Tag Archives: came

For Sale – iMac Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, Late 2015 Reduced £600

Bought from eBay and came with Curry’s extended warranty which has now expired.

I have the trackpad which I paid extra for and could swap to the version 1s to bring the price down. Was going to give them to the brother in law.

It doesn’t come with a lightning cable, but these are readily available or might be able to include one depending on offer.

I’ve not had any work done to it or issues with the machine except it’s been under utilised.

For Sale – iMac Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, Late 2015 Reduced £600

Bought from eBay and came with Curry’s extended warranty which has now expired.

I have the trackpad which I paid extra for and could swap to the version 1s to bring the price down. Was going to give them to the brother in law.

It doesn’t come with a lightning cable, but these are readily available or might be able to include one depending on offer.

I’ve not had any work done to it or issues with the machine except it’s been under utilised.

When barbed wire, ammo cans, and dirt get you to Microsoft – IT Showcase Blog

Britney O’Dell came to Microsoft sprinkled with a fine layer of dirt.

Call it grit.

It first blew over her in the deserts of southern Arizona, where she could have easily lost her way as the lone person who believed she could climb out of her no-exit town.

She collected more when, on her first day of Marine Corps boot camp, her drill instructor, in a stern voice, proclaimed to everyone that she would be the first to quit.

She lined her pockets with more grit when, just after landing her dream job at Microsoft, there was a reorg and her job was eliminated.

Never one to give up, each time O’Dell dusted herself off, always leaning on her military training and her hardy soul.

“We were trained to prepare for the unexpected,” she says. “You never know what you’re going to face on the battlefield. I feel like that’s a metaphor you can apply to your life—you have to treat life like it’s a battlefield. When something happens to you, you can’t dwell on it. You have to find clarity somewhere in there and keep pushing.”

That early attention at boot camp?

“If anything, I just got stronger at a faster rate,” she says. “I was getting used to intensity.”

Each step of the way, she held true to a promise she made to herself when she was very young—no matter what, she was going to get an education and make something of herself. It was her ticket to happiness.

Charting her path

O’Dell grew up in sand-blown Casa Grande, Arizona, lodged in the desert halfway between Phoenix and Tucson. Everyone who knew her knew she had a lot of potential and they didn’t want her to make a mistake that would jeopardize her future. Like the landscape, her family was broken.

“My father was never in the picture, and my mom would come and go. I know she wanted what was best for me and did her best to make that happen,” O’Dell says. “Thankfully, I had my amazing grandparents who were able to step in and help with the parental guidance.”

Strong role models were in short supply.

“I was learning from all the mistakes I noticed from those around me,” she says. “I knew I didn’t want my life to take a turn in the wrong direction, not ever making something of my life.”

College was the way out, but how? Money was scarce, and so was help.

Powered by a strong work ethic and a love of math, she enrolled in community college. She paid her way with scholarships and her job as a bookkeeper at her local grocer, where she started working when she was 16. She moved out on her own at age 18, working eight hours each morning and taking classes each afternoon.

O’Dell got her associate degree, but she soon ran out of money and classes to take without moving away and enrolling at a university. With credit card debt mounting, she had to do something. Fearing she was about to dead-end, she made a pivotal decision that would guide the rest of her life, including her journey to Microsoft.

“The only way I could think of making it out of where I grew up was to join the military,” she says. “I would get help earning a college degree, and what better way to do it than serve my country?”

Sharpness of focus and the ability to deal with ambiguity make veterans like O’Dell great Microsoft employees, says Carol Hedly, program director for a Microsoft program that trains and helps place military service members and veterans in technology jobs at companies like Microsoft.

“They have high-level learning ability,” Hedly says. “Growth mindset is in their DNA. They are constantly training, constantly learning, constantly looking to improve things. They’re also great collaborators. They are taught to look left, look right. They are taught to deal with ambiguity. They are relentless in the persistence to identify solutions and create opportunities.”

When Microsoft says it wants to hire people with a diverse array of backgrounds, it’s so it can bring people like O’Dell here, says James Gagnon, who hired O’Dell to her second Microsoft job.

“It’s got to be her focus and determination,” says Gagnon, a senior software engineering lead. “She’s relentlessly thorough. She wants to understand what success looks like and the impact that she’s having. She’s very proactive at making sure her work is complete and making sure she meets expectations.”

Britney O'Dell in military fatigues
Britney O’Dell served in the Marine Corps for four years, rising to the rank of sergeant and leading a unit of 12 Marines. Training runs like this were one of the many ways she was challenged to improve herself.

Booting boot camp

If you’re going to sign on the dotted line, O’Dell remembers thinking, if you’re going to test your mettle in the armed services, you might as well go big. You might as well sign up for the Marine Corps.

