Tag Archives: developers

Announcing Azure Pipelines with unlimited CI/CD minutes for open source

With the introduction of Azure DevOps today, we’re offering developers a new CI/CD service called Azure Pipelines that enables you to continuously build, test, and deploy to any platform or cloud. It has cloud-hosted agents for Linux, macOS, and Windows, powerful workflows with native container support, and flexible deployments to Kubernetes, VMs, and serverless environments.

Microsoft is committed to fueling open source software development. Our next step in this journey is to provide the best CI/CD experience for open source projects. Starting today, Azure Pipelines provides unlimited CI/CD minutes and 10 parallel jobs to every open source project for free. All open source projects run on the same infrastructure that our paying customers use. That means you’ll have the same fast performance and high quality of service. Many of the top open source projects are already using Azure Pipelines for CI/CD, such as Atom, CPython, Pipenv, Tox, Visual Studio Code, and TypeScript – and the list is growing every day.

In the following, you can see Atom running parallel jobs on Linux, macOS, and Windows for its CI.

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Azure Pipelines app on GitHub Marketplace

Azure Pipelines has an app in the GitHub Marketplace so it’s easy to get started. After you install the app in your GitHub account, you can start running CI/CD for all your repositories.

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Pull Request and CI Checks

When the GitHub app is setup, you’ll see CI/CD checks on each commit to your default branch and every pull request.

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Our integration with the GitHub Checks API makes it easy to see build results in your pull request. If there’s a failure, the call stack is shown as well as the impacted files.

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More than just open source

Azure Pipelines is also great for private repositories. It is the CI/CD solution for companies like Columbia, Shell, Accenture, and many others. It’s also used by Microsoft’s biggest projects like Azure, Office 365, and Bing. Our free offer for private projects includes a cloud-hosted job with 1,800 minutes of CI/CD a month or you can run unlimited minutes of CI/CD on your own hardware, hosted in the cloud or your on-premises hardware. You can purchase parallel jobs for private projects from Azure DevOps or the GitHub Marketplace.

In addition to CI, Azure Pipelines has flexible deployments to any platform and cloud, including Azure, Amazon Web Services, and Google Cloud Platform, as well as any of your on-premises server running Linux, macOS or Windows. There are built-in tasks for Kubernetes, serverless, and VM deployments. Also, there’s a rich ecosystem of extensions for the most popular languages and tools. The Azure Pipelines agent and tasks are open source and we’re always reviewing feedback and accepting pull requests on GitHub.

Join our upcoming live streams to learn more about Azure Pipelines and other Azure DevOps services.

  • Keynote: Watch our live Azure DevOps keynote on September 11, 2018 from 8:00 – 9:30 AM Pacific Time.

  • Live training: Join our live Mixer workshop with interactive Q&A on September 17, 2018 from 8:30 AM – 2:30 PM Pacific Time.

You can save-the-date and watch both live streams on our events page. There you’ll also find additional on-demand videos and other resources to help get you started.

I’m excited for you to try Azure Pipelines and tell us what you think. You can share your thoughts directly to the product team using @AzureDevOps, Developer Community, or comment on this post.

Jeremy Epling

@jeremy_epling

Introducing Azure DevOps

Today we are announcing Azure DevOps. Working with our customers and developers around the world, it’s clear DevOps has become increasingly critical to a team’s success. Azure DevOps captures over 15 years of investment and learnings in providing tools to support software development teams. In the last month, over 80,000 internal Microsoft users and thousands of our customers, in teams both small and large, used these services to ship products to you.

