Tag Archives: changed

TP Link N600-TD-W9980 Modem/Router

Hi all,

There is nothing wrong with it. I have changed ISP and they sent me a new, decent modem/router as such my trusty TPlink is up for grabs.

It is this one here:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00NEQZ12Y/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

As can be seen it is boxed with the original packaging and has (as far as I am aware) all the original bits, mini cd, paperwork etc

Purchased October 2015.

There are some light scratches on the top.

Price and…

TP Link N600-TD-W9980 Modem/Router

TP Link N600-TD-W9980 Modem/Router

Hi all,

There is nothing wrong with it. I have changed ISP and they sent me a new, decent modem/router as such my trusty TPlink is up for grabs.

It is this one here:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00NEQZ12Y/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

As can be seen it is boxed with the original packaging and has (as far as I am aware) all the original bits, mini cd, paperwork etc

Purchased October 2015.

There are some light scratches on the top.

Price and…

TP Link N600-TD-W9980 Modem/Router

Looking at the Hyper-V Event Log (January 2018 edition)

Hyper-V has changed over the last few years and so has our event log structure. With that in mind, here is an update of Ben’s original post in 2009 (“Looking at the Hyper-V Event Log”).

This post gives a short overview on the different Windows event log channels that Hyper-V uses. It can be used as a reference to better understand which event channels might be relevant for different purposes.

As a general guidance you should start with the Hyper-V-VMMS and Hyper-V-Worker event channels when analyzing a failure. For migration-related events it makes sense to look at the event logs both on the source and destination node.

Windows Event Viewer showing the Hyper-V-VMMS Admin log

Below are the current event log channels for Hyper-V. Using “Event Viewer” you can find them under “Applications and Services Logs”, “Microsoft”, “Windows”.
If you would like to collect events from these channels and consolidate them into a single file, we’ve published a HyperVLogs PowerShell module to help.

Event Channel Category Description
Hyper-V-Compute Events from the Host Compute Service (HCS) are collected here. The HCS is a low-level management API.
Hyper-V-Config This section is for anything that relates to virtual machine configuration files. If you have a missing or corrupt virtual machine configuration file – there will be entries here that tell you all about it.
Hyper-V-Guest-Drivers Look at this section if you are experiencing issues with VM integration components.
Hyper-V-High-Availability Hyper-V clustering-related events are collected in this section.
Hyper-V-Hypervisor This section is used for hypervisor specific events. You will usually only need to look here if the hypervisor fails to start – then you can get detailed information here.
Hyper-V-StorageVSP Events from the Storage Virtualization Service Provider. Typically you would look at these when you want to debug low-level storage operations for a virtual machine.
Hyper-V-VID These are events form the Virtualization Infrastructure Driver. Look here if you experience issues with memory assignment, e.g. dynamic memory, or changing static memory while the VM is running.
Hyper-V-VMMS Events from the virtual machine management service can be found here. When VMs are not starting properly, or VM migrations fail, this would be a good source to start investigating.
Hyper-V-VmSwitch These channels contain events from the virtual network switches.
Hyper-V-Worker This section contains events from the worker process that is used for the actual running of the virtual machine. You will see events related to startup and shutdown of the VM here.
Hyper-V-Shared-VHDX Events specific to virtual hard disks that can be shared between several virtual machines. If you are using shared VHDs this event channel can provide more detail in case of a failure.
Hyper-V-VMSP The VM security process (VMSP) is used to provide secured virtual devices like the virtual TPM module to the VM.
Hyper-V-VfpExt Events form the Virtual Filtering Platform (VFP) which is part of the Software Defined Networking Stack.
VHDMP Events from operations on virtual hard disk files (e.g. creation, merging) go here.

Please note: some of these only contain analytic/debug logs that need to be enabled separately and not all channels exist on Windows client. To enable the analytic/debug logs, you can use the HyperVLogs PowerShell module.

Alles Gute,

Lars

For Sale – Mac Mini (2014) i5, 16Gb, 256Gb SSD, Applecare

Has been sat under my TV running as a Media Centre since purchase. I have now changed the system I use and it’s no longer required. It’s in mint condition and I’m sure I’ve got the box (I just need to find it!) and all accessories.

