Tag Archives: can’t

For Sale – Toshiba P300 3TB 7200RPM 3.5″ SATA – BRAND NEW AND SEALED

This one.

Bought 4 of these for my server last year but for reasons I can’t begin to remember, I only used 3 of them.

Warranty until July 2018.

Price and currency: 60
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PayPal Gift / BT
Location: MANCHESTER
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
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  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Toshiba P300 3TB 7200RPM 3.5″ SATA – BRAND NEW AND SEALED

This one.

Bought 4 of these for my server last year but for reasons I can’t begin to remember, I only used 3 of them.

Warranty until July 2018.

Price and currency: 60
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PayPal Gift / BT
Location: MANCHESTER
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Toshiba P300 3TB 7200RPM 3.5″ SATA – BRAND NEW AND SEALED

This one.

Bought 4 of these for my server last year but for reasons I can’t begin to remember, I only used 3 of them.

Price and currency: 60
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PayPal Gift / BT
Location: MANCHESTER
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Gtx 1080

Founders Edition Model. I am the second owner so can’t offer any transfer of warranty. Will be shipped fully insured for peace of mind.

Price and currency: 425
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: Lichfield
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Toshiba P300 3TB 7200RPM 3.5″ SATA – BRAND NEW AND SEALED

This one.

Bought 4 of these for my server last year but for reasons I can’t begin to remember, I only used 3 of them.

Price and currency: 60
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PayPal Gift / BT
Location: MANCHESTER
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Toshiba P300 3TB 7200RPM 3.5″ SATA – BRAND NEW AND SEALED

This one.

Bought 4 of these for my server last year but for reasons I can’t begin to remember, I only used 3 of them.

Price and currency: 60
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PayPal Gift / BT
Location: MANCHESTER
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – Intel CPU

Again, you can’t compare to a 2nd hand store that has no control over its stock intake. I’d eat my hat if it winds up in stock again whilst it’s current price is so high on auction sites.

That’s all I’ll say on it, I’ve been told the same plenty before, just trying to be helpful.

For Sale – MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 8GB GAMING X

Recently got an Xbox One X and been really impress so can’t justify having an expensive Graphics Card in my PC as I think all the games I play will be on there now.

The card comes in mint condition, it’s an absolute beast and I am selling it with a heavy heart tbh. Never been hacked or modded.

It comes unboxed but as I say, in mint condition. The GPU will be very securely boxed and packaged to avoid any damage during delivery.

Looking for £400 (Paid £579.99 July of last year) via BT or PPG.

I’ll upload some pictures tomorrow :)

Price and currency: £400
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT Or PPG
Location: Norwich
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Avast Security Pro (for Mac)

The myth that Macs can’t suffer viruses, Trojans, or other types of malware attack is busted. Oh, the situation isn’t nearly as bad as on Windows or Android, but Macs really do need antivirus protection. There are free options available, including Avast Security (for Mac), but commercial antivirus utilities offer more features and do better in testing. Looking at what this product adds beyond the features in the free edition, it’s really hard to justify the price.

Similar Products

This product’s main window looks exactly like that of the free edition, except for the absence of the upgrade offer. Plenty of white space surrounds a simple security status indicator. The left-rail menu is also the same as in the free edition. The difference is that clicking Ransomware Shield or Wi-Fi Inspector brings up the component, rather than displaying an upgrade invitation. The look is very different from that of Avast Pro Antivirus, which uses a dark gray background with occasional elements in purple and green.

Pricing and OS Support

Like Bitdefender and Kaspersky, Avast supports macOS versions back to 10.9 (Mavericks). If you have an antique Mac that for some reason can’t even run Mavericks, consider ESET, ProtectWorks, or ClamXav—all of which support versions of macOS from 10.6 (Snow Leopard) on. At the other end of the spectrum, Avira, Trend Micro, and Symantec Norton Security Deluxe (for Mac) require macOS 10.11 (El Capitan) or better.

The most common pricing plan for Mac antivirus runs $39.99 per year for one license or $59.99 for three. Bitdefender, ESET Cyber Security (for Mac), Kaspersky, and Malwarebytes all fit this profile. Price-wise, Avast is on the high end, at $59.99 per year or $69.99 for three licenses. That’s expensive, considering that the free edition has all the same features except for Ransomware Shield and Wi-Fi Inspector, which I’ll detail below.

Shared Features

This utility shares all the features of the free Avast Security (for Mac), and that’s saying a lot. I’ll briefly summarize those shared features here, and you can should read my review of the free product for more details.

AV-Comparatives certified Avast’s Mac malware protection as effective. In testing, it protected against 99.9 percent of Mac malware and 100 percent of Windows malware. AV-Test Institute, the other major lab that tests Mac antivirus, did not include Avast in testing. Note, though, that Bitdefender and Kaspersky earned 100 percent in both tests, and received certification from both labs.

