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Tech giants support FHIR standard. Will that make a difference?

During a White House meeting about the new Blue Button 2.0 API for Medicare, six major technology players signed a joint statement pledging to work toward healthcare interoperability with a particular focus on the cloud and artificial intelligence.

The companies — Amazon, Microsoft, Google, IBM, Oracle and Salesforce — promised to support the goal of  “frictionless” interoperability using established industry standards, including the HL7 FHIR standard API. They offered a vision of a robust ongoing dialogue that would include every healthcare entity from payers to patients and application developers, according to a statement released by the Information Technology Industry Council.

Pushing the FHIR standard forward

The statement comes at a time when patient demand for easy access to healthcare data has never been greater. Large hospitals have responded with nascent efforts to improve data exchange based on the FHIR standard API, but there is widespread acknowledgement that healthcare lags far behind other industries when it comes to tech innovation and particularly interoperability. The idea of what could effectively be a consortium of mainstream technology companies working on this tricky problem and promoting the FHIR standard was received warmly by some this week and with a healthy dose of skepticism by others.

The fact that the statement called out cloud usage specifically, is telling, because, for reasons ranging from security to cost, a significant portion of healthcare organizations continue to avoid the cloud. A 2017 report from KLAS Research found 31% of hospitals either won’t expand their cloud efforts or won’t move to the cloud. “The cloud really is a double-edged sword,” said Kathy Downing, vice president of information governance,  informatics, standards, privacy and security at the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), in an interview. While the cloud might offer a more secure environment than some smaller health organizations could achieve, Downing isn’t convinced the cloud itself is pivotal to interoperability. “I don’t know that the cloud really has a dog in this interoperability hunt,” she said. “You want to think through the safeguards and do all the assessments. That’s more important than whether you’re using a server or the cloud.”

I’m not sure how any of these entities will solve the issue of semantic interoperability.
John Moorefounder and managing partner of Chilmark Research

It’s a positive sign for the healthcare industry that it’s attracted the attention of these major players, said Coray Tate, vice president of clinical research at KLAS, in an email. But the market has to be there for this to work. “We’re at the base of the mountain and early steps are the easiest,” he said. “It remains to be seen if the market will provide a business case that will sustain the long climb.”

And the business case may not be there because this group of tech companies isn’t in most hospitals in any significant way today, said John Moore, founder and managing partner of Chilmark Research, in an email. “As big and influential as these companies are their collective presence in healthcare is quite disparate and at the end of the day it is what a clinician is using in their workflow that matters,” he explained. “These companies are simply not there. I’m not sure how any of these entities will solve the issue of semantic interoperability.” To further complicate matters, most hospitals don’t want to share patient data with competitors, he said. “They have instead opted to let patients themselves take direct responsibility.”

Tech support potentially a good thing

Attention from tech giants, however, should be seen as a good thing as long as everyone is thoughtful about how to proceed, said Stan Huff, M.D., chief medical informatics officer at Intermountain Healthcare and co-chair of the Health Level 7(HL7) Clinical Information Modeling Initiative, which developed the FHIR standard API. “This is significant because it creates faith in HL7 FHIR and will encourage investment in FHIR development,” he said. “The thing I would want to encourage is that this group work with existing organizations like HL7, ONC, HSPC and CIIC to ensure they all implement the FHIR standard the same way so we get to true semantic interoperability at some point.”

The joint statement offered few details on future plans but stressed the need to get everyone involved, including the open source community. “I think we will need to wait a few weeks to hear specific projects to know what additional impact they will have,” Huff said.

Industrial cloud moving from public to hybrid systems

The industrial cloud runs largely in the public domain currently, but that may be about to change.

Over the next few years, manufacturers will move industrial cloud deployments from the public cloud to hybrid cloud systems, according to a new report from ABI Research, an Oyster Bay, N.Y., research firm that specializes in industrial technologies. Public cloud accounts for almost half of the industrial IoT market share in 2018 (49%), while hybrid cloud systems have just 20%. But by 2023 this script will flip, according to the report, with hybrid cloud systems making up 52% of the IIoT market and public cloud just 25%.

