Tag Archives: Choice

GraphQL vs. REST choice steers microservices development

The choice to use schema-first development with GraphQL vs. REST API-driven development has laid the groundwork for all future microservices architecture decisions at a major web hosting firm.

The firm, San Francisco-based Pantheon Platform, specializes in hosting services for WordPress and Drupal sites. Three years ago, the company wanted to take advantage of the emerging microservices trend, but its engineers needed a distributed, backward-compatible ‘source of truth’ to coordinate microservices communications. But such a tool also couldn’t place an undue burden on product teams every time they updated individual apps and services.

“GraphQL protects the front end from the back end, so the back end can change data structures quite a bit, and the front end just asks for what it needs,” said Michelle Krejci, service engineer lead at Pantheon.

GraphQL was the best fit to solve that problem, Pantheon determined. It’s based on a graph database protocol, which was originally the domain of webscale behemoths such as Facebook. The social media giant developed GraphQL in 2012 to manage complex sets of relationships between users and their networks of friends.

In the last three years, however, similarly complex interconnections between microservices have made graphs relevant for a broader set of companies, such as Netflix, IBM and online learning firm Coursera. Industry experts expect graph databases to catch on among enterprises in general, and GraphQL for front-end developers in particular, in 2020.

Pantheon chose Apollo GraphQL Server, a federated GraphQL platform designed for developers who want to use graphs to manage communications between services. Apollo GraphQL serves a function similar to a REST API gateway for Patheon, but replaces REST API language with a GraphQL schema. Pantheon’s deployment of Apollo GraphQL remains a work in progress, but ultimately, Pantheon engineers believe that GraphQL will offer greater network efficiency, support finer-grained queries on relationships between objects, build in monitoring endpoints and most importantly, decouple back-end from front-end development. 

“A schema is code and its own documentation,” Krejci said. “It’s not just, you know, a Wiki page that no one will ever refer to — literally writing it is creating its implementation and making it available.”

Once the GraphQL schema is created, both front-end and back-end developers can start their development cycles and test against that schema in parallel.

“[That’s] not something we could do with API-first development,” Krejci said. “We had to wait for someone to build the API after they [designed] it.”

GraphQL vs.REST
GraphQL vs.REST pros and cons for microservices architecture

GraphQL vs. REST pros and cons

The benefits of GraphQL vs. REST also include certain microservices security advantages, according to Krejci.

“[GraphQL] meets a lot of our goals around authorization, and our desire to, as our CTO David Strauss would say, solve the ‘confused deputy problem’ once and for all,” she said. This refers to a failure pattern in which an authorization routing path becomes overwhelmed with requests and begins to erroneously authorize requests that don’t actually have adequate privileges.

Moving things from REST into GraphQL opens up a whole new paradigm of thinking about data and contracts.
Michelle KrejciService engineer lead, Pantheon

“Moving things from REST into GraphQL opens up a whole new paradigm of thinking about data and contracts,” Krejci said.  “What does it mean to sell a request and part of a request, and what is the contract now between the client and the back end?” Smaller, more precise requests in such a system are less likely to overwhelm authorization routing paths.

However, GraphQL has its shortcomings, such as the fact that it can’t use HTTP caching in web and mobile browsers, or use familiar HTTP status codes, such as 403, for when an access request is forbidden, or 404, which pops up when a resource is unavailable. For Pantheon, the major downside of GraphQL vs. REST is the steep learning curve for developers already well-versed in REST concepts, including HTTP status codes, as they adopt new coding methods for graph schemas.

“We’ve actually acquired another piece of technical debt in my mind, which is  adopting a bleeding-edge technology like GraphQL,” Krejci said. “We have blown our innovation budget for the next couple years.”

This means that while other microservices architecture approaches such as service mesh are all the rage, including within the Google Kubernetes Engine cloud infrastructure Pantheon uses, it’s on the back burner while the company devotes developer resources to GraphQL.

However, GraphQL remains the wisest decision, in Krejci’s mind, because of the way it facilitates conversations between business managers, product designers and software developers, without requiring tight coupling between various services and underlying infrastructure resources. 

