Tag Archives: content

Icelandair turns to headless CMS to improve CX

Icelandair’s web content repository has taken flight from a traditional, on-premises content management system to a headless CMS in the cloud to improve its online travel booking experience for customers.

The migration started several years ago, and remains ongoing as processes move one at a time into the headless system from Contentstack.

We spoke with Icelandair’s global director of marketing Gísli Brynjólfsson and UX writer Hallur Þór Halldórsson to discuss how they made this IT purchasing decision and what CX improvements the airline stands to gain by going to the cloud.

What was the technology problem that got Icelandair thinking about changing to a headless CMS in the cloud?

Halldórsson: When I came on to the project in 2015 we had a very old-fashioned on-premises CMS with a publishing front-end attached to it, which handled all the content for our booking site. Content managers had to go in and do a lot of cache-flushing and add code here, add code there to the site.

Icelandair jetliner in flight
Icelandair’s headless CMS is making flight reservations more efficient for customers.

Load tests during cloud containerizing experiments on AWS in 2016 made people scared the site would crash a lot; people weren’t sure the CMS could handle what was coming in our digital transformation. We started looking for another CMS, using a different one for a year that wasn’t headless — but had API functionality — but it wasn’t quite doing what we expected. We ended up trying several cloud CMS vendors and Contentstack won the contract.

What about headless CMS made sense in the context of your digital transformation plan?

The ability to adapt quickly and scalability were the primary reasons to go with a headless CMS.
Hallur Þór HalldórssonUX writer, Icelandair

Halldórsson: Headless became a requirement at one point to decouple it from the publishing end of the old CMS. We needed this approach if we wanted to personalize content for customers, which we eventually would like to do. But the ability to adapt quickly and scalability were the primary reasons to go with a headless CMS.

What features or functionality won the bid for Contentstack’s headless CMS?

Halldórsson: The way it handles localized content. We support 11 languages online and 16 locales (four different versions of English, two French), and you have to be able to manage that. Other vendors that impressed us otherwise didn’t have mature localization features. 

What is on your digital transformation roadmap over the next couple years?

Halldórsson: The first thing we did was integrate our translation process into the CMS. Before, we had to paste text into a Microsoft Word document, send it to the translation agency, wait for it to come back and paste it into the CMS. Now it gets sent to the agency via API and is delivered back. Automating that workflow was first. Next is a Salesforce integration to more quickly give salespeople and customer service agents the content we know they’re looking for. Integrating a personalization engine, too, is a dream.

Editor’s note: This Q&A has been edited for clarity and brevity.

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CenturyLink acquires Streamroot, adding P2P CDN capabilities

CenturyLink is looking to grow its content delivery network capabilities with the acquisition of privately held Streamroot Inc. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Streamroot’s technology provides a peer-to-peer (P2P) mesh approach for video content delivery applications. The advantage of the P2P content delivery network (CDN) approach, according to Streamroot, is it can potentially reach underserved markets and enable an alternative system for content delivery.

The deal was made public on Tuesday.

P2P CDNs are a fairly small business right now, and CenturyLink’s acquisition of Streamroot won’t change the CDN landscape, said 451 Research analyst Craig Matsumoto. That said, for CenturyLink, a P2P CDN capability is a nice, low-risk way to extend reach into different markets, especially internationally, he added.

“Think of live sports. Someone broadcasting a World Cup match is probably going to use multiple CDNs. So, if CenturyLink can claim extended reach into underserved areas, that’s a differentiator,” Matsumoto said.

Overall, he said, it’s known that P2P CDN technology can work at scale; though, to date, it’s been more a matter of finding use cases where the need is acute enough.

“If the CenturyLink-Streamroot deal works out, I could see the other CDNs working out partnerships or acquisitions with the other P2P startups,” he said.

P2P CDN

In the past, the term P2P was often associated with BitTorrent as a network approach that uses the power of devices in the network to share data.

Streamroot’s P2P CDN is completely unlike BitTorrent, in that it allows premium content providers complete control to ensure only users who have accepted their terms of use can benefit from and contribute to the user experience improvements achieved by incorporating into a mesh of similarly licensed users, said Bill Wohnoutka, vice president of global internet and content delivery services at CenturyLink.

