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For Sale – Brand new Alienware m15 R2 (i7, RTX 2070, 256GB SSD)

I won this beautiful piece of equipment at a conference in NL a couple of weeks back but I use a Macbook Pro for work and don’t game so it’s been sitting around collecting dust and now, trying to fund a start-up it’s a good opportunity for me to sell.

It’s never been used, the lid has been opened once to take the picture for this thread and it’s never been out of the box. Seals still on the screen. Did a bit of research and these are real state of the art machines, not too clunky and the keyboard isn’t obnoxiously small – over-all I think whoever buys it will have a hell of an experience.

I’ve sold phones on here and also a Macbook Pro without issue! Also, i’ll link my ebay profile where I used to sell refurbed phones if anyone wants to check my rep.

I will be posting for FREE using the most competent and reliable logistics companies so either DHL or DPD – tracked a signed for next day delivery. No RoyalMail BS in this thread!

(Also, the box has the plastic on it because DHL stick their labels in a sticky bag)

SPECS:

9th gen Intel Core i7 9750H
8GB DDR4 RAM
RTX 2070 8GB GDDR6
256GB PCIe SSD
15 inch FHD 60hz display
Comes with Win-10 pre installed.

Also comes with European power adapter (as I won it in NL) so a UK wall adapter will work fine.

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For Sale – Brand new Alienware m15 R2 (i7, RTX 2070, 256GB SSD)

I won this beautiful piece of equipment at a conference in NL a couple of weeks back but I use a Macbook Pro for work and don’t game so it’s been sitting around collecting dust and now, trying to fund a start-up it’s a good opportunity for me to sell.

It’s never been used, the lid has been opened once to take the picture for this thread and it’s never been out of the box. Seals still on the screen. Did a bit of research and these are real state of the art machines, not too clunky and the keyboard isn’t obnoxiously small – over-all I think whoever buys it will have a hell of an experience.

I’ve sold phones on here and also a Macbook Pro without issue! Also, i’ll link my ebay profile where I used to sell refurbed phones if anyone wants to check my rep.

I will be posting for FREE using the most competent and reliable logistics companies so either DHL or DPD – tracked a signed for next day delivery. No RoyalMail BS in this thread!

(Also, the box has the plastic on it because DHL stick their labels in a sticky bag)

SPECS:

9th gen Intel Core i7 9750H
8GB DDR4 RAM
RTX 2070 8GB GDDR6
256GB PCIe SSD
15 inch FHD 60hz display
Comes with Win-10 pre installed.

Also comes with European power adapter (as I won it in NL) so a UK wall adapter will work fine.

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Q&A: Recounting the rough-and-tumble history of PowerShell

To examine the history of PowerShell requires going back to a time before automation, when point-and-click administration ruled.

In the early days of IT, GUI-based systems management was de rigueur in a Windows environment. You added a new user by opening Active Directory, clicking through multiple screens to fill in the name, group membership, logon script and several other properties. If you had dozens or hundreds of new users to set up, it could take quite some time to complete this task.

To increase IT efficiency, Microsoft produced a few command-line tools. These initial automation efforts in Windows — batch files and VBScript — helped, but they did not go far enough for administrators who needed undiluted access to their systems to streamline how they worked with the Windows OS and Microsoft’s ever-growing application portfolio.

It wasn’t until PowerShell came out in 2006 that Microsoft gave administrators something that approximated shell scripting in Unix. PowerShell is both a shell — used for simple tasks such as gathering the system properties on a machine — and a scripting language to execute more advanced infrastructure jobs. Each successive PowerShell release came with more cmdlets, updated functionality and refinements to further expand the administrator’s dominion over Windows systems and its users. In some instances, the only way to make certain adjustments in some products is via PowerShell.

Today, administrators widely use PowerShell to manage resources both in the data center and in the cloud. It’s difficult to comprehend now, but shepherding a command-line tool through the development gauntlet at a company that had built its brand on the Windows name was a difficult proposition.

