Tag Archives: aren’t

For Sale – 13″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (2019) – 128 GB SSD, Space Grey

Don’t be silly, if you don’t ask you don’t know

Thank you for the kind advice by the way. In truth you aren’t a million miles away from an offer I’d accept and I much prefer to sell here due to people like your good self. The forums are great.

The issue being postage and if I accept £800 then I’ll likely clear £775 something like that. If you can stretch to say £850-860 then I’d be happy to accept on the basis I clear closer to £800.

Still a massive loss on my part, but you would be getting an as new machine (really is immaculate). only 6 charge cycles. Plus the 3 year warranty which includes accidental damage, replacement guarantee etc. Quite comprehensive.

The difference between a 2017 model and this quad core model will also be noticeable. I believe a lot of the reviews will show just what a step up it is.

Either way, counter offer on the table should you be tempted.

Take care…

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For Sale – 13″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar (2019) – 128 GB SSD, Space Grey

Don’t be silly, if you don’t ask you don’t know

Thank you for the kind advice by the way. In truth you aren’t a million miles away from an offer I’d accept and I much prefer to sell here due to people like your good self. The forums are great.

The issue being postage and if I accept £800 then I’ll likely clear £775 something like that. If you can stretch to say £850-860 then I’d be happy to accept on the basis I clear closer to £800.

Still a massive loss on my part, but you would be getting an as new machine (really is immaculate). only 6 charge cycles. Plus the 3 year warranty which includes accidental damage, replacement guarantee etc. Quite comprehensive.

The difference between a 2017 model and this quad core model will also be noticeable. I believe a lot of the reviews will show just what a step up it is.

Either way, counter offer on the table should you be tempted.

Take care…

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Wanted – External USB BluRay Writer/player for Mac

My trusty but 6 year old Samsung no longer works and Samsung aren’t interested in keeping drivers updated so I need a more recent model. Make not important as long as it will work on a Mac and I’m not bothered if it’s not a rapid one. Just as long as it loads BluRays that can be read by OSX/MakeMKV/Handbrake

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Wanted – External USB BluRay Writer/player for Mac

My trusty but 6 year old Samsung no longer works and Samsung aren’t interested in keeing drivers updated so I need a more recent model. Make not important as long as it will work on a Mac and I’m not bothered if it’s not a rapid one. Just as long as it loads BluRays that can be read by OSX/MakeMKV/Handbrake

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Deloitte CIO survey: Traditional CIO role doesn’t cut it in digital era

CIOs who aren’t at the forefront of their companies’ digital strategies risk becoming obsolete — and they risk taking their IT departments with them.

The message isn’t new to IT executives, who have been counseled in recent years to take a leadership role in driving digital transformation. But new data suggests CIOs are struggling to make the shift. According to a recently published global CIO survey by Deloitte Consulting, 55% of business and technology leaders polled said CIOs are focused on delivering operational efficiency, reliability and cost-savings to their companies.

Kristi Lamar, managing director and U.S. CIO program leader at Deloitte and a co-author of the report, said IT executives who are serving in a traditional CIO capacity should take the finding as a clarion call to break out of that “trusted operator” role — and soon.

“If they don’t take a lead on digital, they’re ultimately going to be stuck in a trusted operator role, and IT is going to become a back office function versus really having a technology-enabled business,” she said. “The pace of change is fast and they need to get on board now.”

Taking on digital

Manifesting legacy: Looking beyond the digital era” is the final installment of a three-part, multiyear CIO survey series on CIO legacy. The idea was to chronicle how CIOs and business leaders perceived the role and to explore how CIOs delivered value to their companies against the backdrop of digital transformation.

Kristi Lamar, managing director and U.S.CIO program leader at DeloitteKristi Lamar

In the first installment, the authors developed three CIO pattern types. They are as follows:

  • Business co-creators: CIOs drive business strategy and enable change within the company to execute on the strategy.
  • Change instigators: CIOs lead digital transformation efforts for the enterprise.
  • Trusted operators: CIOs operate in a traditional CIO role and focus on operational efficiency and resiliency, as well as cost-savings efforts.

