Tag Archives: Access

Microsoft awards grant to Tribal Digital Village and Numbers4Health to expand internet access and solutions for rural and underserved communities in California – Stories

The grant will provide broadband access and telehealth solutions in Valley Center and Compton, California

REDMOND, Wash. — Aug. 1, 2018 — On Wednesday, Microsoft Corp. announced it selected Tribal Digital Village and Numbers4Health as winners of its third annual Airband Grant Fund to help bring broadband internet access to rural and underserved communities. As two of eight winners, Tribal Digital Village (TDVNet) will help bring broadband to tribal land in the rural community of Valley Center, California, and Numbers4Health will deploy a solution in partnership with internet service providers to help support telemedicine and improve healthcare outcomes in Compton, California. The Airband Grant Fund is part of the Microsoft Airband Initiative, which aims to help close the broadband access gap in rural America by 2022.

“Tribal Digital Village and Numbers4Health are working to ensure the citizens of Valley Center and Compton have the broadband access they need to connect and compete with their more urban neighbors and access critical telehealth solutions,” said Shelley McKinley, Microsoft’s head of Technology and Corporate Responsibility. “Their use of innovative technologies like TV white spaces will help address the broadband and healthcare gap in California.”

The Microsoft Airband Grant Fund seeks to spark innovation to overcome barriers to affordable internet access, through support of high-potential, early-stage startups creating innovative new technologies, services and business models. This year’s grantees receive cash investments, access to technology, mentoring and networking opportunities.

“It’s truly a benefit when a corporation such as Microsoft focuses on scaling the reach of new technologies, like TV white spaces, to solve for the hardest-to-reach tribal communities,” said Matthew Rantanen, director, TDVNet. “Microsoft’s investment in projects that are uniquely solving these connectivity issues on the ground, like TDVNet, is essential in stimulating creativity and permanently fixing the broadband access gap.”

“The best way to manage healthcare costs and improve health outcomes is to treat injury and illness as fast as possible,” said Peg Molloy, managing director, Numbers4Health. “Numbers4Health puts health information software and technology at schools where injured student athletes can be quickly assessed. Microsoft’s Airband Grant Fund is helping us make that happen.”

Broadband is the electricity of the 21st century. It is a necessity to start and grow a small business and take advantage of advances in agriculture, telemedicine and education. In the United States, more than 24 million Americans lack broadband access, including 19.4 million people living in rural areas.

Below is a list of this year’s Microsoft Airband Grant Fund recipients. More about the Microsoft Airband Grant Fund can be found here.

About Tribal Digital Village

Tribal Digital Village, a tribal-owned ISP based in Valley Center, California, has developed hybrid wireless networks to solve last mile connectivity challenges and enable tribal members to deliver community-based networks.

About Numbers4Health

Numbers4Health is a Colorado-based startup that provides a collection of tools to encourage increased use of telehealth solutions to drive positive change and better healthcare outcomes. The system operates across Windows, Android, and iOS environments.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, +1 (425) 638-7777,

rrt@we-worldwide.com

Numbers4Health, Peg Molloy, managing director, memolloy@vistapartners.com

Tribal Digital Village, Matthew R. Rantanen, director, mrr@sctdv.net

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com.Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

Microsoft’s Airband Grant Fund invests in 8 start-ups delivering internet-connected solutions to rural communities around the globe – Microsoft on the Issues

Today, internet access is as essential as electricity. It empowers entrepreneurs to start and grow small businesses, farmers to implement precision agriculture, doctors to improve community health and students to do better in school. But almost half the world’s population is still not online, often because they live in underserved areas, and therefore miss out on opportunities to take advantage of and become part of the digital economy. As a global technology company, we believe we have a responsibility and a great opportunity to help close this gap.

That’s why we’re excited to announce the eight early-stage companies selected for our third annual Airband Grant Fund. These start-ups are overcoming barriers to provide affordable internet access to unconnected and underserved communities in the U.S., Africa and Asia using TV white spaces (TVWS) and other promising last-mile access technologies. Our grant fund will provide financing, technology, mentorship, networking opportunities and other support to help scale these start-ups’ innovative new technologies, services and business models. The Airband Grant Fund is part of the Microsoft Airband Initiative, launched last year to extend broadband access across the United States and, ultimately, connectivity around the globe.