I have a genuine Apple Trackpad and a handheld BT Keyboard/Mouse that can be negotiated in to the deal…

Full Spec is:

Mac Mini (Late 2014)
2.8GHz Core i5 CPU
16Gb RAM (8Gb Factory, 8Gb aftermarket)
256Gb SSD (Factory model, not an aftermarket upgrade)
macOS High Sierra
Applecare until 3/12/2018

Price and currency: 500
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG
Location: Bromsgrove
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Western Digital Red 10TB – New

Purchased as I was changing some home storage round and due to various issues, lots changed and they’ve ended up not being required!

They’re brand new and sealed, unregistered and thus will come with the full warranty (happy to act as liaison if required in future)

I have a total of 2 of them.

Asking £275 each based on current pricing online

Price and currency: 275 Each
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG
Location: Bromsgrove
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Western Digital Red 10TB – New

Purchased as I was changing some home storage round and due to various issues, lots changed and they’ve ended up not being required!

They’re brand new and sealed, unregistered and thus will come with the full warranty (happy to act as liaison if required in future)

I have a total of 2 of them.

Asking £275 each based on current pricing online

Price and currency: 275 Each
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG
Location: Bromsgrove
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Mac Mini (2014) i5, 16Gb, 256Gb SSD, Applecare

Has been sat under my TV running as a Media Centre since purchase. I have now changed the system I use and it’s no longer required. It’s in mint condition and I’m sure I’ve got the box (I just need to find it!) and all accessories.

I have a genuine Apple Trackpad and a handheld BT Keyboard/Mouse that can be negotiated in to the deal…

Full Spec is:

Mac Mini (Late 2014)
2.8GHz Core i5 CPU
16Gb RAM (8Gb Factory, 8Gb aftermarket)
256Gb SSD (Factory model, not an aftermarket upgrade)
macOS High Sierra
Applecare until 3/12/2018

Price and currency: 500
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG
Location: Bromsgrove
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Western Digital Red 10TB – New

Purchased as I was changing some home storage round and due to various issues, lots changed and they’ve ended up not being required!

They’re brand new and sealed, unregistered and thus will come with the full warranty (happy to act as liaison if required in future)

I have a total of 5 of them.

Asking £275 each based on current pricing online

Price and currency: 275 Each
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG
Location: Bromsgrove
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Commvault GO: Vendor ‘HyperScales’ data management strategy

The Commvault HyperScale appliance is the latest — and largest — example of how the data protection company has changed in recent years.

The vendor put those changes on display at its Commvault GO user conference in early November. Besides showing off its integrated appliance, Commvault emphasized its software’s role in data management and analytics across on-premises and cloud storage.

Commvault CEO Bob Hammer said the type of scale-out storage HyperScale represents will soon become common. The key is to have all the software pieces in place.

“Everybody and their brother is going to do some scale-out stuff,” Hammer said in an interview at Commvault GO. “But that doesn’t mean, from a customer use case standpoint, it solves their data management problem, their data protection problem, their DR problems, and still highlights data movement, compliance and analytics.”

Commvault long resisted the notion of selling its backup software on a branded Commvault-sold appliance. Hammer maintained Commvault should concentrate on software and let disk appliance vendors handle the backup target.

Bob Hammer, CommvaultBob Hammer

“We don’t want to be in the hardware business,” Hammer said after its largest software rival, Symantec — now Veritas — put its flagship NetBackup application on an integrated appliance in 2010.

But if Veritas couldn’t nudge Commvault into the hardware business, a pair of newcomers could. Startups Cohesity and Rubrik — both with leadership roots from hyper-converged pioneer Nutanix — emerged in 2015 with integrated appliances that went beyond backup. The upstarts called their products converged secondary storage, because they handled data for backup, archiving, test and development, and disaster recovery, and they pulled in the cloud as well as disk for targets. Both have gained traction rapidly with their converged strategy.

Commvault was already headed in a new direction with its software, changing the name from Simpana to the Commvault Data Platform in 2015. Commvault always mixed data management with protection, but critics and even customers found all that functionality difficult to learn and use.