Based on their findings, the authors decided that CIOs should expect to move between the three roles, depending on what their companies needed at a given point in time. But this year’s CIO survey of 1,437 technology and business leaders suggested that isn’t happening for the most part. “We have not seen a huge shift in the last four years of CIOs getting out of that trusted operator role,” Lamar said.

The pace of change is fast and they need to get on board now.
Kristi Lamarmanaging director, Deloitte

Indeed, 44% of the CIOs surveyed reported they don’t lead digital strategy development or lead the execution of that strategy.

The inability of CIOs to break out of the trusted operator role is a two-way street. Lamar said that companies still see CIOs as — and need CIOs to be — trusted operators. But while CIOs must continue to be responsible for ensuring a high level of operational excellence, they also need to help their companies move away from what’s quickly becoming an outdated business-led, technology-enabled mindset.

The more modern view is that every company is a technology company, which means CIOs need to delegate responsibility for trustworthy IT operations and — as the company’s top technology expert — take a lead role in driving business strategy.

“The reality is the CIO should be pushing that trusted operator role down to their deputies and below so that they can focus their time and energy on being far more strategic and be a partner with the business,” she said.

Take your seat at the table

To become a digital leader, a trusted operator needs to “take his or her seat at the table” and change the corporate perception of IT, according to Lamar. She suggested they build credibility and relationships with the executive team and position themselves as the technology evangelist for the company.

“CIOs need to be the smartest person in the room,” she said. “They need to be proactive to educate, inform and enable the business leaders in the organization to be technology savvy and tech fluent.”

Trusted operators can get started by seeing any conversation they have with business leaders about digital technology as an opportunity to begin reshaping their relationship.

If they’re asked by the executive team or the board about technology investments, trusted operators should find ways to plant seeds on the importance of using new technologies or explain ways in which technology can drive business results. This way, CIOs continue to support the business while bringing to the discussion “the art of the possible and not just being an order taker,” Lamar said.

Next, become a ‘digital vanguard’

Ultimately, CIOs want to help their organizations join what Deloitte calls the “digital vanguard,” or companies with a clear digital strategy and that view their IT function as a market leader in digital and emerging technologies.

Lamar said organizations she and her co-authors identified as “digital vanguards” — less than 10% of those surveyed — share a handful of traits. They have a visible digital strategy that cuts across the enterprise. In many cases, IT — be it a CIO or a deputy CIO — is leading the execution of the digital strategy.

CIOs who work for digital vanguard companies have found ways to shift a percentage of their IT budgets away from operational expenses to innovation. According to the survey, baseline organizations spend on average about 56% of their budgets on business operations and 18% on business innovation versus 47% and 26% respectively at digital vanguard organizations.

Digital vanguard CIOs also place an emphasis on talent by thinking about retention and how to retool employees who have valuable institutional knowledge for the company. And they seek out well-rounded hires, employees who can bring soft skills, such as emotional intelligence, to the table, Lamar said.

Talent is top of mind for most CIOs, but digital vanguards have figured out how to build environments for continuous learning and engagement to both attract and retain talent. Lamar called this one of the hardest gaps to close between organizations that are digital vanguards and those that aren’t. “The culture of these organizations tends to embrace and provide opportunities for their people to do new things, play with new tools or embrace new technologies,” she said.

News briefs: Mobile recruiting interfaces still painful

Mobile recruiting platforms aren’t getting enough attention from HR departments, according to a recent Glassdoor report. Mobile interfaces are clunky and hard to use. They impose required fields that duplicate data that’s already on the résumé.

“Mobile job application experiences remain painful for most job seekers,” said Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor’s chief economist, in a report on upcoming trends. This is a problem for employers. Many job seekers today are using mobile devices to reach employer job sites.

It is a consequence of legacy enterprise applicant tracking systems (ATSes) built before the mobile era. Firms are waking up to this fact, and Glassdoor believes improving mobile recruiting systems is on the verge of becoming a priority.

A lot of organizations have a hodgepodge of HR systems. Their primary goal is moving to cloud and to mobile more quickly, said Tony DiRomualdo, senior director of the HR executive advisory program at The Hackett Group, based in Miami.

