Tag Archives: affect

SOLD SOLD SOLD Very cheap Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B, i5, 6GB RAM, 500GB HDD

Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B

Marks from keyboard on screen, but does not affect viewing, hence the price
Marks underside of laptop
Feint marks on lid of laptop but can hardly see them
Well used keyboard and some marks on trackpad
None of the above affects the use of the machine, still very fast and easy to use

500GB hard drive and 15GB SSD
6GB ram
USB3.0
Comes with…

SOLD SOLD SOLD Very cheap Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B, i5, 6GB RAM, 500GB HDD

SOLD SOLD SOLD Very cheap Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B, i5, 6GB RAM, 500GB HDD

Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B

Marks from keyboard on screen, but does not affect viewing, hence the price
Marks underside of laptop
Feint marks on lid of laptop but can hardly see them
Well used keyboard and some marks on trackpad
None of the above affects the use of the machine, still very fast and easy to use

500GB hard drive and 15GB SSD
6GB ram
USB3.0
Comes with…

SOLD SOLD SOLD Very cheap Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B, i5, 6GB RAM, 500GB HDD

SOLD SOLD SOLD Very cheap Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B, i5, 6GB RAM, 500GB HDD

Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B

Marks from keyboard on screen, but does not affect viewing, hence the price
Marks underside of laptop
Feint marks on lid of laptop but can hardly see them
Well used keyboard and some marks on trackpad
None of the above affects the use of the machine, still very fast and easy to use

500GB hard drive and 15GB SSD
6GB ram
USB3.0
Comes with…

SOLD SOLD SOLD Very cheap Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B, i5, 6GB RAM, 500GB HDD

SOLD SOLD SOLD Very cheap Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B, i5, 6GB RAM, 500GB HDD

Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B

Marks from keyboard on screen, but does not affect viewing, hence the price
Marks underside of laptop
Feint marks on lid of laptop but can hardly see them
Well used keyboard and some marks on trackpad
None of the above affects the use of the machine, still very fast and easy to use

500GB hard drive and 15GB SSD
6GB ram
USB3.0
Comes with…

SOLD SOLD SOLD Very cheap Samsung Notebook/Ultrabook NP530U3B, i5, 6GB RAM, 500GB HDD

PC Specialist desktop

As you can see from the picture the panel on the side of the pc is cracked. This does not affect its performance. Specs are

I7 6700k Overclocked to 4.2 Ghz
ASUS Z170-P
Corsair CS650m650w psu
16gb Hyperx fury black 2666Mhz DDR4
240 GB SSD
2TB HDD
Windows 10

View attachment 1008172

View attachment 1008173

View attachment 1008174

View attachment 1008175

Originally came with a gtx 970 graphics card but this was sold seperately. You will need to add your own graphics…

PC Specialist desktop

Digital classrooms aren’t a distraction. Here’s why. |

Many people assume that devices and technology distract students and negatively affect how teachers run their lessons. That’s not the case when implementation is done purposefully, with learning tools that support existing structures in the classroom.

In other words, tech doesn’t replace the teacher, but enhances their capabilities in teaching and administration. One of the more effective solutions seen recently is from a Microsoft Gold Partner, Insync. The company uses Microsoft’s technology to make learning more efficient and students more engaged, in a number of different ways:

Devices and mobility

Insync uses Microsoft’s wide range of Windows devices to support different subjects and learning styles, giving educators more effective ways of delivering lessons. Devices functions such as touch-screen interactivity, digital ink, keyboard compatibility, voice integration and video allow students to sketch notes, type essays, conduct video lessons and do much more.

To help get lessons up and running, Microsoft also makes the management of all devices a straightforward process–via their Enterprise Mobility Suite, which provides secure single sign-on access to school services, applications, and safe social media.  Windows 10 also helps students and staff organise their schoolwork, with easy ways to snap apps in place, optimise their screen space, group items and create virtual desktops.

Additionally, students with special needs benefit most from Insync’s approach to the digital classroom. Learning is more accessible for physically challenged students thanks to speech recognition in Windows 10, while Skype provides real-time transcripts for the hearing impaired.

Learning solutions

Interactions between students for group projects don’t stop after school. They can continue online through Microsoft’s Office 365, which includes a range of cloud-based productivity tools that let students and staff members update essays, documents and spreadsheets at home, school or on the go.

And to help students excel in their projects or revision, schools can also register multiple third-party cloud applications on their Azure Active Directory, which provides single sign-on access to a portfolio of relevant resources online.

School administration

One of the biggest costs for schools comes from administration. Schools are always looking for ways to simplify registration, declutter paperwork, and improve course management. Staff simply don’t have the time or headspace to deal with these things and focus on their students’ wellbeing.

With Microsoft Azure, schools can opt into pay-as-you-go access to infrastructure and platform services. That saves them money by letting them scale up resources during busy times, such as enrolment and assessment periods, and scaling down during periods of low demand.

Furthermore, personal devices can also connect to mobile device management services, giving administration teams smarter reporting and more proactive security.

Security and Infrastructure

And of course, Microsoft’s integrated security options also provide schools with an impressive level of digital security and utility, negating the need to purchase more expensive solutions. Through Microsoft’s Enterprise Mobility Suite (EMS), students and staff can access IT services with self-service password reset, application and device installations, and group management.

EMS also manages access to devices (including those consistently outside firewalls) and multifactor authentication capabilities. An integrated environment extends device management to small or remote schools and campuses.

