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A brother and sister team are rowing 3,000 miles across the Atlantic Ocean – their equipment includes Microsoft Teams

A brother and sister team taking part in a 3,000-mile race across the Atlantic Ocean have stayed in touch with family and friends by using Microsoft Teams, despite being hundreds of miles from land.

Anna and Cameron McLean have used the Microsoft tool to contact loved ones, and receive weather and race updates from a crew on shore during the Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge.

Known as “the world’s toughest row”, participants spend 60 days at sea in a small boat, braving 40-foot waves, sharks, illness and a schedule that sees them sleep and row in two-hour shifts as they make their way from La Gomera in The Canary Islands to Antigua. To put the gruelling race in context, fewer people have rowed the Atlantic than reached the summit of Everest.

While many mixed-sex teams have completed the challenge, Anna and Cameron believe they are the first brother and sister to take part.

Speaking via Teams on the 35th day of their journey, Anna said the Microsoft tool had been crucial for receiving messages of support that have kept the siblings going.

  • Part of the Microsoft Teams call between Anna McLean, in the Atlantic, and Andy Trotman, in the UK

“We can use Teams to communicate with anyone in the world from the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. That’s been essential,” she said. “Teams has been such a dream because we’ve been able to maintain a two-way dialogue with our family and friends back home, as well as our sponsors. We have been able to share real-time updates and pictures, and get information such as the weather forecast. That’s been a big contributing factor to the success and speed of our crossing. Teams has helped us navigate the best and most direct course.

“It’s been easy to set up, too. We connect to the internet via a satellite, and then open up the Teams app on my phone. That’s it.”

Anna, 25, and Cameron, 32, are currently third in the pairs race, in a field of 34 vessels. They are each burning 10,000 calories a day and fighting against sleep deprivation, exhaustion, blisters and bruises. Meals consist of “space food” that has to be mixed with water and left on deck so the sun can warm it up. Sea water is filtered for drinking, and they aim to drink at least 10 litres a day.

Even though they are experienced rowers, having competed at university, nothing could prepare them for a race of this magnitude.

Anna McLean rowing across the Atlantic
Anna and Cameron are spending 60 days at sea in a small boat, braving 40-foot waves, sharks, illness and a schedule that sees them sleep and row in two-hour shifts

“The nights are brutal,” said Anna, who works for Microsoft partner AlfaPeople. “With a lack of moonlight, the nights are so dark that you can’t see your hand in front of your face or the waves that crash over the side of the boat and threaten to capsize you. The sea was so rough one night that we broke an oar.

“Then, each new day brings new challenges. Our water maker and autohelm broke, and we have been followed by what I estimate to be a 14-foot shark. But we have no choice but to overcome those challenges through strength and perseverance.”

Anna and Cameron are rowing to raise money for UN Women, an organisation dedicated to gender equality and the empowerment of women. “The impact they have for women and girls everywhere is just phenomenal,” Anna added.

The pair have around 300 miles to go before they reach the finish line, and Anna is already looking forward to some simple luxuries.

“I can’t wait to see my mum and dad, and give them a big hug,” she said. “I’m also looking forward to a hot shower and eating fresh fruit and vegetables.”

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Storytelling using data makes information easy to digest

Storytelling using data is helping make analytics digestible across entire organizations.

While the amount of available data has exploded in recent years, the ability to understand the meaning of the data hasn’t kept pace. There aren’t enough trained data scientists to meet demand, often leaving data interpretation in the hands of both line-of-business employees and high-level executives mostly guessing at the underlying meaning behind data points.

Storytelling using data, however, changes that.

A group of business intelligence software vendors are now specializing in data storytelling, producing platforms that go one step further than traditional BI platforms and attempt to give the data context by putting it in the form of a narrative.

One such vendor is Narrative Science, based in Chicago and founded in 2010. On Jan. 6, Narrative Science released a book entitled Let Your People Be People that delves into the importance of storytelling for businesses, with a particular focus on storytelling using data.

Recently, authors Nate Nichols, vice president of product architecture at Narrative Science, and Anna Schena Walsh, director of growth marketing, answered a series of questions about storytelling using data.

Here in Part II of a two-part Q&A they talk about why storytelling using data is a more effective way to interpret data than traditional BI, and how data storytelling can change the culture of an organization. In Part I, they discussed what data storytelling is and how data can be turned into a narrative that has meaning for an organization.

