-screen experiences on the web
Connect your apps with Microsoft 365
We hope that you will join us, and we are excited to see what dual-screen experiences you build.

Upgrading to the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

The new Microsoft Edge is now out of preview and available for download, with today’s release of our first Stable channel build (Microsoft Edge 79 stable). You can download the new Microsoft Edge today at microsoft.com/edge. In this post, we’ll walk through what you can expect now that the new Edge channel is open – including how the update will roll out, how you can get started testing and what to expect from the preview channels going forward. 
The work of upgrading devices to the new Microsoft Edge across hundreds of millions of Windows PCs around the world won’t happen overnight. Our goal is to make this process as simple and non-intrusive as possible to deliver a great experience, while minimizing risk to users and organizations.  

You can get the new Microsoft Edge for Windows and macOS today by downloading it directly from microsoft.com/edge. When you install Microsoft Edge on an up-to-date Windows 10 device, it will replace the previous (legacy) version on your device. In some cases, you may be prompted to install additional updates. Your favorites, passwords, and basic settings will carry over to the new Microsoft Edge automatically. Web apps (including those built on EdgeHTML), and Microsoft Edge preview channels (such as Dev or Canary) will continue to work without interruption.  
If you’re using Microsoft Edge on iOS or Android, you don’t need to take any action – your device will update automatically. 

If you’d prefer not to install Microsoft Edge manually, you can wait for it to be installed in a future update to Windows 10, following our measured roll-out approach over the next several months. We will start to migrate Windows 10 customers to the new Microsoft Edge in the coming weeks, starting with a subset of Windows Insiders in the Release Preview ring.  
Enterprise and education users will not be automatically upgraded at this time. Contact your administrator for more information on updating to the new Microsoft Edge in your organization. Administrators should refer to the “Enterprise updates and options” section below.  
The new Microsoft Edge will gradually be made available on Windows Update and offered to additional devices as data and feedback indicate that users are having a good experience. If you don’t want to wait, you can get the new Microsoft Edge at microsoft.com/edge. 
Whether you download today or wait for us to upgrade it on your device, your favorites, passwords, and basic settings will carry over to the new Microsoft Edge automatically. The automatic rollout will maintain your default browser setting – if your default is currently set to a browser other than Microsoft Edge, your setting will carry over once the new Microsoft Edge is installed.  
Once you’ve installed Microsoft Edge, it will update independently on a roughly six-week cadence. You can always preview the next major update via the Beta channel—for example, Microsoft Edge 80 will enter the Beta channel soon, and is expected to release to Stable in February. You can learn more about Microsoft Edge preview channels in our previous blog post, What to expect in the new Microsoft Edge Insider channels. 

Organizations are in full control of when the new Microsoft Edge will be deployed to their managed devices. Managed devices will not be automatically updated to the new Microsoft Edge. In addition to managed devices, Enterprise, Education, and Workstation Pro Edition devices will not be automatically updated at this time.  Organizations that would like to block the automatic delivery of the new Microsoft Edge to devices on Home and Pro Editions with Windows Update enabled can do so either via policies or by downloading and deploying the Blocker Toolkit.  Note that Internet Explorer is not impacted by our automatic rollout. 
When you are ready to deploy the new Microsoft Edge, you can learn more about rolling out and managing Microsoft Edge across your organization from our enterprise documentation, and you can download our offline deployment packages and administrative policy templates for configuring Microsoft Edge on Windows and macOS at our enterprise page. Eligible Microsoft 365 customers can also take advantage of Fast Track and App Assure support, launching in Q1 of 2020.    
Once you have deployed the new Microsoft Edge to your organization, you can configure or restrict updates using the Microsoft Edge Update policies. In the future, we plan to include Microsoft Edge built-in to Windows, to be delivered through a future Windows 10 Feature Update for all customers. 
For more guidance on deployment, check out this Microsoft Mechanics interview from Ignite, where host Jeremy Chapman interviews Chuck Friedman, CVP of Microsoft Edge engineering, and walks through deployment demos including Configuration Manager and a new security baseline for Microsoft Edge.  