We are excited to partner with this year’s cohort of Airband grantees, which include:

These companies are improving life for some of the most underserved communities here in the U.S. and around the world. For example, approximately 35 percent of people living on tribal lands in the U.S. lack broadband. Tribal Digital Village wants to change that. With support from our Airband Grant Fund, they will use TVWS – vacant broadcast spectrum that enables internet connections in challenging rural terrain – and other technologies to deploy broadband to tribal homes on 20 isolated reservations in Southern California. “We realized that without access to the internet, tribal students weren’t going to have access to advanced opportunities that other kids had,” said Matt Rantanen, director of technology for Tribal Digital Village. “But there was no infrastructure on tribal land and no telecommunications companies wanted to work with us to build it out. So we had to build it ourselves.”

ColdHubs is another organization finding innovative ways to tackle the broadband access challenge. In Owerri, Nigeria, ColdHubs is transforming their refrigerated crop storage rooms into Wi-Fi hot spots using TVWS technology. The company aims to empower smallholder farmers with the ability to earn better livelihoods. Their solar-powered crop storage facilities help reduce food spoilage, which causes 470 million smallholder farmers to lose 25 percent of their annual income. Farmers who use ColdHubs can extend the freshness of their fruits and vegetables from two to about 21 days, reducing post-harvest loss by 80 percent. By turning these facilities into Wi-Fi “Farm Connect Centers,” ColdHubs will enable farmers to get online and access agricultural training, resources to improve crop yields and marketing and digital skills training.

Whether in the U.S. or around the world, we believe in nurturing innovative solutions by supporting local companies and entrepreneurs. We are eager to work in close partnership with these Airband Grant Fund recipients over the next year to refine and expand the reach of their solutions. And in the coming months, we’ll have more to share on the exciting progress we’re making on our Airband Initiative, and our goal to deliver broadband to 2 million rural Americans by 2022, and to extend connectivity to underserved communities around the world. Learn more about the Airband Grant Fund recipients here.

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RTO Wireless and Microsoft announce agreement to deliver broadband internet to rural communities in New York and Maine

TV white spaces and other new technologies will provide affordable, reliable broadband access to approximately 290,000 people

REDMOND, Wash. — July 24, 2018 — On Tuesday, RTO Wireless and Microsoft Corp. announced a new agreement to provide broadband internet access to more than 290,000 people living in unserved rural regions of New York and Maine. The partnership is part of the Microsoft Airband Initiative, which aims to extend broadband access to 2 million people in unserved portions of rural America by July 4, 2022.

Currently, 19.4 million people living in rural areas in the United States lack access to a broadband internet connection. RTO Wireless will use innovative techniques and technologies, including TV white spaces and Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS), to deliver fixed and mobile wireless services to rural markets within the U.S., with initial rollouts across 16 counties in Maine and 20 counties in New York.

“Without reliable internet access, many people living in rural America are unable to take advantage of the same opportunities as their urban neighbors,” said Shelley McKinley, Microsoft’s head of Technology and Corporate Responsibility. “We are excited to partner with RTO Wireless to bring broadband to students, farmers, educators and business owners across the Southern Tier and North Country of New York and Western Maine so that they have an equal opportunity to learn, grow, contribute and prosper in the 21st century economy.”

“The TV white spaces technology ecosystem championed by Microsoft provides a critical low-band function enabling tremendous RF propagation over a large service area,” said Steve Hubbard, CEO of RTO Wireless. “Microsoft is contributing tremendous resources to solving the lack of broadband options in rural America. Joining the Microsoft Airband Initiative will enable RTO to enhance the educational, healthcare and agricultural services that can be provided to the rural communities. RTO is proud to launch its initial networks in New York and Maine with an impressive consortium of technology partners to deliver exciting applications and services.”

This partnership between Microsoft and RTO Wireless will complement the already established and successful “broadband for all” initiative in New York. In 2015, Governor Andrew Cuomo and the state legislature established the $500 million New NY Broadband Program, the nation’s largest and most ambitious state investment in broadband expansion. Three rounds of grants using a reverse-auction method have expended this $500 million and provided support to projects that deliver high-speed internet access to unserved and underserved areas of the state.