The U.S.-based report surveyed vice presidents and other high-level decision-makers from manufacturing firms of various types and sizes, according to Ryan Martin, ABI Research principal analyst. The main focus of the report was IoT industrial cloud and it surveyed the manufacturers and their predisposition to technology adoption.

According to the report, the industrial cloud encompasses the entirety of the manufacturing process  and unifies the digital supply chain. This unification can lead to a number of benefits. Companies can streamline internal and external operations through digital business, product, manufacturing, asset and logistics processes; use data and the insights generated to enable new services; and improve control over environmental, health and safety issues.

Changing needs will drive move to hybrid systems

Historically, most data and applications in the IoT resided on premises, often in proprietary systems, but as IoT exploded the public cloud became more prevalent, according to Martin. 

The cloud, whether public or private, made sense because it offers a centralized location for storing large amounts of data and computing power at a reasonable cost, but organizational needs are changing, Martin said. Manufacturers are finding that a hybrid approach makes sense because it’s better to perform analytics on the device or activity that’s generating the data, such as equipment at a remote site, than to perform analytics in the cloud.

You don’t want to be shipping data to and from the cloud every time you need to perform a query or a search because you’re paying for that processing power, as well as the bandwidth.
Ryan Martinprincipal analyst, ABI Research

“There’s a desire to keep certain system information on site, and it makes a lot of business sense to do that, because you don’t want to be shipping data to and from the cloud every time you need to perform a query or a search because you’re paying for that processing power, as well as the bandwidth,” Martin said. “Instead it’s better to ship the code to the data for processing then shoot the results back to the edge. The heavy lifting for the analytics, primarily for machine learning types of applications, would happen in the cloud, and then the inferences or insights would be sent to a more localized server or gateway.”

Providers like AWS and Microsoft Azure will likely carry the bulk of the cloud load, according to Martin, but several vendors will be prominent in providing services for the industrial cloud.

“There will be participation from companies like SAP, as well as more traditional industrial organizations like ABB, Siemens, and so forth,” Martin said. “Then we have companies like PTC, which has recently partnered with Rockwell Automation, doing aggregation and integration, and activation to the ThingWorx platform.”

The industrial cloud will increasingly move from public cloud to hybrid cloud systems.
The hybrid cloud market for IIOT will double by 2023.

Transformation not disruption

However, companies face challenges as they move to implement the new technologies and systems that comprise the hybrid industrial cloud. The most prominent challenge is to implement the changes without interrupting current operations, Martin said.

“It will be a challenge to bring all these components like AI, machine learning and robotics together, because their lifecycles operate on different cadences and have different stakeholders in different parts of the value chain,” Martin said. “Also they’re producing heterogeneous data, so there needs to be normalization of mass proportion, not just for the data, but for the application providers, partners and supplier networks to make this all work.”

The overall strategy should be about incremental change that focuses on transformation over disruption, he explained.

“This is analogous to change management in business, but the parallel for IIoT providers is that these markets in manufacturing favor those suppliers whose hardware, software and services can be acquired incrementally with minimal disruption to existing operations,” he said. “We refer to this as minimal viable change. The goal should be business transformation; it’s not disruption.”

IBM DS8882F converges array and mainframe in one rack

Talk about converged infrastructure — IBM just embedded an all-flash array inside mainframe server racks.

IBM today launched a rack-mounted IBM DS8882F array for IBM Z ZR1 and LinuxOne Rockhopper II “skinny” mainframes that rolled out earlier in 2018. The 16U DS8882F is the smallest of IBM’s high-end DS8880 enterprise storage family designed for mainframes. The new mainframes install in a standard 19-inch rack. The IBM DS8882F array inserts into the same rack and scales from 6.4 TB to 368.64 TB of raw capacity.

The IBM DS8882F is part of a large IBM storage rollout that features mostly software and cloud storage updates, including the following:

  • IBM Spectrum Protect1.6 data protection software now supports automatic tiering to object storage and ransomware protection for hypervisor workloads. The software generates email warnings pointing to where an infection may have occurred. Spectrum Protect supports Amazon Web Services, IBM Cloud and Microsoft Azure.
  • IBM Spectrum Protect Plus1.2 virtual backup now supports on-premises IBM Cloud Object Storage, IBM Cloud and AWS S3. It also supports VMware vSphere 6.7, encryption of vSnap repositories, and IBM Db2 databases.
  • IBM Spectrum Scale0.2 added file audit logging, a watch folder and other security enhancements, along with a GUI and automated recovery features. Spectrum Scale on AWS now enables customers to use their own AWS license and supports a single file system across AWS images.
  • The IBM DS8880 platform supports IBM Cloud Object Storage and automatically encrypts data before sending it to the cloud.