I don’t have the same kind of resources for antivirus testing under macOS as I do for Windows. I did try scanning a folder containing my current collection of Windows malware. Avast detected and quarantined 85 percent of the samples, which is quite good. Only Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus (for Mac), with 86 percent, and Sophos, with 100 percent, have done better. At the low end, McAfee caught 25 percent and Intego just 18 percent.

Avast’s full scan finished in 14.5 minutes, which is quite a bit faster than the current average of 24 minutes. The impressive Home Network Security Scanner took less than three minutes to take note of all devices on my network. It found 36 devices and flagged legitimate security problems on two of them.

Phishing websites masquerade as secure sites in the hopes of fooling you into giving away your login credentials. It doesn’t matter which browser you use, or which operating system. Avast’s scores in my hands-on phishing protection test were extremely poor. The phishing protection systems built into Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer all outperformed Avast, by a long shot.

The Online Security browser extension marks up search results to flag dangerous links. It also displays a list of all ad trackers and other trackers on the current page, with an option to actively block these. Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac includes a similar active Do Not Track feature.

Avast comes with a basic password manager that installs as a separate application. It handles basic functions like password capture and replay, saving secure notes, and generating strong passwords. The app stores passwords locally, but you can set up syncing between all your macOS, iOS, Windows, and Android devices. However, you won’t find any advanced features like secure password sharing, two-factor authentication, or password inheritance.

Ransomware Shield

Everything I’ve described to this point is also available in the free edition. The premium-only Ransomware Shield component simply prevents unauthorized access to files in sensitive folders. By default, it protects the Documents and Pictures folders for the current user. Naturally, you can add other folders if needed. A similar feature in Bitdefender Antivirus for Mac also protects your Time Machine backups.

To test this kind of access control on Windows, I use a small text editor that I wrote myself, something that would never show up on a list of trusted applications. I don’t have such a program for macOS, so I had to disable the feature that automatically trusts Apple and App Store applications.

Operation is very simple. When an untrusted program tries to modify a protected app, Avast pops up a warning. If you’ve just installed and launched a new photo editor, click Allow. If you don’t recognize the program, click Block. Note that clicking Allow only makes the program trusted temporarily. To ensure that new photo editor doesn’t get blocked, you must manually add it to the list of Allowed Apps.

This type of access control is an effective tool for ransomware protection, one used by many security tools both on Windows and macOS. However, it does require vigilance on your part. When you see the Ransomware Shield popup, examine it carefully, and only click Allow if you’re absolutely sure the program is legitimate.

Wi-Fi Inspector

As noted, you get the Home Network Security Scan even in the free edition. The premium edition adds a component called Wi-Fi Inspector. Despite the name, the main function of this component is to alert you when new devices join the network. It maintains its own simple list of devices. If you click Deep Scan, it launches the Home Network Security Scan.

Wi-Fi Inspector’s device list doesn’t identify security issues the way the security scan does. On the plus side, it lists the MAC address and IP address for each device, along with the name. For many devices, the name is a clear identification, like neilsipad or all-in-one-pc, but some come out with names like unknown6542990b6483. If you have basic network skills, you can use those addresses to figure out which device corresponds to a weird name. Bitdefender Home Scanner (a Windows utility) lets you edit such entries to give them a friendly name, and even remembers the name on subsequent scans. With Avast, you’ll just have to keep a list of which device matches which weird name.

I did encounter a serious problem with the device list. It found 36 devices on my network, but I couldn’t scroll down to see more than the first bunch of devices. My Avast contact confirmed this as a bug. It’s not such a big problem, as you can see all your connected devices in network scanner.

The real point of Wi-Fi Inspector is to alert you when a new device connects. Just after installation, you’ll probably see quite a few of these, as devices that were turned off during the initial scan wake up. Once you get past that shakeout period, you should pay close attention to the new-device notifications. If you don’t recognize the device, it could be a neighbor mooching your Wi-Fi, or even a hack attempt.

If you determine that the new connection isn’t legitimate, there’s not a lot you can do about it. Wi-Fi Inspector offers notification, but no direct way to act on that information. Your best bet is to snap a screenshot of the notification and then find a friend who’s a network whiz. Your buddy can use the info from the screenshot to log into your router’s settings and ban the device from the network.

Doesn’t Add Enough

Avast Security Pro offers certified Mac malware protection, a network security scanner, and a password manager, but those features also come with the free Avast Security. The Pro edition adds ransomware protection that works by banning untrusted applications from modifying your files. It also adds real-time notification of new connections to your network, but offers no way to do anything if you determine the new connection is perfidious. That’s not much for $59.99 per year. The only reason to buy this product is if you want to protect your Macs in a business setting, but in that case, you can get better protection for less.