“Streamroot’s data science and client heuristics enable connected consumer devices, such as smart phones, tablets, computers, set-top consoles and smart TVs, to participate in the serving of premium content through a secure and private mesh delivery,” Wohnoutka said. “Mesh servers are made from users that demonstrate performance and are created within the boundaries of carrier and enterprise networks to minimize the negative impact of the traffic on the network.”

Streamroot and CenturyLink

While the acquisition is new, Wohnoutka noted that CenturyLink began reselling Streamroot’s mesh delivery service in April 2019. He added that, as over-the-top (OTT) content becomes more pervasive worldwide, CenturyLink felt now was the right time to accelerate innovation and acquire Streamroot.

Streamroot’s data science and client heuristics enable connected consumer devices … to participate in the serving of premium content through a secure and private mesh delivery.
Bill WohnoutkaVice president of global internet and content delivery services, CenturyLink

With the P2P CDN technology, Wohnoutka said the goal is enable customers to get the most out of CenturyLink’s CDN and other CDNs they may be using, supporting a hybrid CDN approach.

“It is a true last-mile solution that pushes edge computing all the way down to the user device to localize traffic and reduce the pressures that OTT content puts on carrier networks,” he said.

P2P CDNs will also likely benefit from the rollout of 5G access technology. Wohnoutka said, with 5G, there are inherent localization and traffic optimization algorithms embedded in the software, as well as a data science approach to ensure best performance during peak internet traffic and in hard-to-reach locations.

“The direct benefits are realized by the content customer, end user and, importantly, the ISPs [internet service providers] architecting their 5G networks for low latency, high performance and traffic efficiency,” he said.

Wohnoutka noted that CenturyLink’s fiber network already has more than 450,000 route miles of coverage. He added that the company’s CDN business is a key part of continued investment in edge computing capabilities that puts workloads closer to customers’ digital interactions.

“What we are bringing our customers with this acquisition is the advantage of data science and software to help them improve the user experience with rich media content during peak hours on the internet,” Wohnoutka said.

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Microsoft and The Walt Disney Studios to develop ‘scene-to-screen’ content workflows – Stories

Companies collaborate to pilot new ways to transform content workflows in the Microsoft Azure cloud; Microsoft becomes a Disney Studios StudioLAB innovation partner

REDMOND, Wash., and BURBANK, Calif. Sept. 13, 2019 Microsoft Corp. and The Walt Disney Studios today announced a five-year innovation partnership to pilot new ways to create, produce and distribute content on the Microsoft Azure cloud platform. Through The Walt Disney Studios’ StudioLAB, a technology hub designed to create and advance the future of storytelling with cutting-edge tools and methods, the companies will deliver cloud-based solutions to help accelerate innovation at The Walt Disney Studios for production and postproduction processes, or from “scene to screen.”

The Walt Disney Studios’ StudioLAB logo“The cloud has reached a tipping point for the media industry, and it’s not surprising that The Walt Disney Studios, which has its heritage based on a passion for innovation and technology, is at the forefront of this transformation,” said Kate Johnson, president of Microsoft US. “The combination of Azure’s hyperscale capacity, global distribution, and industry-leading storage and networking capabilities with Disney’s strong history of industry leadership unlocks new opportunity in the media and entertainment space and will power new ways to drive content and creativity at scale. With Azure as the platform cloud for content, we’re excited to work with the team at StudioLAB to continue to drive innovation across Disney’s broad portfolio of studios.”

“By moving many of our production and postproduction workflows to the cloud, we’re optimistic that we can create content more quickly and efficiently around the world,” said Jamie Voris, CTO, The Walt Disney Studios. “Through this innovation partnership with Microsoft, we’re able to streamline many of our processes so our talented filmmakers can focus on what they do best.”

Microsoft and Disney — working closely with leading global media technology provider Avid — are already demonstrating that the kinds of demanding, high-performance workflows the media and entertainment industry requires can be deployed and operated with the security offered by the cloud, while unlocking substantial new benefits and efficiencies and enabling production teams to rethink the way they get their work done.