“Commvault was not known as the least expensive solution, or the easiest to use,” said Jon Walton, CIO of San Mateo County in California, and a longtime Commvault customer. “But it was definitely the most flexible. Its challenge was it was seen as a good tool, but not the cheapest. And in government, cheap wins bids. But we were trying to introduce a single tool to back up everything.”

Walton said he took the plunge with Commvault and made sure his staff received the training it needed. “I don’t lose any sleep using this platform for my data,” he said.

Around early 2016, Hammer said it became clear that secondary storage, and some primary storage, was moving to a “cloud-like infrastructure.” Customers were looking for a more unified way to protect and manage their data, both on premises and in public clouds.

“Going way back, I didn’t want to go into the hardware business, but it was clear as day the market was going to be driven by an integrated device,” Hammer said. “We said, ‘OK, we can supply that device,’ and just needed to put partnerships together.”

HyperScale involves hardware, software partners

Commvault HyperScale appliances run on 1U servers from Fujitsu. HyperScale software provides data services on the appliance. Commvault also partners with Red Hat, using Red Hat’s Gluster file system as a foundation for the HyperScale scale-out storage.

Commvault also lined up server vendors Cisco, Dell EMC, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Huawei, Lenovo and Super Micro as partners on reference architectures that run HyperScale software and the Commvault Data Platform stack on top.

Cisco became an OEM partner, rebranding HyperScale as ScaleProtect on Cisco Unified Computing System. Commvault sees the 2U UCS server — 4U blades are also planned — as a good fit for the enterprise, while its 1U HyperScale blades handle all secondary data needs for SMBs, remote offices and departments.

Commvault's HyperScale appliance
Commvault showed off its HyperScale integrated appliance at the Commvault GO user conference.

Wrapping all of its features — plus cloud support — on an integrated appliance could help Commvault solve its complexity problems. The vendor already moved to simplify pricing and management in recent years by changing its licensing and selling a targeted bundle for use cases such as cloud storage, endpoint backup and virtual machine protection.

Commvault uses capacity-based licensing for HyperScale, with free hardware refreshes at the end of a three-year subscription.

“I think Commvault recognized the cost challenges and has probably risen to the challenges of meeting those as well as everybody,” San Mateo’s Walton said in an interview at Commvault GO.

Other customers at Commvault GO agreed with Walton that Commvault’s complexity is at least partly the result of ifs comprehensive feature set, and its broad functionality is a selling point.

“It’s a single tool to help us protect structured data, unstructured data, virtual and physical machines,” said John Hoover, IT manager of the database and infrastructure team at the Iowa Judicial Branch. “It’s one pane of glass, one index, one tool to know.”

Hoover said his team includes five people for infrastructure and two database administrators to manage more than 100 million digital court documents.

“We’re busy people. Trying to keep up with multiple tools to protect all that data taxes our time,” he said. “And we have to protect it. An electronic file is the official file of the state. There’s no paper trail anymore.”

Commvault HyperScale fights old foes

Despite moving to an integrated model to take on the likes of Cohesity and Rubrik, Commvault still battles old backup software competitors — mainly Veritas and Dell EMC. Hammer referred to Veritas NetBackup as a “legacy scale-up appliance,” the kind that customers are moving to scale-out models to avoid.

Hammer also challenged Michael Dell during his Commvault GO keynote. Dell EMC is one of Commvault’s HyperScale server partners, but also sells backup and data management software. Hammer pointed to the Dell CEO’s claim that he would pump $1 billion over three years into research and development for an internet of things (IoT) division.

I say, ‘Game on,’ to Michael Dell. You can’t do it with piece parts. It’s not so simple.
Bob HammerCEO, Commvault

“I have news for him,” Hammer said. “We’re going to innovate faster than you are, Michael. Game on.”

Off-stage, Hammer elaborated on Commvault’s relationship with Dell.

“Obviously, they’re a major player with HyperScale. Many customers are going to buy HyperScale with Dell servers,” he said. “That’s where we’re aligned. But it’s a whole different story putting a platform together for IoT and analytics, and that’s where I say, ‘Game on,’ to Michael Dell. You can’t do it with piece parts. It’s not so simple. I’m sure he’ll be in the game, but it’s not an easy thing.”

He should know, because Commvault has already gone down that path.

Are you ready for NVMe storage and the future of flash?