What does emphasis an on storytelling in the workplace look like, beyond a means of explaining the reasoning behind data points?

Nate NicholsNate Nichols

Nate Nichols: As an example of that, I’ve been more intentional since the New Year about applying storytelling to meetings I’ve led, and it’s been really helpful. It’s not like people are gathering around my knee as I launch into a 30-minute story, but just remembering to kick off a meeting with a 3-minute recap of why we’re here, where we’re coming from, what we worked on last week and what the things are that we need going forward. It’s really just putting more time into reminding people of why, the cause and effect, just helping people settle into the right mindset. Storytelling is an empirically effective way of doing it.

We didn’t start this company to be storytellers — we really wanted everyone to understand and be able to act on data. It turned out that the best way to do that was through storytelling. The world is waking up to this. It’s something we used to do — our ancestors sat around the campfire swapping stories about the hunt, or where the best potatoes are to forage for. That’s a thing we used to do, it’s a thing that kids do all the time — they’re bringing other kids into their world — and what’s happening is that a lot of that has been beaten out of us as adults. Because of the way the workforce is going, the way automation is going, we’re heading back to the importance of those soft skills, those storytelling skills.

How is storytelling using data more effective at presenting data than typical dashboards and reports?

Anna Schena WalshAnna Schena Walsh

Anna Schena Walsh: The brain is hard-wired for stories. It’s hard-wired to take in information in that storytelling arc, which is what is [attracting our attention] — what is something we thought we knew, what is something new that surprised us, and what can we do about it? If you can put that in a way that is interesting to people in a way they can understand, that is a way people will remember. That is what really motivates people, and that’s what actually causes people to take action. I think visuals are important parts of some stories, whether it be a chart or a picture, it can help drive stories home, but no matter what you’re doing to give people information, the end is usually the story. It’s verbal, it’s literate, it’s explaining something in some way. In reality, we do this a lot, but we need to be a lot more systematic about focusing on the story part.

What happens when you present an explanation with data?

Nichols: If someone sends you a bar chart and asks you to use it to make decisions and there’s no story with it at all, what your brain does is it makes up a story around it. Historically, what we’ve said is that computers are good at doing charts — we never did charts and graphs and spreadsheets because we thought they were helpful for people, we did them because that was what computers could do. We’ve forgotten that. So when we do these charts, people look at them and make up their own stories, and they may be more or less accurate depending on their intuition about the business. What we’re doing now is we want everyone to be really on the same story, hearing the same story, so by not having a hundred different people come up with a hundred different internal stories in their head, what we’re doing at Narrative Science is to try and make the story external so everyone is telling the same story.

So is it accurate to say that accuracy is a part of storytelling using data?

Schena Walsh: When I think of charts and graphs, interpreting those is a skill — it is a learned skill that comes to some people more naturally than others. In the past few decades there’s been this idea that everybody needs to be able interpret [data]. With storytelling, specifically data storytelling, it takes away the pressure of people interpreting the data for themselves. This allows people, where their skills may not be in that area … they don’t have to sit down and interpret dashboards. That’s not the best use of their talent, and data storytelling brings that information to them so they’re able to concentrate on what makes them great.

What’s the potential end result for organizations that employ data storytelling — what does it enable them to do that other organizations can’t?

With data storytelling there is a massive opportunity to have everybody in your company understand what’s happening and be able to make informed decisions much, much faster.
Anna Schena WalshDirector of growth marketing, Narrative Science

Schena Walsh: With data storytelling there is a massive opportunity to have everybody in your company understand what’s happening and be able to make informed decisions much, much faster. It’s not that information isn’t available — it certainly is — but it takes a certain set of skills to be able to find the meaning. So we look at it as empowering everybody because you’re giving them the information they need very quickly, and also giving them the ability to lean into what makes them great. The way we think about it is that if you can choose to have someone give a two-minute explanation of what’s going on in the business to everyone in the company everyday as they go into work, would you do it? And the answer is yes, and with data storytelling that’s what you can do.

I think what we’ll see as companies keep trying to move toward everyone needing to interpret data, I actually think there’s a lot of potential for burnout there in people who aren’t naturally inclined to do it. I also think there’s a speed element — it’s not as fast to have everybody learn this skill and have to do it every day themselves than to have the information serviced to them in a way they can understand.