Microsoft logoBuilding on Microsoft’s strategic cloud alliance with Avid, the companies have already produced several essential media workflows running in the cloud today, including collaborative editing, content archiving, active backup and production continuity. Bringing these complex workflows into production using Avid solutions such as the Avid MediaCentral® platform, MediaCentral | Cloud UX™, Avid NEXIS® | Cloud storage and Avid Media Composer® — all running natively on Azure — will provide the foundation for helping transform content creation and content management to overcome today’s operational pressures, as well as pave the way for ongoing innovation.

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, [email protected]

The Walt Disney Studios Communications, [email protected]

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

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Bluescape releases newest version of its mobile app

Bluescape has launched its newest mobile app to enable users to access their content on the go.

The app, available in the Apple App Store and Google Play store, connects to Bluescape workspaces from mobile devices, such as cellphones or tablets. According to the vendor, it enables users to give presentations without a laptop by launching a Bluescape session from the app onto larger touchscreens.

Users can also access their content and workspace anytime and from anywhere and search and view content. According to Bluescape, the app provides a visual collaboration workspace that integrates day-to-day applications, content and tools.

The Bluescape platform is cloud-based software, with applications designed for collaboration in the workplace. Available applications include mobile and personal workstations, huddle rooms, innovation centers, collaboration suites, conference rooms, training rooms, executive briefing centers, command centers and control centers. Search, messaging and file sharing are also built into the platform.

Bluescape lists professionals in jobs such as architecture, consulting, designing, filmmaking, marketing and product development as ideal users for its product, as these are often groups of people working collaboratively and visually.

Bluescape is among the vendors offering visual collaboration software, which works hand in hand with digital collaborative whiteboards. Vendor Mural provides separate workspaces for teams and enables scaling for companywide processes, with frameworks for Agile, Lean and Design Thinking methods. Custom frameworks are also available.

Competitor Miro touts its product development, user experience research and design, and Lean and Agile capabilities, as well as its enterprise-grade security. Available applications include Google Drive, Box, Dropbox, Slack, OneDrive and Microsoft Teams.

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New Contentful CMS targets content delivery for retailers

Contentful has launched a content infrastructure system to drive online sales by enabling more content management across channels for retailers.

Like a headless content management system, the Contentful CMS allows users to publish and update content across all digital platforms at once, but at an enterprise-grade scale. The vendor claimed content infrastructure enables retailers to repurpose existing content, improve impact and deliver marketing messages to target audiences.

Headless CMS enables content creation and sharing across multiple channels with one action by removing the head — or presentation layer — which defines the channel or platform in a traditional CMS. Content infrastructure has the same benefits as headless CMS, but unifies content to be managed from one content hub.

Contentful claimed content infrastructure markets digital content four to seven times faster than a traditional CMS by enabling users to do the following:

  • organize content specific to their business;
  • create content once for different platforms;
  • store all content in a central hub;
  • edit content without the involvement of developers;
  • manage teams with roles and permissions; and
  • publish content to any device.

Contentful intends its content infrastructure to enable brands to build and manage targeted, customized marketing for event-driven campaigns and localize the content for any market. Through the vendor’s Content Delivery API, editors can update content through a web app synced with any platform for consistent management.

The vendor claimed its array of content management services has decreased bounce rates, increased mobile conversion, personalized content across a breadth of languages and locales, updated content at a fraction of the time as legacy tools, and delivers new customer touch points five times faster than with a traditional CMS.

In 2018, Contentful was named a contender in Forrester’s Wave for web content management systems, challenged by leaders Adobe, Acquia and Sitecore. According to Contentful, its headless enterprise focus makes it flexible for developers. Forrester recommended the vendor for progressive digital initiatives that require content unification across channels, but also have easy access to developer resources.

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How PhotoDNA for Video is being used to fight online child exploitation – On the Issues

PhotoDNA has also enabled content providers to remove millions of illegal photographs from the internet; helped convict child sexual predators; and, in some cases, helped law enforcement rescue potential victims before they were physically harmed.