The products are part of IBM’s third large storage rollout this year. It added an NVMe FlashSystem 9100 and Spectrum software in July, and cloud-based analytics and block-based deduplication in May.

Steve McDowell, senior technology analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy, said IBM has become the most aggressive of the large storage vendors when it comes to product delivery.

“IBM storage is marching to a cadence and putting out more new products faster than its competitors,” McDowell said. “We’re seeing announcements every quarter, and their products are extremely competitive.”

IBM ended a string of 22 straight quarters of declining storage revenue in early 2017 and put together four quarters of growth until declining again in the first quarter of 2018. IBM’s storage focus has been around its Spectrum software family and all-flash arrays.

IBM’s focus on footprint

McDowell called the IBM DS8882F “a nice piece of hardware.” “The zSeries is moving towards a more standard rack, and this fits right in there with almost 400 TB of raw capacity in a 19-inch rack,” he said. “It’s about capacity density and saving floor space. If I can put a zSeries and a rackmount of storage unit side by side, it makes a nice footprint in my data center.”

“The days of an EMC VMAX spanning across your data center are gone. With flash, it’s how many terabytes or petabytes I can put into half a rack and then co-locate all of that with my servers.”

Eric Herzog, chief marketing officer for IBM storage, said reducing the footprint was the main driver of the array-in-the-mainframe.

“We created a mini-array that literally screws into the same 19-inch mainframe rack,” Herzog said. “This frees up rack space and floor space, and gives you a smaller, lower-cost entry point.”

Competing in a crowded market

IBM’s DS8880 series competes with the Dell EMC PowerMax — the latest version of the VMAX — and the Hitachi Vantara Virtual Storage Platform as mainframe storage platforms.

IBM storage revenue rebounded to grow in the second quarter this year, but the market remains crowded.

IBM’s Herzog said the storage market “is fiercely competitive in all areas, including software. It’s a dog-eat-dog battle out there. Software is just as dog-eat-dog as the array business now, which is unusual.”

The new products are expected to ship by the end of September.

Rohit Bhargava | Microsoft Story Labs

Mark Mobleywritten by

Mark Mobley

A ’near-futurist‘ scours data for hidden clues about how the world works

How does self-described “Trend Curator” Rohit Bhargava navigate the future? By shredding magazines and planting sticky notes. Throughout each travel-packed year of international speaking and teaching, he collects untold piles of periodicals, then skims, tears and screens their editorial and advertising content for clues to what’s now, what’s new and — most of all — what’s going to be influential in the years to come.

“The trends,” Bhargava said, “really explain how the world works.”

Using what he calls his “haystack method,” Bhargava sorts and sifts and shifts the material he and his team have found. Gradually, connections are made, combinations arise, synchronicities emerge and trends appear. He compiles what he gleans in an annual series of books called “Non Obvious: How To Predict Trends And Win The Future,” which have been published in more than a dozen languages. These have schooled more than a million businesspeople and interested civilians about the cultural currents, jet streams and eddies that shape our lives.

Rohit reading a magazine in front of post-it notes.

“You’ve got to look somewhere other than where everyone else is looking,” said Bhargava at his airy home, where visitors are welcomed by photo collages of his two young sons, in a leafy suburb of Washington, D.C. “I tend to pick up a lot of stuff about things I otherwise would never have picked up because the media here are so U.S.-centric.”

His omnivorous media diet includes everything from legacy magazines like The Atlantic and Variety to city magazines (Washingtonian), alumni magazines (Emory magazine), specialty publications (USA Philatelic, Adweek), foreign in-flight magazines and periodicals definitely not published with him in mind (Teen Vogue, Modern Farmer).

The irony of a “near-futurist” relying so heavily on paper in the digital age is not lost on him.