She knew she was going to be pushed to the limit. She knew boot camp was going to be hard. But still, the harshness of it shocked her.

“The senior drill instructor sat us down,” she says. “I remember her looking at me, asking me to stand up. She had everyone look at me. ‘Remember her face,’ she said. ‘She’s not going to make it. She’s the first one who’s going to fail.’”

O’Dell bore the brunt of the instructors’ wrath for two weeks, until they grudgingly let up and life normalized into rugged training—running, lugging 45-pound ammo cans across gritty fields, low crawling under barbwire, carrying “wounded” fellow Marines on her back while under simulated enemy fire, and more running. She was also learning to make decisions under pressure, training on a specialty (for O’Dell it was managing the complicated supply chain that kept her military base working), learning how to read people, and many other life skills.

O’Dell quickly established herself, rising to the rank of sergeant, and was leading a unit of 12 Marines by the time her four-year commitment to the Marines finished. Her officers wanted her to stay in, but she had promised herself that she would use her time in the military as stepping stone toward getting her engineering degree in college.

Along the way, she got wind of the Microsoft Software and Systems Academy (MSSA), an 18-week program designed to help transitioning service members and veterans prepare for careers in technology. More information on MSSA is available at http://military.microsoft.com/mssa. O’Dell signed up, taking a series of courses to prep her for working at a company like Microsoft.

O’Dell’s class was trained in cloud server and system administration. She excelled in the program, turning it into a job interview at Microsoft, which in turn led to her landing a job as a service manager for the company’s supply chain process.

“When I joined, it was challenging,” O’Dell says. “It wasn’t the first time I started a job I didn’t know anything about. I thought the military had a lot of acronyms, Microsoft had way more. Learning the new terminology and finding the right place to jump in, build a foundation, and build upon that was the toughest part. It felt like everyone around me was running when I was still learning how to walk.”

Her job was to ensure that the processes behind delivering Microsoft products to customers was seamless.

“If something ever disrupted that process, I would gather all the details behind what went wrong and make sure the issue was mitigated or a permanent fix was implemented, getting the confirmation that the customer was no longer impacted,” she says.

When the job got difficult, she fell back the leadership skills she honed leading teams of diverse people and personalities in the Marines.

“I wasn’t afraid to ask questions,” she says.

Going in a different direction

Three months in, the supply chain group was reorganized, and her role was eliminated. An unexpected meeting, getting called into a room, and being told, “we’re going a different direction, here’s your severance package.”

“That was a little scary,” O’Dell says, but not something she couldn’t handle. “I’m not mad about it. I know it’s life—it could happen at any job.”

Thankfully, there was a robust process for helping her find a new job at Microsoft. She reached out to her community at MSSA, where a mentor helped her get interviews for other Microsoft roles.

“A former Marine veteran I met while working in my first job reached out to me and mentored me during the search for a new role,” O’Dell says. “There were other individuals who stepped in and helped with the job search as well—each played a small part that got me closer and closer to the position I have today. I’m grateful to everyone who helped.”

She ended up getting a job in Core Services Engineering and Operations, a software engineering role that she had applied for after graduating from the MSSA program. It’s a security role that she still holds today, helping make the Microsoft payee management system secure.

“It’s actually pretty cool,” she says. “I’ve made an important impact and learned new skills I didn’t think would come this soon—focusing on security has taken my career in a direction I didn’t see coming.”

Getting out of her small town, being underestimated in boot camp, and having her first job taken out from under her hasn’t held O’Dell back. She has paid off all her debts, she is working in a field that she loves, and most importantly, she’s fulfilling her promise to herself to get her education.

She’s taking courses at Bellevue College on her way to getting her degree. “I’m acing the courses,” she says. “I don’t plan to stop.”

On her terms: Ghada Khalifa is making a social impact across the Middle East and Africa – Microsoft Life

During the Egyptian revolution of 2011, urban youth groups across Egypt came together to call attention to the variety of societal challenges their communities faced, including economic issues such as high unemployment rates and low wages. With such a pervasive threat to the future of Egypt’s youth, major corporations began to advertise philanthropic programs that aimed to help.

Ghada Khalifa, who was Microsoft’s philanthropy lead for Egypt at the time, noticed a slew of campaigns aimed at supporting the people of Egypt. Despite these commitments, she said, life wasn’t necessarily getting better for the average urban Egyptian; tools and technology that would lead to jobs and empower people never materialized.

“Little to no money was put toward actual community development,” Khalifa said.

Microsoft wanted to take a different approach, using its expertise and technology resources to empower Egyptians so they could then—in turn—enact lasting change. The company assessed the situation, uncovered opportunities to truly add community value, and committed to creating programming that would prepare Egyptians to transform their communities through long-term solutions, Khalifa said.