In the meantime, though, the volume of child sexual exploitation material being shared in videos instead of still images has ballooned. The number of suspected videos reported to the CyberTipline managed by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) in the United States increased tenfold from 312,000 in 2015 to 3.5 million in 2017. As required by federal law, Microsoft reports all instances of known child sexual abuse material to NCMEC.

Microsoft has long been committed to protecting its customers from illegal content on its products and services, and applying technology the company already created to combating this growth in illegal videos was a logical next step.

“Child exploitation video content is a crime scene. After exploring the development of new technology and testing other tools, we determined that the existing, widely used PhotoDNA technology could also be used to effectively address video,” says Courtney Gregoire, Assistant General Counsel with Microsoft’s Digital Crimes Unit. “We don’t want this illegal content shared on our products and services. And we want to put the PhotoDNA tool in as many hands as possible to help stop the re-victimization of children that occurs every time a video appears again online.”

A recent survey of survivors of child sexual abuse from the Canadian Centre for Child Protection found that the online sharing of images and videos documenting crimes committed against them intensified feelings of shame, humiliation, vulnerability and powerlessness. As one survivor was quoted in the report: “The abuse stops and at some point also the fear for abuse; the fear for the material never ends.”

Graphic showing how DNA for Video creates hashes from video frames and compares to known images

The original PhotoDNA helps put a stop to this online recirculation by creating a “hash” or digital signature of an image: converting it into a black-and-white format, dividing it into squares and quantifying that shading. It does not employ facial recognition technology, nor can it identify a person or object in the image. It compares an image’s hash against a database of images that watchdog organizations and companies have already identified as illegal. IWF, which has been compiling a reference database of PhotoDNA signatures, now has 300,000 hashes of known child sexual exploitation materials.

PhotoDNA for Video breaks down a video into key frames and essentially creates hashes for those screenshots. In the same way that PhotoDNA can match an image that has been altered to avoid detection, PhotoDNA for Video can find child sexual exploitation content that’s been edited or spliced into a video that might otherwise appear harmless.

“When people embed illegal videos in other videos or try to hide them in other ways, PhotoDNA for Video can still find it. It only takes a hash from a single frame to create a match,” says Katrina Lyon-Smith, senior technical program manager who has implemented the use of PhotoDNA for Video on Microsoft’s own services.

Box Activity Stream embeds Salesforce, Slack in Box viewer

SAN FRANCISCO — With Box Activity Stream, the content management software vendor is bidding to make its cloud platform a collaboration hub for all Box users’ daily communications by integrating with popular third-party apps like Slack, Salesforce and DocuSign.

Unveiled at the BoxWorks 2018 conference here, Box Activity Stream enables users to use apps in the file preview pane of the Box user interface, where users tag each other about file sharing and exchange messages.

As well as giving users the ability to share and post links on non-Box apps, the new feature also recommends apps for people to use in conjunction with a file they are working on in Box. The app recommendations are customized according to how often a user chooses them, their popularity in the company, and the file type with which they are most frequently associated.

Announcement-beta cycle

Box Activity Stream is expected to see beta release next year, following a pattern of Box product releases being announced the year before they are available in beta.

Analysts familiar with Box Activity Stream said the technology is a useful addition to the Box platform, but that it also puts Box in the position of competing with a host of software platforms to be the go-to hub for enterprise users, and could also lead to notification overload.

“It helps Box go from cloud file storage to being an interactive user experience that involves content. It makes it a more collaborative workspace,” said Alan Lepofsky, an analyst at Constellation Research.

Vendors vying to be digital hub

“In theory, it’s a great concept,” Lepofsky added. “But everyone wants to be the digital hub. Everyone wants to fight for everybody’s attention and eyeballs and to do that they want to bring in all the other products.”

Everyone wants to be the digital hub.
Alan Lepofskyanalyst, Constellation Research

Meanwhile, the company views Box Activity Stream as a key part of its digital workplace strategy to redefine content management, workflow and services as digital first, said Faizan Buzdar, senior director of product management at Box.

While modern SaaS enterprise applications have accelerated time-to-market and time-to-adoption rates, they have also created a sort of scattering of content, Buzdar said.