The services we are announcing today span the breadth of the development lifecycle to help developers ship software faster and with higher quality. They represent the most complete offering in the public cloud. Azure DevOps includes:

Azure PipelinesAzure Pipelines

CI/CD that works with any language, platform, and cloud. Connect to GitHub or any Git repository and deploy continuously. Learn More >

Azure BoardsAzure Boards

Powerful work tracking with Kanban boards, backlogs, team dashboards, and custom reporting. Learn more >

Azure ArtifactsAzure Artifacts

Maven, npm, and NuGet package feeds from public and private sources. Learn more >

Azure ReposAzure Repos

Unlimited cloud-hosted private Git repos for your project. Collaborative pull requests, advanced file management, and more. Learn more >

Azure Test PlansAzure Test Plans

All in one planned and exploratory testing solution. Learn more >

Each Azure DevOps service is open and extensible. They work great for any type of application regardless of the framework, platform, or cloud. You can use them together for a full DevOps solution or with other services. If you want to use Azure Pipelines to build and test a Node service from a repo in GitHub and deploy it to a container in AWS, go for it. Azure DevOps supports both public and private cloud configurations. Run them in our cloud or in your own data center. No need to purchase different licenses. Learn more about Azure DevOps pricing.

Here’s an example of Azure Pipelines used independently to build a GitHub repo:

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Alternatively, here’s an example of a developer using all Azure DevOps services together from the vantage point of Azure Boards.

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Open Source projects receive free CI/CD with Azure Pipelines

As an extension of our commitment to provide open and flexible tools for all developers, Azure Pipelines offers free CI/CD with unlimited minutes and 10 parallel jobs for every open source project. With cloud hosted Linux, macOS and Windows pools, Azure Pipelines is great for all types of projects.

Many of the top open source projects are already using Azure Pipelines for CI/CD, such as Atom, Cpython, Pipenv, Tox, Visual Studio Code, and TypeScript – and the list is growing every day.

We want everyone to have extremely high quality of service. Accordingly, we run open source projects on the same infrastructure that our paying customers use.

Azure Pipelines is also now available in the GitHub Marketplace making it easy to get setup for your GitHub repos, open source or otherwise. 

Here’s a walkthrough of Azure Pipelines:

Learn more >

The evolution of Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) 

Azure DevOps represents the evolution of Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS). VSTS users will be upgraded into Azure DevOps projects automatically. For existing users, there is no loss of functionally, simply more choice and control. The end to end traceability and integration that has been the hallmark of VSTS is all there. Azure DevOps services work great together. Today is the start of a transformation and over the next few months existing users will begin to see changes show up. What does this mean?

  • URLs will change from abc.visualstudio.com to dev.azure.com/abc. We will support redirects from visualstudio.com URLs so there will not be broken links.
  • As part of this change, the services have an updated user experience. We continue to iterate on the experience based on feedback from the preview. Today we’re enabling it by default for new customers. In the coming months we will enable it by default for existing users.
  • Users of the on-premises Team Foundation Server (TFS) will continue to receive updates based on features live in Azure DevOps. Starting with next version of TFS, the product will be called Azure DevOps Server and will continue to be enhanced through our normal cadence of updates.

Learn more

To learn more about Azure DevOps, please join us:

  • Keynote: Watch our live Azure DevOps keynote on September 11, 2018 from 8:00 – 9:30 AM Pacific Time.

  • Live training: Join our live Mixer workshop with interactive Q&A on September 17, 2018 from 8:30 AM – 2:30 PM Pacific Time.

You can save-the-date and watch both live streams on our events page. There you’ll also find additional on-demand videos and other resources to help get you started.

We couldn’t be more excited to offer Azure DevOps to you and your teams. We can’t wait to see what amazing things you create with it.

No-code and low-code tools seek ways to stand out in a crowd

As market demand for enterprise application developers continues to surge, no-code and low-code vendors seek ways to stand out from one another in an effort to lure professional and citizen developers.

For instance, last week’s Spark release of Skuid’s eponymous drag-and-drop application creation system adds on-premises, private data integration, a new Design System Studio, and new core components for tasks such as creation of buttons, forms, charts and tables.

A suite of prebuilt application templates aim to help users build and customize a bespoke application, such as salesforce automation, recruitment and applicant tracking, HR management and online learning.