Whether you’re just trying out the new Microsoft Edge for the first time, or have been with us on this journey over the last year, thank you for getting involved and helping make Microsoft Edge great. We’ve seen exciting momentum in the Chromium project over the last year, landing more than 1900 contributions across areas like accessibility, modern input including touch, speech, digital inking, and many more, and we couldn’t be more excited for what’s next. 
Enterprise administrators and IT professionals can learn more about deploying, managing, and configuring the new Microsoft Edge in your organization at our new enterprise page.  
Web developers can find guidance on incorporating Microsoft Edge into your test matrix in our recent blog post, “Getting your sites ready for the new Microsoft Edge,” as well as more information on new platform capabilities, developer tools, web apps, and more in our web developer documentation. 
Happy browsing! 
– Kyle Pflug, Senior PM Lead, Microsoft Edge 

Announcing the draft Security Baseline for Microsoft Edge version 79 – Microsoft Edge Blog

We are pleased to announce the draft security baseline for the initial stable release of the new Microsoft Edge! Please review the security baseline (DRAFT) for Microsoft Edge version 79, and send us your feedback through the Baselines Discussion site.Every organization faces security threats. However, the types of security threats that are of most concern to one organization can be completely different from another organization. For example, an e-commerce company may focus on protecting its Internet-facing web apps, while a hospital may focus on protecting confidential patient information. The one thing that all organizations have in common is a need to keep their apps and devices secure.
A security baseline is a group of Microsoft-recommended configuration settings that explains their security impact. These settings are based on feedback from Microsoft security engineering teams, product groups, partners, and customers.

Security baselines are an essential benefit to your organization because they bring together expert knowledge from Microsoft, partners, and customers.
For example, there are 200+ Microsoft Edge Group Policy settings for Windows. Of these settings, only some are security-related.  Although Microsoft provides extensive guidance on these policies, exploring each one can take a long time. You would have to determine the security impact of each setting on your own. Then, you would still need to determine the appropriate value for each setting.
In modern organizations, the security threat landscape is constantly evolving, and IT administrators and policy-makers must keep up with security threats and make required changes to Microsoft Edge security settings to help mitigate these threats. To enable faster deployments and make managing Microsoft Edge easier, Microsoft provides customers with security baselines that are available in consumable formats, such as Group Policy Objects backups.

As with our current Windows and Office security baselines, our recommendations for Microsoft Edge configuration follow a streamlined and efficient approach to baseline definition when compared with the baselines we published before Windows 10. The foundation of that approach is essentially this:
The baselines are designed for well-managed, security-conscious organizations in which standard end users do not have administrative rights.
A baseline enforces a setting only if it mitigates a contemporary security threat and does not cause operational issues that are worse than the risks they mitigate.
A baseline enforces a default only if it is otherwise likely to be set to an insecure state by an authorized user:
If a non-administrator can set an insecure state, enforce the default.
If setting an insecure state requires administrative rights, enforce the default only if it is likely that a misinformed administrator will otherwise choose poorly.

(For further explanation, see the “Why aren’t we enforcing more defaults?” section in this blog post.)

You can use security baselines to:
Ensure that user and device configuration settings are compliant with the baseline.
Set configuration settings. For example, you can use Group Policy, System Center Configuration Manager, or Microsoft Intune to configure a device with the setting values specified in the baseline.

For version 78, see Security baseline (DRAFT) for Chromium-based Microsoft Edge, version 78.
For version 79, see Security baseline (DRAFT) for Chromium-based Microsoft Edge, version 79.
Future draft security baselines versions will be posted to the Microsoft Security Baselines Blog, and final security baselines will be available in the Security Compliance Toolkit (SCT).

Check out our Microsoft Edge enterprise documentation to learn more about deploying and managing the next version of Microsoft Edge.
– Forbes Higman, Program Manager, Microsoft Edge enterprise security– Brian Altman, Program Manager, Microsoft Edge manageability

Participate in the Developer Economics Survey – Windows Developer Blog

The Developer Economics Q4 2019 Survey is now open! Every year more than 40,000 developers around the world participate in this survey, so this is a chance to be part of something big and share your experience as a developer and your view of the future of the software industry. Take the survey now or first read answers to the questions below.

The survey is for all developers, whether you’re a professional, a hobbyist, or a student; building front-end, back-end, or full stack; working on desktop, web, gaming, cloud, mobile, IoT, AR/VR, machine learning, or data science.

There are some perks to go with your participation. Have a look at what you can get our hands on:
A chance to win awesome prizes like a Microsoft Surface Pro 6.
A free State of the Developer Nation report with the key findings (available March 2020).
The Q2 2019 State of the Nation report delved into a wide range of topics from career paths of developers who considered themselves introverts vs. extroverts (not everyone in the C-suite is an extrovert) to the most popular tools for cross-platform development (React Native and Xamarin).

