Tag Archives: desktop

For Sale – Intel i7-3770 3.4GHZ, 8Gb Ram, Nvidia GT 640, Corsair Case, 128Gb SSD, 1tb HDD, Wi-Fi

Per the title, for sale is my DIY desktop, as I have received a new laptop for christmas so this will no longer get used. Built many years ago but still going strong and still running fast. Operating system loaded onto SSD so super fast load times, all files saved onto 1tb hard drive. Great desktop at very cheap price!

Location
Manchester
Price and currency
200
Delivery cost included
Delivery is NOT included
Prefer goods collected?
I prefer the goods to be collected
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Cash or Paypal

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For Sale – Intel i7-3770 3.4GHZ, 8Gb Ram, Nvidia GT 640, Corsair Case, 128Gb SSD, 1tb HDD, Wi-Fi

Per the title, for sale is my DIY desktop, as I have received a new laptop for christmas so this will no longer get used. Built many years ago but still going strong and still running fast. Operating system loaded onto SSD so super fast load times, all files saved onto 1tb hard drive. Great desktop at very cheap price!

Location
Manchester
Price and currency
200
Delivery cost included
Delivery is NOT included
Prefer goods collected?
I prefer the goods to be collected
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Cash or Paypal

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For Sale – *price reduced* Fanless HTPC (Intel i7 4785T 2.2 GHz, 8GB RAM, 120GB SSD, USB 3.0 Wi-Fi)

Sedatech UC03109F1I8HE Mini Evolution Passive Cooling Desktop PC

CPU Intel Core i7-4785T 4×2.2Ghz (max 3.2Ghz)
Asus Rock motherboard
Haswell Generation low power Intel i7 processor (TDP 35W) with Turbo Boost Technology (up to 3.2Ghz)
120Gb SSD Drive
Completely silent fanless case which looks like an unbadged Akasa Euler Mini ITX Case
Low power consumption and small dimensions (W x H x D): 22,8 x 6,15 x 18,7
With Windows 8.1 64-bit EN (DVD + booklet + activation key) plus drivers disc

Perfect silent HTPC

Wiped clean with latest Ubuntu 19.10 but it does come with the original Windows 8.1 cd and key

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Using wsusscn2.cab to find missing Windows updates

Keeping your Windows Server and Windows desktop systems updated can be tricky, and finding missing patches in conventional ways might not be reliable.

There are a few reasons why important security patches might not get installed. They could be mistakenly declined in Windows Server Update Services or get overlooked in environments that a lack an internet connection.

Microsoft provides a Windows Update offline scan file, also known as wsusscn2.cab, to help you check Windows systems for missing updates. The CAB file contains information about most patches for Windows and Microsoft applications distributed through Windows Update.

The challenge with the wsusscn2.cab file is its size. It weighs in around 650 MB, and distributing it to all the servers to perform a scan can be tricky and time-consuming. This tutorial explains how to avoid those issues and run it on all of your servers in a secure and timely manner using IIS for file transfer instead of SMB or PowerShell sessions.

Requirements for offline scanning

There are some simple requirements to use this tutorial:

  • a server or PC running Windows Server 2012 or newer or Windows 10;
  • a domain account with local administrator on the servers you want to scan; and
  • PowerShell remoting enabled on the servers you want to scan.

Step 1. Install IIS

First, we need a web server we can use to distribute the wsusscn2.cab file. There are several ways to copy the file, but they all have different drawbacks.

For example, we could distribute the wsusscn2.cab file with a regular file share, but that requires a double-hop. You could also copy the wsusscn2.cab file over a PowerShell session, but that causes a lot of overhead and is extremely slow for large files. An easier and more secure way to distribute the file is through HTTP and IIS.

Installing on Windows Server

Start PowerShell as admin and type the following to install IIS:

Install-WindowsFeature -name Web-Server -IncludeManagementTools

Installing on Windows 10

Start PowerShell as an admin and type the following to install IIS:

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName IIS-WebServer

The IIS role should be installed. The default site will point to the root folder of the C drive.

We can now proceed to download wsusscn2.cab from Microsoft.