Don JonesDon Jones

Don Jones currently works as vice president of content partnerships and strategic initiatives for Pluralsight, a technology skills platform vendor, but he’s been fully steeped in PowerShell from the start. He co-founded PowerShell.org and has presented PowerShell-related sessions at numerous tech conferences.

Jones is also an established author and his latest book, Shell of an Idea, gives a behind-the-scenes history of PowerShell that recounts the challenges faced by Jeffrey Snover and his team.

In this Q&A, Jones talks about his experiences with PowerShell and why he felt compelled to cover its origin story.

Editor’s note: This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

What was it like for administrators before PowerShell came along?

Don Jones: You clicked a lot of buttons and wizards. And it could get really painful. Patching machines was a pain. Reconfiguring them was a pain. And it wasn’t even so much the server maintenance — it was those day-to-day tasks.

I worked at Bell Atlantic Network Integration for a while. We had, maybe, a dozen Windows machines and we had one person who basically did nothing but do new user onboarding: creating the domain account and setting up the mailbox. There was just no better way to do it, and it was horrific.

I started digging into VBScript around the mid-1990s and tried to automate some of those things. We had a NetWare server, and you periodically had to log on, look for idle connections and disconnect them to free up a connection for another user if we reached our license limit. I wrote a script to do something a human being was sitting and doing manually all day long.

This idea of automating — that was just so powerful, so tremendous and so life-affirming that it became a huge part of what I wound up doing for my job there and jobs afterward.

Do you remember your introduction to PowerShell?

Jones: It was at a time when Microsoft was being a little bit more free talking about products that they were working on it. There was a decent amount of buzz about this Monad shell, which was its code name. I felt this is clearly going to be the next thing and was probably going to replace VBScript from what they were saying.

I was working with a company called Sapien Technologies at the time. They produce what is probably still the most popular VBScript code editor. I said, ‘We’re clearly going to have to do something for PowerShell,’ and they said, ‘Absolutely.’ And PrimalScript was, I think, the first non-Microsoft tool that really embraced PowerShell and became part of that ecosystem.

That attracted the attention of Jeffrey Snover at Microsoft. He said, ‘We’re going to launch PowerShell at TechEd Europe 2006 in Barcelona, [Spain], and I’d love for you to come up and do a little demo of PrimalScript. We want to show people that this is ready for prime time. There’s a partner ecosystem. It’s the real deal, and it’s safe to jump on board.’

That’s where I met him. That was the first time I got to present at a TechEd and that set up the next large chapter of my career.

I think PowerShell has earned its place in a lot of people’s toolboxes and putting it out there as open source was such a huge step.
Don JonesVice president of content partnerships and strategic initiatives, Pluralsight

What motivated you to write this book?

Jones: I think I wanted to write it six or seven years ago. I remember being either at a TechEd or [Microsoft] Ignite at a bar with [Snover], Bruce Payette and, I think, Ken Hansen. You’re at a bar with the bar-top nondisclosure agreement. And they’re telling these great stories. I’m like, ‘We need to capture that.’ And they say, ‘Yeah, not right now.’

I’m not sure what really spurred me. Partly, because my career has moved to a different place. I’m not in PowerShell anymore. I felt being able to write this history would be, if not a swan song, then a nice bookend to the PowerShell part of my career. I reached out to a couple of the guys again, and they said, ‘You know what? This is the right time.’ We started talking and doing interviews.

As I was going through that, I realized the reason it’s the right time is because so many of them are no longer at Microsoft. And, more importantly, I don’t think any of the executives who had anything to do with PowerShell are still at Microsoft. They left around 2010 or 2011, so there’s no repercussions anymore.

Regarding Jeffrey Snover, do you think if anybody else had been in charge of the PowerShell project that it would have become what it is today?

Jones: I don’t think so. By no means do I want to discount all the effort everyone else put in, but I really do think it was due to [Snover’s] absolute dogged determination, just pure stubbornness.