The irony of a ‘near-futurist’ relying so heavily on paper in the digital age is not lost on him.

“I think that people are more surprised about that than I am,” Bhargava said. “What you see is the paper. What you don’t see is my Feedly account, where I read hundreds of stories each week.” He also relies on conversations at conferences and interviews by his associates. But Bhargava sees a certain tactical advantage in scanning a vast amount of information in physical form.

Bhargava siting at a desk working.

“There’s a reason every James Bond villain looks down on that diorama of the world they’re trying to conquer,” he says. “Hopefully I’m not doing that for evil.”

He smiled and added, “Maybe there is some evil, because I want people to think for themselves and a lot of people don’t want that.”

Bhargava was born in India and came to the United States at 6 months old. After studies at Emory University he moved to Australia in 1998 and began his career at a company called Dimension Data, where he worked for three years before joining the Sydney office of advertising agency Leo Burnett. He returned to the U.S. in 2003 and started working the following year in Washington at Ogilvy. He stayed at that advertising agency until 2012, when he left to start his own consultancy.

Conference and convention planners appreciate the experiences Bhargava himself provides — he speaks at upward of 50 events a year, in addition to consulting with individual companies and teaching smaller groups. “My goal is to give them something they can do, not just inspire them,” he said. He wants to help his audiences find interesting ideas in unexpected places.

While he may appreciate tradition and rigorous methodology, he is anything but a stickler for doing things the way they’ve always been done.

“Our habits are really hard to unlearn,” he told an audience at a recent construction software convention in San Antonio. “The things that we know, the best practices, are really hard to abandon.

If we are going to be innovators, we are going to have to leave some things behind.

“If we are going to be innovators, we are going to have to leave some things behind.”

That’s why one of his five rules for Non-Obvious thinking is to “be fickle” — in other words, keep it moving. The others are “be observant,” “be curious,” “be thoughtful” and “be elegant.” That final command is the guide for the pithy names he likes to assign to the trends he observes.

For example, ”brand stand” is his term for how corporations can make themselves more attractive by backing up their work with socially conscious messaging and actions. (“The job of marketing is not to sell a car, it’s to get people to come into the dealership,” Bhargava explained.) “Predictive protection” is what he calls device makers working to anticipate and defend user vulnerabilities. And “approachable luxury” is the idea that experiences and objects that evoke authenticity and sincerity are now sometimes considered as valuable as high-end products from legacy makers.

In addition to isolating 15 trends for each edition of the Non Obvious books, he also looks back at previous years to reassess the accuracy of his own predictions. Take two from 2013: ”precious print” and “branded inspiration.” While consumers’ fondness for books and print media in general hasn’t waned (Bhargava still gives that trend an A five years later), brands are less willing to stage dramatic one-off events to stand out (today he gives that one a C).

While reevaluating trends, Bhargava realized he could also present them in new ways. He is increasingly using data visualization as a storytelling tool. The Microsoft Power BI platform allowed him to create The Non-Obvious Trend Experience, a periodic table of elements-style dashboard that shows how trends connect across years, industries and areas of interest.

The playful, informative Power BI dashboard is yet another product of an ever-expanding Non-Obvious universe. He’s planning what he calls “the most Non-Obvious thing to do,” a short-form podcast about the past hosted by a futurist. And he and his wife, Chhavi, are co-owners of the publishing imprint Ideapress, which has published 22 books and has another 12 coming soon. His own contribution to the series will be a volume on running a small business.

“I think any of us can be more innovative, more creative,” he told his San Antonio audience. “We just have to give ourselves permission to do it.” He demonstrated that the following morning by leading a workshop of about two dozen executives and staffers. They gathered around tables piled high with magazines.

He opened with a drawing exercise and soon the group was on to Bhargava’s haystack method, scouring the magazines before them for new ideas and things they hadn’t seen before. “I know it’s uncomfortable for some of you, but these magazines are for ripping,” he said. “I want to hear you ripping things out of these magazines. It might be an ad, it might be a story. Feel free to collaborate with your table.”

Curation is the ultimate method for transforming noise into meaning.

Rohit buried in post-it notes.