Step 2. Download wsusscn2.cab

The link for this file can be tricky to find. You can either download it from this link and save it to the C drive or run the following script as admin on the IIS server:

# Default Site path, change if necessary
$IISFolderPath = "C:inetpubwwwroot"

# Download wsusscn2.cab
Start-BitsTransfer -Source "http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=74689" -Destination "$IISFolderPathwsusscn2.cab"

The script downloads the file to the wwwroot folder. We can verify the download by browsing to http:///wsusscn2.cab.

You also need to get the hash value of wsusscn2.cab to verify it. After saving it, run the following PowerShell command to check the file hash:

(Get-FileHash C:inetpubwwwrootwsusscn2.cab).Hash

31997CD01B8790CA68A02F3A351F812A38639FA49FEC7346E28F7153A8ABBA05

Step 3. Run the check on a server

Next, you can use a PowerShell script to download and scan for missing updates on a PC or server using the wsusscn2.cab file. You can run the script on at least Windows Server 2008 or newer to avoid compatibility issues. To do this in a secure and effective manner over HTTP, we get the file hash of the downloaded wsusscn2.cab file and compare it with the file hash of the CAB file on the IIS server.

We can also use the file hash to see when Microsoft releases a new version of wsusscn2.cab.

Copy and save the following script as Get-MissingUpdates.ps1:

Param(
    [parameter(mandatory)]
    [string]$FileHash,

    [parameter(mandatory)]
    [string]$Wsusscn2Url
)


Function Get-Hash($Path){
    
    $Stream = New-Object System.IO.FileStream($Path,[System.IO.FileMode]::Open) 
    
    $StringBuilder = New-Object System.Text.StringBuilder 
    $HashCreate = [System.Security.Cryptography.HashAlgorithm]::Create("SHA256").ComputeHash($Stream)
    $HashCreate | Foreach {
        $StringBuilder.Append($_.ToString("x2")) | Out-Null
    }
    $Stream.Close() 
    $StringBuilder.ToString() 
}

$DataFolder = "$env:ProgramDataWSUS Offline Catalog"
$CabPath = "$DataFolderwsusscn2.cab"

# Create download dir
mkdir $DataFolder -Force | Out-Null

# Check if cab exists
$CabExists = Test-Path $CabPath


# Compare hashes if download is needed
if($CabExists){
    Write-Verbose "Comparing hashes of wsusscn2.cab"
    
    $HashMatch = $Hash -ne (Get-Hash -Path $CabPath)

    if($HashMatch){   
        Write-Warning "Filehash of $CabPath did not match $($FileHash) - downloading"
        Remove-Item $CabPath -Force
    }
    Else{
        Write-Verbose "Hashes matched"
    }
}

# Download wsus2scn.cab if it dosen't exist or hashes mismatch
if(!$CabExists -or $HashMatch -eq $false){
    Write-Verbose "Downloading wsusscn2.cab"
    # Works on Windows Server 2008 as well
    (New-Object System.Net.WebClient).DownloadFile($Wsusscn2Url, $CabPath)

    if($Hash -ne (Get-Hash -Path $CabPath)){
        Throw "$CabPath did not match $($FileHash)"
    }

}

Write-Verbose "Checking digital signature of wsusscn2.cab"

$CertificateIssuer = "CN=Microsoft Code Signing PCA, O=Microsoft Corporation, L=Redmond, S=Washington, C=US"
$Signature = Get-AuthenticodeSignature -FilePath $CabPath
$SignatureOk = $Signature.SignerCertificate.Issuer -eq $CertificateIssuer -and $Signature.Status -eq "Valid"


If(!$SignatureOk){
    Throw "Signature of wsusscn2.cab is invalid!"
}


Write-Verbose "Creating Windows Update session"
$UpdateSession = New-Object -ComObject Microsoft.Update.Session
$UpdateServiceManager  = New-Object -ComObject Microsoft.Update.ServiceManager 

$UpdateService = $UpdateServiceManager.AddScanPackageService("Offline Sync Service", $CabPath, 1) 

Write-Verbose "Creating Windows Update Searcher"
$UpdateSearcher = $UpdateSession.CreateUpdateSearcher()  
$UpdateSearcher.ServerSelection = 3
$UpdateSearcher.ServiceID = $UpdateService.ServiceID.ToString()
 
Write-Verbose "Searching for missing updates"
$SearchResult = $UpdateSearcher.Search("IsInstalled=0")