Bitdefender Antivirus for Mac has certification from two labs, excellent phishing protection, an anti-ransomware feature much like Avast’s, and more. Kaspersky Internet Security for Mac also has two certifications, and it comes with a full parental control system, excellent anti-phishing, protection against webcam peepers, and more. These are our Editors’ Choice products for macOS antivirus, and they both costs $20 less than Avast.

How to craft a data archiving strategy for 95% of your data

Reality can’t be ignored. In most data centers, 80% or more of stored data hasn’t been accessed in more than a year. Tighten that time frame up, and we find 95% of data has not been accessed in the last 90 days. That means the vast majority of data just sits on that expensive and speedy flash array you bought to serve active data.

The problem is most IT professionals hesitate to take an aggressive step such as moving 95% of their data to a secondary storage tier. But the truth is, with proper design, IT can reach this goal with few complaints. Here are four basic rules that will get you on your way:

Rule No. 1: Archive response can be almost as fast as primary

Your data archiving strategy should rely on storage using high-capacity HDDs, assisted by deduplication and compression, to drive as much cost out of the archive storage tier as possible. While all those technologies could affect data recall performance, in most cases, a recall from a properly designed active archive is almost as fast as primary storage.

That’s because primary storage is responding to hundreds, if not hundreds of thousands, of recall requests per second, while an archive typically responds to one or two per hour. Archives are usually busier dealing with inbound write traffic than old data being accessed. With less I/Os to respond to, disk-based archive storage can respond to individual requests almost as fast as primary storage. Note, though, that archives don’t have to respond as fast as primary storage, they just have to respond fast enough that users won’t notice the difference.

Rule No. 2: Don’t archive everything on day one

With an archive strategy in place, the only reason to buy more primary storage is to gain performance, not capacity.

IT has, with good reason, developed a distrust of everything. Archive software vendors and, especially, hardware vendors brag about ROIs showing data archiving strategy investments paying for themselves 30 seconds after installation. The problem is to get this rapid ROI, customers must buy 100 TB of archive or secondary storage and move 80% to 95% of their data as soon as the archive platform is stood up. Any IT professional worth their certifications isn’t going to do that. There’s no need. The primary storage that holds all this old data is bought and paid for, and most vendors aren’t going to let you send back half of a storage array for a refund.

A more logical data archiving strategy is to archive data on an as-needed basis — typically, as those primary systems come off of maintenance, have reached end of life or are full to the point that more capacity or another primary storage system must be purchased. You’ll want to know how much of the data on that array can be archived. With that information, you should buy just that amount of storage from your archive vendor, enabling you to put off the purchase of a primary storage system or to run a much smaller high-performance storage system. With an archive strategy in place, the only reason to buy more primary storage is to gain performance, not capacity.

Rule No. 3: Transparent recall may or may not be critical

If an aggressive data archiving strategy — such as archiving 80% of primary storage — is followed, then prepare for more frequent data recalls from users. Considering the gradual move to archive storage described in rule No. 2, however, recalls may not be a frequent as you’d expect.

First, make sure most of those recalls can occur without IT interruption. That means you need to select software that can set transparent links between where the file used to be and where it is on the archive. It’s also important to remember the archive might be multistep, on-premises disk to tape or on-premises disk to the cloud, which means that these links must be updated with the file location each time it moves to another storage device.

The other side of the coin in transparent recalls is setting up an apparatus in the architecture that has stub files or a centralized metadata control layer. Like any apparatus, there’s a certain amount of rigidity to this control layer, including a potential management issue with stub files and a certain amount of lock-in to the data management vendor. You must decide if the downsides of transparent recall are worth the upside.

Rule No. 4: Expect more frequent recalls

If your organization goes all-in with a 95% data archiving strategy or evolves to that point, be prepared for more recalls. Whether recalls are done transparently or manually because of the lack of the transparent recall component, you can now measure them in dozens per hour. The higher the recall rate, the more you’ll want to lean toward a disk-based archive, either exclusively or as a front end to tape.

If most of the archive is disk-based, a high recall rate shouldn’t affect performance. At the very least, the front end of the archive should be disk- or cloud-based. Tape, if used at all, should either serve as the deep archive or solely as a backup to the archive. While tape is a robust and reliable technology, its role in a data archiving system as that archive becomes more active requires more planning.

Don’t go on a data archiving strategy diet

No question, 95% of your data is likely eligible for archiving. Archiving shouldn’t be looked at as a storage diet that’s done every so often.  Instead, it’s an organizational change that occurs gradually and, once fully applied, never stops. Data should constantly flow through your enterprise from primary storage to archive storage, and occasionally back to primary.