Editor’s note: This interview has been edited for clarity and conciseness.

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SMBs grappling with digital transformation initiatives

Small and medium-sized businesses across the board have either recently launched or are in the process of launching digital transformation initiatives, but many are running up against obstacles.

The results of the inaugural Insight 2020 Technology Report: IT Trends for Midmarket and Small Business, a study based on input from more than 400 North American IT professionals at independent and emerging businesses, highlighted that dilemma. Insight Enterprises conducted the research.

Technology has become a corporate cornerstone, even for small businesses, according to the report. “Enterprises recognize that they need to embrace leading-edge technology in order to remain competitive,” said Joseph Clinton, central region sales director at Insight Enterprises.

Organizations expect that embracing digital transformation will positively impact their operations, the report said. The top three business areas that respondents said digital transformation initiatives would help improve are customer experience, cited by 43%; operational efficiency, 42%; and workforce productivity and collaboration, 42%.

Digital transformation challenges

Realizing the potential benefits of digital transformation has been vexing, however. Close to half of the study’s respondents, 49%, said integrating new technology with legacy systems is very or extremely challenging when dealing with IT service providers. “Many companies perform a lift and shift. They simply take their existing applications and port them to the cloud,” Clinton explained. “In those cases, they do not take advantage of any of the modernization features available in the new environment.”

Steps for digital transformation chart
Four essential steps to digital transformation

Funding also poses issues for these initiatives. The study found that 44% of respondents pointed to budget constraints as an inhibitor to embracing digital transformation.

Additionally, when attempting to equip their businesses with the latest technology, 45% of SMBs said understanding which new technologies to invest in is an area of concern. Many new systems are cloud-based, and cost is a key obstacle here, as well. Comparing cloud pricing to current expenditures is the most frequently cited barrier to migration, cited by 56% of SMB respondents.

Building a digital transformation framework

So, how can a company address its digital transformation challenges? “Businesses need a framework, a plan that aligns where they are today to where they want to be in the future,” Clinton said.

Businesses need a framework, a plan that aligns where they are today to where they want to be in the future.
Joseph ClintonCentral region sales director, Insight Enterprises

But in many cases, these organizations lack the technical depth to create the plan — a task that channel partners can help with. “There are a lot of potential pitfalls,” Clinton said. “Businesses need to get their applications and employees ready for the change. The bursting that cloud offers can be helpful, but it can also be expensive. In some cases, modern applications cost much more than legacy systems.”

As a result, corporations should not automatically assume the cloud offers them a better deployment model than legacy infrastructure. They need to create a methodology to see which workloads should move. Channel partners with deep cloud experience are in prime position to help them make the right call, Clinton said.

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Microsoft study: Teens are better than adults at finding help with online issues – Microsoft on the Issues

It’s World Kindness Day – and we’re calling on teens across the globe to assist adults with online issues. That’s because, according to our latest research conducted in 25 countries, teens are considerably better than adults at tracking down useful resources to help resolve digital difficulties.

Both demographic groups say risk is a significant problem when it comes to life online. Both also admit that finding help can be hard. Some 74% of teens and 73% of adults say online risks are a “big problem,” while 65% of teens say they know where to find useful resources, compared to just 39% of adults. Both percentages are up from last year when 60% of teens and 37% of adults said they knew where to turn for assistance. In addition, 41% of teenagers and 44% of grown-ups said tracking down resources to assist with online risks can be “somewhat to extremely” difficult.

The findings are from Microsoft’s latest research into aspects of digital civility – encouraging safer, healthier and more respectful online interactions among all people. The study, “Civility, Safety and Interaction Online – 2019,” polled teens aged 13-17 and adults aged 18-74 about their exposure to 21[1] different online risks. This latest research builds on similar studies we’ve undertaken each year for the last three years. Previous projects polled the same demographic groups in 14, 22 and 23 countries, respectively. A total of 12,520 individuals participated in this year’s study, and we’ve surveyed more than 44,000 people on these topics since 2016. Full results of this latest poll will be released in conjunction with international Safer Internet Day 2020 on February 11.

Confidence in facing online risks

While two-thirds of teens say they know where to find help with online risks, their self-assuredness in managing online risk exposure is slightly lower than that of adults. Just under half of the teens surveyed (48%) said they were confident in handling online risks versus just over half of the adults (52%). To help build those confidence levels, check out our resources guide, which offers primary and secondary sources for all 21 risks covered in our survey. Additional information about a wide  range of online activities and potential risks and harm can be found on the resources page of our website.