This was the type of integrity that Khalifa had dared to wish for when she first interviewed with Microsoft for a role in antipiracy in 1996.

Khalifa had challenged her interviewer to better understand how antipiracy was being managed in Egypt. “In my religion, Islam, people who copied the software were committing a sin, so I was passionate about the company’s efforts to prevent it,” she said. “I would never accept a role because it simply drives a company’s bottom line. I would take it on because it was what I wanted to do for my country.”

She hoped her sense of responsibility to improve life for Egyptians—and her strong convictions—would be embraced.

Khalifa had first been introduced to Microsoft years earlier, while working for a friend’s computing magazine, when she had an opportunity to interview several Microsoft employees. She was invited to visit the company’s campus and learn more about its mission, which sparked her initial admiration for the company. “It was very transformative for me,” she said of that first exposure. “It gave me a long-term vision of how tech could impact life, especially in Africa, where tech can make a huge impact on our continent.”

Now, the moment to be a part of Microsoft’s work was right in front of her. But it would have to sync with her principles. Khalifa told the hiring team that if the company did anything that was non-supportive of Egypt, she could not sign on. Her hiring manager explained that that was the passion they desired in the candidate. It turned out that Microsoft valued Khalifa’s conviction and her commitment to Egypt and her culture. She was brought on board.

It was the beginning of a fruitful partnership between Microsoft and Khalifa, who would later move into a Philanthropies role, which would ultimately help to change the lives of hundreds of thousands of her fellow citizens.

Platform to make a difference

In response to the protests, Khalifa spearheaded and led an employment initiative to help Microsoft bring real value to the youth of Egypt. Her team looked at the community and government to identify opportunities for local youth, with the goal of reducing the unemployment rate. At the time there was a staggering growth in the youth population, while unemployment rates were nearly 10 times higher for urban youth with college educations than those who had completed only elementary school.

“We wanted to prevent them from going in a harmful direction, and encourage them toward a beneficiary one,” she said. “I wanted to provide the youth with hope and opportunity, while getting them out of poverty and preventing a stagnated future.”

Khalifa and her team partnered with the Ministry of Youth, the United Nations, universities, STEM schools, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to launch the initiative, part of Microsoft’s global YouthSpark program, which creates opportunities for youth around the world through technology.

The Egypt initiative kicked off in 2011, targeting underserved communities and their respective youth centers to provide IT training, web and app development courses, business training, freelance consulting company setup, and sessions on entrepreneurship. Khalifa explained that after the revolution, jobs were scarce, so the objective of her program was to create opportunity for the very youth who were in the streets during the protests.

“I spent seven months researching, attending research sessions, and meeting with a lot of the youth” to better understand the needs, then rollout the program in phases, she said.

Since 2012, the program has created 91,000 job opportunities with more than 1,400 employers in Egypt. Over 80,000 youth participants have attended career advisement sessions, and more than 400,000 youth have accessed digital, entrepreneurial, and employability skills training.

In addition to her work with the YouthSpark initiative, Khalifa was also a leader in Microsoft Egypt’s intern program. Rather than seek students from top-tier universities, she sought young adults who showed initiative, interest in tech, and came from less affluent backgrounds.

“It’s important that you allow them to innovate and drive out their capacity for leadership, then watch them excel,” she said. “We had to be willing to share the knowledge and take the risk. They learn from you, but you also learn from them.”

Khalifa—now the regional director of Microsoft Philanthropies (Middle East and Africa)—is currently working on other community development programs, using technology to address societal challenges. It’s especially exciting, she says, to be able to take this type of initiative to Sub-Saharan Africa and make an impact.

An example of such impact: across the broader Middle East and Africa region, more than 968,000 youth were upskilled through YouthSpark program activities, more than 462,000 accessed employability services, and 88,000 were connected to job opportunities in 2017 alone.

A strong foundation

“Being strong means you can stand up for what you believe is right, regardless of what others think.”

Khalifa’s father taught her this rule, which became one of the many mantras that has guided her life.

She is most grounded when she is helping others. The practice of giving back is second nature: Khalifa, born and raised in Cairo, says she was taught to always consider the welfare of others.

Her father, a former fighter pilot in Egypt, strongly believed in equality between all genders, backgrounds, and religions.

“He always encouraged us to not judge others and embrace them for who they are and to see the good in them,” she said. “When I was about 9 years old, I made a judgement about a certain sect of Islam. He was so furious that he made me read many books about other religions, not just that sect.”

Khalifa said the exercise reminded her that she is “not a god on Earth” and of the importance of being humble and respecting people of all religions and backgrounds.