Two tables pulled the same story about new leashes for walking with children. Another person landed on a makeup line from Crayola. Yet another found an under-the-desk bicycle apparatus that generates power through pedaling. “That’s like next-level LEED certification,” Bhargava joked. “You can power your own building.”

In under an hour, the participants caught a glimpse of what is for Bhargava a year-round process producing mounds of material that gain more meaning with age and comparison.

“Sometimes we have to give ourselves a little bit of time,” he said. He thinks of his haystack method as akin to collecting frequent flyer miles. The ideas are there, mounting over time, ready be cashed in when they’re needed.

Frank Di Lorenzo Jr., a participant from Sacramento, California, called the session “excellent.”

“It got me to think a little more creatively,” Di Lorenzo said. “It’s like taking a step. If I always start on my right foot, this was my left. For an hour, he accomplished a lot.”

“I never saw anybody present this kind of topic before,” added Mary Cunningham of Jupiter, Florida. “It helps you think beyond the obvious. Don’t take things at face value. It allows you to open your mind to other ideas. The way he presents the material, it’s very easy to comprehend and allows the ideas to sink in easily.”

“Curation,” as Bhargava writes in “Non Obvious” and shared in his seminar, “is the ultimate method for transforming noise into meaning.”

Even if the noise is as much the shredding of magazines and riffling of sticky notes as it is the rising, roaring tide of cultural chatter.

Originally published on 8/14/2018 / Photos by Brian Smale / © Microsoft

For Sale – Surface Pro 4 – i7 8gb 256gb – Type Cover + Pen

For sale is my Surface Pro 4, I’ve had it about 3 years so its out of warranty. Its the i7, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD version and it comes with a well used dark grey type cover and a Red Surface Pen (the pen does have a scratch on it)

There are a few cosmetic marks on the back, honestly the photos do make them look worse than they are hence my reluctance to call them “scratches”.

There is one tiny (size of a grain of sand) mark on the screen (next to the 5p), but its on the black surround and hidden by the type cover.

I cant see any other marks on the screen EXCEPT and this is a big EXCEPT when you “huff” or “breathe” on the screen and then you can see the outlines of the keyboard keys on the screen. I’m not quite sure what the marks are as they are 100% not there when the screen is cleaned. I’ve tried to capture it in a photo but its almost impossible.

Also attached is a battery report from tonight.

I’m looking for 600inc now £500inc delivery but am happy to listen to offers.

It will probably take me a few days to get the laptop ready for posting as i will need to copy some of the information off it and then factory reset it for the new owner. I’m pretty sure i should also have the boxes in the loft but no promises.

Price and currency: £600£500
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Cash/BT/PPG
Location: Kent/London
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Surface Pro 4 – i7 8gb 256gb – Type Cover + Pen

For sale is my Surface Pro 4, I’ve had it about 3 years so its out of warranty. Its the i7, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD version and it comes with a well used dark grey type cover and a Red Surface Pen (the pen does have a scratch on it)

There are a few cosmetic marks on the back, honestly the photos do make them look worse than they are hence my reluctance to call them “scratches”.

There is one tiny (size of a grain of sand) mark on the screen (next to the 5p), but its on the black surround and hidden by the type cover.

I cant see any other marks on the screen EXCEPT and this is a big EXCEPT when you “huff” or “breathe” on the screen and then you can see the outlines of the keyboard keys on the screen. I’m not quite sure what the marks are as they are 100% not there when the screen is cleaned. I’ve tried to capture it in a photo but its almost impossible.

Also attached is a battery report from tonight.

I’m looking for 600inc now £500inc delivery but am happy to listen to offers.

It will probably take me a few days to get the laptop ready for posting as i will need to copy some of the information off it and then factory reset it for the new owner. I’m pretty sure i should also have the boxes in the loft but no promises.

Price and currency: £600£500
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Cash/BT/PPG
Location: Kent/London
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Surface Pro 4 – i7 8gb 256gb – Type Cover + Pen

For sale is my Surface Pro 4, I’ve had it about 3 years so its out of warranty. Its the i7, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD version and it comes with a well used dark grey type cover and a Red Surface Pen (the pen does have a scratch on it)

There are a few cosmetic marks on the back, honestly the photos do make them look worse than they are hence my reluctance to call them “scratches”.