“It’s an awesome trend, but at the same time it creates a challenge. How do I know what’s happening, how do I know where all that content lives?” he said.

Box Activity Stream enables users to, say, create a document in response to an email, send it to a collaborator for editing, send it to someone else over Slack and then attach it to an account in Salesforce or NetSuite.

With that process, Buzdar said, “our goal is to avoid content fragmentation and segmentation and let enterprises apply the same security and compliance layers across all their content from the perspective of the touch points that their end users have.”

Buzdar said Box has seen demand for this kind of capability among users in CRM, sales and ERP.

Screenshot of new Box Activity Stream feature
Box Activity Stream showing integrations with Slack, Salesforce and DocuSign

Google integrations

In addition to Box Activity Stream, Box on the first day of the conference said its previously announced Box for G Suite and Gmail integrations are now available for public beta use.

Box enterprise users have been calling for Google integrations more and more, Buzdar said.

“We love Google. We work closely with Google,” Buzdar said. “Customers are coming in who are basically deciding to standardize on Google. If you’re a big company, say with 100,000 employees, somewhere in the organization you have Google.”

The company also said Box Feed, which was announced at BoxWorks 2017, will also now go into public beta. The machine learning feature provides personalized updates, activities and recommended Box content.

A primitive precursor to Box Activity Stream was rolled out in 2011 when Box added a collaboration feature to its then mostly cloud document storage-focused platform, which it termed “activity streams.”

Mobile and desktop screenshots of Box Feed system
Box Feed displaying content trends, activity

Possible confusion, more engagement

As for Box Feed, Karen Hobert, a Gartner analyst, said with Box Activity Stream, Box runs the risk of confusion between the two.

“One would think a user might want them combined as long as they could control the experience. But maybe the different UI experiences — Activity Stream in viewers, Feed in Box UI — will mitigate any confusion,” Hobert said.

But Hobert said she sees value in Box Activity Stream in terms of smoothing what can be a sometimes disjointed experience toggling between apps and Box.

“Basically, I see it as a way to keep employees engaged in Box throughout the day. Certainly users will like not having to bounce around from app to app,” she said. “Activity Stream clearly makes a more seamless experience with Box and content in other apps. In the end, Box wants to — and needs to — be a destination that users won’t live without.”

Hobert also questioned Box’s record on delivering on new systems and features, noting that there were “significant delays” in two earlier products, Box Relay and Box Sync, and that Box Feed and Box Skills, the company’s high-profile AI play that was announced nearly a year ago, are still in beta.

Lepofsky said he expected significant news at the conference about the much-touted Box Skills system.

“Otherwise, they’re going to look bad,” he said.

M-Files cloud subscription turns hybrid with M-Files Online

To reflect the desire for flexibility, and regulatory shifts in the enterprise content management industry, software vendors are starting to offer users options for storing data on premises or in a cloud infrastructure.

The M-Files cloud strategy is a response to these industry changes. The information management software vendor has released M-Files Online, which enables users to manage content both in the cloud and behind a firewall on premises, under one subscription.

While not the first ECM vendor to offer hybrid infrastructure, the company claims that with the new M-Files cloud system, it is the first ECM software provider to provide both under one software subscription.

“What I’ve seen going on is users are trying to do two things at once,” said John Mancini, chief evangelist for the Association of Intelligent Information Management (AIIM). “On one hand, there are a lot of folks that have significant investment in legacy systems. On the other hand, they’re realizing quickly that the old approaches aren’t working anymore and are driving toward modernizing the infrastructure.”

Providing customer flexibility

It’s difficult, time-consuming and expensive to migrate an organization’s entire library of archives or content from on premises to the cloud, yet it’s also the way the industry is moving as emerging technologies like AI and machine learning have to be cloud-based to be able to function. That’s where a hybrid cloud approach can help organizations handle the migration process.

Organizations need to understand that cloud is coming, more data is coming and they need to be more agile.
John Mancinichief evangelist, Association of Intelligent Information Management

According to a survey by Mancini and AIIM, and sponsored by M-Files, 48% of the 366 professionals surveyed said they are moving toward a hybrid of cloud and on-premises delivery methods for information management over the next year, with 36% saying they are moving toward cloud and 12% staying on premises.