$Updates = $SearchResult.Updates

$UpdateSummary = [PSCustomObject]@{

    ComputerName = $env:COMPUTERNAME    
    MissingUpdatesCount = $Updates.Count
    Vulnerabilities = $Updates | Foreach {
        $_.CveIDs
    }
    MissingUpdates = $Updates | Select Title, MsrcSeverity, @{Name="KBArticleIDs";Expression={$_.KBArticleIDs}}
}

Return $UpdateSummary

Run the script on one of the servers of computers to check for missing updates. To do this, copy the script to the machine and run the script with the URL to the wsusscn2.cab on the IIS server and the hash value from step two:

PS51> Get-MissingUpdates.ps1 -Wsusscn2Url "http://
  
   /wsusscn2.cab" -FileHash 31997CD01B8790CA68A02F3A351F812A38639FA49FEC7346E28F7153A8ABBA05
  

If there are missing updates, you should see output similar to the following:

ComputerName     MissingUpdatesCount Vulnerabilities  MissingUpdates
------------     ------------------- ---------------  --------------
UNSECURESERVER                    14 {CVE-2006-4685, CVE-2006-4686,
CVE-2019-1079, CVE-2019-1079...} {@{Title=MSXML 6.0 RTM Security Updat

If the machine is not missing updates, then you should see this type of output:

ComputerName MissingUpdatesCount Vulnerabilities MissingUpdates
------------ ------------------- --------------- --------------
SECURESERVER                   0

The script gives a summary of the number of missing updates, what those updates are and the vulnerabilities they patch.

This process is a great deal faster than searching for missing updates online. But this manual method is not efficient when checking a fleet of servers, so let’s learn how to run the script on all systems and collect the output.

Step 4. Run the scanning script on multiple servers at once

The easiest way to collect missing updates from all servers with PowerShell is with a PowerShell job. The PowerShell jobs run in parallel on all computers, and you can fetch the results.

On a PC or server, save the file from the previous step to the C drive — or another directory of your choice — and run the following as a user with admin permissions on your systems:

# The servers you want to collect missing updates from
$Computers = @(
        'server1',
        'server2',
        'server3'
)

# These are the arguments that will be sent to the remote servers
$RemoteArgs = @(
    # File hash from step 2
    "31997CD01B8790CA68A02F3A351F812A38639FA49FEC7346E28F7153A8ABBA05",
    "http://$env:COMPUTERNAME/wsusscn2.cab"
)

$Params = @{
    ComputerName = $Computers
    ArgumentList = $RemoteArgs
    AsJob        = $True
    # Filepath to the script on the server/computer you are running this command on
    FilePath = "C:ScriptsGet-MissingUpdates.ps1"
    # Maximum number of active jobs
    ThrottleLimit = 20
}

$Job = Invoke-Command @Params

# Wait for all jobs to finish
$Job | Wait-Job

# Collect Results from the jobs
$Results = $Job | Receive-Job

# Show results
$Results

This runs the Get-MissingUpdates.ps1 script on all servers in the $Computers variable in parallel to save time and make it easier to collect the results.

You should run these PowerShell jobs regularly to catch servers with a malfunctioning Windows Update and to be sure important updates get installed.

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Microsoft Teams for Linux launches in public preview

Microsoft has released in public preview a Microsoft Teams desktop client for Linux.

The move is aimed at boosting Teams adoption among software developers, who often prefer working in Linux. The lack of support for the open source operating system has made it harder for Microsoft to compete with Slack, which has supported Linux for years. 

“A lot of the companies that we’ve researched who are running both Slack and Teams are doing so because their application developers use Slack,” said Irwin Lazar, analyst at Nemertes Research. The new Microsoft Teams for Linux client could convince more organizations to go all-in on Teams. 

The Linux client supports Teams’ core capabilities, including calling and video meetings. But it comes with certain limitations. For example, it doesn’t offer users as many in-meeting controls as the Windows and Mac clients for Teams do.

Nevertheless, releasing Microsoft Teams for Linux represents a significant milestone for the company. Microsoft said Teams was “the first Microsoft 365 app that is coming to Linux desktops.” The company declined to say whether it would launch additional apps on Linux.