And a native mobile capability enables developers to take the apps they’ve built with Skuid and deploy them on mobile devices with native functionality for iOS and Android.

Ray Wang, Constellation ResearchRay Wang

“We’re seeing a lot of folks who started in other low-code/no-code platforms move toward Skuid because of the flexibility and the ability to use it in more than one type of platform,” said Ray Wang, an analyst at Constellation Research in San Francisco.

Skuid CTO Mike DuensingMike Duensing

“People want to be able to get to templates, reuse templates and modify templates to enable them to move very quickly.”

Skuid — named for an acronym, Scalable Kit for User Interface Design — was originally an education software provider, but users’ requests to customize the software for individual workflows led to a drag-and-drop interface to configure applications. That became the Skuid platform and the company pivoted to no-code, said Mike Duensing, CTO of Skuid in Chattanooga, Tenn.

Quick Base adds Kanban reports

Quick Base Inc., in Cambridge, Mass., recently added support for Kanban reports to its no-code platform. Kanban is a scheduling system for lean and just-in-time manufacturing. The system also provides a framework for Agile development practices, so software teams can visually track and balance project demands with available capacity and ease system-level bottlenecks.

The Quick Base Kanban reports enable development teams to see where work is in process. It also lets end users interact with their work and update their status, said Mark Field, Quick Base director of products.

Users drag and drop progress cards between columns to indicate how much work has been completed on software delivery tasks to date. This lets them track project tasks through stages or priority, opportunities through sales stages, application features through development stages, team members and their task assignments and more, Field said.

Datatrend Technologies, an IT services provider in Minnetonka, Minn., uses Quick Base to build the apps that manage technology rollouts for its customers, and finds the Kanban reports handy.

A lot of low-code/no-code platforms allow you to get on and build an app but then if you want to take it further, you’ll see users wanting to move to something else.
Ray Wanganalyst, Constellation Research

“Quick Base manages that whole process from intake to invoicing, where we interface with our ERP system,” said Darla Nutter, senior solutions architect at Datatrend.

Previously, we kept data of work in progress through four stages (plan, execute, complete and invoice) in a table report with no visual representation, but with these reports users can see what they have to do at any given stage and prioritize work accordingly, she said.

“You can drag and drop tasks to different columns and it automatically updates the stage for you,” she said.

Like the Quick Base no-code platform, the Kanban reports require no coding or programming experience. Datatrend’s typical Quick Base users are project managers and business analysts, Nutter said.

For most companies, however, the issue with no-code and low-code systems is how fast users can learn and then expand upon it, Constellation Research’s Wang said.

“A lot of low-code/no-code platforms allow you to get on and build an app but then if you want to take it further, you’ll see users wanting to move to something else,” Wang said.

OutSystems sees AI as the future

OutSystems said it plans to add advanced artificial intelligence features into its products to increase developer productivity, said Mike Hughes, director of product marketing at OutSystems in Boston.

“We think AI can help us by suggesting next steps and anticipating what developers will be doing next as they build applications,” Hughes said.

OutSystems uses AI in its own tool set, as well as links to publicly available AI services to help organizations build AI-based products. To facilitate this, the company launched Project Turing and opened an AI Center of Excellence in Lisbon, Portugal, named after Alan Turing, who is considered the father of AI.

The company also will commit 20% of its R&D budget to AI research and partner with industry leaders and universities for research in AI and machine learning.

Cisco wants to help developers build Webex integrations

Cisco is encouraging developers to innovate on the web conferencing platform Webex Meetings as third-party integrations become an increasingly crucial differentiator in the market for collaboration software.

The vendor has added a new Webex Meetings page to its website for developers. The page includes tutorials, sample source codes and a full catalog of API reference documents. Those resources will help developers customize how their organization manages users and data through Webex.