“We still see customers that are less comfortable to moving it all to the cloud and there are certain use cases where that makes sense,” said Mika Javanainen, vice president of product marketing at M-Files. “This is the best way to provide our customers flexibility and make sure they don’t lag behind. They may still run M-Files on premises, but be using the cloud services to add intelligence to your data.”

M-Files cloud system and its new online offering act as a hub for an organization’s storehouse of information.

“The content resides where it is, but we still provide a unified UI and access to that content and the different repositories,” Javanainen said.

M-Files Online screenshot
An M-Files Online screenshot shows how the information management company brings together an organization’s content from a variety of repositories.

Moving to the cloud to use AI

While the industry is moving more toward cloud-based ECM, there are still 60% of those in the AIIM survey that want some sort of on-premises storage, according to the survey.

“There are some parts of companies that are quite happy with how they are doing things now, or may understand the benefits of cloud but are resistant to change,” said Greg Milliken, senior vice president of marketing at M-Files. “[M-Files Online] creates an opportunity that allows users that may have an important process they can’t deviate from to access information in the traditional way while allowing other groups or departments to innovate.”

One of the largest cloud drivers is to realize the benefit of emerging business technologies, particularly AI. While AI can conceivably work on premises, that venue is inherently flawed due to the inability to store enough data on premises.

M-Files cloud computing can open up the capabilities of AI for the vendor’s customers. But for organizations to benefit from AI, they need to overcome fears of the cloud, Mancini said.

“Organizations need to understand that cloud is coming, more data is coming and they need to be more agile,” he said. “They have to understand the need to plug in to AI.”

Potential problems with hybrid clouds

Having part of your business that you want more secure to run on premises and part to run in the cloud sounds good, but it can be difficult to implement, according to Mancini.

“My experience talking to people is that it’s easier said than done,” Mancini said. “Taking something designed in a complicated world and making it work in a simple, iterative cloud world is not the easiest thing to do. Vendors may say we have a cloud offering and an on-premises offering, but the real thing customers want is something seamless between all permutations.”

Regardless whether an organization is managing through a cloud or behind a firewall, there are undoubtedly dozens of other software systems — file shares, ERP, CRM — which businesses are working with and hoping to integrate its information with. The real goal of ECM vendors and those in the information management space, according to Mancini, is to get all those repositories working together.

“What you’re trying to get to is a system that is like a set of interchangeable Lego blocks,” Mancini said. “And what we have now is a mishmash of Legos, Duplos, Tinker Toys and erector sets.”

M-Files claims its data hub approach — bringing all the disparate data under one UI via an intelligent metadata layer that plugs into the other systems — succeeds at this.

“We approach this problem by not having to migrate the data — it can reside where it is and we add value by adding insights to the data with AI,” Javanainen said.

M-Files Online, which was released Aug. 21, is generally available to customers. M-Files declined to provide detailed pricing information.

Box AI, workflow automation strategies about to unfold

Box AI and workflow automation advancements that users are waiting for, and which are instrumental to the content services platform vendor’s future, will come into clearer focus this month, according to CEO Aaron Levie.

With Box AI tools at the hub of Box Skills, the company’s still-in-beta system for customizing Box applications with machine learning technology from Google, Microsoft or IBM, AI will permeate Box’s content management systems, Levie said.

“We want to make sure we continue to automate and bring intelligence to your digital business processes,” Levie said in an interview.

New Box AI tools

Levie said the company will make announcements around Box AI and workflow automation, and generally, about how Box plans to “advance the state of the digital workplace,” at the BoxWorks 2018 conference in San Francisco Aug. 29 to 30.

“We’re going to talk a lot about AI and the power of machine learning,” Levie said. “And you’re going to see more of a roadmap around workflow in Box as well, which we’re really excited about.”

Indeed, workflow and digital process automation have been a perennial question for Box in recent years, said Cheryl McKinnon, a Forrester analyst scheduled to speak at BoxWorks.