Leaders in New York have offered strong support for closing the rural broadband gap in the U.S.:

U.S. Rep. Tom Reed, District 23, said, “We care about the promotion of rural broadband, and this announcement will allow more hardworking people in our region to access the digital economy and quality, family-sustaining jobs. We will continue our work in Washington to promote broadband infrastructure through funding and fair regulation.”

U.S. Rep. Chris Collins, District 27,  said, “New York’s 27th Congressional District is 65 percent underserved by broadband technologies, and it is welcome news that RTO Wireless and Microsoft are taking action to expand service in five of the counties I represent. As a member of the Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology, I’ve been able to work on policies that will help bring more broadband to rural America. We still have a long way to go in making sure all of Western New York has reliable access to broadband, but I commend Microsoft for its investment in our area that will benefit thousands of my constituents.”

U.S. Rep. Elise Stefanik, District 21, said, “This is excellent news, and I applaud Microsoft and RTO Wireless for working to bring broadband to our district. Increasing access to broadband is critical to ensuring our businesses can compete, our economy can grow and our children have access to the best educational resources. At the federal level, I am pleased to be a leader on expanding access to rural broadband and will continue to work to ensure the North Country has access to this critical 21st century infrastructure.”

U.S. Rep. Claudia Tenney, District 22, said, “Broadband internet access unlocks pathways to better education, business growth, health and so much more. Microsoft and RTO Wireless’ new agreement to bring broadband to underserved rural regions of New York, including to people in the 22nd District, ensures our community can take advantage of the opportunities offered by today’s digital economy.”

The Microsoft Airband Initiative is focused on bringing broadband coverage to rural Americans through commercial partnerships and investment in digital skills training for people in the newly connected communities. Proceeds from Airband connectivity projects will be reinvested into the program to expand broadband to more rural areas.

About RTO Wireless

RTO Wireless is a “Rural Technology Operator” who has solved a unique set of operational and economical constraints plaguing rural broadband & narrowband connectivity, by incorporating the latest wireless connectivity technologies across TV White Space, CBRS, LoRaWAN and traditional spectrum bands. RTO is founded by executives with vast experience building and operating neutral host and wholesale wireless affiliate & roaming networks for top tier mobile operators. In 2018, RTO’s financial commitments to new wireless infrastructure construction has exceeded $150,000,000. RTO is building wireless infrastructure for rural communities to access fixed broadband services and IoT applications, including middle mile backhaul connections to serve education, healthcare, public safety, utilities, asset tracking, precision agriculture, connected vehicles, and environmental applications. RTO’s neutral host rural networks enable dynamic partnerships with IoT ASPs, wireless carriers and wireline/cable operators in need of higher capacity rural network footprint. More information can be found at www.rtowireless.com.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777,

rrt@we-worldwide.com

RTO Wireless Media Requests: Please submit requests through the RTO website: www.rtowireless.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

Vendor admits election systems included remote software

Election system security was compromised by the installation of remote access software on systems over the span of six years, a vendor admitted in a letter to a senator.

Election Systems & Software (ES&S), a voting machine manufacturer based in Omaha, Neb., admitted it installed the flawed PCAnywhere remote access software on its election management system (EMS) workstations for a “small number of customers between 2000 and 2006,” according to a letter sent to Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) that was obtained by Motherboard.

The PCAnywhere source code was stolen from Symantec servers in 2006, leaving the software vulnerable, and further issues in 2012 caused Symantec to suggest users uninstall the program before officially putting PCAnywere to its end of life in 2014.

ES&S had previously denied knowledge of the use of remote access software on its election management systems, but told Wyden about the vulnerable software that could have put voting machine security at risk. ES&S wrote that it stopped installing the PCAnywhere software in December 2007 due to new policies enacted by the Election Assistance Commission regarding voting machine security.

Gene Shablygin, CEO and founder of WWPass, an identity and access management company based in Manchester, N.H., said the actions by ES&S were “pretty consistent with the overall state of computer security” for the time.

“Today, these technologies and general approaches are totally unacceptable, and must be completely reworked. The last decade especially, was the period of explosive growth of hacking technologies, and the defensive side of many systems was left in the dust. So, most of the systems that are still in use — and voting systems are no exception — have multiple vulnerabilities, some of which are zero-day, or not yet discovered,” Shablygin wrote via email. “You can’t stop progress, and sooner or later, remote voting will become a matter of everyday life.”