Microsoft CityNext education solutions can even help schools operate more sustainably by using Internet of Things sensors to control lighting, heating and cooling and smartcards for secure access.

Education analytics and research

Before this, schools had next to no way to track areas of improvement for individual students, forcing teachers to rely on direct feedback or their own instincts on how effective their lessons were proving. With data analytics, however, teachers can track and evaluate different criteria across each of their students’ scores and results, helping them better identify and address any learning difficulties that may crop up.

On a school-wide level, Microsoft Power BI gives schools a 360-degree view of performance and operations, while easy-to-use reporting tools simplify access to visual data and improve report-sharing capabilities with stakeholders.

Solutions like Insync’s help schools to conduct lessons, manage administration and provide accountability like never before. To learn how your school can benefit from Microsoft-based education solutions, check out the resources listed below:

Download the whitepaper: 6 features of a Modern Australian School >

Download the value summary: Education in the Cloud >

Or get in touch with the education experts at Insync on 1300 652 207 or email [email protected]

Our mission at Microsoft is to equip and empower educators to shape and assure the success of every student. Any teacher can join our community and effort with free Office 365 Education, find affordable Windows devices and connect with others on the Educator Community for free training and classroom resources. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for our latest updates.

KRACK WPA2 vulnerability might be more hype than risk

Researchers found a vulnerability in the WPA2 protocol that could affect many Wi-Fi devices in the wild, but some experts said early reports overstated the danger the flaw.

The WPA2 vulnerability was discovered by Mathy Vanhoef, a network security and applied crypto post-doctoral candidate, and Frank Piessens, a computer science professor at the University of Leuven in Flanders, Belgium. According to Vanhoef, the WPA2 vulnerability is “in the Wi-Fi standard itself, and not in individual products or implementations. Therefore, any correct implementation of WPA2 is likely affected.”

“An attacker within range of a victim can exploit these weaknesses using key reinstallation attacks (KRACKs). Concretely, attackers can use this novel attack technique to read information that was previously assumed to be safely encrypted,” Vanhoef wrote in his report detailing the flaw. “This can be abused to steal sensitive information such as credit card numbers, passwords, chat messages, emails, photos, and so on. The attack works against all modern protected Wi-Fi networks. Depending on the network configuration, it is also possible to inject and manipulate data.”

Rob Graham, owner of Errata Security, described the issue as “reliable enough that people should be afraid.”

“When a client connects to the network, the access-point will at some point send random key data to use for encryption. Because this packet may be lost in transmission, it can be repeated many times. What the hacker does is just repeatedly sends this packet, potentially hours later. Each time it does so, it resets the keystream back to the starting conditions,” Graham wrote in a blog post. “At this point, the protocol bug becomes a crypto bug. We know how to break crypto when we have two keystreams from the same starting position.”

Vanhoef and Piessens said that the biggest potential risk with the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability would be in Linux and Android devices where it could more easily be exploited. On Android, Graham said attackers could even create “a fake WiFi access-point and man-in-the-middle all traffic.”

Questions surrounding the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability risk

Other experts were not as convinced that KRACK was as big a danger because of the difficulty in successfully exploiting the flaw.

Martijn Grooten, security researcher for Virus Bulletin, was impressed with the research but not sold on the impact.

You would need an incredibly high skill set and to be at the Wi-Fi base station to attack this.
Kevin Beaumontsecurity architect based in the U.K.

Kevin Beaumont, security architect based in the U.K., said on Twitter that the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability was “very difficult to exploit.”

“The attack realistically doesn’t work against Windows or iOS devices. The Group vulnerability is there, but it’s not near enough to actually do anything of interest,” Beaumont added in a blog post detailing the flaw. “There is currently no publicly available code out there to attack this in the real world – you would need an incredibly high skill set and to be at the Wi-Fi base station to attack this.”

Remediating the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability

While some experts said traffic running over HTTPS could help to mitigate the risks of data interception by an attacker exploiting KRACK, most said patching was the best option and praised Vanhoef and Piessens for their responsible disclosure and waiting for major manufacturers to create patches.

Vanhoef and Piessens said patching either the client or access point can mitigate the risk of the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability.

“Implementations can be patched in a backwards-compatible manner. This means a patched client can still communicate with an unpatched access point, and vice versa. In other words, a patched client or access point sends exactly the same handshake messages as before, and at exactly the same moment in time,” Vanhoef wrote. “However, the security updates will assure a key is only installed once, preventing our attack.”

Experts said that although patches may be available, another trouble with the KRACK WPA2 vulnerability is scale. Currently, Android versions 6.0 and higher are affected — approximately 41% of devices, according to Google’s stats — but as more devices are updated to newer Android versions or users buy new smartphones, that number could rise.

Apple added patches for the WPA2 vulnerability in the latest beta version of iOS, but it has not been pushed to most users as of this post. Beaumont said patches were already available for Linux, but he admitted that Android could be a problem because security patches often don’t get to users or get patched when they are pushed out.

Paul Martini, CEO and co-founder of iboss, said the most concerning part of this exploit “is that it affects every device that connects to a Wi-Fi network.”

“This is another reminder that even if your security team does everything in its power to keep your devices and network secure, there will always be incidents like this that put your information at risk,” Martini told SearchSecurity. “This vulnerability is particularly worrisome for distributed organizations that often have mobile and remote employees connecting via Wi-Fi. Even secure Wi-Fi networks are now at risk and require additional protection at the web gateway level to help prevent data loss.”