Workflow automation progress

McKinnon noted that Box, which started out as an enterprise file sync-and-share company, has tried to remedy the gap through a partnership with IBM on the Box Relay workflow automation tool and other deals (with companies like Nintex and Pegasystems). Box also recently acquired startup Progressly to improve workflow automation.

We want to make sure we continue to automate and bring intelligence to your digital business processes.
Aaron LevieCEO, Box

“I do expect to see deeper investment in Box’s own automation capabilities as it puts some of the expertise from recent acquisitions, such as Progressly, to work,” McKinnon said.

“Content doesn’t get created in a vacuum — embedding the content creation, collaboration and sharing lifecycle into key business processes is important to keep Box a sticky and integral part of its clients’ internal and external work activities,” she said.

In addition to Box AI and workflow automation, Levie said Box is putting a lot of emphasis on its native-cloud architecture and persuading potential customers to move from on-premises content management systems to the cloud-based content services platform model that has distinguished Box.

Box CEO Aaron Levie
Box CEO Aaron Levie speaking at the BoxWorks 2017 conference.

“We’re really trying to help them move their legacy information systems, their technology infrastructure, to the cloud,” Levie said.

Box wants “to show a better path forward for managing, securing, governing and working content and not just using the same legacy systems, not having a fragmented content management architecture that we think is not going to enable a modern digital workplace,” Levie said.

Box vs. Dropbox and bigger foes

Meanwhile, its similarly named competitor, DropBox, completed a successful IPO this year and is angling for the enterprise market, where Box holds the lead. Dropbox’s stock price took a hit recently, but Levie said he takes the competition seriously. Box, too, sustained a decline in its stock price earlier this year, though the stock’s value has stabilized.

“I would not dismiss them as a player in this space,” Levie said of Dropbox. “But we think we serve more or less different segments of the market. They are more consumer and SMB leaning and we are much more SMB and enterprise leaning.”

Actually, Box’s most dangerous competitive threats are from cloud giants like Microsoft and Google, McKinnon said.

They are “investing significantly in their own content and collaboration platforms, and while Box partners with both of them for integration with office productivity tools and as optional cloud storage back ends, the desire to be the single source of truth for corporate content in the cloud will put them head to head in many accounts,” she said.

At OpenText Enterprise World, security and AI take center stage

OpenText continues to invest in AI and security, as the content services giant showcased where features from recent acquisitions fit into its existing product line at its OpenText Enterprise World user conference.

The latest Pipeline podcast recaps the news and developments from Toronto, including OpenText OT2, the company’s new hybrid cloud/on-premises enterprise information management platform. The new platform brings wanted flexibility while also addressing regulatory concerns with document storage.

“OT2 simplifies for our customers how they invest and make decisions in taking some of their on-premises workflows and [porting] them into a hybrid model or SaaS model into the cloud,” said Muhi Majzoub, OpenText executive vice president of engineering and IT.

Majzoub spoke at OpenText Enterprise World 2018, which also included further updates to how OpenText plans to integrate Guidance Software’s features into its endpoint security offerings following the Guidance’s September 2017 acquisition.

Will the native AI functionality from OpenText compare and keep up? What will be the draw for new customers?
Alan Lepofskyprincipal analyst, Constellation Research

OpenText has a rich history of acquiring companies and using the inherited customer base as an additional revenue or maintenance stream, as content management workflows are often built over decades of complex legacy systems.

But it was clear at OpenText Enterprise World 2018 that the Guidance Software acquisition filled a security gap in OpenText’s offering. One of Guidance’s premier products, EnCase, seems to have useful applications for OpenText users, according to Lalith Subramanian, vice president of engineering for analytics, security and discovery at OpenText.

In addition, OpenText is expanding its reach to Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud, but it’s unclear if customers will prefer OpenText offerings to others on the market or if current customers will migrate to public clouds.

“It comes down to: Will customers want to use a general AI platform like Azure, Google, IBM or AWS?” said Alan Lepofsky, principal analyst for Constellation Research. “Will the native AI functionality from OpenText compare and keep up? What will be the draw for new customers?”