Cisco also hosts a cloud-based “sandbox” where developers can design and test Webex integrations and offers one-on-one support to members of its developer program, Cisco DevNet. More than 500,000 developers have registered for the program, but many are focused on networking rather than collaboration.

Cisco is in the midst of an overhaul of its collaboration portfolio that includes the merging of its team collaboration app, formerly known as Cisco Spark, with the online meetings platform Cisco Webex, which has more than 135 million users.

Beyond rebranding the two platforms — as Webex Teams and Webex Meetings — Cisco also refreshed their user interfaces and combined them onto the same back-end infrastructure.

In addition to the revamped DevNet page, Cisco is also highlighting its Android SDK for Webex Teams, the product of a new partnership with Google. The tool will help developers add the messaging and meetings features of Webex Teams to Android devices.

Webex integrations increase business value of the platform

Vendors rely on an ecosystem of partners to improve their platforms by developing value-added integrations with other apps. For example, Google recently added several Webex integrations to Google Calendar, making it easier for G Suite users to schedule and join Webex meetings.

Integrations expand the possible use cases of a platform, making it more valuable to businesses, said Alan Lepofsky, a principal analyst at Constellation Research Inc., based in Cupertino, Calif.

“In the highly competitive collaboration market, vendors such as Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Cisco, Salesforce and Slack are all competing for developer mindshare,” Lepofsky said. “They try and entice partners to develop new features and third-party integrations by offering both financial and marketing incentives.”

In the team collaboration market, Slack has been particularly successful at curating an ecosystem of developers. Open APIs helped the startup challenge established vendors like Cisco and Microsoft and inspired many vendors to embrace a similar approach. (This week, Slack said it was valued at $7.1 billion, up from $5.1 billion less than one year ago.)

Even Microsoft has taken steps to open its historically closed system as it attempts to boost adoption of Microsoft Teams, the cloud-based successor to Skype for Business. This spring, for example, the vendor released a new line-of-business app store for Teams, where organizations can upload custom integrations.

Cisco has also given customers tools to customize their use of Webex Teams. But the app stores of both Microsoft and Cisco still trail Slack’s directory, which contains more than 1,500 prebuilt integrations with third-party business apps.

BP Logix BPM tool packs AI features in latest release

Low-code BPM development tools today already help developers simplify and speed up business process application development. The next step is to make those apps smarter.

To that end, BP Logix, a business process management (BPM) company in Vista, Calif., recently introduced version 5.0 of its Process Director that adds AI features to enable predictive analysis, enhanced UIs and journals for configurable collaboration.

Rather than present complex AI features, Process Director 5.0 offers a set of basic machine learning tools that the average app developer can use, such as a point-and-click graphical interfaces that guide configuration processes and display results of analytics, with no coding required.

Embedding intelligence into business applications requires specialized knowledge and teams of data scientists, said Charles Araujo, principal analyst for Intellyx, a consulting firm in Glens Falls, N.Y. Process Director 5.0’s blend of AI and low-code features brings predictive application processes to nontechnical users.

“The value Process Director 5.0 delivers is less about features, per se, and more about accessibility,” Araujo said.

AI inside

The AI tools inside Process Director 5.0 enable machine learning, sentiment analysis, capture and expression of dissimilar events and conditions in a single state and configurable collaboration. The company also added UI features for iterative list search, calendar views, and inline HTML and text editing.

“AI and machine learning create prediction models that have been missing from BPM,” said Neil Ward-Dutton, research director for MWD Advisors, a U.K.-based IT consulting firm. With AI, the application learns from past history, identifies trends and makes recommendations for decisions.

As an example, Ward-Dutton pointed to how AI capabilities can help with a loan request by identifying factors that make the applicant and the loan’s purpose a low or high risk. Combined data mining and machine learning tools aggregate information about previous loan applications and current market conditions to help the loan officer make a decision.