This is an independent survey from SlashData, an analyst firm in the developer economy that tracks global software developer trends. We’re interested in seeing the reports that come from this survey, and we want to ensure the broadest developer audience participates.
Of course, any data collected by this survey is between you and SlashData. You should review their Terms & Conditions page to learn more about the awarding of prizes, their data privacy policy, and how SlashData will handle your personal data.

The survey is open until Jan. 17, 2020.

The survey is available in English, Chinese, Spanish, Portuguese, Vietnamese, Russian, Japanese, or Korean.

Get started building extensions for the new Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

Starting today, the Microsoft Edge Addons store is now open for submissions for all developers. This is where users will find your extensions for the new Microsoft Edge. You can submit your extensions today by visiting the Partner Center Developer Dashboard.In most cases, existing extensions built for Chromium will work without any modifications in the new Microsoft Edge. Check out our developer documentation to learn more about Microsoft Edge-specific APIs, tips on submitting your extension, and other helpful information. The extension submission program is in its preview phase and we are excited to hear and incorporate your feedback.
Transitioning your existing extensions to Chromium
As we move towards the general availability of the new Microsoft Edge on January 15th, 2020, we will no longer accept new submissions for Microsoft Edge Legacy (EdgeHTML-based) extensions after December 17th, 2019. We will continue to accept updates for your existing extensions.
We recommend you prioritize building new extensions for the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge, and continue to support your existing EdgeHTML-based extensions to ensure a quality experience for active users.
Developers who have given consent for Microsoft to migrate their EdgeHTML extension listings to the new Microsoft Edge should begin to see their extensions available in the new Addons store experience in Microsoft Edge. If you publish an EdgeHTML extension and have not received any communication regarding its migration or are unsure of its status, please contact us at [email protected]
If you have already received a confirmation from us regarding migration, we encourage you to log on to the Partner Center Developer Dashboard to validate your access to the extension, and verify whether you can update it. Once the migration is complete, ownership and management will be completely transferred to you, and Microsoft will not be responsible for updating or maintaining your extension.
Migrating extension users to the new Microsoft Edge
We will migrate users’ extensions from the current version of Microsoft Edge when they update to the new Microsoft Edge (starting January 15th). Extensions will only be migrated for users if they are already available on the Microsoft Edge Addons store at the time of switching to the new browser.
We recommend that developers update your existing EdgeHTML extensions for Chromium and publish them via the new portal as soon as possible, so your existing customers will not face any interruptions when they update to the new Microsoft Edge.
Getting started
You can check out our initial developer documentation today, and expect to see more coming soon. If you have any additional questions about the extension submission process, please contact Microsoft Edge Addons Developer Support.
It’s a great time to build for the web, and we look forward to collaborating with you on our new browser!
– Killian McCoy, Program Manager 2– Pratyusha Avadhanula, Senior Program Manager

Try out WebView2 with the new interactive API sample – Microsoft Edge Blog

Over the past few years, we have seen increased demand for the development of applications that leverage both web and native technologies to modernize native applications, iterate faster with web technologies, and more easily develop cross-platform.At this year’s Build conference in May, we introduced the Win32 preview of the WebView2 control, powered by the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser. A WebView is a modal that is embedded within a native application, and which renders web content (HTML/CSS/JavaScript) powered by the browser. Since launching our Win32 WebView2 preview, we have been engaging with the community and partners to collect a great deal of feedback, and delivering SDK updates every six weeks.
To learn more about WebViews, how they work, and more about options like Evergreen (WebView content is rendered by the Microsoft Edge browser instance on the user’s computer) vs. Bring Your Own (WebView content is rendered by a separate instance of the Microsoft Edge browser downloaded with the application) check out our developer documentation.
WebView2 API Sample
Recently, we built and launched a sample application (we call it WebView2 API Sample) using the WebView2 APIs to create an interactive application that demonstrates WebView2’s functionalities. The WebView2 API Sample is intended to be the most comprehensive guide available and will be updated regularly as we add more features to our SDK.
Notable features in our WebView2 API Sample are Navigation, Web Messaging (communication between the Win32 Host and the WebView), and Native Object Injection (accessing Win32 Objects directly from JavaScript).