There is one tiny (size of a grain of sand) mark on the screen (next to the 5p), but its on the black surround and hidden by the type cover.

I cant see any other marks on the screen EXCEPT and this is a big EXCEPT when you “huff” or “breathe” on the screen and then you can see the outlines of the keyboard keys on the screen. I’m not quite sure what the marks are as they are 100% not there when the screen is cleaned. I’ve tried to capture it in a photo but its almost impossible.

Also attached is a battery report from tonight.

I’m looking for 600inc now £500inc delivery but am happy to listen to offers.

It will probably take me a few days to get the laptop ready for posting as i will need to copy some of the information off it and then factory reset it for the new owner. I’m pretty sure i should also have the boxes in the loft but no promises.

Price and currency: £600£500
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Cash/BT/PPG
Location: Kent/London
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Surface Pro 4 – i7 8gb 256gb – Type Cover + Pen

For sale is my Surface Pro 4, I’ve had it about 3 years so its out of warranty. Its the i7, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD version and it comes with a well used dark grey type cover and a Red Surface Pen (the pen does have a scratch on it)

There are a few cosmetic marks on the back, honestly the photos do make them look worse than they are hence my reluctance to call them “scratches”.

There is one tiny (size of a grain of sand) mark on the screen (next to the 5p), but its on the black surround and hidden by the type cover.

I cant see any other marks on the screen EXCEPT and this is a big EXCEPT when you “huff” or “breathe” on the screen and then you can see the outlines of the keyboard keys on the screen. I’m not quite sure what the marks are as they are 100% not there when the screen is cleaned. I’ve tried to capture it in a photo but its almost impossible.

Also attached is a battery report from tonight.

I’m looking for 600inc now £500inc delivery but am happy to listen to offers.

It will probably take me a few days to get the laptop ready for posting as i will need to copy some of the information off it and then factory reset it for the new owner. I’m pretty sure i should also have the boxes in the loft but no promises.

Price and currency: £600£500
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Cash/BT/PPG
Location: Kent/London
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – HP ProBook 6470b , i5-3360M, 8GB RAM and 500 GB 7.2K hdd

Hi guys,
Selling
HP ProBook 6470b, i5-3360M, 8GB RAM and 500 GB 7.2K hdd
It is about 5 years old and spent first three on the docking station. Was not in use for about 18 months and about 6 months ago I brought it back to life by installing new Hitachi HDD and Windows 10 Pro (HP version, 1803 and activated). I cannot see any mark on it and it is very clean (see the picture without the back panel ). Battery lasted two and half hours playing you tube music videos at full screen.

Delivery cost is included within my country, will be 2-3 day delivery from parcel2go, you are welcome to collect.

Spec
i5-3360M
8GB RAM
500GB 7.2K Hitachi hdd
Screen res 1600×900
DVD writer
Original 90w HP power supply

IMG_20180725_152239.jpg

IMG_20180725_152144.jpg

IMG_20180725_152451.jpg

IMG_20180725_153201.jpg

Price and currency: 135
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank transfer , paypal gift or cash on collection
Location: Manchester
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – HP ProBook 6470b , i5-3360M, 8GB RAM and 500 GB 7.2K hdd

Hi guys,
Selling
HP ProBook 6470b, i5-3360M, 8GB RAM and 500 GB 7.2K hdd
It is about 5 years old and spent first three on the docking station. Was not in use for about 18 months and about 6 months ago I brought it back to life by installing new Hitachi HDD and Windows 10 Pro (HP version, 1803 and activated). I cannot see any mark on it and it is very clean (see the picture without the back panel ). Battery lasted two and half hours playing you tube music videos at full screen.

Delivery cost is included within my country, will be 2-3 day delivery from parcel2go, you are welcome to collect.

Spec
i5-3360M
8GB RAM
500GB 7.2K Hitachi hdd
Screen res 1600×900
DVD writer
Original 90w HP power supply

IMG_20180725_152239.jpg

IMG_20180725_152144.jpg

IMG_20180725_152451.jpg

IMG_20180725_153201.jpg

Price and currency: 135
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank transfer , paypal gift or cash on collection
Location: Manchester
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.