He said, ‘Bill Gates got it fairly early.’ And even Bill Gates getting it and understanding it and supporting it didn’t help. That’s not how it worked. [Snover] really had to lead them through some — not just people who didn’t get it or didn’t care — but people who were actively working against them. There was firm opposition from the highest levels of the company to make this stop.

Because you got in close to the ground floor with PowerShell, were you able to influence any of its functionality from the outside?

Jones: Oh, absolutely. But it wasn’t really just me. It was all the PowerShell MVPs. The team had this deep recognition that we were their biggest fans — and their biggest critics.

They went out of their way to do some really sneaky stuff to make sure they could get our feedback. Windows Vista moving into Windows 7, there was a lot of secrecy. Microsoft knew it had botched — perceptually if nothing else — the Vista release. They needed Windows 7 to be a win, and they were being really close to the vest about it. For them to show us anything that had anything to do with Windows 7 was verboten at the highest levels of the company. Instead they came up with this idea of the “Windows Vista update,” which was nothing more than an excuse to show us PowerShell version 3 without Windows 7 being in the context.

They wanted to show us workflows. They put us in a room and they not only let us play with it and gave us some labs to run through, but they had cameras running the whole time. They said, ‘Tell us what you think.’

I think nearly every single release of PowerShell from version 2 onward had a readme buried somewhere. They listed the bug numbers and the person who opened it. A ton of those were us: the MVPs and people in the community. We would tell the team, ‘Look, this is what we feel. This is what’s wrong and here’s how you can fix it.’ And they would give you fine-print credit. Even before it went open source, there was probably more community interaction with PowerShell than most Microsoft products.

I came from the perspective of teaching. By the time I was really in with PowerShell, I wasn’t using it in a production environment. I was teaching it to people. My feedback tended to be along the lines of, ‘Look, this is hard for people to grasp. It’s hard to understand. Here’s what you could do to improve that.’ And a lot of that stuff got adopted.

Was there any desire — or an offer — to join Microsoft to work on PowerShell directly?

Jones: If I had ever asked, it probably could have happened. I had had previous dealings with Microsoft, as a contractor, that I really enjoyed.

I applied for a job there — and I did not enjoy how that went down.

My feeling was that I was making a lot more money and having a lot more impact as an independent.

What is your take on PowerShell since it made the switch to an open source project?

Jones: It’s been interesting. PowerShell 6, which was the first cross-platform open source was a big step backward in a lot of ways. Just getting it cross-platform was a huge step. You couldn’t take the core of PowerShell, and, at that point, 11 years of add-on development and bring it all with you at once. I think a lot of people looked at it as an interesting artifact.

The very best IT people reach out for whatever tool you put in front of them. They rip it apart and they try to figure out how is this going make my job better, easier, faster, different, whatever. They use all of them.
Don JonesVice president of content partnerships and strategic initiatives, Pluralsight

[In PowerShell 7], they’ve done so much work to make it more functional. There’s so much parity now across macOS, Linux and Windows. I feel the team tripled down and really delivered and did exactly what they said they were going to do.

I think a lot more people take it seriously. PowerShell is now built into the Kali Linux distribution because it’s such a good tool. I think a lot of really hardcore, yet open-minded, Linux and Unix admins look at PowerShell and — once they take the time to understand it — they realize this is what shells structurally should have been.

I think PowerShell has earned its place in a lot of people’s toolboxes and putting it out there as open source was such a huge step.

Do you see PowerShell ever making any inroads with Linux admins?

Jones: I don’t think they’re the target audience. If you’ve got a tool that does the job, and you know how to use it, and you know how to get it done, that’s fine.

We have a lot of home construction here in [Las] Vegas. I see guys putting walls up with a hammer and nails. Am I going to force you to use a nail gun? No. Are you going to be a lot faster? Yes, if you took a little time to learn how to use it. You never see younger guys with the hammer; it’s always the older guys who’ve been doing this for a long, long time.