A lack of confidence in knowing where to find help can contribute to concerns about online risks in general. Additionally, as survey results have shown for the past few years, consequences and pain from online risk exposure are real. According to our latest findings, 71% of teens and 65% of adults are “somewhat to extremely” worried about encountering online risks, while even higher percentages of both groups have faced consequences from digital risk exposure: three quarters of teens (75%) and 77% of adults. Consequences range from declining to participate in social media and heightened stress levels, to losing trust in others online or offline, losing sleep and even contemplating suicide. This year, 14% of respondents said they had thoughts of suicide following an online issue, double the percentage from two years ago.

Chart showing online safety

Microsoft’s Digital Civility Challenge

We’re making this preliminary research available on World Kindness Day to again call attention to Microsoft’s Digital Civility Challenge – four basic tenets for life online to encourage kinder, more empathetic and more respectful interactions. We’d never want to thwart debate, discussion or the free flow of ideas; it’s just important that those interactions take place free of name-calling and abuse. Specifically, we’re encouraging people to:

  • Live the “Golden Rule” and treat others as you would like to be treated by leading with empathy, compassion and kindness, and affording everyone respect and dignity both online and off.
  • Respect differences by honoring diverse opinions and perspectives and, when disagreements surface, engage thoughtfully by avoiding name-calling and abuse.
  • Pause before replying to comments or posts you disagree with and refrain from posting or sending anything that could hurt someone, damage a reputation or threaten someone’s safety.
  • Stand up for yourself and others if it’s safe and prudent to do so; report illegal and abusive content and behavior, and preserve evidence.

As we approach the close of 2019 and prepare for Safer Internet Day 2020, we’ll be ushering in not only a new year, but a new decade. We’ll kick off 2020 with a series of predictions from teens and adults about various aspects of online life over the next ten years. By embracing the Digital Civility Challenge and other common-sense habits and practices, we can help make the 2020s the safest and most respectful decade yet.

To learn more about digital civility and how you can help advance these practical ideals for online interaction, visit www.microsoft.com/digitalcivility. For more on digital safety generally, visit our website, “like” us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

[1] The 21 risks span four broad categories: behavioral, sexual, reputational and personal/intrusive.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

How autonomous systems use AI that learns from the world around it

Millions of engineers across industries such as automotive, aerospace, industrial machinery and medical devices have already built models of the systems they work on using MATLAB or Simulink. This new partnership allows users to bring simulation models built using MATLAB and Simulink to Microsoft’s Azure cloud computing platform, enabling unprecedented scalability and making it easier for developers and engineers building autonomous systems.

“Our core interest really comes down to engineering productivity — the ability to succeed at a task in the least amount of time possible,” said Loren Dean, MathWorks senior director of engineering for MATLAB products.  “This partnership allows engineers to stay in a familiar workflow to learn and apply AI without having to do the things that are non-traditional for them, like setting up the infrastructure to run a bunch of simulations at once. They’re shielded from all that.”

By running hundreds or thousands of simulations in parallel in Azure and learning from massive amounts of data at once, deep reinforcement learning algorithms can find optimal solutions to chaotic, real-world control problems that other types of AI still struggle to solve.

It turns out these problems are everywhere, said Gurdeep Pall, Microsoft’s corporate vice president for Business AI. Microsoft received three times more interest than it expected after opening its autonomous systems limited preview program in May.

The companies who have applied to work with Microsoft’s autonomous systems team and partners are looking to develop control systems to intelligently stitch fabric, optimize chemical engineering processes, manufacture durable consumer goods and even process food. The potential goes far beyond robotics or autonomous vehicles, Microsoft says.

“These are the kinds of diverse use cases for autonomous systems that we’re starting to see emerge,” Pall said.  “As customers learn about the capabilities of our toolchain, we’re seeing them apply it in really interesting ways because these control problems exist almost everywhere you look.”

Most customer use cases Microsoft has seen so far involve helping existing employees do their jobs more efficiently, safely or with higher quality, said Mark Hammond, Microsoft general manager for Business AI and the former CEO of the startup Bonsai, which Microsoft acquired last year. As sensors in modern workplaces collect ever more data, it can become difficult for any one operator — such as someone who is guiding a drill bit or calibrating expensive equipment — to track it all. AI tools can process that data and bring the most relevant patterns to that operator’s attention, enabling them to make more informed decisions.