Microsoft has long been criticized for not playing nice with competing operating systems. The U.S. government sued the company in the late 1990s over its bundling of Internet Explorer and Windows, ending in a settlement. More recently, Microsoft has moved toward becoming more of an open ecosystem.

Users have been pushing Microsoft to release Teams on Linux since the app’s launch. A 2016 post requesting the Linux client has received more than 10,000 likes and 1,800 comments on the vendor’s user feedback website. Microsoft had put the issue on the back burner before reviving it earlier this year.

Many users commented on the website to say that they would stick with Slack until Microsoft launched a Linux client. Those kinds of declarations likely helped convince Microsoft that supporting Linux would be worthwhile. The company has made competing with Slack a priority.

Microsoft seemingly waited to reveal user numbers for Teams until it had more users than Slack. The company even went so far as to produce a bar graph comparing the growth of Teams and Slack in its announcement. Teams now has 20 million daily active users to Slack’s 13 million.

Slack has responded by repeatedly highlighting that 70% of its 50 largest customers subscribe to Office 365, which includes Teams. Slack has also argued that users are more engaged with its app, although a lack of apples-to-apples statistics makes it impossible to compare the two. 

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For Sale – Sedatech Fanless HTPC (Intel i7 4785T 2.2 GHz, 8GB RAM, 120GB SSD, USB 3.0 Wi-Fi)

Sedatech UC03109F1I8HE Mini Evolution Passive Cooling Desktop PC

CPU Intel Core i7-4785T 4×2.2Ghz (max 3.2Ghz)
Asus Rock motherboard
Haswell Generation low power Intel i7 processor (TDP 35W) with Turbo Boost Technology (up to 3.2Ghz)
120Gb SSD Drive
Completely silent fanless case which looks like an unbadged Akasa Euler Mini ITX Case
Low power consumption and small dimensions (W x H x D): 22,8 x 6,15 x 18,7
With Windows 8.1 64-bit EN (DVD + booklet + activation key) plus drivers disc

Perfect silent HTPC

Wiped clean with latest Ubuntu 19.10 but it does come with the original Windows 8.1 cd and key

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Benefits of virtualization highlighted in top 10 stories of 2019

When an organization decides to pursue a virtual desktop solution, a host of questions awaits it.

Our most popular virtual desktop articles this year highlight that fact and show how companies are still trying to get a handle on the virtual desktop infrastructure terrain. The stories explain the benefits of virtualization and provide comparisons between different enterprise options.

A countdown of our most-read articles, determined by page views, follows.

  1. Five burning questions about remote desktop USB redirection

Virtual desktops strive to mimic the traditional PC experience, but using local USB devices can create a sticking point. Remote desktop USB redirection enables users to attach their devices to their local desktop and have it function normally. In 2016, we explored options for redirection, explained how the technology worked and touched upon problem areas such as how scanners are infamously problematic with redirection.

  1. Tips for VDI user profile management

Another key factor for virtualizing the local desktop experience includes managing things like a user’s browser bookmarks, desktop background and settings. That was the subject of this FAQ from 2013 and our ninth most popular story for 2019. The article outlines options for managing virtual desktop user profiles, from implementing identical profiles for everyone to ensuring that settings once saved locally carry over to the virtual workspace.

  1. VDI hardware comparison: Thin vs. thick vs. zero clients

The push toward centralizing computing services has created a market for thin and zero clients, simple and low-cost computing devices reliant on servers. In implementing VDI, IT professionals should consider the right option for their organization. Thick clients, the traditional PC, provide proven functionality, but they also sidestep some of the biggest benefits of virtualization such as lower cost, energy efficiency and increased security. Thin clients provide a mix of features, and their simplicity brings VDI’s assets, such as centralized management and ease of local deployment, to bear. Zero clients require even less configuration, as they have nothing stored locally, but they tend to be proprietary.

  1. How to troubleshoot remote and virtual desktop connection issues

Connection issues can disrupt employee workflow, so avoiding and resolving them is paramount for desktop administrators. Once the local hardware has been ruled out, there are a set of common issues — exceeded capacity, firewalls, SSL certificates and network-level authentication — that IT professionals can consider when solving the puzzle.