I feel that PowerShell has already been through this cycle once. We tried to convince everyone that you needed to use PowerShell instead of the GUI, and a lot of admins stuck with the GUI. That’s a fairly career-limiting move right now, and they’re all finding that out. They’re never going to go any further. The people who picked it up, they’re the ones who move ahead.

The very best IT people reach out for whatever tool you put in front of them. They rip it apart and they try to figure out how is this going make my job better, easier, faster, different, whatever. They use all of them.

You don’t lose points for using PowerShell and Bash. It would be stupid for Linux administrators to fully commit to PowerShell and only PowerShell, because you’re going to run across systems that have this other thing. You need to know them both.

Microsoft has released a lot of administrative tools — you’ve got PowerShell, Office 365 CLI and Azure CLI to name a few. Someone new to IT might wonder where to concentrate their efforts when there are all these options.

Jones: You get a pretty solid command-line tool in the Azure CLI. You get something that’s very purpose-specific. It’s scoped in fairly tightly. It doesn’t have an infinite number of options. It’s a straightforward thing to write tutorials around. You’ve got an entire REST API that you can fire things off at. And if you’re a programmer, that makes a lot more sense to you and you can write your own tools around that.

PowerShell sits kind of in the middle and can be a little bit of both. PowerShell is really good at bringing a bunch of things together. If you’re using the Azure CLI, you’re limited to Azure. You’re not going to use the Azure CLI to do on-prem stuff. PowerShell can do both. Some people don’t have on-prem, they don’t need that. They just have some very simple basic Azure needs. And the CLI is simpler and easier to start with.

Where do you see PowerShell going in the next few years?

Jones: I think you’re going to continue to see a lot of investment both by Microsoft and the open source community. I think the open source people have — except for the super paranoid ones — largely accepted that Microsoft’s purchase of GitHub was not inimical. I think they have accepted that Microsoft is really serious about open source software. I think people are really focusing on making PowerShell a better tool for them, which is really what open source is all about.

I think you’re going to continue to see it become more prevalent on more platforms. I think it will wind up being a high common denominator for hiring managers who understand the value it brings to a business and some of the outcomes it helps achieve. Even AWS has invested heavily in their management layer in PowerShell, because they get it — also because a lot of the former PowerShell team members now work for AWS, including Ken Hansen and Bruce Payette, who invented the language.

I suspect that, in the very long run, it will probably shift away from Microsoft control and become something a little more akin to Mozilla, where there will be some community foundation that, quote unquote, owns PowerShell, where a lot of people contribute to it on an equal basis, as opposed to Microsoft, which is still holding the keys but is very engaged and accepting of community contributions.

I think PowerShell will probably outlive most of its predecessors over the very long haul.

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For Sale – 19 ” x 2 Monitor

Hi All

I have 2 of 19 ” for sales.

– Dell 19″ Model 1908FPt : , VGA x 1 , DVI x 1 , USB x 2 on the side , USB x 2 on the back . I think you can find more detail on google. Price £20

– Acer 19″ Model ACER AL1906 : VGA x 1 . as well more detail on google. Price £10

As I don’t have any appropriate boxes for these 2 monitors , so you ‘re welcome for the collection.
Please see the attached file for the photos.

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For Sale – Brand new Alienware m15 R2 (i7, RTX 2070, 256GB SSD)

I won this beautiful piece of equipment at a conference in NL a couple of weeks back but I use a Macbook Pro for work and don’t game so it’s been sitting around collecting dust and now, trying to fund a start-up it’s a good opportunity for me to sell.

It’s never been used, the lid has been opened once to take the picture for this thread and it’s never been out of the box. Seals still on the screen. Did a bit of research and these are real state of the art machines, not too clunky and the keyboard isn’t obnoxiously small – over-all I think whoever buys it will have a hell of an experience.

I’ve sold phones on here and also a Macbook Pro without issue! Also, i’ll link my ebay profile where I used to sell refurbed phones if anyone wants to check my rep.