You can build and play around with the WebView2 API Sample by downloading or cloning it from our WebView2 Samples repository. To learn more about the sample’s source code and functionality, read our WebView2 API Sample guide. As you develop your own applications, we recommend referencing the source code for suggested API patterns for WebView2 workflows.
Build your own WebView2 application
You can learn more about WebView2 through our documentation, get started using our getting-started guide, and checkout more examples in our samples repository.
Tell us what you plan to build with WebView2 and please reach out with any thoughts or feedback through our feedback repo.
– Palak Goel, Program Manager, WebView

Get started with Collections in Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

We’re excited to announce that Collections is now enabled by default for all Microsoft Edge Insiders in the Canary and Dev channels (build 80.0.338.0 or later). Following our initial preview behind a feature flag two months ago, we have been adding in new features and functionality. For those who enabled the feature flag – thank you! We have been listening to your feedback and are excited to share the improvements we’ve made.We designed Collections based on what you do on the web. If you’re a shopper, it will help you collect and compare items. If you’re an event or trip organizer, Collections will help pull together all your trip or event information as well as ideas to make your event or trip a success. If you’re a teacher or student, it will help you organize your web research and create your lesson plans or reports. Whatever you are doing on the web, Collections can help.
Recent improvements to Collections
We’ve been working hard to add more functionality and refine the feature over the last couple months – some of which were directly informed by your feedback.
Here are some of the improvements we made, based on your input:
Access your collections across your devices: We’ve added sync to Collections. We know some of you have seen issues around sync, your feedback has been helping us improve. We know this is an important scenario and are ready for you to try it. When you are signed into Microsoft Edge preview builds with the same profile on different computers, Collections will sync between them.
Open all links in a collection into a new window: We’ve heard you’d like an easy way to open all sites saved in a collection. Try out “Open all” from the “Sharing and more” menu to open tabs in a new window, or from the context menu on a collection to open them as tabs in the current window so you can easily pick up where you left off. We’ve also heard that you want an easy way to save a group of tabs to a collection. This is something that we are actively working on and are excited to share when it is ready.
Edit card titles: You’ve been asking for the ability to rename the titles of items in collections, so they are easier for you to understand. Now you can. To edit a title, right click and choose “Edit” from the context menu. A dialog will appear giving you the ability to rename the title.
Dark theme in Collections: We know you love dark theme, and we want to make sure we provide a great experience in Collections. We’ve heard some feedback on notes which we’ve addressed. Try it out and let us know what you think.
 “Try Collections” flyout: We understand that if you’re an active user of Collections that we were showing you the “Try Collections” flyout even though you previously used the feature. We’ve now tuned the flyout to be quieter.
Sharing a collection: You’ve told us that once you’ve collected content you want to share it with others. We have lots of work planned to better support sharing scenarios. One way you can share today is through the “Copy all” option added to the “Sharing and more” menu, or by selecting individual items and copying them via the “Copy” button in the toolbar.

Once you’ve copied items from your Collection, you can then paste them into your favorite apps, like OneNote or Email. If you are pasting into an app that supports HTML you will get a rich copy of the content.

Try out Collections
You can get started by opening the Collections pane from the button next to the address bar.
When you open the Collections pane, select Start new collection and give it a name. As you browse, you can start to add content related to your collection.

Send Feedback
Now that we’re on by default, we hope that more of you will give us a try. Thank you again to all of you that have been using the feature and sending us feedback. If you think something’s not working right, or if there’s some capability you’d like to see added, please send us feedback using the smiley face icon in the top right corner of the browser.

Thanks for continuing to be a part of this preview!

Improving Tracking Prevention in Microsoft Edge – Microsoft Edge Blog

Today, we’re excited to announce some improvements to our tracking prevention feature that have started rolling out with Microsoft Edge 79. In our last blog post about tracking prevention in Microsoft Edge, we mentioned that we are experimenting with ways that our Balanced mode can be further improved to provide even greater privacy protections by default without breaking sites. We are looking to strike a balance between two goals:Blocking more types of trackers – Microsoft Edge’s tracking prevention feature is powered by Disconnect’s tracking protection lists. We wanted to build off our initial implementation of tracking prevention in Microsoft Edge 78 and maximize the protections we offered by default by exploring blocking other categories of trackers (such as those in the Content category) in Balanced mode. These changes resulted in Microsoft Edge 79 blocking ~25% more trackers than Microsoft Edge 78.
Maintaining compatibility on the web – We knew that blocking more categories of trackers (especially those in the Content category) had the potential to break certain web workflows such as federated login or embedded social media content.
We learned through experimentation that it is possible to manage these tradeoffs by relaxing tracking prevention for organizations with which a user has established a relationship. To determine this list, we built on-device logic that combines users’ personal site engagement scores with the observation that some organizations own multiple domains that they use to deploy functionality across the web. It’s worth mentioning that this compatibility mitigation only applies to Balanced mode; Strict mode will continue to block the largest set of trackers without any mitigations.