AI and machine learning create prediction models that have been missing from BPM platforms.
Neil Ward-Duttonresearch director, MWD Advisors

Araujo said he sees businesses with reliable data on actions and outcomes adopt AI-enabled, predictive-type applications quickly and with good results. Developers can use that legacy data to build models that predict behavior of application users who meet certain criteria and perform specific actions. With these functions, the tool recommends a best action and prioritizes options that are presented to the user, so the application feels more intuitive or takes actions automatically.

Applying AI for nontechnical users, even with accessible tools, requires a change in traditional BPM project approaches. Araujo said project teams will have to think like a data scientist.

“Applying intelligence to applications requires imagination,” he said. “Developers need to think about application usage patterns and imagine ways to use predictive capabilities to meet users’ needs.”

“That’s not the way we’ve historically approached applications, particularly business-process-based ones,” Araujo added.

Process Director 5.0 is generally available, with versions for both cloud and on premises. In addition to AI and low-code/no-code development tools, the platform includes traditional BPM capabilities for compliance automation, process modeling, multifactor authentication and other standard BPM features.

Cisco and Google deepen collaboration partnership

Developers from Cisco and Google have been working together to build native integrations between the Cisco Webex web conferencing and team collaboration platform and the productivity apps in G Suite. The partnership should help both vendors compete against rival Microsoft.

G Suite users will soon be able to schedule and join Webex meetings from Google Calendar with one click. The integration works on Cisco video conferencing hardware and within Google Chrome, without requiring downloads or guest accounts.

Cisco Webex Teams, which competes with Slack and Microsoft Teams, lets users collaborate in real time using Google Docs, Sheets and Slides — the G Suite equivalents of Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint. That eliminates the need for users to upload a revised version of a file to Webex Teams after every edit.

Developers, meanwhile, can add Cisco calling and meeting capabilities to Android apps using the Webex Teams Android software development kit. For example, a pair of augmented reality smart glasses could be connected to Webex, so the wearer can stream a video feed from the device into a web conference.

“While Google and Microsoft compete with full portfolios of personal productivity and team collaboration, Cisco only has the team collaboration elements,” said Alan Lepofsky, principal analyst at Constellation Research, based in Cupertino, Calif. “So, deeper integration between Webex and Gmail, Google Calendar and Google Drive makes a lot of sense.”

Cisco and Google plan future integrations  

While Cisco’s collaboration portfolio also integrates with the productivity tools of Microsoft Office 365, those links are based on Microsoft’s public APIs. In contrast, Cisco and Google have been working directly together to create seamless connections between their portfolios.

Public APIs “tend to be semi-limiting at times,” said Sri Srinivasan, vice president and general manager of Cisco’s team collaboration group. “With Google, it looks like one between Google and Webex.”

Cisco and Google are currently exploring ways to use Google’s AI technology within Webex for tasks such as transcription, translation, meeting notes and project management. Cisco was also one of several vendors to adopt Google’s new AI platform for contact centers last month.

Amy Chang, who replaced Rowan Trollope as head of Cisco’s $5 billion collaboration technology group in May, worked at Google for seven years before founding relationship intelligence firm Accompany.

“For Cisco, it certainly makes a great deal of sense to expand these partnerships to improve their ability to compete with Microsoft,” said Irwin Lazar, analyst at Nemertes Research, based in Mokena, Ill. “Same for Google, who lacks the broad UC [unified communications] suite, video conferencing and contact center offerings that Cisco provides.”

Google expands presence in enterprise market

Google is working on additional Google Calendar integrations with the web conferencing vendors Arkadin, GoToMeeting, LogMeIn, Dialpad, RingCentral, Vidyo and Vonage. Google also recently made its online meetings platform, Hangouts Meet, interoperable with Microsoft Skype for Business and hardware from Cisco and Polycom.

At the same time that Google is tightening partnerships with Cisco and other vendors, the consumer tech giant has been building out its collaboration portfolio with products such as Hangouts Meet and Hangouts Chat, a team collaboration app.