“For the most part, we can all work within our domains without needing to look around, and we’ve built a lot of tooling to make that possible,” she said. “Service mesh would require the cooperation of all kinds of teams that have different ways of integrating with that system.”

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Wanted – i5 4th gen/ i7 4th gen gaming pc

I’ve got a Dell XPS i7 4770 with, 16Gb 128Gb SSD, Wi-fi and B/tooth and a choice of GPU. I have a 4Gb RX560, 2Gb GTX 960, 6Gb GTX1060 or a 8Gb GTX 1070. It also has a small HD in for data and games.

It runs great and is driving my 4K TV for some casual gaming. It’s very rarely used as I have another gaming rig.

let me know which GPU you fancy and I’m sure we can do a deal.

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Wanted – i5 4th gen/ i7 4th gen gaming pc

I’ve got a Dell XPS i7 4770 with, 16Gb 128Gb SSD, Wi-fi and B/tooth and a choice of GPU. I have a 4Gb RX560, 2Gb GTX 960, 6Gb GTX1060 or a 8Gb GTX 1070. It also has a small HD in for data and games.

It runs great and is driving my 4K TV for some casual gaming. It’s very rarely used as I have another gaming rig.

let me know which GPU you fancy and I’m sure we can do a deal.

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Author:

Wanted – i5 4th gen/ i7 4th gen gaming pc

I’ve got a Dell XPS i7 4770 with, 16Gb 128Gb SSD, Wi-fi and B/tooth and a choice of GPU. I have a 4Gb RX560, 2Gb GTX 960, 6Gb GTX1060 or a 8Gb GTX 1070. It also has a small HD in for data and games.

It runs great and is driving my 4K TV for some casual gaming. It’s very rarely used as I have another gaming rig.

let me know which GPU you fancy and I’m sure we can do a deal.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Wanted – i5 4th gen/ i7 4th gen gaming pc

I’ve got a Dell XPS i7 4770 with, 16Gb 128Gb SSD, Wi-fi and B/tooth and a choice of GPU. I have a 4Gb RX560, 2Gb GTX 960, 6Gb GTX1060 or a 8Gb GTX 1070. It also has a small HD in for data and games.

It runs great and is driving my 4K TV for some casual gaming. It’s very rarely used as I have another gaming rig.

let me know which GPU you fancy and I’m sure we can do a deal.

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Purchase an Xbox One with Xbox All Access for No Upfront Cost; Special Upgrade Offer Available for a Limited Time – Xbox Wire

At Xbox we believe strongly in choice.  Choice in what, where and how you play, in addition to where and how you buy.  It’s with that that we’re thrilled to reintroduce Xbox All Access to more players around the world starting with the U.S., U.K. and Australia— and now including an all-new upgrade option for the next Xbox console, Project Scarlett.

With Xbox All Access, you get an all-inclusive Xbox experience with everything you need to start playing right out of the box for as little as $19.99 per month for 24 months (US pricing). The program is a great choice for players who want flexibility in their purchasing options and are looking for the best value in gaming. When joining Xbox All Access, you get:

  • Xbox One console
  • 24-month membership to Xbox Game Pass Ultimate
    • Xbox Pass Ultimate includes all the benefits of Xbox Live Gold, including online multiplayer, and access to over 100 great games on console and PC.
  • Option to upgrade to Project Scarlett once its available in Holiday 2020

While Xbox All Access isn’t eligible to be stacked with any other discounts or limited time promotions, the price you pay per month is dependent upon which console you choose and saves players over $100 dollars compared to purchasing everything separately.

Here’s how it works in four easy steps:

  • In order to join the program, simply visit a participating retailer.
  • Select the console you would like to purchase with no upfront cost.^
  • Qualify with our financing partner (Citizens Bank in the U.S.; Klarna in the U.K.; Telstra in Australia). Once approved, complete your purchase with the retailer.
  • Once you’ve signed up and brought your console home, it’s time to power up and game on.

Xbox All Access will be available beginning on October 29 in Australia, November 5 in the U.K. and November 18 in the U.S. through select partners and retailers, including:

Some program details vary by country. Please visit country specific links to learn more.

Players in the U.S. and U.K. who purchase an Xbox One console with Xbox All Access have the option to upgrade to Project Scarlett once it’s available Holiday 2020 and they’ve made 18 payments.  Players in Australia can buyout their hardware at any time and upgrade to Project Scarlett once it’s available.