The Chromium project’s site engagement score is a measure of how engaged a specific user is with a specific site. Site engagement scores can range from 0 (meaning a user has no relationship with a site) to 100 (meaning that a user is extremely engaged with a site). Activities such as browsing to a site repeatedly/over several days, spending time interacting with a site, and playing media on a site all cause site engagement scores to increase, whereas not visiting a site causes site engagement scores to decay exponentially over time. You can view your own site engagement scores by navigating to edge://site-engagement.
It’s also worth noting that site engagement scores are computed on your device and never leave it. This means that they are not synced across your devices or sent to Microsoft at any time.
Through local experimentation, we found that a site engagement score of 4.1 was a suitable threshold to define a site that a user has an active relationship with. While this value is subject to change based on user feedback and future experiments, it was selected as an initial value for two reasons:
It is low enough to ensure successful interactions with a site that a user has not previously had a history of engagement with.
It is high enough to ensure that sites a user visits infrequently will drop off the list relatively quickly.
While site engagement helps signal which sites are important to individual users, allowing third party storage access/resource loads from only these sites would not consider the fact that organizations can serve content that users care about from multiple domains, which can still result in site breakages.
Combining site engagement with organizations
In our last blog post about tracking prevention, we introduced the concept of an organization, that is, a single company that can own multiple domains related to their business (such as Org1 owning “org1.test” and “org1-cdn.test”). We also shared that in order to keep sites working smoothly, our tracking prevention implementation groups such domains together and exempts storage/resource blocks when a domain in one organization requests resources from another domain in that same organization.
In order to keep sites that users engage with working as expected while also increasing the types of trackers that we block by default, we combined the concept of an organization together with site engagement to create a new mitigation. This mitigation takes effect whenever a user has established an ongoing relationship with a given site (currently defined by a site engagement score of 4.1 or greater). For example, consider the following organization which owns two domains:
Social Org
social.example
social-videos.example
A user will be considered to have a relationship with Social Org if they have established a site engagement score of at least 4.1 with any one of its domains.
If another site, content-embedder.example, includes third-party content (say an embedded video from social-videos.example) from any of Social Org’s domains that would normally be restricted by tracking prevention, it will be temporarily allowed as long as the user’s site engagement score with Social Org’s domains is maintained above the threshold.
If a site does not belong to an organization, a user will need to establish a site engagement score of at least 4.1 with it directly before any storage access/resource load blocks imposed by tracking prevention will be lifted.
What does this mean?
By exempting sites and organizations that you have an ongoing and established relationship with from tracking prevention, we can ensure that the web services and applications you care about continue to work as you expect across the web. Leveraging site engagement also allows us to only unblock content that is likely to be important to you and reflects your current needs. This ensures that actions such as briefly visiting a site or seeing a popup aren’t enough to unblock content by themselves. If content does get unblocked due to you interacting with a site, it is always unblocked in a temporary manner that is proportional to how highly engaged you are with that site/its parent organization. By combining these exemptions with more strict blocking of trackers by default, we can provide higher levels of protection while still maintaining compatibility on the ever-evolving set of sites that you engage with.
It’s worth noting that tracking prevention, when enabled, will always block storage access and resource loads for sites that fall into the Fingerprinting or Cryptomining categories on Disconnect’s tracking protection lists. We will also not apply the site engagement-based mitigation outlined above for our most privacy-minded users who opt into tracking prevention’s Strict mode.

The best way to learn what’s changed with tracking prevention in Microsoft Edge 79 is to take a look at the table below:
Along the top are the categories of trackers as defined by Disconnect’s tracking protection list categories.
Along the left side are comparisons of the improvements made to our tracking prevention feature broken down into Basic, Balanced, and Strict.
The letter “S” in a cell denotes that storage access is blocked.
The letter “B” in a cell denotes that both storage access and resource loads (i.e. network requests) are blocked.
A “-“ in a cell denotes that no block will be applied to either storage access or resource loads.
The “Same-Org Mitigation” refers to the first mitigation that we introduced in our previous blog post and recapped above.
The “Org Engagement Mitigation” refers to the second mitigation based on site engagement that we introduced earlier in this post.