“The journey from automated to autonomous systems is a spectrum of solutions, and very few of the engagements we’re seeing are in that fully autonomous with no humans in the loop zone,” Hammond said. “The vast majority are assistive technologies that work with people.”

Training AI systems in virtual worlds

Traditionally, AI models have often relied on labor-intensive labeled data for training, which works well for many problems but not for those that lack real-world data. Now, Microsoft and partners like MathWorks are expanding the use of AI into more areas such as those that require learning from the three-dimensional physical world around them — through the power of reinforcement learning and simulation.

Engineers have long used simulations to mathematically model the systems they work with in the real world. This allows them to estimate how a particular change in a chemical, manufacturing or industrial process may affect performance, without having to worry about slowing production or putting people or equipment at risk.

Now, those same simulations can be used to train reinforcement learning algorithms to find optimal solutions, Dean said.

“The AI is really augmenting how these traditional systems have worked — it just gives you greater confidence in your design and gives you additional capabilities that either had to be done manually before or were difficult to solve,” Dean said.

Imagine a building engineer whose job is to calibrate all the heating and cooling systems in a large commercial building to keep each room at a comfortable temperature as people stream in and out for meetings and outside weather fluctuates — while using as little energy as possible. That could involve tuning dozens of different parameters and might take many cycles of modeling and measuring changes for that engineer to find the best balance of controls.

With the new Microsoft and MathWorks partnership, that engineering expert could use machine teaching tools to help an AI system focus on the most important dimensions of the problem, set safety limits and figure out how to reward success as the algorithms learn. This allows for greater transparency and trust in how the AI system is making decisions and also helps it work more efficiently than randomly exploring all possibilities.

The engineer could train the AI using models that he or she already developed in MATLAB or Simulink. The simulations can be automatically scaled up in the Azure cloud — which means the engineer doesn’t have to worry about learning how to host and manage computing clusters.

The end result is the building engineer uses AI to zero in on promising solutions much faster — but still uses his or her judgment to decide what works best.

“This partnership really marries the best of MathWorks’ capabilities for modeling and simulation with the best of Microsoft’s capabilities for cloud computing and AI,” Microsoft’s Hammond said.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

ArubaOS-CX upgrade unifies campus, data center networks

Aruba’s latest switching hardware and software unifies network management and analytics across the data center and campus. The approach to modern networking is similar to the one that underpins rival Cisco’s initial success with enterprises upgrading campus infrastructure.

Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise company, launched this week its most significant upgrade to the two-year-old ArubaOS-CX (AOS-CX) network operating system. With the NOS improvements, Aruba unveiled two series of switches, the stackable CX 6300 and the modular CX 6400. Together, the hardware covers access, aggregation and core uses. 

The latest releases arrive a year after HPE transferred management of its data center networking group to Aruba. The latter company is also responsible for HPE’s FlexNetwork line of switches and software.

The new CX hardware is key to taking AOS-CX to the campus, where companies can take advantage of the software’s advanced features. As modular hardware, the 6400 can act as an aggregation or core switch, while the 6300 drives the access layer of the network where traffic comes from wired or wireless mobile or IoT devices.

For the data center, Aruba has the 8400 switch series  that also run AOS-CX. The hardware marked Aruba’s entry into the data center market, where it has to build credibility.

“Many non-Aruba customers and some Aruba campus customers are likely to take a wait-and-see posture,” said Brad Casemore, an analyst at IDC. 

ArubaOS-CX everywhere  

Nevertheless, having one NOS powering all the switches does make it possible to manage them with the Aruba software that runs on top of AOS-CX. Available software includes products for network management, analytics and access control. 

For the wired and wireless LAN, Aruba has ClearPass, which lets organizations set access policies for groups of IoT and mobile devices; and Central, a cloud-based management console. For the data center, Aruba has HPE SimpliVity, which provides automated switch configurations during deployment of Aruba and HPE switches.

CX switches
Aruba’s new line of CX 6300and 6400 switches

New features in the latest version of ArubaOS-CX include Dynamic Segmentation that lets enterprises assign polices to wired client devices based on port or user role. Other enhancements include support for an Ethernet VPN over VXLAN for data center connectivity.