I will be posting for FREE using the most competent and reliable logistics companies so either DHL or DPD – tracked a signed for next day delivery. No RoyalMail BS in this thread!

(Also, the box has the plastic on it because DHL stick their labels in a sticky bag)

SPECS:

9th gen Intel Core i7 9750H
8GB DDR4 RAM
RTX 2070 8GB GDDR6
256GB PCIe SSD
15 inch FHD 60hz display
Comes with Win-10 pre installed.

Also comes with European power adapter (as I won it in NL) so a UK wall adapter will work fine.

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For Sale – Gaming PC: 7700k/16GB/Vega56/NVME SSD Full specs inside

So I’ve gone back to team red out of a need to do hefty video editing and as such selling my old PC which was mostly used for gaming:

Intel Core i7 7700K (delid + liquid metal) – Cooled by a Noctua NH-D15
16GB Corsair Dominator Platinum 3200MHz C16
Asus Intel ROG STRIX Z270E Gaming
Samsung 960 EVO M.2 SSD (250GB)
Radeon Vega 56 8GB HBM2 (Purchased April 2019 so still within warranty)
Corsair Crystal 460X Midi Tower
BeQuiet PurePower 11 500W 80Plus Bronze PSU

If I spec up a PC today on OcUK at the same or lower spec parts it comes to £793, so this is available for £600 collected.

Also available are 2x WD RED 6TB NAS hard drives for £130 each. Replaced by larger capacity drives so working fine just no longer used. S.M.A.R.T tests etc all available.

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PowerShell tutorials capture attention of admins in 2019

As 2019 reaches its end, it’s time to look back at the tips and tutorials published this year that mattered the most to the Windows Server audience.

Microsoft has redoubled its efforts to make PowerShell the overarching management tool for workloads no matter where they reside. Interest in automation and PowerShell tutorials that explain how to streamline everyday tasks continue to resonate with readers. In this top-five compilation of the 2019 tips that picked up the most page views, nearly all the articles focus on PowerShell, from learning advanced text manipulation techniques to plumbing the features in the newer, open source version initially dubbed PowerShell Core. But the article that claimed the top spot indicates many administrators have their eyes on a relatively new way to manage resources in their organization.

5. Windows Compatibility module expands PowerShell Core reach

The first PowerShell Core release, version 6.0, arrived in January 2018, but it was a step back in many ways for administrators who had been used to the last Windows PowerShell version, 5.1. This new PowerShell version, developed to also run on the other major operating system platforms of Linux and macOS, lost a fair amount of functionality due to the switch from the Windows-based .NET Framework to the cross-platform .NET Core. The end result was a fair number of cmdlets administrators needed to do their jobs did not run on PowerShell Core.

With any project of this size, there will be growing pains. Administrators can continue to use Windows PowerShell, which Jeffrey Snover said will always be supported by Microsoft and should serve IT workers faithfully for many years to come. But to ease this transition, the PowerShell team released a Windows Compatibility module in late 2018 to close the functionality gap between the Windows and open source versions of PowerShell. This tip digs into the background of the module and how to use it on PowerShell Core to work with some previously incompatible cmdlets.

4. How to use the PowerShell pending reboot module

Among the many perks of PowerShell is its extensibility. Administrative functions that were once out of reach — or laborious to accomplish — can magically appear once you download a module from the PowerShell Gallery. Install a module and you get several new cmdlets to make your administrative life just a bit easier.

For example, after Patch Tuesday rolls around and you’ve applied Microsoft’s updates to all your systems, the patching process generally is not complete — and the system not fully protected from the latest threats — until the machine reboots. A Microsoft field engineer developed a pending reboot module that detects if a Windows system has not rebooted. These insights can help you see which users might require a nudge to restart their machines to make sure your patching efforts don’t go for naught. This tip explains how to install and use the pending reboot cmdlet.

3. How to configure SSL on IIS with PowerShell    

Among its many uses in the enterprise, Windows Server also functions as a web server. Microsoft shops can use the Internet Information Services role in Windows Server to serve up content and host web applications for use across the internet or in a company’s private intranet.

To keep threat actors from sniffing out traffic between your IIS web server and the clients, add HTTPS to encrypt data transmissions to and from the server. HTTPS works in tandem with Transport Layer Security (TLS), the more secure ancestor to Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Most in IT still refer to the certificates that facilitate the encrypted transmissions between servers and clients as SSL certificates. This tip explains how to use PowerShell to deploy a self-signed TLS/SSL certificate to an IIS website, which can come in handy if you spin up a lot of websites in your organization.

2. Hone your PowerShell text manipulation skills

It might seem like a basic ability, but learning how to read text from and write text to files using PowerShell opens up more advanced avenues of automation. There are several cmdlets tailored for use with text files to perform several tasks, including importing text into a file that can then be manipulated for other uses. It’s helpful to know that while text might look the same, Windows PowerShell and PowerShell Core have different ways of dealing with encoding. This tip covers some of the finer details of working with text in PowerShell to broaden your automation horizons.

1. Azure AD Premium P1 vs. P2: Which is right for you?

Most organizations require some way to manage their resources — from user accounts to physical devices, such as printers — and Active Directory has been the tool for the job for many years. Based on Windows Server, the venerable on-premises identity and access management platform handles the allocation and permissions process to ensure users get the right permissions to access what they need.

Microsoft unveiled its cloud-based successor to Active Directory, calling it Azure Active Directory, in 2013. While similar, the two products are not a straight swap. If you use Microsoft’s cloud, either for running VMs in Azure or using the collaboration apps in Office 365, then you’ll use Azure Active Directory to manage resources on those platforms. This tip digs into some of the permutations between the two higher-end editions of Azure Active Directory to help you decide which one might work best for your organization.

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For Sale – Custom Gaming PC – Intel i5 3570 – Mini ATX – GTX 770 – 8GB RAM – SSD – Windows 10 Pro

For sale here is a small form factor gaming PC, as I decided to go back to using console. It can handle most latest titles in medium settings and some not-so-demanding ones in high. Will come with power cord and few bits of screws that come with the case. As I don’t have the box anymore, this is only to collect in person from Tooting, South London. Looking for a quick sale as I’m moving in 3 weeks time.

Specifications:
Case

Kolink Satellite Micro ATX Desktop PC Gaming CubeCase Black

Motherboard
MSI H61M-P20-G3 Motherboard (Intel H61 Processor,M-ATX, Gigabit LAN, Socket LGA1155, USB2)

CPU
Intel Core i5-3570 Processor and Intel Cooler

Graphics Card
EVGA GeForce GTX770 SuperClocked with EVGA ACXCooler, 2GB GDDR5 256bit, DL DVI-I, DVI-D, HDMI, DP, SLI Ready

Memory
Ballistix Sport 8GB Kit (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 UDIMM

SSD
Samsung SSD 850 Evo 250GB ATA
Integral V Series 120 GB SATA III Solid StateDrive, 2.5 Inch

PSU
EVGA 500 W1, 80+ WHITE 500W

Misc
USB Bluetooth Adaptor

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For Sale – Core i5 4670k – 8gb Ripjaw Ram – Gigabyte Motherboard – Apple Magic Keyboard 2 (Seperate or as combo)

Hi, I am selling an Apple Magic Keyboard 2 bought a few months back but I’ve only really used it two or three times. I intended to use when having my MacBook hooked up to my main monitor but ended up still using my PC for the majority of web development stuff.

Also comes with

  • Original box in good condition (with cellophane around it except the opening)
  • Lightning Cable
  • Original packaging around the keyboard (as in the first photo)
  • Apple Sticker

Location
Sheffield
Price and currency
46
Delivery cost included
Delivery Is Included
Prefer goods collected?
I have no preference
Advertised elsewhere?
Not advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Paypal Gift / Bacs

Last edited:

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