  1. Comparing converged vs. hyper-converged infrastructure

What’s the difference between converged infrastructure (CI) and hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI)? This 2015 missive took on that question in our sixth most popular story for 2019. In short, while CI houses four data center functions — computing, storage, networking and server virtualization — into a single chassis, HCI looks to add even more features through software. HCI’s flexibility and scalability were touted as advantages over the more hardware-focused CI.

  1. Differences between desktop and server virtualization

To help those seeking VDI deployment, this informational piece from 2014 focused on how desktop virtualization differs from server virtualization. Server virtualization partitions one server into many, enabling organizations to accomplish tasks like maintaining databases, sharing files and delivering media. Desktop virtualization, on the other hand, delivers a virtual computer environment to a user. While server virtualization is easier to predict, given its uniform daily functions, a virtual desktop user might call for any number of potential applications or tasks, making the distinction between the two key.

  1. Application virtualization comparison: XenApp vs. ThinApp vs. App-V

This 2013 comparison pitted Citrix, VMware and Microsoft’s virtualization services against each other to determine the best solution for streaming applications. Citrix’s XenApp drew plaudits for the breadth of the applications it supported, but its update schedule provided only a short window to migrate to newer versions. VMware ThinApp’s portability was an asset, as it did not need installed software or device drivers, but some administrators said the service was difficult to deploy and the lack of a centralized management platform made handling applications trickier. Microsoft’s App-V provided access to popular apps like Office, but its agent-based approach limited portability when compared to ThinApp.

  1. VDI shops mull XenDesktop vs. Horizon as competition continues

In summer 2018, we took a snapshot of the desktop virtualization market as power players Citrix and VMware vied for a greater share of users. At the time, Citrix’s product, XenDesktop, was used in 57.7% of on-premises VDI deployments, while VMware’s Horizon accounted for 26.9% of the market. Customers praised VMware’s forward-facing emphasis on cloud, while a focus on security drew others to Citrix. Industry watchers wondered if Citrix would maintain its dominance through XenDesktop 7.0’s end of life that year and if challenger VMware’s vision for the future would pay off.

  1. Compare the top vendors of thin client systems

Vendors vary in the types of thin client devices they offer and the scale they can accommodate. We compared offerings from Advantech, Asus, Centerm Information, Google, Dell, Fujitsu, HP, Igel Technology, LG Electronics, Lenovo, NComputing, Raspberry Pi, Samsung, Siemens and 10ZiG Technology to elucidate the differences between them, and the uses for which they might be best suited.

  1. Understanding nonpersistent vs. persistent VDI

This article from 2013 proved some questions have staying power. Our most popular story this year explained the difference between two types of desktops that can be deployed on VDI. Persistent VDI provides each user his or her own desktop, allowing more flexibility for users to control their workspaces but requiring more storage and heightening complexity. Nonpersistent VDI did not save settings once a user logged out, a boon for security and consistent updates, but less than ideal in providing easy access to needed apps.

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Windows 10 issues top list of most read stories for IT pros

Windows 10 — and the challenges posed to IT professionals by its updates — dominated the enterprise desktop discussion in 2019. Troubleshooting and understanding the eccentricities of 2019’s Windows 10 issues comprised many of our top 10 most popular stories this year.

With the sunset of Windows 7 scheduled for the first month of 2020, interest in other Microsoft OSes, including Windows 10, may intensify in the coming year.

Below is a countdown of the top ten most-read SearchEnterpriseDesktop stories, based on page views.

  1. Micro apps, AI to power new version of Citrix Workspace

Citrix announced a new version of Citrix Workspace, which enables IT admins to provide employees with virtual access to an organization’s desktop and applications, at May’s Citrix Synergy event in Atlanta. The company cited micro apps or small, task-based applications as a key feature, saying they would handle complicated tasks more efficiently by bringing them into a unified work feed. The addition of micro apps was made possible through a $200 million acquisition of Sapho in 2018.

  1. Lenovo to launch ThinkBook brand, next-gen ThinkPad x1

Lenovo started a new subbrand — called ThinkBook — this past spring, with two laptops aimed at younger employees in the workforce. The 13- and 14-inch laptops were intended to incorporate a sleek design with robust security, reliability and support services. The company also launched a laptop for advanced business users, ThinkPad X1 Extreme Gen 2, and the ultrasmall desktop ThinkCentre M90n-1 Nano in the same time frame.