Lane Thames, senior security researcher at Tripwire, agreed that the failures of ES&S with election system security shouldn’t be surprising, “especially during the 2000 to 2007 timeframe when cybersecurity was hardly ever on the roadmap for companies producing computing systems.”

“Another concerning point is the underlying arguments that imply the devices built from 2000 to 2007 are still in use. As with many critical infrastructure systems, costs can prohibit frequent hardware refresh cycles,” Thames wrote via email. “As such, many voting machines are likely to contain older operating systems and other software with many vulnerabilities due to these systems not being able to be updated with operating system patches and such. This is a challenging problem we face with all of our critical infrastructure, with very few good solutions at this time.”

ES&S did not respond to requests for comment and it is unclear if the affected election systems were ever fixed or if they are still in use.

Fixing voting machine security

Voting machine security was already proved to be in a troubling state after hackers at Defcon 2016 were able to crack all systems tested within just a few days.

Every system charged with securing our government’s processes … should be open to large security audits.
Jonathan SanderCTO, Stealthbits Technologies

Sean Newman, director of product management at Corero Network Security, said the news about PCAnywhere will make “little difference” in the likelihood of finding other election system security issues.

“They run software and, if they have any kind of internet connectivity, even for managing the voting system/process itself, then there’s a reasonable chance that vulnerabilities exist, which could provide unauthorized users with the ability to have an impact on the normal operation of the system,” Newman wrote via email. “The focus should be for vendors, like ES&S, to ensure they use secure coding practices to develop the software for such systems and avoid any need to expose such systems to the public Internet.”

Jonathan Sander, CTO at Stealthbits Technologies, noted that government “pressures to do everything cheaply and with world class, state actor proof security are in tension” when it comes to election system security and outside audits are needed.

“Every system charged with securing our government’s processes — a.k.a. protecting our collective benefit — should be open to large security audits. To sell anything to the federal government you need to go through tons of certifications. But that’s not enough,” Sander wrote via email. “Bug bounties to get the hacker community to find vulnerabilities, open review at a source level for all solutions to be used in government, and mandatory standards for any remote access features should be table stakes for putting in systems like this.”

Thames notes that a major issue is that “although the U.S. electoral infrastructure is part of the nation’s critical infrastructure, it is still largely up to local and state agencies to ultimately enforce security of the systems.”

“Herein lies another challenging problem. Local and state agencies likely have little to no expertise or budget for securing their voting systems. Every time I go to the voting polls, I see mostly volunteers with a few dedicated staff. Most volunteers at the polls will not have experience with cyber and/or physical security issues related to voting machines,” Thames wrote. “Moreover, the nation already has a significant deficit for staffing our cyber security departments, in both government and industry. Funding will likely need to be increased, somehow, for local and state government agencies in order to provide adequate security for our voting systems.”

The power and promise of digital healthcare in the Middle East and Africa – Middle East & Africa News Center

Mirembe, 24, lives in a rural village in north-east Uganda, where access to healthcare is limited. Mirembe is pregnant and walks, cradling her swollen belly and fanning herself from the heat, 15 kilometres to the closest clinic to check on her unborn child.

Hundreds of expectant mothers, elderly men and women, and sickly children line the corridors of the clinic patiently awaiting medical attention. Midwives and nurses are few, and they wearily dart from patient to patient doing what they can to help. Mirembe will wait six hours to be attended to.

When she’s finally seen, she’s told the clinic doesn’t have an ultrasound machine. If she wants to have an ultrasound, she must travel to the Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda’s largest public hospital, where she must pay 20,000 Ugandan shillings, equivalent to about US$5, for a prenatal visit. In this part of the world, that is a significant amount of money.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), about 830 women die from pregnancy or childbirth-related complications around the world every day. It’s estimated that in 2015, roughly 303 000 women died during and after pregnancy and childbirth. Many of these deaths were in low-resource locations like Uganda, and most could have been prevented.

However, technology is helping to eliminate some of the challenges of distance and lack of trained medical staff. Mirembe can now hear her unborn child’s heartbeat from the comfort of her own home through an innovative app call WinSenga, which reassures her that both she and her baby are healthy.