Flash storage has radically changed the IT landscape. While the most obvious benefit is improved application performance, Enterprise Strategy Group research shows flash users have experienced improved reliability and resource utilization, as well as reduced TCO. Solid-state storage continues to transform the data center, but what’s next? Nonvolatile memory express, or NVMe storage, is one technology to watch.

Think about the entire data path for a second. Applications demand processing — typically in the form of servers — and access to data via reads and writes across some sort of interconnect or storage network to a storage device. That model is overly simplistic, but it helps illustrate my point. With spinning disk technology, the storage device was often the bottleneck in the data path.

Using a memory cache to accept write requests and serve a subset of read requests helped reduce latencies, but, typically, the entire system was limited to HDD performance. Even with the performance benefits of spreading, or striping, data volumes across a large number of spinning disks, these mechanical devices were the bottleneck. With solid-state, a couple things happened.

First, flash storage dramatically reduced latencies. As a result, IT organizations didn’t need all the hardware and spindles to manufacture performance, helping reduce TCO. In addition, managing data center infrastructure got simpler because the additional performance headroom eliminated the need to regularly isolate and resolve application performance issues.

The second impact was less obvious. With the storage device no longer slowing down the rest of the data path, it wasn’t the performance bottleneck anymore. As a result, the entire data path experienced a surge in performance and utilization. The bottleneck didn’t go away, though; it only moved.

The new bottleneck

Understanding the location of the bottleneck is critical. If you want to increase the performance of a system, adding resources to any component other than the bottleneck is usually futile.

The low-latency NVMe offers must be extended to the entire data path.

But where did the bottleneck go? Often in flash storage environments, it shifts to the storage network or, in other words, the data path. The dramatic reduction in storage latencies increases the amount of traffic on the storage network, and now the storage network starts holding back data center performance.

NVM Express is one technology expected to resolve this problem. The basic premise of NVMe is that SCSI technology, and SAS by extension, which were designed for HDDs, are simply too inefficient. NVMe storage is an alternative to SCSI that can take advantage of the low latency and internal parallelism inherent to flash storage.

Beating the bottleneck

NVMe flash storage is the presumptive favorite to replace the common SAS- or SATA-based flash storage offerings. But it’s only one component. The low-latency NVMe offers must be extended to the entire data path. For external storage systems, such as all-flash arrays, that means using NVMe over Fabrics.

NVMe over Fabrics extends NVMe performance to common storage network technologies, such as Ethernet and Fibre Channel. IT shops that wish to maximize the value of their flash storage investments should look at integrating NVMe storage technology into their storage networks: But where to start?

Storage networking infrastructure is a significant capital investment that should support multiple technology lifecycles. Your decision must therefore incorporate other factors besides performance. In an ideal world, you’d want your NVMe-enabled storage network to deliver the latest technical capabilities, manageability and support, while enabling your infrastructure to easily integrate future technology options.

Before building an NVMe flash storage network, consider three factors beyond its technical capabilities:

  • Who owns — or should own — the data path? This old argument remains relevant. The addition of NVMe will dramatically reduce — and possibly eliminate — the need to diagnose complex performance issues across the network. Having a single IT team that owns and manages the entire data path, including the storage device and the network, is critical for timely diagnosis and resolution of issues. A single team is also important in guaranteeing the fast deployment of new infrastructure capacity and resources.
  • Is your NVMe storage deployment a new infrastructure deployment or an update? A concern with new technologies is how much existing infrastructure you must replace. If NVMe performance is added to a data center that already has significant investment in Fibre Channel- or Ethernet-based storage, ensuring continued access to that storage via NVMe technology is an important consideration.
  • What are the skill sets of your team? There are limits to what you can accomplish with retraining. The addition of NVMe can help eliminate the need for complex diagnosis of performance issues, but familiarity with the network architecture is key to ensuring an agile and resilient architecture.

Others considerations — such as manageability, analytics and bandwidth —  focus on technical or vendor-specific options. Of course, you should consider these elements when making an NVMe storage investment, but the three factors highlighted above will help provide the context to maximize the advantages of that decision. For enterprises seeking to get the most out of flash storage, an investment in NVMe technology is becoming a foregone conclusion.