  1. Learn about the device-as-a-service model and its use cases

The device-as-a-service model, in which a vendor leases devices to a business, may help IT admins fulfill their responsibility to support, maintain and repair equipment. The model has its pros and cons. It can provide a single point of contact for troubleshooting and enable more frequent hardware refreshes, but it can also limit an organization’s device choices and pose complications for a company’s BYOD plan.

  1. Lenovo powers new ThinkPad series with AMD Ryzen Pro processors

Lenovo released three Windows 10 laptops with AMD processors this past spring, the first time it has used non-Intel chips in its higher-end ThinkPad T and X series devices. The company hoped its T495, T495s and X395 computers would provide better performance and security at a lower cost; the company said the AMD-powered T and X series laptops saw an 18% increase over the previous generation.

  1. Windows 10 security breach highlights third-party vulnerabilities

Microsoft detected a security vulnerability in Windows 10, introduced through Huawei PCManager driver software. Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection, a feature that finds and blocks potential compromises, found the problem before the vulnerability could cause serious damage, but industry professionals said the incident highlighted the risks posed by third-party kernels such as device drivers and the importance of working with trusted companies.

  1. Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 2-in-1 impresses with specs and looks

Samsung released a redesign of its flagship Windows 10 laptop this year, opting for an aluminum chassis in place of the plastic from previous iterations. The device offered comparable specs to other high-end laptop offerings, with a slate of features including a backlit keyboard, a variety of inputs and the Samsung Active Pen.

  1. With the new Windows 10 OS update, trust but verify

Dave Sobel, senior director and managed services provider at SolarWinds in Austin, Texas, expounded on the then-forthcoming May 2019 Windows 10 update a month before its scheduled release. Sobel acknowledged the security importance of patching systems but stressed that IT professionals remain vigilant for complications — notable, as the Windows 10 update came in the wake of an October 2018 patch that deleted files of users who work with Known Folder redirection.

  1. Citrix CEO David Henshall addresses Citrix news, sale rumors

In a Q&A, Citrix CEO David Henshall talked about the future of the 30-year-old company, downplaying rumors that it would be sold. Henshall spoke of the venerable firm’s history of connecting people and information on demand and saw the coming years as a time when Citrix would continue to simplify and ease that connection to encourage productivity.

  1. Latest Windows 10 update issues cause more freezing problems

The April 9 Windows 10 update caused device freezing upon launch. Those in IT had already noted freezing in devices using Sophos Endpoint Protection; after a few days, they learned that the patch was clashing with antivirus software, causing freezing both during startup and over the course of regular operation of the computer. Microsoft updated its support page to acknowledge the issue and provided workarounds shortly thereafter.

  1. 1. IT takes the good with the bad in Windows 10 1903 update

After experiencing problems with previous Windows 10 updates, June’s 1903 version came with initial positive — but wary — reception. Microsoft’s Windows-as-a-service model drew complaints for the way it implemented updates. Among its changes, 1903 enabled IT professionals to pause feature and monthly updates for up to 35 days. Also new was Windows Sandbox, providing IT with the ability to test application installations without compromising a machine. The new version of Windows 10 did not launch bug-free, however; issues with Wi-Fi connectivity, Bluetooth device connection and USB devices causing the rearrangement of drive letters were reported.

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Wanted – WANTED All In one Desktop PC

As per title, I’m looking for a all in one desktop pc as part of a study room I’m making for my son.

If anyone has an all in one pc that they would consider selling please let me know.

Ideally within the West Yorkshire area but if your far I would cover postage costs.

Please it must be a good working order with zero faults.

Thanks in advance

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For Sale – Desktop PC – 3770K, 970gtx, 16GB Ram

Selling my old desktop PC now that I’ve finished university and no longer use it all that much.

Specs:

Graphics Card: Galax 970GTX EXOC
Power Supply: Corsair TX550M
Mother Board: Asus P8Z77-M
Case: Fractal Define Mini
Ram: 16GB 1600mhz
Storage: Evo 850 500GB SSD and 500GB Hard Drive
CPU: Intel 3770k
CPU Cooler: Noctua (not sure of the model)

Great system, just not being used any more.

Collection preferred so it can be seen working, I’m in the Cambridge area and can deliver if required.

£300

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