WinSenga is a mobile tool, supported by Microsoft technologies, which helps mothers with prenatal care. The idea was conceived when the Microsoft Imagine Cup competition inspired then-university students Okello and Aaron Tushabe to use their computer science skills to tackle some of Africa’s biggest problems. They were motivated by the plight of mothers like Mirembe who live outside the reach of modern medical care.

The handheld device scans the womb of a pregnant woman and reports foetal weight, position, breathing patterns, gestational age, and heart rate. The app makes use of a trumpet-shaped device and a microphone which transmits the data to a smart phone. The mobile application plays the part of the nurse’s ear and recommends a course of action. The analysis and recommendations are uploaded to the cloud and can be accessed by a doctor anywhere.

man touching a smart tablet

This is just one example of how Africa, a continent that bears one-quarter of the global disease burden but only has two percent of the world’s doctors, could outperform developed nations’ healthcare systems by leapfrogging over inefficiencies and legacy infrastructure.

In fact, digital healthcare in the Middle East and Africa (MEA) region is booming with the proliferation of disruptive solutions underpinned by 21st century innovations like cloud, mobile, Internet of Things (IoT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Let’s talk telemedicine

One trend revolutionising the delivery of healthcare in MEA is telemedicine, which is the use of telecommunication and IT to provide clinical healthcare over long distances. Given the region’s high rate of mobile penetration, telemedicine is growing rapidly. In fact, the telemedicine market in MEA was estimated at $2.19 billion in 2015 and is projected to reach $3.67 billion in 2020.

Forward-thinking countries like Botswana are making swift progress when it comes to the implementation of sustainable telemedicine projects.  Microsoft and the Botswana Innovation Hub launched Africa’s first telemedicine service over TV white spaces in 2017. Through this initiative, clinics in outlying areas of Botswana can now access specialised care remotely using TV white spaces, which are unused broadcasting frequencies in the wireless spectrum.

IAM engineer roles require training and flexibility

BOSTON — As identity and access management become more critical to security strategies, organizations must be on the lookout for good identity engineers — and there are a few different ways IT can approach this staffing.

Identity and access management (IAM) is increasingly essential as mobile devices add new access points for employees and fresh ways to leak corporate data. But the job market still lacks skilled IAM engineer candidates, so organizations may be better off training existing IT staff or hiring general security engineers to educate on IAM expertise, experts said here at this week’s Identiverse conference.

“Focus on general IT skills and roles [when you] hire engineers,” said Olaf Grewe, director of access certification services at Deutsche Bank, in a session. “Don’t wait for this elusive candidate that has all of this baked in. Bring them up to where you need to be.”

IAM job market landscape

Job growth in IAM has surged in the past year, with about 1,500 IAM engineer openings currently in the Boston area, 4,800 in the D.C. area and 3,320 in Silicon Valley, according to a presentation by Dave Shields, a senior security architect for IAM at DST Systems, a financial technology company in Kansas City.

“It is finally reaching a state where people see that it’s a viable place to have [a career],” said Shields, who was also recently the managing director of IT and ran IAM at the University of Oklahoma. “There are so many things you can do with it.”

There aren’t enough people already skilled in IAM to fill these roles, however, and ones that are may not live nearby. Instead, IT departments can train up existing staff on IAM — but the key is to choose the right people.

“The best engineers you’re going to find are the people who aren’t afraid to break stuff,” Shields said. “Maybe you have a sysadmin who gets into systems and was able to make them do things they were never able to do before. Talk to that person.”

The person should also be flexible, adaptable to change and willing to ask questions others don’t want to hear, he said. Other desirable qualities for an IAM engineer are creativity and an ability to understand the business’ functions and the technology in use.

“Find someone who can look at something and say, ‘I can make that better,'” Shields said. “There are some things that simply cannot be taught.”

IAM and security go hand in hand

Deutsche Bank is currently building up an IAM team that includes existing IT staff and external hires, which the company then trains on IAM skills. That involves four major steps: baseline IAM training, then vendor-specific education, then CISSP, followed by continuous learning over time via conferences, lunch and learns, and updated vendor training.

We need to make sure people have access to the right resources.
Olaf Grewedirector of access certification services, Deutsche Bank

“We need to make sure people have access to the right resources,” Grewe said. “We want to have people who are continuously developing.”