We realize buying a console is an investment and some players are waiting to make the jump to the next generation with Project Scarlett when it launches in Holiday 2020 alongside “Halo Infinite”.  This is why as a limited time offer this holiday season, players in the U.S. and U.K. who purchase an Xbox One X with Xbox All Access through December 31, 2019, have the option to upgrade to the next Xbox console in as few as 12 months and once Project Scarlett has officially launched.

In order to participate in the upgrade program when Project Scarlett launches in Holiday 2020,  players in the U.S. and U.K. will need to be in good standing with the respective financing partner in their market, purchase Project Scarlett with a new Xbox All Access purchase from the same retail partner where they joined the program, and trade-in the console originally purchased with Xbox All Access. Terms and conditions apply, including an upgrade fee for players upgrading from the Xbox One S All-Digital Edition to Project Scarlett.

As always, we’re grateful to our fans for their support and look forward to bringing Xbox All Access to more players around the world in the coming months.

To find out more about Xbox All Access, including how to join, what consoles are available for purchase, your upgrade option, and terms and conditions, please click here in the US, here in the United Kingdom and here in Australia, or visit your local retail partner.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Diversity and cybercrime: Solving puzzles and stopping bad guys – Asia News Center

Diana Kelley bristles at suggestions that cybersecurity is a dry or dull career choice – after all, she’s dedicated most of her working life to protecting data and blocking digital wrongdoers.

“I think it is the most interesting part of IT. It can be a fascinating puzzle to solve. It can be like a murder mystery on that show, ‘Law & Order,’ except that when they find a dead body, we find a network breach,” she says.

“As we investigate, we go back through all these twists and turns. And, sometimes we discover that the real culprit isn’t the one we had suspected at the beginning.”

As Microsoft’s global Cybersecurity Field Chief Technology Officer, she wants to erase misconceptions that might be stopping people from more walks of life from entering her profession – which, she argues,  needs new ways of thinking and innovating.

Successful companies know that by building diversity and inclusion within their ranks, they can better understand and serve their many and varied customers. Cybersecurity teams need to read from the same playbook so they can better anticipate and block attacks launched by all kinds of people from all sorts of places.

“Cybercriminals come from different backgrounds and geo-locations and have different mindsets,” Kelley says. “They collaborate and use very diverse attack techniques to come after individuals, companies, and countries. So, it helps us also to have a very diverse set of protection and controls to stop them.”

Knowing how attackers might think and act can be difficult for any cybersecurity team, particularly if it is made up of people from similar backgrounds with similar viewpoints. It is the kind of conformity that can even lead to a sort of “groupthink,” which results in blind spots and unintended bias.

The power of different viewpoints

“If people think in the same ways again and again, they are going to come up with the same answers. This only stops when different viewpoints are raised, and different questions are heard.”

Kelley says attackers come from, and operate in, many different environments, and cybersecurity teams need to match this diversity as much as they can. However, the make-up of today’s international cybersecurity community remains surprisingly homogenous.

“About 90 percent are men and, depending on where you are in the world, they are often white men,” she says. “In Asia, it tends to be a little worse. Only about nine percent are women.”

The need for change comes amid unprecedented demand for cybersecurity and a chronic shortage of skilled specialists across the world. Kelley sees this an opportunity.

“We’ve got this big gap in hiring, so why not create a more diverse and inclusive community of people working on the problem?” she said in an interview on her recent visit to Singapore, one of many global cities vying for talent in the sector.

One major concern is gender imbalance. Even though many well-paying jobs are up for grabs, relatively few women are taking up, and staying in, cybersecurity roles.

Fixing the gender imbalance

“When I got into the field almost 30 years ago, women had very low representation in computer science in general,” Kelley says. “Back then, I just assumed it would change over time. But it hasn’t.”

Studies show that girls often drop out of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) subjects in middle or high school. Some women university graduates do enter the profession. But a lot end up leaving – many for cultural reasons in the workplace.

“There is a high attrition rate. We need to promote the value of studying STEM. And, we also need to work for the people who are in the field now by creating inclusive work environments.”