Also, within the new 10.4 version of AOS-CX, Aruba integrated the Network Analytics Engine (NAE) with Aruba’s NetEdit software for orchestration of multiple switch configurations. NAE is a framework built into AOS-CX that lets enterprises monitor, troubleshoot and collect network data through the use of scripting agents.

Aruba vs. Cisco

How well Aruba’s unification strategy for networking can compete with Cisco’s remains to be seen. The latter company has had significant success with the Catalyst 9000 campus switching line introduced in 2017 with Cisco’s DNA Center management console. Some organizations use the DNA product in data center networking.

In the first quarter of 2019, Cisco’s success with the Catalyst 9000 boosted  its revenue share of the campus switching market by 5 points, according to the research firm Dell’Oro Group. During the same quarter, the combined revenue of the other vendors, which included HPE, declined.

In September, Gartner listed Cisco and Aruba as the leaders in the research firm’s Magic Quadrant for Wired and Wireless LAN Access Infrastructure.

Competition is fierce in the campus infrastructure market because enterprises are just starting to upgrade networks. Driving the current upgrade cycle is the switch to Wi-Fi 6 — the next-generation wireless standard that can support more devices than the present technology.

Wi-Fi 6 lets enterprises add to their networks IoT devices ranging from IP telephones and surveillance cameras to medical devices and handheld computers. The latter is used in warehouses and on the factory floor.

That transition will drive companies to deploy aggregation and access switches with faster port speeds and PoE ports to power wired IoT gear.

Enterprises skeptical of cross-domain networking

Aruba, Cisco and other networking vendors pushing a unified campus and data center haven’t convinced many enterprises to head in that direction, IDC analyst Brandon Butler said. Adopting that cross-domain technology would require significant changes in current operations, which typically have separate IT teams responsible for the campus and the data center.

IDC has not spoken to many enterprises that have centralized management across domains, Butler said. “This idea that you’re going to have a single pane of glass across the data center and the campus and out to the edge, I just don’t know if the industry is quite there yet.”

Meanwhile, Aruba’s focus on its CX portfolio has left some industry observers wondering whether it would diminish the development of FlexNetwork switches and software. 

However, Michael Dickman, VP of Aruba product line management, said the company plans to fully support its FlexNetwork architecture “in parallel” with the CX portfolio.

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Elastic SIEM spring release will complete Endgame tie-in

Elastic Inc. is preparing another shot across the bow of IT monitoring and analytics competitor Splunk with the integration of endpoint security features it plans to complete in the next six months.

The Elastic SIEM will add initial integration with software from Endgame, the endpoint security firm Elastic acquired in June, in a release that will be available Nov. 1. This initial integration will pull Endgame telemetry into the Elastic back end, where it can be visualized alongside the rest of an organization’s information from Logstash, Beats and other data collectors, via Kibana.

In the next release, endpoint security data will be displayed in the Elastic SIEM user interface, and will be covered by the Elastic Common Schema, a specification that adds consistency to data collected from various sources. Users will also be able to take enforcement action on endpoints through the SIEM UI in the later release, such as isolating an infected host, killing a suspicious application process, or removing an attacker from a system.

Sebastian Mill, CTO of global development, InfoTrackSebastian Mill

The Elastic SIEM, available since June, appeals to Elastic Stack users who want a centralized monitoring, logging and data visualization platform for various types of data, whether for infrastructure and application performance monitoring or security operations. This convergence of data monitoring tool sets reflects a convergence between security and IT operations teams under DevOps.

“We have over 100 developers across three countries,” said Sebastian Mill, CTO of global development at InfoTrack, a legal practice software maker based in Australia, with offices in the U.K. and U.S. “All of them can log in and see how their app is performing, and Elastic makes it easier for us to provide security to our DevOps teams as well.”

Security monitoring is particularly complex in a geographically distributed infrastructure where hundreds of millions of logs are collected from systems on a daily basis. InfoTrack, which uses the Elastic SIEM, plans to add endpoint security integration when it becomes available, and use Elastic’s machine learning tools to refine security analysis on its data.

It’s … really interesting to us that we cannot just alert and monitor, but also take action, and [avoid] alert fatigue from various different tools.
Sebastian MillCTO of global development, InfoTrack

“With endpoints, the number of assets will increase exponentially,” Mill said. “It’s also really interesting to us that we cannot just alert and monitor, but also take action, and [avoid] alert fatigue from various different tools.”