General security skills are especially important for IAM engineer candidates, experts said. Sarah Squire, a senior technical architect at Ping Identity, started out by learning the important security specs and standards as a way toward training up on identity management.

“It’s a lot of on-the-job training,” Squire said. “We’re starting to realize that we really need a base body of knowledge for the entire field.”

For that reason, Squire along with Ian Glazer, vice president for identity product management at Salesforce, founded IDPro, a community for IAM professionals. Launched at last year’s Identiverse (then Cloud Identity Summit), IDPro is currently forming the body of knowledge that an IAM engineer must know, and plans to offer a certification in the future, Squire said.

“It’s really important that people who come in not only understand IAM but also really understand security,” Grewe said.

It’s also important to determine where within the organization those IAM professionals will live. Is it operations? Development? Security?

“A lot of people just don’t know where that fits,” Shields said. “There is nowhere better for them to be in my opinion than on the IT security team.”

Grewe’s team at Deutsche Bank, for instance, works under the chief security officer, which has a lot of budget to work with, he said. At IBM, the team that handles internal identity management works closely with HR and other groups that are involved in employees’ access rights, said Heather Hinton, vice president and chief information security officer for IBM Hybrid Cloud.

“[Organizations] need to figure out how to be less siloed,” she said.

Microsoft and DEWA bringing quantum computing to Dubai | Stories

DEWA will work with Microsoft and access new quantum Microsoft Azure services to create quantum-inspired solutions to power energy optimization and improve sustainability efforts in Dubai and the United Arab Emirates

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — June 28, 2018 — The Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) on Thursday announced plans to work with Microsoft Corp. to develop new quantum-based solutions to address energy optimization and other challenges where classical computers have serious limitations, making it the first organization outside the U.S. to participate in the Microsoft Quantum program.

As part of the deal, Microsoft will work closely with DEWA to identify the challenges where quantum computing will have the greatest impact. Energy optimization, for example, requires far too much traditional computing power to identify the ideal balance of resources from different energy sources to meet ever-changing consumption needs in real time.

As part of Dubai 10X (an initiative to use advances in technology to deliver new or existing services in radically different ways), DEWA wants to reimagine its role as a utility company by launching “Digital DEWA,” the digital arm of Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, and is leveraging Microsoft Quantum to help accelerate its goals. In addition, the two organizations will look at ways to support the Dubai EXPO 2020, an event that brings people from all over the world to share ideas.

“We are delighted to work with Microsoft to bring the revolutionary power of quantum computing to Dubai, to achieve the vision of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, vice president and prime minister of the UAE and ruler of Dubai, to make Dubai the smartest and happiest city in the world. This also will contribute to addressing key challenges while furthering our goal to make the UAE one of the most innovative and sustainable countries in the world,” said HE Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, managing director and CEO of DEWA. “This partnership will provide us with early access to Microsoft’s quantum computing research and capabilities to develop solutions that improve performance, productivity and quality of services provided to our customers and beyond.”

Microsoft is pioneering the emerging quantum era through a unique approach that will deliver the industry’s most stable and scalable quantum computer. As the development of the quantum computer continues, select partners such as DEWA can access new quantum-inspired Azure services for the most complete, state-of-the-art, end-to-end quantum programming.

Working with Microsoft, the Quantum Development Kit toolset and Azure quantum-inspired services, DEWA will be able to program and test quantum algorithms, then apply those quantum solutions within the existing Azure platform to achieve real-world impacts even before the development of a general-purpose quantum computer. This work will also provide DEWA with a seamless migration to using Microsoft’s quantum computer once it is available.

“Quantum computing holds the promise of solving some of our planet’s greatest challenges that today’s computers are unable to solve,” said Todd Holmdahl, corporate vice president of Microsoft Quantum. “Innovative partners such as DEWA understand the benefits of getting in early, not only to build their quantum knowledge and skills but to create immediate solutions that can be applied today.”

DEWA will also work with Microsoft to develop a quantum strategy, including understanding where quantum optimization methods can be applied for greatest impact in Dubai, both on classical computers and in the future on Microsoft’s quantum computer.

More information can be found at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/quantum/.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, rrt@we-worldwide.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com.Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

For Sale – Ubiquiti Unifi Network gear

I am having to simplify my network at home, so my Unifi gear is up for sale.