Kelley joined Microsoft about two years ago. Since then, she has been struck by its strong culture of respecting diverse viewpoints and encouraging inclusion – things she hasn’t seen stressed in some other companies.

“Not every idea is a great idea. But that doesn’t mean it should be mocked or dismissed. It should be respected as an idea. I have spoken to some women elsewhere who say because they didn’t feel heard or respected, they didn’t want to stay in IT.”

Bringing in all sorts of people

Kelley says more can be done to build up diversity and inclusion beyond fixing the gender mix. Again, she is impressed by Microsoft’s efforts. “Yes, we need to engage more women. But we also need to bring in all sorts of people from different social and career backgrounds.

“For instance, our team – the Cybersecurity Solution Group at Microsoft – is looking for people who may not have worked in cybersecurity in the past, but have a great interest (in technology) as well as other talents. So we are creating diversity that way too.”

Kelley recounts her own sideways entry into the field. She fell in love with computers and software during her teens when she discovered for herself how vulnerable networks at the time could be.

Later she graduated from university with a very non-techie qualification: a degree in English. Her first few jobs were editorial roles, but being tech-savvy soon meant she became the “go-to IT guy” in her office.

“Finally someone said to me, ‘Hey, you know what? IT is your calling, and we are hiring.’ So, what had been a hobby for me then became a career.”

She eventually moved into cybersecurity after an intruder broke into a network she had just built. “I pivoted from being a network and software person to someone very much focused on creating secure and resilient architectures and networks to thwart the bad guys.”

We need diverse thinkers

Looking to the future, she wants a broader pool of job seekers to consider careers in cybersecurity, even if they did not like STEM at school.

“We need diverse thinkers … people who understand psychology, for example, who can help understand the mindsets behind these attacks. We need great legal minds to help with ethics and privacy. And, political minds who understand lobbying.”

The cybersecurity world needs individuals who are altruistic and have a little more. “We go into this field because we want to do the right thing and protect people and protect data. That is a critical part. And, it also really helps to have a sort of a ‘tinkering mindset.’”

She explains that when cybersecurity professionals create systems, they also have to produce threat models. To do that, they need to think about, ‘What if I was a bad guy? What if I was trying to take this apart? How could it be taken apart?’ That is the point where they can start to work out how to make their system more attack resistant.

Meanwhile, she is eager to debunk a few myths swirling around the subject of cybercrime.

For starters, the days of the smart lone wolf kid in a hoodie hacking for fun from his bedroom are more or less over. Nowadays, only a tiny minority of perpetrators cause digital mischief and embarrassment just for the bragging rights or are “hacktivists” who want to advance social or environmental causes.

Ominously, there are sophisticated state-sponsored actors targeting the vulnerabilities of rival powers. Governments around the world are rightly worried about their citizens’ data. But they also fear for the security of vital infrastructure, like power grids and transport systems. Accordingly, military strategists now rate cyber as a field of warfare alongside land, sea, and air.

That said, most of the bad guys are simply in it for the money and do not deserve the glory and headlines they sometimes get.

“They are not glamorous. Many are in big criminal syndicates that just want to grab our data – hurting us and hurting our loved ones.”

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Wanted – High end gaming PC

is this any good mate? Youd need to add your choice of GFX card but a good start..

i7 4770K
Gigabyte G1 Sniper Motherboard ( Z87 I think )
16Gb Geil DDR3 2133Mhz ( 2×8 )
850W Superflower Leadx PSU
24x DVDRW
CoolerMaster HAF X case
Samsung EVO 750 120Gb SSD
Cougar Gaming Keyboard
Corsair Mouse

Prolite B2783QSU 2560×1440 freesysnc monitor. Couple of bad scratches on the screen but the screen is fully working.

You’ll need your own version of windows as im going to wipe the SSD. I don’t have the boxes to the main components but I do have the box for the monitor.

How to Configure a File Share Witness for a Hyper-V Cluster

Traditionally, the preferred choice for a cluster quorum witness has been some type of networked disk. Small SAN LUNs do the trick nicely. Things have changed a bit, increasing the viability of the file share witness. You can configure one easily in a few simple steps.

Read the post here: How to Configure a File Share Witness for a Hyper-V Cluster