Last month, Google announced a beta program for a new enterprise telephony product based on WebRTC, called Google Voice for G Suite. If that platform proves successful, Google will be in a position to provide all of the core unified communications technologies that businesses require: voice, messaging and web conferencing.

It was surprising to see Google launch a stand-alone voice product, rather than position Google Voice as a virtual service within G Suite that could tie into existing enterprise telephony systems, Lazar said. The move could bring them into closer competition with Cisco, a leading provider of business telephony. 

Expert questions funds for interoperability challenges in healthcare

One expert says the $2 million in funding ONC is offering developers to address interoperability challenges in healthcare — although commendable — may not be enough.

“I applaud ONC for recognizing this challenge and making funds available for development of interoperability platforms and solutions,” said John McDaniel, senior vice president of innovation and technology for health IT consulting firm The HCI Group. “However, based on the work we have done with vendors that offer interoperability solutions, I don’t believe $2 million will address the issue.”

ONC funding offered in two areas

ONC will provide up to $2 million in funding to two recipients focused on developing innovative and breakthrough advances in two areas: expanding the scope of population-level data-focused application programming interfaces (APIs) and advancing clinical knowledge at the point of care, according to ONC.

For expanding the scale of APIs, ONC wants to see projects that reduce provider burdens associated with reporting through API technology, as well as assessing trade-offs associated with various big data formats and challenges to the scope of FHIR-based APIs.

As for advancing clinical knowledge at the point of care, ONC hopes to see “emerging innovations” in clinical medicine, as well as data-driven medicine infrastructure and legal and policy implications for innovative approaches, according to the ONC news release.

Additional funding may be available

ONC will fund up to $1 million per area of interest by 2019. After the funds are awarded, there will be a two-year project and budget period, but applicants are encouraged to submit responses based on a five-year project and budget period because additional funding for three to five years could be provided based on the availability of funds and “meaningful progress.”

Based on the work we have done with vendors that offer interoperability solutions, I don’t believe $2 million will address the issue.
John McDanielsenior vice president of innovation and technology, The HCI Group

The funding opportunity will be open for three years, allowing for the possibility that ONC will issue additional awards to other eligible applicants for future “priority areas of interest.”  

ONC expects the funding to “further a new generation of health IT development and inform the innovative implementation and refinement of standards, methods and techniques for overcoming major barriers and challenges as they are identified.” Though he questions whether $2 million will be enough to address interoperability challenges in healthcare, McDaniel said he has seen ONC be successful with similar initiatives in the past, such as establishing incentives to motivate healthcare organizations to implement EHRs, which enabled the digitization of patient care documentation.

The full scope of interoperability challenges in healthcare

Now, McDaniel said, the challenge is to enable full interoperability to not only digitize retrospective patient data, but to “capture and use real-time patient information coupled with cognitive computing to assist care providers with decision-making and best practices given the full view of all relevant patient data.”

“Developing interoperability between EHR’s is a good start, but since only a percentage of relevant retrospective patient data is maintained in those systems, we need to establish interoperability standards for dynamic exchange of data from all source systems, including IoT, EHR’s medical devices, personal health devices, etc., to enable precision and predictive care models,” McDaniel said.

Microsoft Azure Dev Spaces, Google Jib target Kubernetes woes

To entice developers to create more apps on their environments, major cloud platform companies will meet them where they live.

Microsoft and Google both released tools to help ease app development on their respective platforms, Microsoft Azure and the Google Cloud Platform. Microsoft’s Azure Dev Spaces and Google Jib help developers build applications for the Kubernetes container orchestrator and Java environments and represent a means to deliver simpler, developer-friendly technology.

Microsoft’s Azure Dev Spaces, now in public preview, is a cloud-native development environment for the company’s Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS), where developers can work on applications while connected with the cloud and their team. These users can build cloud applications with containers and microservices on AKS and do not deal with any infrastructure management or orchestration, according to Microsoft.