Endgame helps Elastic catch up with its chief competitor, Splunk, which already offers endpoint security monitoring and enforcement features in its Enterprise Security product. So far, the Elastic SIEM’s chief appeal for enterprise users has been cost, as the SIEM product is not licensed separately from Elastic Stack, and Elastic has typically charged less for data collection and retention than Splunk, although Splunk introduced new pricing models, including $10,000 “Rapid Adoption” packages, last month.

Elastic SIEM users wary of endpoint security costs

Elastic also plans to take a competitive approach to cost with endpoint security in the Elastic SIEM, though some enterprise users are more concerned about how data collection costs and network bandwidth demands will shake out with many more endpoint assets to monitor. Endpoints are any devices attached to a network, which also includes laptops, desktops and even API endpoints on servers.

“It becomes very interesting to see how much data will be sent into Elastic, where Elastic will ultimately make its money, and how much will stay on the client,” said John Gerber, principal cybersecurity analyst at Reston, Va., systems integrator SAIC, who has worked as a dedicated consultant at Elastic customer Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2001.

“One has to question [the] balance of keeping [data] local and calculating at the endpoint, versus sending [it] to the central log area for analysis, and how that model will be affected by Elastic’s pricing,” he said. “It will be interesting to see what develops as Endgame and Elastic work these issues out.”

Endgame’s agent can store data locally on the endpoint when it is disconnected and then stream it back to the Elastic Stack when a network connection is available, which organizations can use to optimize bandwidth, Elastic officials said.

The Elastic Common Schema also does some pre-analysis of data before it’s ingested, which eases some of the performance requirements for ingestion into the central data repository and analysis once it’s there. Users also have a choice about whether they attach endpoints to the Elastic SIEM if they are concerned about data collection and storage costs.

On the licensing front, as of its Nov. 1 release, Elastic will not charge separately for Endgame for users of its Elastic Enterprise license. Users of this license level will get Endgame agents with no additional fee.

However, ORNL’s Gerber said he believes Endgame will require a license upgrade for his organization to Elastic Enterprise from Elastic Stack Platinum.

“Organizations will need to decide if they switch their license completely to Enterprise, split their licenses, or stay with [a lower] license while they wait for their current endpoint protection license to expire and Endgame to get integrated in Elastic,” he said.

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For Sale – Windows 7 Home Premium Full Retail (New, Sealed)

Hello

Bit of a clear out and I’ve come across a new, unopened full retail copy of Windows 7 Home Premium (based on the sticker on the box, I bought it from Comet originally!). As a full retail copy, you can use this to install Windows 7 Home Premium without needing any existing operating system on the laptop / PC etc.

I believe that these keys are also still accepted for a clean install of Windows 10 too, so that might be a bonus (but I don’t promise anything): https://www.howtogeek.com/266072/yo…ws-10-for-free-with-a-windows-7-8-or-8.1-key/

Price includes recorded delivery postage.

Price and currency: £50.00
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: South London
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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For Sale – Windows 7 Home Premium Full Retail (New, Sealed)

Hello

Bit of a clear out and I’ve come across a new, unopened full retail copy of Windows 7 Home Premium (based on the sticker on the box, I bought it from Comet originally!). As a full retail copy, you can use this to install Windows 7 Home Premium without needing any existing operating system on the laptop / PC etc.

I believe that these keys are also still accepted for a clean install of Windows 10 too, so that might be a bonus (but I don’t promise anything): https://www.howtogeek.com/266072/yo…ws-10-for-free-with-a-windows-7-8-or-8.1-key/

Price includes recorded delivery postage.

Price and currency: £50.00
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: South London
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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For Sale – Windows 7 Home Premium Full Retail (New, Sealed)

Hello

Bit of a clear out and I’ve come across a new, unopened full retail copy of Windows 7 Home Premium (based on the sticker on the box, I bought it from Comet originally!). As a full retail copy, you can use this to install Windows 7 Home Premium without needing any existing operating system on the laptop / PC etc.

I believe that these keys are also still accepted for a clean install of Windows 10 too, so that might be a bonus (but I don’t promise anything): https://www.howtogeek.com/266072/yo…ws-10-for-free-with-a-windows-7-8-or-8.1-key/

Price includes recorded delivery postage.

Price and currency: £50.00
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: South London
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Go to Original Article
Author: