Tag Archives: came

Deliver better experiences, insights, and care with Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare – Microsoft Industry Blogs

The world after this pandemic will not be the same as the one that came before it.

From remote teamwork and telehealth, to supply management and customer service, to critical cloud infrastructure and security—we are working alongside customers every day to help manage through a world of remote everything.

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted nearly every aspect of people’s lives and every aspect of the healthcare system. It’s preventing healthcare delivery practices from operating at normal business levels, it’s disrupting patient access to high-quality medical care, and it’s forcing everyone to think about how to continue pushing forward in new and different ways. Our commitment has always been to ensure the tools we provide are up to the task of supporting our customers in their time of need. Hear CEO Satya Nadella’s words for more on Microsoft’s thoughts for our healthcare workers.

In that same spirit, Microsoft is announcing its first industry-specific cloud offering, Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare, now available in public preview and through a free trial for the next six months. The offer brings together existing and future capabilities that deliver automation and efficiency on high-value workflows, as well as deep data analytics for both structured and unstructured data, that enable customers to turn insight into action. A robust partner ecosystem extends the value of the platform with additional solutions to address the most pressing challenges the healthcare industry is facing today. Healthcare will be the first industry served with additional industry-specific clouds to follow.

Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare brings together trusted and integrated capabilities for customers and partners that enrich patient engagement and connects health teams to help improve collaboration, decision-making, and operational efficiencies. Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare will support accelerated health transformation into the future, with capabilities for customers spanning the most important needs for healthcare organizations:

  • Enhancing patient engagement
  • Empowering health team collaboration
  • Improving operational and clinical data insights
  • Cloud built on interoperability, security, and trust
  • Extensible healthcare partner ecosystem

Enhance patient engagement

More than ever, being connected is critical to creating an individualized patient experience. Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare helps healthcare organizations to engage in more proactive ways with their patients, allows caregivers to improve the efficiency of their workflows and streamline interactions with patients with more actionable results. Organizations can use Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare to extend the value of Microsoft Dynamics 365 Marketing, Dynamics 365 Customer Service, and Azure IoT to deploy:

  • Consumer-friendly patient experience: healthcare organizations can create individualized care plans for patients, or groups of patients, that allows providers to publicize relevant content and proactive outreach to patients on any device when they need it. Deploy secure virtual visits, chatbot assessments, and remote health monitoring to create a connected health experience. One of those tools is our Microsoft Healthcare Bot Service. Since March, more than 1,600 instances of COVID-19 bots based on our service have gone live impacting more than 31 million people across 23 countries. The CDC and healthcare systems from Seattle to Copenhagen, and from Rome to Tel Aviv, are using this service to create COVID-19 self-assessment tools to reduce some of the strain on their emergency hotlines.
  • Connected physician and referral management: care teams can easily create referrals, search for providers, and understand physician spend, satisfaction, and enhanced analytics on referral categories.
  • Enhanced patient engagement portals: patients and providers can easily interact through this self-service portal which enables various healthcare tasks such as online appointment booking, reminders, bill pay, and much more. This also allows providers the ability to engage with patients easily through the device of their choice.
  • Intelligent patient outreach: enables healthcare organizations to design interactive patient journeys to nurture leads, publicize relevant events, and contact patients with preventative and care management programs that help promote better health outcomes.
  • Continuous patient monitoring through IoT: generate secure, scalable data ingestion from medical devices to allow care teams to monitor patients in and outside of clinical facilities. With real-time insights, care teams can provide timely escalations of care, reduce readmissions, and provide personalized, predictive care.

Empower health team collaboration

Even before the current global pandemic, the healthcare industry has been in the midst of a massive shift marked by the rise of team-based care due to increased medical specialization, exponential growth in the volume of digital patient data, and increasingly demanding data protection requirements. Too often, the tools providers use to coordinate patient care are fragmented and impede the collaborative workflows required in a complex care environment.

To address these challenges, we have been building capabilities in Microsoft 365 and Microsoft Teams that streamline healthcare workflows and provide a secure platform for connected care coordination. Teams, which supports HIPAA compliance and is HITRUST certified, brings together chat, voice and video meetings, and offers recording and transcription, as well as secure messaging features, available across devices.

As we’ve seen during the COVID-19 pandemic, clinicians also need greater flexibility and convenience in how they are able to connect with patients. Today we are announcing general availability of the Bookings app in Teams, which enables healthcare providers to schedule, manage, and conduct provider-to-patient virtual visits within Teams.

In an effort to protect patients and providers while maintaining continuity of ambulatory care, healthcare providers including St. Luke’s University Health Network, Stony Brook Medicine, and Calderdale  & Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust in the U.K. have been using teams to conduct virtual patient visits and provide continuity of care while protecting providers and patients. Patients receive a customized email and can join their appointment in one click on a desktop, or in the Microsoft Teams iOS or Android Mobile apps.

Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare brings together existing and future capabilities important to how care teams communicate, collaborate, coordinate care, and generate insights that help improve patient outcomes and workflow effectiveness.

Improve clinical and operational data insights

Healthcare organizations are taking advantage of building virtual agents, automating workflows, analyzing data, and sharing insights in real-time. COVID-19 has accelerated the urgent need for healthcare organizations to create no-code/low-code apps and workflows in hours or days, not weeks or months. Thousands of organizations are relying on new integration between Microsoft Teams and Power Apps to share timely information.

In just two weeks, Swedish Health Services, the largest non-profit health provider in the Seattle area, used Power Apps to build a solution to track critical supplies.

Microsoft’s newest releases that support FHIR technology enabled the Chicago Dept of Public Health (CDPH) and Rush Hospital with an end to end solution to bring together clinical, lab and capacity data analysis in just a few days to support the COVID crisis. Using the C-CDA converter to FHIR converter, the API for FHIR—a cloud-based FHIR Server, and the Power BI FHIR connector, CDPH was able to ingest data in different formats with a simple API call, convert it to FHIR and add visualizations and downstream analytics that enabled rapid connectivity of data and interoperability across multiple hospitals.

Cloud built on interoperability, security, and trust

Underpinning all these great capabilities is our focus and commitment to interoperability, security, and compliance. We know that to provide the best care, healthcare organizations need to be able to consume, access, and share information rapidly and securely.

The future of highly secure data agility in the cloud– and the interoperability tools that healthcare organizations need to organize their health data in the cloud around FHIR – are integrated into Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare. Last year Microsoft was the first cloud to offer a generally available Azure FHIR service—which allows healthcare organizations to ingest and persist data in the FHIR format.

Healthcare organizations that are already underway with open standards like FHIR have been able to collaborate in rapid time, and it’s given their teams the ability to care for patients with a high level of agility. We’re seeing examples all around the globe and it’s been both humbling and inspiring to see the FHIR technology we’ve built specifically for health workloads in Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare support these efforts.

Security and compliance remain a strategic priority for healthcare organizations, and the shift to remote work only increases the need for integrated, end-to-end security architecture that reduces both cost and complexity. Microsoft has the highest levels of commitment to trust, security, and meeting industry compliance standards and certifications in the industry.

Extensible healthcare partner ecosystem

Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare also enables healthcare systems to take advantage of our robust ecosystem of healthcare partners who can provide solutions that complement and extend core cloud capabilities. Using these partners’ expertise will help organizations through EHR and platform integrations, implementation services, and healthcare SaaS offerings. Microsoft is proud to work closely with the leading providers of health systems, from organizations like Accenture, Adaptive Biotechnologies, Allscripts, DXC Technology, Innovaccer, KPMG, and Nuance to co-develop new solutions with leaders in their respective sectors like Humana, Providence, Novartis, and Walgreens Boots Alliance.

What’s powerful about these tools is that they’re being used not just by providers in the delivery of healthcare but by ISVs, pharmaceutical and life sciences companies, and government systems. We’ve seen companies like KenSci—a healthcare AI & data management platform—launch their Mobile Command Center with Real Time Bed Management, Ventilator Utilization, and Capacity Planning for COVID-19. In just 48 hours they can create a hospital solution—even those using legacy data systems—and help manage their data in the Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare using the open standard of FHIR.

Commitment to industry

We know that technology has a role to play in accelerating progress for solutions to the pandemic and other pressing healthcare concerns and challenges. Looking ahead, we expect to see healthcare organizations continue to use newly implemented technology tools throughout the recovery period and into the new normal. Companies that need to accelerate their digital transformation during this time will continue to rely on trusted partners who can support their trust, security, and technology adoption into the future.

Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare will make it easier for them to remain agile and focus on what they do best – delivering better experiences, insights, and care.

Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare is available for a free trial over the next 6 months. Click to see the launch during the Microsoft Healthcare Summit, view a demo, or learn more about public preview.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

How to Set Up Hyper-V VM Groups with PowerShell

The other day I was poking around the Hyper-V PowerShell module and I came across a few commands that I must have initially ignored. I had no idea this feature existed until I came across the cmdlets. I can’t find anything in the Hyper-V Manager console that exposes this feature as well so if you want to take advantage of it, PowerShell is the way to go. It turns out that you can organize your virtual machines into groups with these commands.

VM Group cmdlets in PowerShell

NOTE: You should take the time to read through full help and examples before using any of these commands.

Creating a VM Group

The commands for working with VM Groups support remote connections and credentials. The default is the local host and take note that you can only specify credentials for remote connections. Creating a new group is a pretty simple matter. All you need is a group name and type.  You can create a group that is a collection of virtual machines (VMCollectionType) or a group that is a collection of other groups (ManagementCollection). I’m going to create a group for virtual machines.

Creating a new VM group

I’ve created the group and can retrieve it with Get-VMGroup.

Retrieving a VM Group with PowerShell

You can only create one group at a time, but you can create the same group on multiple servers.

This command created the management group Master on both Hyper-V hosts.

Adding a Group Member

Adding members to a group requires a separate step but isn’t especially difficult. To add members to a VMCollectionType group, you need references to the virtual machine object.

The command won’t write anything to the pipeline unless you use -Passthru. You can take advantage of nested expressions and create a group with members all in one line.

With this one-line command, I created another group call Win and added a few virtual machines to the group.

Creating a VM Group and Members in a PowerShell one-liner

Since I have two groups, let me add them to the management group.

Adding VM Management Groups with PowerShell

And yes, you can put a virtual machine in more than one group.

Retrieving Groups and Group Members

Using Get-VMGroup is pretty straightforward. Although once you understand the object output you can customize it.

Enumerating VM Groups

Depending on the group type you will have a nested collection of objects. You can easily enumerate them using dotted object notation.

Listing VM Group virtual machines

You can do something similar with management groups.

Expanding VM management groups with PowerShell

Be aware that it is possible to have nested management groups which might make unrolling things to get to the underlying virtual machines a bit tricky. I would suggest restraint until you fully understand how VM groups work and how you intend to take advantage of them.

The output of the VMMembers property is the same virtual machine object you would get using Get-VM so you can pipe this to other commands.

Incorporating VM Groups into a PowerShell expression

Group membership can also be discovered from the virtual machine.

Listing groups from the virtual machine

You cannot manage group membership from the virtual machine itself.

To remove groups and members, the corresponding cmdlets should be self-evident and follow the same patterns I demonstrated for creating VM groups and adding members.

Potential Obstacles

When you assign a virtual machine to a group, the membership is linked to the virtual machine. This may pose a challenge down the road. I haven’t setup replication with a virtual machine that belongs to a group so I’m not sure what the effect if any, might be. But I do know that if you export a virtual machine that belongs to a group and import the virtual machine on a different Hyper-V host, you’ll encounter an error about the missing group. You can remove the group membership on import so it isn’t that much of a showstopper. Still, you might want to remove the virtual machine from any groups prior to exporting.

Doing More

The VM group cmdlets are very useful, but not useful enough. At least for me. I have a set of expectations for using these groups and the cmdlets as written don’t meet those expectations. Fortunately, I can write a few PowerShell functions to get the job done. Next time, I’ll share the tools I’m building around these commands.

In the meantime, I hope you’ll share how you think you’ll take advantage of this feature!

Want to boost your Hyper-V performance? Discover 6 Hardware Tweaks that will Skyrocket your Hyper-V Performance

Go to Original Article
Author: Jeffery Hicks

Fortnite vulnerability on Android causes disclosure tension

Google’s disclosure policy and Android security in general came under question after the company disclosed a flaw in the Android installer for the world’s most popular game, Fortnite. The flawed installer is only for Android users because Fortnite developer Epic Games bypassed security protections available for apps distributed through the Google Play Store, in order to maximize profits and avoid paying distribution fees to Google.

On Friday, Google disclosed the Fortnite vulnerability and described it as a risk for a man-in-the-disk attack where any “fake [Android Package Kit] with a matching package name can be silently installed” by the Fortnite installer. Google disclosed the flaw to Epic Games on Aug. 15, and Epic had produced a patch within 24 hours.

After testing the patch and deploying it to users on Aug. 16, Epic asked Google on the issue tracker page if they could have “the full 90 days before disclosing this issue so our users have time to patch their devices.” Google did not respond on the issue tracker until Aug. 24, when it noted that “now the patched version of Fortnite Installer has been available for 7 days we will proceed to unrestrict this issue in line with Google’s standard disclosure practices.”

Epic Games founder Tim Sweeney accused Google on Twitter of wanting “to score cheap PR points” by disclosing the Fortnite vulnerability because Epic Games had released the game outside of the Google Play Store.

Epic Games had previously claimed the reason for not releasing Fortnite for Android through the Play Store was twofold: to maintain a “direct relationship” with customers and to avoid the 30% cut Google would take from in-app purchases. Security experts immediately expressed skepticism about the move because of the security checks in Android that need to be turned off in order to sideload an app from outside of the Play Store and the risk of malicious fakes.

Sweeney admitted on Twitter that the Fortnite vulnerability was Epic’s responsibility, but took issue with Google’s fast disclosure.

It is unclear if Epic Games contacted users directly regarding the Fortnite vulnerability and the need to update. And the company did not respond to requests for comment at the time of this post.

Sweeney did note on Twitter that the “Fortnite installer only updates when you run it or run the game” and said Google was monitoring the Fortnite vulnerability situation.

Liviu Arsene, senior e-threat analyst at Romania-based antimalware firm Bitdefender, said that “from a security perspective there’s no right or wrong in this scenario.”

From a security perspective there’s no right or wrong in this scenario.
Liviu Arsenesenior e-threat analyst, Bitdefender

“As soon as the vulnerability was reported, Epic fixed [it] within 24 hours, which is commendable, and then Google publicly disclosed it according to their policy. Technically, users are now safe and informed regarding a potential security vulnerability that could have endangered their privacy and devices,” Arsene wrote via email. “Granted, not all users will receive and install the update instantly, but the same can be said for most security patches and updates. As long as Epic is committed to delivering patches for their apps, regardless if they’re in Google Play or not, and Google is committed to finding and responsibly disclosing vulnerabilities, security is enforced and users are the ones that benefit most.”

ICS security fails the Black Hat test

The news at Black Hat 2018 wasn’t great when it came to industrial control systems. But while numerous sessions added up to sweeping condemnation of ICS security, there was at least the occasional saving grace that some vendors will correct some problems — at least some of the time. Still, the apparent lack of a security-conscious culture within these organizations means they’ll only fix the minimum, leaving similar products with the same underlying hardware, firmware and fatal bugs untouched and unsecured.

Speaking in a session, called “Breaking the IIoT: Hacking Industrial Control Gateways,” Thomas Roth, security researcher and founder of Leveldown Security, an embedded and ICS security consulting and research company based in Esslingen, Germany, walked through the security faults of a series of five gateway devices he’d found at prices he could afford on eBay. He wanted to look at commonly deployed, relatively current devices — things you find in the real world.

“If you go out on the network and start scanning, you’ll find thousands of these devices. In fact, you’ll find entire network ranges that are used almost exclusively for these devices,” he said.

“Often, they use static IP addresses with no VPN protection.” One device he looked at had a proprietary protocol for its wireless communications. But if you could break it — and he did — you had access to every one of those devices in the field, because the network addressing architecture was flat and unsegmented.

The first device he looked at was typical of his various experiments, tackling a Moxa W2150A which connects ICS devices to wireless networks via an Ethernet port on the device side and a wireless interface on the other side. In between the two interfaces is an easily opened case that reveals a circuit board with pads for connecting to a debugging port. Roth discovered, in a common theme across many of the devices discussed at the conference, the port was a serial terminal connection that booted directly to a root shell in Linux.

“This is a design decision, not a bug,” Roth said. But he noted that if you have the device and you can access a root shell, then as you are writing exploits, you can debug them directly on the device, “which is a pretty nice situation to be in.”

Roth noted the firmware for the device was available on the internet from the Moxa website, but it was encrypted. At first, this seemed like a dead end. But in looking at earlier firmware versions, he noticed one of the upgrades included adding the feature of encrypting the firmware.

This led him to an unencrypted update version, which included a package called “upgrade_firmware.” This, in turn, led to a function called “firmware_decrypt” — a function name that gave the audience a chuckle — which gave him plaintext access to the current version of the software. The decryption key was, needless to say, included in the upgrade code.

Roth raised an issue that hasn’t been much discussed in ICS security: supply chain security issues caused by the wide prevalence of openly accessible terminal access ports on devices. You can change the firmware, he said, write the changed version back to the device, return it to your distributor without mentioning the change, “and they will happily resell it to someone else.” In fact, he knows this because he conducted an experiment and was sold a device with firmware he had previously rewritten.

Roth discussed four more devices in some detail, with two of them still in the process of disclosure, “and there are a lot of fun issues.”

Beyond Roth’s pathway strewn with pwned gateways, there were other such sessions, including ones that found significant vulnerabilities in medical devices, cellular gateways, smart city infrastructure and satellite communications.

Jonathan Butts, CEO of security consultancy QED Secure Solutions, located in Coppell, Texas, noted in a press conference at the event that dealing with vendors around ICS security disclosure had been particularly frustrating. In the case of a pacemaker made by Medtronic, a protracted process leading to the company deciding that changes in the product weren’t necessary led Butts and co-speaker Billy Rios, founder of WhiteScope LLC, a cybersecurity company based in Half Moon Bay, Calif., to demonstrate their attack live and let the audience judge for themselves.

“To be honest,” Butts said, “after about the one-and-a-half-year mark, and you see stuff like [Medtronic’s response], you get fed up.”

ICS security: Protection? Not

While it’s theoretically possible to protect at least the devices that aren’t implanted in human bodies by placing the ICS equivalents of a firewall at strategic network junction points, a session by Airbus security evaluators Julien Lenoir and Benoit Camredon showed a widely deployed ICS firewall made by Belden could be remotely exploited.

The Tofino Xenon device is typically situated between the IP-based control network and local ICS assets that use Modbus, EtherNet/IP or OPC protocols. Interestingly, the device itself doesn’t have an IP address; it is essentially invisible to ordinary interrogation on the network.

A custom protocol allows a Windows machine running a configurator to discover and then send configuration data to a Xenon device. The configurator knows the addresses of protected ICS devices and knows the Xenon is somewhere between the configurator and the devices. The Xenon knows to watch for packets that carry a specific payload and recognizes them as packets from a configurator.

The two researchers were able to reverse-engineer the protocol enough to understand the arrangement that was used for encryption keys. The configurator discovers devices using a common key and then generates two additional keys that are unique to the particular pairing of that configurator and that specific firewall. All of these keys could be extracted from the discovery session, and then the keys unique to the device were used to establish a connection with the device.

“We were able to get a root shell,” Lenoir told the audience, heralding the familiar theme that almost all ICS devices are actually outdated Linux kernels. “Once everything was running as root, now the appliance was no longer a black box, but was instead a Linux kernel.”

From here, they settled on an attack model that used the devices’ ability to be updated from files on a USB stick. Camredon explained the updates comprised two files, both encrypted. “One is an update script, and one is a data file that is an image, including an image of the kernel.”

It turned out that all configurators and all Tofino Xenon devices used the same key for decrypting the update files. Because they had access to root on the Xenon, they were able to extract this key, at which point they further discovered there were no checks in the update script to ensure the data file hadn’t been tampered with since it was created.

Thus, a breached Xenon could be modified in whatever way the attackers wanted, an image of that system made, and the image could be encrypted and included in an update package without the separate installation script detecting the change.

The Xenon has been updated to correct these problems since the researchers disclosed their findings. So, in theory, the firewall is back in business. One problem Roth noted, though, is these systems often come in dozens of variants, with different names and model numbers.

“If you report a bug to some of these vendors,” Roth said, “the vulnerability gets fixed, but then there are 10 different devices which run the same firmware, and they are left completely unpatched.”

Roth suggested this was a clear indication of the lack of security culture at many ICS vendors.

“It’s like exploiting in the ’90s,” he concluded. “We have no integrity protections on any of these devices.”

At another moment, he made a sweeping generalization: “Everything runs as root; everything runs on outdated Linux kernels; everything runs on outdated web servers. If any of these components fails, you have root permission.”

For Sale – Apple MacBook Pro SSD – Samsung Apple 256GB SSD (MZ-JPV256S/0A4)

I upgraded the SSD on my MacBook Pro 13″ Early 2015 so I am selling the 256GB that came with the machine.

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

The manufacturer date is January 2017.
As I mentioned previously, this has been taken out from a MBP 13″ Early 2015 laptop but I believe this SSD is compatible with 2013 – 2015 MBP Retinas. I offer no guarantee for this.

Price and currency: 150
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: Edinburgh
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Apple MacBook Pro SSD – Samsung Apple 256GB SSD (MZ-JPV256S/0A4)

I upgraded the SSD on my MacBook Pro 13″ Early 2015 so I am selling the 256GB that came with the machine.

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

The manufacturer date is January 2017.
As I mentioned previously, this has been taken out from a MBP 13″ Early 2015 laptop but I believe this SSD is compatible with 2013 – 2015 MBP Retinas. I offer no guarantee for this.

Price and currency: 150
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: Edinburgh
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Apple MacBook Pro SSD – Samsung Apple 256GB SSD (MZ-JPV256S/0A4)

I upgraded the SSD on my MacBook Pro 13″ Early 2015 so I am selling the 256GB that came with the machine.

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

The manufacturer date is January 2017.
As I mentioned previously, this has been taken out from a MBP 13″ Early 2015 laptop but I believe this SSD is compatible with 2013 – 2015 MBP Retinas. I offer no guarantee for this.

Price and currency: 150
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: Edinburgh
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.