There are 2 AC Pro access points. On one of them, the blue LED status light no longer illuminates, but other than that the AP works just fine. The other is in perfect working order. Both are boxed, and both come with PoE injector and UK power cable. Both APs have No More Nails adhesive on the back of the mounting plates – I used it to fix them to the ceilings! It doesn’t affect the use – you can just redrill the mounting holes where the adhesive has covered them.

I have a Unifi USG – boxed and perfect working order.

Unifi Cloud Key – boxed and perfect working order, and running the latest beta firmware with the new dashboard.

Unifi US-8-150W switch – 8 port PoE switch, boxed and perfect working order.

Prices :-

AC Pro with faulty status LED – £sold
AC Pro fully working – £sold
Unifi USG – £sold
Unifi Switch – £sold
Unifi Cloud Key – £sold

Delivery is not included in the price, but collection is welcome from Wirral.

Price and currency: Various
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: PPG
Location: Wirral
Advertised elsewhere?: Yes
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Ubiquiti Unifi Network gear

I am having to simplify my network at home, so my Unifi gear is up for sale.

There are 2 AC Pro access points. On one of them, the blue LED status light no longer illuminates, but other than that the AP works just fine. The other is in perfect working order. Both are boxed, and both come with PoE injector and UK power cable. Both APs have No More Nails adhesive on the back of the mounting plates – I used it to fix them to the ceilings! It doesn’t affect the use – you can just redrill the mounting holes where the adhesive has covered them.

I have a Unifi USG – boxed and perfect working order.

Unifi Cloud Key – boxed and perfect working order, and running the latest beta firmware with the new dashboard.

Unifi US-8-150W switch – 8 port PoE switch, boxed and perfect working order.

Prices :-

AC Pro with faulty status LED – £70
AC Pro fully working – £sold
Unifi USG – £sold
Unifi Switch – £sold
Unifi Cloud Key – £55

Delivery is not included in the price, but collection is welcome from Wirral.

Price and currency: Various
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: PPG
Location: Wirral
Advertised elsewhere?: Yes
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Tempered Networks extends reach of NAC software

Tempered Networks, a maker of network access control for a wide variety of devices, has extended its technology to Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, Linux servers and additional IoT endpoints.

Tempered, which introduced the latest enhancements this week, has developed NAC software based on the Host Identity Protocol (HIP), a technology developed by a working group within the Internet Engineering Task Force. A HIP network replaces all IP addresses with cryptographic host identifiers that are resistant to denial-of-service and man-in-the-middle attacks.

Tempered has created a HIP wrapper that lets customers manage large numbers of devices through a product the vendor calls a HIPswitch. The technology creates a private overlay network to control what specific endpoints can access. The product can protect corporate, industrial and IoT systems.

What’s new

The latest improvements to the Tempered product portfolio includes a version of HIPswitch for Microsoft Azure and one for Google Cloud. The virtual appliance serves as an identity gateway for endpoints trying to access data, workloads and containers in the public clouds. The NAC software had only been available for AWS.

Also new is the HIPserver for Linux. HIPserver, which was available only for Windows, acts as a server’s overlay network gateway. The software, combined with a firewall, can cloak workloads, so they are not visible to hackers. The technology also ensures that network connections are authenticated before establishing a TCP session. HIPserver supports all major Linux distributions, whether they are running in a public cloud, on premises or a remote site.

Another technology added to the Tempered portfolio is the HIPswitch 75 appliance, a palm-sized IoT edge gateway designed as “plug-and-play” hardware for medical devices, point-of-sale systems and building automation controls. HIPswitch ensures that access policies are enforced for the attached systems.

Finally, Tempered introduced a product called HIPclient, which runs on Windows, Mac and iOS devices. The NAC software ensures clients only access authorized network resources.

The complete Tempered platform includes central software the vendor calls the conductor, which is akin to a software-defined networking controller. Customers use the product’s user interface to whitelist everything attached to HIPswitches and to set access policies for each endpoint or groups of them. Policy routing across the identity network is handled through technology Tempered calls the HIPrelay.

Tempered sells its products via annual subscription, based on the number of products deployed. Fees for HIPswitch for cloud start at $660, HIPserver for Linux, $1,180; and HIPclient, $300.