Advertising
Analytics
Content
Cryptomining
Fingerprinting
Social
Other
Same Org Mitigation
Org Engagement Mitigation
Basic

Microsoft Edge 78



B
B


Enabled
Not impl.
Microsoft Edge 79



B
B


Enabled
N/A
Balanced

Microsoft Edge 78
S


B
B
S

Enabled
Not impl.
Microsoft Edge 79
S

S
B
B
S
S
Enabled
Enabled1
Strict 2

Microsoft Edge 78
B
B

B
B
B
B
Enabled
Not impl.
Microsoft Edge 79
B
B
S
B
B
B
B
Enabled
Disabled
Does not apply to Cryptomining or Fingerprinting categories.
Strict mode blocks more resource loads than Balanced. This can result in Strict mode appearing to block less tracking requests than Balanced since the trackers making the requests are never even loaded to begin with.
With our recent updates in Microsoft Edge 79, we have seen, on average, 25% more trackers blocked in Balanced mode. Close monitoring of user feedback and engagement time also showed no signs of negative compatibility impact, suggesting that the org engagement mitigation is effective at minimizing breakage on sites that users actively engage with. While this does mean that top sites have the org engagement mitigation applied more often, we believe this is an acceptable tradeoff versus compatibility, especially as more top sites are starting to give users mechanisms to transparently view, control, and delete their data.
As with all our features, we’ll continue to monitor telemetry and user feedback channels to learn more and continually improve tracking prevention in future releases. We are also exploring additional compatibility mitigations such as the Storage Access API, which we intend to experiment with in a future version of Microsoft Edge.
InPrivate Changes
In our previous blog post, we mentioned that users browsing in InPrivate will automatically get Strict mode protections. By listening to the feedback our users provided, we found that this led to unexpected behavior (such as causing sites that worked in a normal browsing window to fail to load InPrivate) and broke some important use cases. That’s why in Microsoft Edge 79, your current tracking prevention settings will be carried over to InPrivate sessions.
We are currently experimenting in our Canary and Dev channels with a switch at the bottom of our settings panel (which you can reach by navigating to edge://settings/privacy) that will allow you to re-enable Strict mode protections InPrivate by default:

We’ve also made it easier for you to view the trackers that Microsoft Edge has blocked for you. Navigate to edge://settings/privacy/blockedTrackers to test out this new experience today!

We’d love to hear your thoughts on our next iteration of tracking prevention. If something looks broken, or if you have feedback to share on these changes, we’d love to hear from you. Please send us feedback using the “smiley face” in the top right corner of the browser.
Send feedback at any time with the Send a Smile button in Microsoft Edge

As always, thanks for being a part of this journey towards a more private web!
–  Scott Low, Senior Program Manager–  Brandon Maslen, Senior Software Engineer

Developing for the new category of dual-screen devices built for mobile productivity – Windows Developer Blog

Last month we shared our vision for dual-screen devices, designed to help people get more done on smaller and more mobile form factors. Today, we are going to share how developers can unlock this new era of mobile creativity. There are two stages to optimize for dual-screen devices:1. Your websites and apps work

2. Embrace dual-screen experiences

Your code is important, and you will not have to start anew on these devices. Our goal is to make it as easy as possible for your existing websites and apps to work well on dual-screen devices.
Windows 10X is an expression of Windows 10 and will be available on dual-screen and foldable PCs, including the Surface Neo and devices from several partners. Developers will be able to use existing investments and tools for Web, UWP, and Win32 on these devices.
The Surface Duo will bring together Android apps, OS, and Surface hardware. Your current websites and Android apps will continue to work and run on a single screen. You can also stay in your current workflow and continue to use the same tools you do now.

The excitement for this new device category creates a great opportunity for developers to innovate and reach new customers – enabling them to be more productive and engaged while on-the-go. We are in the process of identifying key postures and layouts across dual-screen and foldable PCs so that you can take advantage of both.
For native app developers, our goal is to develop a common model layered onto existing platform-specific tools and frameworks for Windows and Android. Of course, APIs to access this model will be tailored to the developer platform for each operating system. For example, you can use APIs to enhance your apps to use dual-screen capabilities and features like the 360-degree hinge.
Web will continue to follow the standards-based model. And we are committed to building the right web standards and APIs to allow web developers to take advantage of cross-platform dual-screen capabilities. Web developers can use the browser or web-based app model of their choosing to take advantage of these capabilities.

We are excited to start working with developers, and for those who want to adopt early please reach out to [email protected] to learn more. Thank you for your continued support and interest in this new device category. We cannot wait to share more details with developers in early 2020.