But mobile is only “widely implemented” in 16% of organizations surveyed last fall by Hackett. DiRomualdo said he believes the percentage is higher for mobile recruiting platforms, because it’s easier to make a business case.  

Mobile recruiting implementation “has been slower than a lot of people in HR would like,” DiRomualdo said. “They have a hard time getting the funding and prioritization for it,” he said.

A new recruiting platform with ATS-like systems

Mobile job application experiences remain painful for most job seekers.
Andrew Chamberlainchief economist, Glassdoor

Recruiting platform vendors are taking on some of the work of internal applicant tracking systems and can give job seekers a better mobile experience. They are creating dashboards and intelligent ranking systems. JobzMall, the latest addition to this trend, is due to launch Jan. 15.

The site, which has about 250 participating organizations and is running in a closed beta, organizes itself around a “virtual shopping mall,” said Nathan Candaner, co-founder of JobzMall, based in Irvine, Calif.

Employers have virtual stores and can use video to create a personalized experience about their business. There are different buildings — such as the startup building, one for nonprofits, another for freelancers and one for larger firms. Job seekers fill out a template on the recruiting platform, which they can use to apply for multiple jobs. The system gives applicants a little more transparency into the progress of their application.

Candaner said he sees a need for this type of recruiting platform. Many job sites today want users to cut and paste their résumés for each job application. The systems give employers little help in managing the applications.

JobzMall gives employers a dashboard, which includes collaborative tools, for managing and viewing applicants in one spot. The system knows what the qualifications are and the skill sets of the applicants. It also learns the employer’s behavior in evaluating candidates. It uses that to help rank and select applicants. “Our system learns, and in time, we do give very pointed candidates to required jobs,” Candaner said.

AI innovations are nothing for EUC IT pros to be scared of

IT experts are excited about future AI innovations and aren’t scared of it taking their jobs.

Artificial intelligence (AI) has been a hot topic lately as some of the biggest names in tech debate its future. Tesla CEO Elon Musk worries AI could grow out of control and lead to killer robots. Andrew Ng, former AI lead at Chinese search engine Baidu, thinks it could cause job displacement. And Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the negatives of AI are overblown.

In the end-user computing (EUC) market, AI innovations will help IT professionals do their jobs more than it will threaten their livelihoods, experts said.

“It’s not going to take people’s jobs, but it will change the way they do it,” said Jim Davies, director of IT at Ongweoweh Corp., a pallet and packing management company in Ithaca, N.Y. “Organizations can embrace it or not, but I really feel those that don’t will be left behind.”

AI will progress over time and get smarter and have more capabilities.
Jack Goldfounder and principal analyst, J. Gold Associates

Some EUC products already take advantage of AI innovations to enforce policies around users’ access to corporate data, and it will be interesting to see how these evolve. For example, Citrix’s new Analytics Service tracks user activity on a corporate network and recognizes patterns. If the AI technology catches unusual activity, it can block a user from accessing a document or enforce multifactor authentication without the help of an IT person.

If AI evolves a step further and can onboard new users, implement appropriate policies and enforce those policies on its own, it would take some responsibilities off IT pros’ plates. But AI won’t take their jobs; it will simply change the way they work, said Jack Gold, founder and principal analyst at J. Gold Associates, an analyst firm in Northborough, Mass.

“AI will progress over time and get smarter and have more capabilities,” Gold said. “IT people will find different things they need to do that AI isn’t good at yet.”

Willem Bagchus, messaging and collaboration specialist at United Bank in Parkersburg, W.Va., agreed.

“People have been terrified of AI forever from all these horrific movies,” Bagchus said. “I don’t quite believe that it will ever become anywhere near a complete replacement for human intelligence. But for monitoring and automating simple tasks, it could do very well.” 

Machine learning capabilities also continue to grow in end-user applications as well, with AI-based features in Box, Microsoft Office 365 and more.

“AI ultimately will be embedded in most aspects of EUC, from security to management to deployments,” Gold said. “It will ultimately make things more efficient and effective for users, and that’s what you want.”

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