As Kubernetes further commoditizes deployment and orchestration, cloud platform vendors and public cloud providers must focus on how to simplify customers’ implementation of cloud-native development methods — namely DevOps, CI/CD and microservices, said Rhett Dillingham, an analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy in Austin, Texas.

“Azure Dev Spaces has the potential to be one of Microsoft’s most valuable recent developer tooling innovations, because it addresses the complexity of integration testing and debugging in microservices environments,” he said.

Edwin Yuen, analyst, Enterprise Strategy GroupEdwin Yuen

With the correct supporting services, developers can fully test and deploy in Microsoft Azure, added Edwin Yuen, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group in Milford, Mass.

“This would benefit the developer, as it eases the process of container development by allowing them to see the results of their app without having to set up a Docker or Kubernetes environment,” he said.

Meanwhile, Google’s Jib containerizer tool enables developers to package a Java application into a container image with the Java tools they already know to create container-based advanced applications. And like Azure Dev Spaces, it handles a lot of the underlying infrastructure and orchestration tasks.

It’s about simplifying the experience … the developer is eased into the process by using existing tools and eliminating the need to set up Docker or Kubernetes.
Edwin Yuenanalyst, Enterprise Strategy Group

Integration with Java development tools Maven and Gradle means Java developers can skip the step to create JAR, or Java ARchive, files and then containerize them, Yuen said.

“Like Azure Dev Spaces, it’s about simplifying the experience — this time, not the laptop jump, but the jump from JAR to container,” he said. “But, again, the developer is eased into the process by using existing tools and eliminating the need to set up Docker or Kubernetes.”

Jib also extends Google’s association with the open source community to provide Java developers an easy path to containerize their apps while using the Google Cloud Platform, Yuen added.

‘These are employees you want’: Special Olympics job fair is a win for athletes, region – On the Issues

“When our developers have that interaction with a person with a disability, it can be very eye opening for them to see that maybe they were not meeting the bar they thought they were,” says Chinyere Samuelson, a JPMorgan Chase accessibility lead. “But once they have that experience, it opens a door. Most developers are all about the challenge, and this allows them to start owning the responsibility for making something that is accessible to everyone.”

Photo of people standing in front of a T Mobile sign that says What Makes You Different Makes You Awesome
Puget Sound employers recruited new talent at Microsoft’s recent inclusive hiring job fair, including Accenture, Alaska Airlines, Amazon, AT&T, Department of Services for the Blind, EY, Facebook, The Lighthouse for the Blind, Inc., LinkedIn, Northwest Center, Skills Inc., Starbucks, T-Mobile, VR-Net and the Washington State Department of Corrections.

Bakhru says national events like the Special Olympics USA Games have the power to showcase all the things that people with disabilities can achieve. But their life skills extend far beyond the basketball court or gymnastics mat.

“People with disabilities can represent some of your best talent pool because they have skills that they’ve had to develop throughout their lives, like problem solving and leadership and time management,” says Bakhru. “There is a very high percentage of people with disabilities who are capable of working but are unemployed simply because of misperceptions or biases.”

Participants in the Special Olympics USA Games job fair are already working to improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. Corporate partners across Puget Sound and nationally have already stepped up to the plate with robust inclusive hiring and supported employment programs, says Beth Knox, President and CEO of the 2018 Games.

“Being a part of the employment solution is a significant priority for all of us,” says Knox. “It’s part of the bigger cultural shift we’re focused on to ensure that people with intellectual disabilities are seen and valued as contributing members of our community. Employment plays a major role in that.”

Harper, in the governor’s office, loves working — citing the money she earns and the independence it affords to the people she gets to interact with every day. She recently asked to increase her hours from 15 to 19 hours a week, which the governor’s office was happy to accommodate.

“I love my job. I just love it. Meeting new people and interacting in different activities is really fun,” Harper says. “I was so excited and happy when I got the job in the governor’s office. It was my dream.”