As for her mother, she continues to challenge her to this day—although, Khalifa says, her mom doesn’t realize it. Khalifa laughs while explaining how her mother has this “capability of forgiving anybody for everything and never holds grudges.” As a person who is easily angered when she sees another person or an animal being treated unjustly or inhumanely, Khalifa often fights an internal battle to forgive.

“I can’t do that, but I’d love to one day,” she said.

Khalifa shuns the idea of being title driven. For her, it’s not about the position, rather it’s about the good you’ve done in the world.

“At the end of life, your position should not be measured as an output of your life. It should be about the people around you,” she said.

In her spare time

Khalifa has always been a world traveler. “I love history and archaeology, especially ancient history. I’ve enjoyed going to old monuments since I was very young and tagging along with my dad,” she said. “There’s so much wisdom. I find it impressive to see how people during that age used to think.”

Her next stop? She would love to visit China and India.

Meanwhile back home, she’s the “mom” to three Rottweilers (Star, Tarazan, and Rex) and three cats by the names of Posy, Eldu, and Lily. A staunch advocate of animal rights, Khalifa said she’s never one to back down from a fight when she’s sees an animal being harmed.

“I’m crazy about animals,” she said. “They teach humans the value of loyalty, cleanliness, calmness, and warmness.”

With her upbringing, her dedication to helping others, and her fondness of animals, Khalifa continues to embody the tenets of humility and selflessness that her parents taught her. She acknowledges that life can get busy but says one should never forget they can help and improve the world as we know it.

“Sometimes you forget humility as you go along. But, sometimes you just need to be reminded.”

Computer Components

For sale I have my 4 month old Zotac GTX 1050ti, boxed with everything it came with. It is in immaculate condition and hasn’t been used much as it was in my 2nd PC. Great wee card.

£120 delivered.

Also for sale is my 7 week old (6 hour use) Steelseries Rival 310 Gaming mouse, again comes boxed and immaculate condition with minimal use.

£40 delivered.

Thanks

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[​IMG]

Price and currency: 120…

Computer Components

Computer Components

For sale I have my 4 month old Zotac GTX 1050ti, boxed with everything it came with. It is in immaculate condition and hasn’t been used much as it was in my 2nd PC. Great wee card.

£120 delivered.

Also for sale is my 7 week old (6 hour use) Steelseries Rival 310 Gaming mouse, again comes boxed and immaculate condition with minimal use.

£40 delivered.

Thanks

[​IMG]
[​IMG]

Price and currency: 120…

Computer Components

2x 4gb iMac ram

This came out of my iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2015)

Not sure of the make or model but it was in my iMac for about 3 weeks before being changed out, just sitting taking up space.

£25 posted for the 8GB

View attachment 1006031

Price and currency: £25
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: bt – pp
Location: Aberdeen
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no…

2x 4gb iMac ram

Mac Mini (2012) i7 16GB 128GB SSD and AirPort Extreme

Apple Mac Mini (2012) with Intel i7 2.3Ghz and 16GB RAM for sale. This came as stock with 4GB RAM and a 1TB 5400RPM drive but I upgraded the memory and swapped the drive for a 128GB Samsung 850 PRO SSD.

Since recently moving house, I have no need for this excellent little computer and would describe the condition as very good with no major scuffs. Unfortunately, the original box got lost in the move.

I would very much prefer collection or a mutual meet near the Leeds area if possible….

Mac Mini (2012) i7 16GB 128GB SSD and AirPort Extreme

Mac Mini (2012) i7 16GB 128GB SSD and AirPort Extreme

Apple Mac Mini (2012) with Intel i7 2.3Ghz and 16GB RAM for sale. This came as stock with 4GB RAM and a 1TB 5400RPM drive but I upgraded the memory and swapped the drive for a 128GB Samsung 850 PRO SSD.

Since recently moving house, I have no need for this excellent little computer and would describe the condition as very good with no major scuffs. Unfortunately, the original box got lost in the move.

I would very much prefer collection or a mutual meet near the Leeds area if possible….

Mac Mini (2012) i7 16GB 128GB SSD and AirPort Extreme

Mac Mini (2012) i7 16GB 128GB SSD and AirPort Extreme

Apple Mac Mini (2012) with Intel i7 2.3Ghz and 16GB RAM for sale. This came as stock with 4GB RAM and a 1TB 5400RPM drive but I upgraded the memory and swapped the drive for a 128GB Samsung 850 PRO SSD.

Since recently moving house, I have no need for this excellent little computer and would describe the condition as very good with no major scuffs. Unfortunately, the original box got lost in the move.

I would very much prefer collection or a mutual meet near the Leeds area if possible….

Mac Mini (2012) i7 16GB 128GB SSD and AirPort Extreme